Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Unit 2 2
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Saving this for later?

Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime - even offline.

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Unit 2 2

248
views

Published on

Published in: Education

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
248
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Unit 2-2 Pop Culture: Cultural Influence in America and Beyond
  • 2. Folk Culture (high) Traditional and non-mainstream cultural activities that are non financially driven.
  • 3. Pop Culture (low) Those systems or artifacts that most people share and that most people know about (TV, music, videos, magazines, etc. . . .)
  • 4. Consuming Pop-Culture
  • 5.  
  • 6. TELEVISION Kids influence over $130 billion of their parents money Kids spend $8 billion of their own
  • 7. Channel One – Costs the US $1.8 billion in lost education time annually
  • 8. Magazines
  • 9. Radio
  • 10. Advertising
  • 11. Why Study Advertising in Intercultural Communication?
  • 12. 1) Pervasive Function
  • 13.  
  • 14.  
  • 15.  
  • 16.  
  • 17. You see over 3,000 Advertising messages per day. - Dr. Jean Kilbourne (1999)
  • 18. You see over 5,000 Advertising messages per day. - Advertising Age (2000)
  • 19. This number will increase ten fold in the next five years because of the new Internet advertising
  • 20.  
  • 21.  
  • 22. $200 Billion on Advertising 1) $250,000 to make a commercial 2) $250,000 to air a commercial 3) $1 Million to air a commercial during the Academy Awards 4) $1.5 Million to air a commercial during the Super bowl (Victoria’s Secret)
  • 23. What do Advertisers Sell?
  • 24. YOU!!! 
  • 25.  
  • 26.  
  • 27.  
  • 28.  
  • 29. 1998 Mike Cameron Was suspended from school because he wore a Pepsi shirt on a school sanctioned “Coke” day in Evans, GA.
  • 30. Top Ten Most Advertised Corporations (1999)
    • Chevrolet
    • AT&T
    • Dodge
    • Ford
    • McDonalds
    • Toyota
    • Sears
    • Sprint
    • Chrysler
    • Nissan
    Source: Advertising Age Magazine
  • 31. According to a 2006 study by Bolt Media, Only One in Four 2- to 34-year-olds Can Name Broadcast Networks. ABC, NBC, CBS and Fox
  • 32. So what do 12-34 year olds do?
    • 84% surf the net during idle periods.
    • 75% hang out with friends.
    • 71% watch movies.
    • 69% watch TV.
  • 33. Five Most watched Networks 18-34 year old market
    • Fox
    • Comedy Central
    • ABC
    • MTV
    • Cartoon Network
  • 34. Abercrombie And Fitch Experiment
  • 35.  
  • 36.  
  • 37.  
  • 38.  
  • 39.  
  • 40.  
  • 41.  
  • 42.  
  • 43.  
  • 44. OBJECTIFICATION Turning a human’s body into an “object among other objects in the world” – Dr. Jean Kilbourne
  • 45.  
  • 46.  
  • 47.  
  • 48.  
  • 49. Objectification & Sex $EX $ELL$
  • 50.  
  • 51.  
  • 52. Michael Pfau (1994) Men need more intensive messages for the persuasion to be as strong as weaker messages are for females.
  • 53.  
  • 54.  
  • 55. Many Advertisers take Culturally Oriented Political Stances as well
  • 56. Why Might You Ask? 1. African Americans spend more than $446 billion more than the GNP of Switzerland 2. Gay and Lesbian Markets – Virtually untapped with a lot of expendable income
  • 57. 3. The Elderly – Over 50 - Spend $60 Million Annually on Grandchildren - Spend $30 Billion on Travel - More likely to be On-line than any other sub-population in the US - By 2020 there will be 96 million over the age of 50 – 43% of all adults in the US
  • 58.  
  • 59.  
  • 60.  
  • 61.  
  • 62. Advertising’s True Effects We live in a Toxic Culture
  • 63.  
  • 64.  
  • 65.  
  • 66.  
  • 67.  
  • 68.  
  • 69.  
  • 70.  
  • 71.  
  • 72.  
  • 73. Representing Cultural Groups A. Foreigner’s Perceptions of US Culture B. Popular Culture and Stereotyping
  • 74. Cultural Imperialism (Tomlinson, 1991)
    • As cultural domination
    • Media Imperialism
    • National Discourse
    • As a critique of Global capitalism
    • A critique of modernity
    • Electronic Imperialism
  • 75. Effects of Consumerism Fill out the Body Dysmorphia Scale on pages 72-74.
  • 76. Body Dysmorphia An inaccurate, unrealistic, and pathological appraisal of one’s physical appearance.
  • 77. Factors of Body Dysmorphia
    • Avoidance of Life
    • Muscle Dysmorphia
    • Propensity Towards Eating Disorders
  • 78. Anorexia Nervosa When an individual is at 85% of what their normal weight should be for someone their height and age.
  • 79. Bulimia Tendency to over eat (binge) followed by some form of purging: self-induced vomiting, diuretics, emetic abuse, excessive exercise, fasting, and/or laxatives.
  • 80. Binge Eating Disorder Eating, in a discrete period of time (e.g., within any 2-hour period), an amount of food that is clearly larger than what most people would eat in a similar period of time under similar circumstances. i
  • 81. Females & Males
    • 0.5-3.7% of females suffer from anorexia nervosa
    • 1.1-4.2% of females suffer from bulimia nervosa
    • 2-5% of males and females suffer from binge eating disorder
  • 82. Females & Males, cont.
    • 4.5% females, 0.4% males report bulimia in first year of college
    • Males represent only 5-10% of eating disordered individuals
  • 83. Factors of Body Dysmorphia
    • Avoidance of Life
    • Muscle Dysmorphia
    • Propensity Towards Eating Disorders
    • Pathological Self-Consciousness
  • 84. Barbie the Culprit? Berger-Cross (1996)
    • 7’6” (or two feet taller than your average female)
    • Would weigh 101 pounds
    • Wears a 4 dress size
    • Have a 39” bust
    • 14” waist
    • Barbie would have only around 10% body fat
  • 85. GI JOE (Pope, Olivardia, Gruber, and Borowiecki, 1999)
    • 6 feet tall
    • 31.7” waist
    • 44.4” chest
    • 12.2” biceps
  • 86. GI JOE (Pope, Olivardia, Gruber, and Borowiecki, 1999)
    • 6 feet tall
    • 36.5” waist
    • 54.8” chest
    • 26.8” biceps
  • 87. What Does this All Mean?!
    • America ™ is no longer a country. It’s a multi-billion dollar brand.
    • American ™ culture is no longer created by the people.
    • A free, authentic life is no longer possible in America ™.
  • 88. What Does this All Mean?!
    • American ™ cool is a global pandemic.
    • The Earth can’t support the life style of the cool hunting American ™ style consumer.