Family Systems Theory

52,008 views

Published on

Published in: Education
3 Comments
10 Likes
Statistics
Notes
No Downloads
Views
Total views
52,008
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
447
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
515
Comments
3
Likes
10
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Family Systems Theory

  1. 1. FAMILY SYSTEMS THEORY By Jason S. Wrench
  2. 2. What is a System? <ul><li>Ludwig Von Bertalanffy (1968) </li></ul>“ Set[s] of elements standing in interrelation among themselves and with the environment”
  3. 3. Systems Theory Development <ul><li>Miller 1978 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Called for a living systems theory </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Broderick & Smith (1979) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Published the first article applying systems theory to family scholarship </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Common Components of Family Systems Theory
  5. 5. Non-Summativity <ul><li>The whole is Greater than the sum of its parts. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Genograms Male Female 55 57 m. 79 82 90 87
  7. 7. Genograms Male Female 55 57 s. 92 82 90 87
  8. 8. Genograms Male Female 55 57 d. 97 82 90 87
  9. 9. Genograms Male Female 55-99 57 d. 97 82 90 87
  10. 10. Circular Causality <ul><li>Family members are interrelated </li></ul><ul><li>Not linear (A affects B) </li></ul><ul><li>A & B affect each other </li></ul>
  11. 11. GALVIN AND BROMMEL (1996) Parents ignore Daughter Daughter Shoplifts Parents Pay More Attention Daughter Behaves More Acceptably
  12. 12. Equifinality <ul><li>Families may react similarly to the same experience or achieve outcomes by very different processes. </li></ul>
  13. 13. System types <ul><li>Sub system </li></ul><ul><li>Supra system </li></ul>Boundaries <ul><li>Open </li></ul><ul><li>Closed </li></ul>
  14. 14. Family Homeostasis Bradshaw (1988) <ul><li>Family Homeostasis (1957) </li></ul><ul><li>Families try to cooperate within the family in order to keep the family at homeostasis. </li></ul>
  15. 15. Morphogenisis <ul><li>Ability to adapt and be flexible to stressors </li></ul>Morphostasis <ul><li>Tendency for a system to stay at equilibrium </li></ul>
  16. 16. Applying Family Systems Theory to Family Stressors
  17. 17. Family Crisis <ul><li>Roberts (1991) 3 Types of Crises </li></ul><ul><li>Hazardous event </li></ul>2. Threat to Life Goals 3. Inability to respond with adequate coping mechanisms
  18. 18. STRESSOR SYSTEM NEED TO CHANGE
  19. 19. Pittman’s (1987) Four Types of Stressors <ul><li>Bolt from the Blue </li></ul><ul><li>Developmental </li></ul><ul><li>Structural </li></ul><ul><li>Caretaker </li></ul>
  20. 20. 3 Approaches to Family System Theory Research
  21. 21. Interactional View <ul><li>How families interact through message transactions </li></ul>Structural View <ul><li>Focuses on dyadic social organization and role structure within the family system. </li></ul><ul><li>How do families regulate boundaries. </li></ul>
  22. 22. Constructivist View <ul><li>How does the family construct its particular social reality </li></ul><ul><li>Narratives and stores that families construct from their own experience </li></ul>Most pupular method currently in use
  23. 23. LIMITATIONS
  24. 24. <ul><li>1. Family Systems Theory has not resulted in a body of specific theoretical assertions or hypothesis which can be tested. (Broderick & Smith, 1979; Fitzpatrick and Noller, 1993). </li></ul>2. Family Systems Theory may best be viewed as a metaphor for thinking about the family (Fitzpatrick and Noller, 1993).
  25. 25. Turner & West (1998) Limitations <ul><li>Too much focus on homeostasis at expense of change </li></ul><ul><li>Too much focus on patterns at the expense of unpredictability </li></ul><ul><li>Too much focus on the system at at the expense of the individuals </li></ul><ul><li>A positivistic intellectual tradition that puts the researcher outside the system in search of the truth. </li></ul>
  26. 26. CASE STUDY
  27. 28. This Presentation was Created by Jason Wrench OAD SPEAKERS, Inc. Copyright 1999

×