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Annotated bibliography

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  • 1. THE ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY
  • 2. What is a Bibliography? What is an Annotation? A Bibliography is a list of citations put together on a topic of interest. An Annotation is a commentary a reader makes after critically reading an information source. It includes a summary of the reading and the reader’s response to the reading.
  • 3. What is an Annotated Bibliography? An Annotated Bibliography is a list of bibliographic citations that includes a descriptive and evaluative paragraph of each citation. Its overall purpose is to support your study of a particular subject by providing a collection of succinct article summaries that will negate the need for rereading of an article.
  • 4. Where do I start?  Begin by critically reading the article. View the reading as an interactive process in which your interpretation of author’s words is influenced by your own knowledge and experiences.  Critical readers attempt to dialogue with the text by asking tough questions on the article’s purpose, audience, language and content.
  • 5. Questions to ask about an article  Who is the author? His/her credentials?, biases?  Where is the article published? What type of journal is it? What is the audience?  What do I know about the topic? Am I open to new ideas?  Why was the article written? What is its purpose?  What is the author’s thesis? The major
  • 6. Questions to ask about an article  Did the author support his/her thesis/assertions?  Did the article achieve its purpose?  Were the supporting sources credible?  Did the article change my viewpoint on the topic?  Was the article convincing? What new information or ideas do I accept or reject?
  • 7. Writing the Annotation A strong annotation contains:  A summary of the article  Your response to the article
  • 8. The Summary Paragraph  Begin by succinctly stating the article’s thesis and major points.  Describe/define key points and how they are connected or substantiated.  Describe the usefulness and the limitations of the article  Limit in length (75-150 words)
  • 9. The Response Paragraph  Describe your reaction to the article as a whole.  Describe the relevance, accuracy, and quality of the citation and its conclusions.  Document your response to the author’s ideas, argument, writing style or any other notable aspect of the article.  Limit in length (50-75 words)
  • 10. The Response Paragraph  Describe your reaction to the article as a whole.  Describe the relevance, accuracy, and quality of the citation and its conclusions.  Document your response to the author’s ideas, argument, writing style or any other notable aspect of the article.  Limit in length (50-75 words)

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