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Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management
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Seven Deadly Sins of Time Management

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Time management is not a sexy or exciting topic, but it is one that should be revisited occasionally. This presentation eschews detailed discussion of task lists and calendars, and focuses instead on …

Time management is not a sexy or exciting topic, but it is one that should be revisited occasionally. This presentation eschews detailed discussion of task lists and calendars, and focuses instead on a holistic approach to managing your workload.

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  • Time management isn’t a sexy or exciting topic, but it is one that is necessary for library staff to frequently consider in our never-ending pursuit of providing the best service to our customers. From an organizational perspective:Improved use of time by staff improves productivityThere is better performance in terms of service delivery to customersImproved coordination of tasks and projects in the libraryBetter planning reduces crises, which reduces overall organizational stress in the libraryWhen you consider how you manage your time at work through the lens of how the library serves the community, you begin to see that time is a valuable commodity. Being a good steward of your time is being a good steward of tax payers dollars. What do I mean by time as a commodity?
  • What I mean by viewing time as a commodity is simply thinking of it as ultimately your most valuable resource. It is perishable, because it cannot be renewed. It cannot be stored up for later. If you take nothing else away from this workshop, take away this tidbit as it will assist you in framing the importance of time in everything that you do – whether at work or in your personal life.There are also myths about time management, fallacies that we should seek to avoid. Some of those common myths of time management are:Time can be managed: Time can’t be managed; it passes and that’s that. We can manage our activities to make better use of time.- Organized people have more time: Everyone has the same amount of time, 1440 minutes every day- Efficiency is the Holy Grail of time management: Efficiency is doing things quickly and well; it needs to be coupled with effectiveness, which is doing the appropriate jobs.- Touch each paper only once: You can’t be efficient or effective if you work reactively based on the order things come into your hands.- A clean desk equals productivity; A cluttered desk equals creativity: A clean desk doesn’t automatically make you productive, nor does a messy one make you creative. But a clean desk makes things easier to find, if coupled with a good filing system. 
  • I’ve struggled with managing time and my workload since I was in elementary school. I do not have all of the answers for how to best manage your priorities and workload, but as I’ve progressed in my career and added more responsibilities in my personal life, I have made it a point to study this subject matter and apply those principles into my personal life. In this workshop, I’m going to share with you some highlights of what I’ve learned and what works for me, as well as engage you in conversations and lead you through exercises that can help you better manage your time.
  • Failure to internalize organization goals– what is purpose of your job in helping the org achieve its mission?Failure to set personal goals – define your goals. How can those align with mission/vision/strat planFailure to prioritizeFailure to manage distractions (discussion: what tips or recommendations can u make for managing your paper and digital tigers?)Giving in to procrastinationTaking on too muchFailure to take care of yourself
  • Failure to internalize the library’s vision, mission, strategic plan, and operational goals is, in my opinion, the cardinal sin people commit in mismanaging time. Rather, we should call this mismanaging work, because time cannot be managed – only your behaviors can.In the modern workplace, people are often pulled in multiple directions at the same time. Prioritizing the work is necessary to ensure that we are concentrating on the most important tasks at any one time. The basics of time management, such as working through a to-do list and negotiating with team members around interruptions, are much easier if everyone agrees to the same priorities. The ability of individuals to do a great job managing their work (rather than their time) depends on their teams and the nonprofit having clear direction and priorities. A colleague and I once put it this way:  For time management to be effective … it must be based on a solid foundation of planning ... [T]ime management depends on setting priorities derived from strategic and operational plans that are grounded by organizational vision and values. Finding better ways to check-off to-do items still begs the questions, are these to-do items truly important, and, where are these activities leading us? (Berthoud and Greene, “Planning for Those Too Busy to Plan”).http://www.bartowlibraryonline.org/Assests/about&home%20images/Strategic%20Plan%20%202011.pdfFailure to set goals is, in my opinion, the cardinal sin people commit in mismanaging time. Many people feel as if they're adrift in the world. They work hard, but they don't seem to get anywhere worthwhile.A key reason that they feel this way is that they haven't spent enough time thinking about what they want from life, and haven't set themselves formal goals. After all, would you set out on a major journey with no real idea of your destination? Probably not!Goals are like a compass: the orient us along paths of action. If you don’t have clear goals, your personal life and career will carry you where they will like a small skiff lost at sea. This may sound overly simple, but I have found it telling in many conversations I’ve had personally and professionally when you ask someone “Where do you see yourself in 5 years” and more often than not, the person cannot articulate an answer. Many of us get so caught up in the day-to-day operations of the library or our home lives that we fail to think about our longer term futures and how our long-term plans play into how we manage our time at work.
  • How many strategic goals were you able to recall in two minutes?
  • How well were you able to recall core components of your organization’s mission?
  • Were you able to readily recall your organizational values?If it was a challenge to recall the library’s strategic goals, mission, and values, this is an indication that you can make improvement in how you internalize your organization’s goals. What are some fun ways you can commit these to memory?
  • Many people feel as if they're adrift in the world. They work hard, but they don't seem to get anywhere worthwhile.A key reason that they feel this way is that they haven't spent enough time thinking about what they want from life, and haven't set themselves formal goals. Goals are like a compass: the orient us along paths of action. If you don’t have clear goals, your personal life and career will carry you where they will like a small skiff lost at sea. This may sound overly simple, but I have found it telling in many conversations I’ve had personally and professionally when you ask someone “Where do you see yourself in 5 years” and more often than not, the person cannot articulate an answer. Many of us get so caught up in the day-to-day operations of the library or our home lives that we fail to think about our longer term futures and how our long-term plans play into how we manage our time at work.By show of hands, how many of you have written, personal work goals set for this year? Now, keep your hands raised if you have written, personal goals set for this year.When people don't know what their own personal goals are, or when they are unsure how their professional tasks and personal desires align with one another, it is difficult to manage time effectively because that person is struggling with competing interests (trying to "serve two masters.") 
  • Goal setting is a powerful process for thinking about your ideal future, and for motivating yourself to turn your vision of this future into reality.The process of setting goals helps you choose where you want to go in life. By knowing precisely what you want to achieve, you know where you have to concentrate your efforts. You'll also quickly spot the distractions that can, so easily, lead you astray.
  • Here are some areas to consider when contemplating your personal and professional goals. It’s important to think about many, if not all of these, as personal life and professional life intersect and have bearing on each other. What you want is for there to be “creative traction” between your job and your personal interests.
  • Engaged individuals move organizations toward accomplishing the organization’s mission and vision. However, an organization cannot fully motivate someone to engage, but rather individuals will engage themselves when there is creative traction between what an org is trying to accomplish and what the person is trying to accomplish.Most org’s have their goals written down – you’ll see these in a strategic plan. Many individuals, however, do not write down their goals (unless usually prodded to do so by their employers as part of an annual review or staff development plan). The best way to make sure your job is working for you and you are doing effective work for your job is to get real about your goals – your personal goals.You MUST solidify your personal goals in order to try to align them with org goals. Let’s look at 2 ways to do this…
  • Some people have a clear idea of their long-term "wants" in life, but no plan for the steps it will take to get there.  If this sounds like you, reflect on where you want to be 20 years from now (both personally and professionally).  Then do the same for 10 years from now, 5 years from now, 1 year from now.  Working backward in this way will help you identify steps you can take in the short-term that may lead you toward your long-term personal and professional goals.
  • Some people have a clear idea of what they love/hate about their jobs and their lives "right now."  They gravitate toward certain tasks and avoid others.  This tug of love/hate with daily tasks makes it very hard to manage time effectively because energy spent avoiding the hated tasks creates a dreaded backlog in one area, and energy spent over-focused on the loved tasks eats up all the available time.  If this sounds like you, making a list of your loved/hated tasks (both personal and professional) can give you indications of the type of things you want to gravitate toward doing more of.  This can help you set a long-term goal for your future.
  • Regardless of how you go about setting your goals, your goals need to be SMART
  • Take a moment to reflect on which type of person you are, and complete either the Backward or Gravitation Goal Exercise.  The result should be a rough timeline of short term goals leading you toward a long-term goal (or goals).Takeaways: When your personal goals are aligned with your organization's goals, your time can be managed more efficiently because you are not hamstrung by competing interests and you are playing to your strengths, giving your organization the best of you while also forwarding your own personal and professional goals so everybody wins.  When you feel fulfilled, it is a joy to use your time working productively; managing your time becomes easier because work is something you can look forward to rather than dread.
  • Having begun reassessing how your job tangibly ties into the library’s organizational plans and gaining clarity on your personal goals, it’s time to turn our attention to making the most of the time we have on hand so that we can be effective. Many time management workshops focus on tools for managing time, such as using notes and checklists, calendars and appointment books, etc. While these tools are useful in managing activities that support your day-to-day work, they do not address how to holistically prioritize all the competing demands you face at work.Let’s look at a popular strategy for prioritizing tasks so that you can effectively manage your daily, required routines while still stretching and growing personally and creating impactful results for your organization.
  • http://www.asianefficiency.com/productivity/coveys-time-management-quadrant/Every activity can be put in one of the four quadrants and this can be used for prioritizing tasks. You can see tasks that can be labeled as “important” or “not important” in combination with “urgent” or “not urgent”. If you are having a hard time prioritizing, this 2-by-2 matrix can be really useful. When you plan for a productive day, you have to be able to identify which tasks you want to do based on priority. Let’s see what each quadrant means.Quadrant 1 – Important and UrgentThe first quadrant, oftentimes referred to as the quadrant of necessity, contains the tasks that are urgent and important. These are the tasks you have to do or else you will face negative consequences. Usually these are deadline driven and/or time sensitive. On a daily basis, it is inevitable that you will do tasks that fall in quadrant one. The key is to being able to manage these.If you feel like you are firefighting most of your days, that is a sign that you are spending too much time in this quadrant. You are just doing the things that bring you the short-term benefits whereas you want to shift investing more time in long-term solutions (see quadrant two).Quadrant 1Quadrant 1 brings· Stress & Burnout· Crises management· Fire-fighting· Focus on the immediateQ2This is THE quadrant where you want to invest most of your time. Tasks in quadrant two are in direct alignment of your goals and things you want to achieve in the long-run. Everyone’s goals and dreams are different. What might be a quadrant two task for me, might not be for you. Also, do you see that the tasks are non-urgent? This might seem counterintuitive at first. A lot of times we associate things that have a sense of urgency as important, but that is not the case. Your goals and dreams are not running away; they will be right where they are now and there is no urgency to achieving them within a specified timeline. Anything that benefits you in the long run could be considered in quadrant two.Quadrant 2Being in Quadrant 2 brings:· Vision· Perspective· Balance· Discipline· ControlQ3Also called the quadrant of deception, people often confuse important tasks while in fact they are not important. Or people think the task is urgent but it really is not (and thus should belong in quadrant four).A common occurrence of mistaking something as important is when someone is asking you to do something but that does not directly help you achieve your goals. The key here is prevention by being able to say “no” to these people.An example of mistaking something as urgent, while it is not, are often sources of distraction. You would think they are urgent so you shift focus, but in reality they are not. For example, constantly checking your email inbox or responding right away to people on instant messenger.Other common examples of quadrant three tasks include:Picking up the phone while you are workingChecking Facebook updatesChecking your for text messagesQuadrant 3Quadrant 3 brings· Short term focus· Crises management· Low value on goals· Feeling of victimization / lack of control· Shallow relationshipsQuadrant 4 – Not important and Not UrgentQuadrant 4 contains the tasks you want to avoid as much as possible. These are your time wasters that you want to eliminate. If you could identify all your Q4 tasks and eliminate most of them, you would free up a lot of time you could otherwise invest in quadrant two tasks.Some examples include:Playing video gamesWatching reruns of your favorite TV showsFollowing the newsChecking your RSS feedsSpending time on RedditThe caveat is that this quadrant can be mistaken as something that shouldn’t be part of life, but that is not true. It is really important to have a balanced life between work and your personal life. You need downtime to not get burnt out and that is where quadrant four comes into the picture. The challenge is you allocate most of your time to quadrant two, with just enough of time spent in quadrant four to get by.Quadrants 3 & 4Cycling between Quadrants 3 & 4 brings:· Total irresponsibility· High dependency on others for basics· Short career path in the organization
  • Activity: Complete a 30 Day Snapshot of your work life by thinking about the current projects, tasks, activities, and daily routines you are responsible for. Map them to the Covey Quadrant.Questions:In which quadrant do you spend most of your time? Is this the most productive quadrant?What factors cause you to be in this particular quadrant?What are some concrete steps you can enact immediately to get out of it?
  • We should strive to “live above the red line” by managing the time-sensitive nature of Q1 (the Quadrant of Necessity) and striving to work as much as possible in Q2 (the Quadrant of Quality). As you get better at managing priorities, you will avoid falling into the suck of the daily doldrums, wasting away in Q3 and Q4.
  • Anecdote: “Jay Fan Club” and how I had a ton of regulars who only wanted to be helped by me, or who wanted to talk with me for extended periods of time. It was flattering, but it became a distraction when I moved to a busier branch. This was starting to suck time away from me working on other required job duties. I had to become more assertive about my boundaries and swat that mosquito that was keeping me from being a better teammate.We all have mosquitos in our lives, little things that bug us that we try to ignore, but they ultimately suck away our time and energy in slow drips.Having begun reassessing how your job tangibly ties into the library’s organizational plans and gaining clarity on your personal goals, it’s time to turn our attention to making the most of the time we have on hand so that we can be effective.
  • Here is a graphic that I’ve borrowed from the book, Do More Great Work by MichaelBungayStanier (It’s a good, quick read in my opinion). Stanier suggests that we systematically examine our lives for mosquitos, starting in the spheres of influence closest to us and radiate outward. You’ll notice that the concentric circles start with what’s closest to you and ripple outward to the edge of the universe. We’re starting small, because sometimes small change can catalyze bigger things. To give us reference, some examples of mosquitos are:Desk (or shared workstation): illogical arrangement of tools and utensils causes poor workflow; inadequate system for staying on top of your files/emailsYour office (or branch): poor sight lines makes it hard to monitor in-branch behavior; most frequently used ranges of shelves not featured near front of building; ineffective signage/shelf aids results in you answering the same dumb questions over and overYour workload: you become the “go to” person because others won’t do their job; you can’t say no to opportunities for which you are nominatedFixing what is broken not only can free up your time, but sometimes the projects that result from killing a mosquito fall into Quadrant 2 work that can produce results for the library or for your personal life. What do I mean by this? For instance, you notice that you repeatedly have people coming in for job placement assistance. You and your colleagues spend a significant portion of your time each week helping individuals upload resumes and apply for jobs online. This is not really a bad mosquito, because the work is impactful to those people you are helping. But you want to go to another level. You beginning drafting a proposal to organize a two-day job fair.
  • These are mosquitos that I’ve identified in my life. After you’ve come up with a list of your mosquitos, pick a few that you want to begin eliminating. Consider writing SMART goal statements to move you forward in your pest control efforts.
  • If you're honest with yourself, you probably know when you're procrastinating. According to Mind Tools, here are some useful indicators that will help you know when you’re procrastinating:-Filling your day with low priority tasks from your To Do List.- Reading e-mails several times without starting work on them or deciding what you’re going to do with them.- Sitting down to start a high-priority task, and almost immediately going off to make a cup of coffee.- Leaving an item on your To Do list for a long time, even though you know it's important.- Regularly saying "Yes" to unimportant tasks that others ask you to do, and filling your time with these instead of getting on with the important tasks already on your list.- Waiting for the “right mood” or the “right time” to tackle the important task at hand.
  • Frank Bruno (1997) “Life’s Little Keys: Stop Procrastinating”. Bruno asserts that there are 5 types of procrastination:Functional: done for a good reason, e.g. insufficient information, illness, deferred for a higher-priority taskDysfunctional: useless or self-defeatingShort-term: a few hours or days lateLong-term: you never get around to doing sthChronic: dysfunctional & long-term combinedWhat kind of procrastinator are you?
  • PerfectionismJob is too big to do all at onceJob takes too long to do all at onceJob is too difficultDon’t like to do itFear of failureFear of success (!?!)HABIT!Other reasons:Generally stuck (in job, in personal life)Feeling overwhelmedDon’t get the instant gratification you wantAvoid making decisions or judgmentsLack of urgencySense of personal controlHABIT is a big one. One can get into the habit of putting things off, just because one always has done so. There’s no immediate reason, but we still do it. This is a tough habit to break, but it’s part of what we’re going to try to attack today.
  • Many library processes are intertwined with each other, and one person’s procrastination at a step can cause delays downstream. See the example on the screen. What other processes or workflows can you think of that are interdependent on multiple individuals or departments coordinating effort to provide a service?A prime example of procrastination in my own world was when Carmen first asked me to do this workshop for your staff day. She sent me a message in late September asking for to come out and I didn’t respond until 5 weeks later, only after she had prodded me with a reminder. I was distracted getting ready for the pending birth of my son, flagged her message for follow up so I could talk about the logistics of making this happen with my wife, and never got back around to it. This was functional procrastination (and long-term procrastination), but procrastination all the same. I don’t know about you, but I still battle with procrastination in other areas because I’ve always lived in such a way where I worked under the illusion that I did better under pressure, which is not true. Like if I don’t want to do something, I’ll put it off as long as possible.Let’s talk about some ways to deal with procrastination in your life.
  • Adapted from http://jeremy.zawodny.com/blog/archives/009311.htmlHis list is quite simple:Delete: just get rid of it (or archive it)Delegate: get someone else to deal with itRespond: if it takes just a few minutes, do it right nowDefer: put it on a todo list, archive it, and deal with it laterDo: handle whatever the email actually needs you to do
  • When confronted with additional tasks, consider the following questions:1) Does this task help me fulfill one of the main goals I’ve identified?  2) Does this task help me fulfill a tertiary goal?  Is it a “necessary evil” I must accomplish?3) If this is a necessary task, is it timebound in any way?  (If so, plug it into a calendar).  Will the world end if it doesn’t get done on time / get done by me / get done at all? 4) If this distraction meets neither #1 or #2 above, is it something that needs to be accomplished AT ALL? ---Use your prioritization techniques already discussed to help plan for and manage typical recurrent distractions---
  • As libraries are asked to do more without more resources, library staff are asked to do more without more timeFailure to say NO because of:Desire to please everyoneDon’t want to thwart supervisorDedication to customer serviceUnrealistic idea of own abilities/commitmentsJust didn’t think before saying yesTo stay within Quadrant 2, there is a requirement that you must say no:· In a professional manner· When items are associated with Quadrant 3 or Quadrant 4 activities· Not important not urgent· Not important but urgent· Will not deliver competitive advantage
  • - Never say Yes without thinking about it- Offer a counterproposal or alternative- Keep explanations short & simple- Head off requests before they are made- Psych yourself up to say NoAsk what’s the worst that could happen if you say NoBe firm; control your body language- Be polite!
  • Everybody knows you can’t perform your best when you don’t feel your best.  Yet many people continually shuffle themselves to the bottom of their own priority lists, to the detriment of themselves and their organizations.When you continually don’t have your own needs met, you may eventually experience: 1) Burnout (“I just can’t do this anymore.”)2) Low Morale (“I don’t care about doing this anymore.”)3) Physical Illness (Workaholics can be especially prone to this, not taking a break until their bodies force them to)4) Marginalization (If you’re not important to you, will you be important to anybody else?)5) Doormat Syndrome (“Let’s dump it on ______;  s/he never says no, and will work 80 hours a week to get it done without compensation!”) I had a mentor once who encouraged me to begin exercising extreme self-care. What do I mean by this? How are you applying extreme self-care to your life?
  • Closer (challenging people to use what they’ve learned): You’ve survived time management hell and now have some tools, techniques, and strategies for dealing with the 7 deadly sins of time management. We’re going to close today in a positive note by having a snowball fight. I want each person here to take a sheet of plain paper, write your name and email address on it, and then jot down three steps that you will take over the course of the next month to improve the way you manage your time. I encourage you to reflect on what we learned together today for guidance.After you’ve done that, crumple up your paper. On the count of three, I want everyone to throw their snowball and others in the room. We’ll do this for about a minute.OK, stop throwing snowballs and grab the one closest to you. Everybody should have a snowball. Your snowball should belong to someone other than you. I want you to take this snowball with you and in one month, email the person and check in to see if he/she has made progress in their steps toward better managing their time.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Seven Deadly Sins of Time ManagementA time management workshopfor busy library peeps
    • 2. Time management isn’t sexy… …but it is necessary.
    • 3. jturner@georgialibraries.org @lawlesslbrarian
    • 4. THE 7 DEADLY SINS
    • 5. Deadly sin #1 Failure to internalize organizational goals
    • 6. Strategic Goals• Implement technology strategies that increase efficiency, service, and responsiveness to the community.• Provide a dynamic, current collection of resources in popular formats designed to meet the needs of the community both now and in the future.• Create a customer-focused environment in all aspects of library service delivery
    • 7. Strategic Goals• Create and promote a public image of the library as a vital, dynamic, customer-friendly and essential source of information, life-long learning, cultural enrichment and civic involvement.• Provide the necessary infrastructure and public access to meet the library needs of a growing population.• Provide a welcoming, safe library environment that reflects the community’s changing needs.• Strengthen existing partnerships and develop new collaborations with schools, agencies, businesses,• community organizations, and individuals to maximize service to the community.
    • 8. MissionThe Bartow County Library System provides allcitizens of the county with resources and services tohelp meet theirinformational, educational, cultural, and recreationalneeds. The library system is the primary self-directedlearning resource for the county and offers extensiveliterary collections, current and reliable referencecollections, and exciting childrens collections thatencourage citizens to develop an interest in readingand lifelong learning.
    • 9. Values• Quality Service• Learning-Centered• Intellectual Freedom• Universal Accessibility• Innovation• Communication• Collaboration/Teamwork• Positive Attitude
    • 10. Deadly sin #2 Failure to set personal goals
    • 11. Why is it important to set goals?
    • 12. Career Financial Education Family Artistic Attitude Physical PleasurePublic Service
    • 13. Creative TractionLibraryneeds Personal needs
    • 14. Backward Goal SettingLifetime Goals Five Year One Year Six Month One Month
    • 15. Gravitational Goal SettingPersonal Life Tasks I love Tasks I loatheProfessional Life Tasks I love Tasks I loathe
    • 16. SMART GoalsSpecificMeasurableAttainableRelevantTime-bound
    • 17. Exercise: Backward or Gravitational Goals?
    • 18. Deadly sin #3 Failure to prioritize
    • 19. Covey Quadrant
    • 20. Necessity• Crises • Preparation• Pressing problems • Prevention• Deadlines • Values clarification • Relationships • Empowerment Deception Waste• Email • Busy work• Phone calls • Time wasters• Meetings • Escape activities• Popular activities
    • 21. 30 Day Snapshot• System-wide initiatives• Department/branch projects• Organizational teams/committees• Fielding daily communication• Daily job responsibilities from job description• other daily job responsibilities not in job description• Library association/community involvement
    • 22. How do your priorities map?
    • 23. Requirements CharacteristicsKnows role BalancedSMART FocusedgoalsScheduling FlexibleAdapts Teamwork player Quadrant 2 Person
    • 24. Deadly sin #4 Failure to manage distractions
    • 25. Desk Office Work Team Div. Org Hood loadEvery surface Layout is not Saying “yes” to Short-term Highly Past grudges The house nextcovered with conducive for everything priorities are competitive interfere with door is inclutter working with keeps me in a not clearly environment getting things disrepair and others state of articulated where dept done negatively perpetual heads compete affects my backlog for limited property value resourcesDual monitor Old projects Inefficient use Team members Lack of No current CE My house is onsetup creates a are still on my of email and don’t respect communication needs a septic tankwall between current task lists makes each others’ between dept assessment and the countyme and visitors projects board it difficult for time, leading to heads in my is in no rush toin my office me to stay permanent division put the current crisis mode in neighborhood office on sewerNo clear sense Slow Internet Not doing Projects could Imbalance of Several peopleof organization connection enough far- be managed the division of in theanywhere speed makes it reaching, better (often resources neighborhood(corkboard, difficult to bigger impact unsure of who are active, butdesk, bookcase, complete projects for GA is responsible there are noetc) online projects library for what, when sidewalks for community will action joggers items be complete) Not enough Too many filing space for presentation/ legacy speaking documents requests Lack of space to fully deploy a Mac/PC environment
    • 26. Deadly sin #5 Giving to procrastination
    • 27. Types of Procrastination Functional Dysfunctional Short-term Long-term Chronic
    • 28. Why do people procrastinate?
    • 29. Procrastination=Delayed Workflows PublicAcquisition Cataloging Processing Shelving Services
    • 30. What methods have you used to combat procrastination?
    • 31. Two Birds• List the tasks you are currently putting off.• Remove two from the list by doing them now!• Plan and set a schedule for the rest.• Reward yourself when the tasks are complete.• Punish yourself when tasks are not completed on schedule.
    • 32. 4D• Don’t do it• Do it• Delegate it• Defer it
    • 33. Nuclear Option• No working late• No taking work home• If it doesn’t get done duringwork hours, it doesn’t get done.
    • 34. Deadly sin #6 Taking on too much
    • 35. Everyone is a negotiator.
    • 36. Sometimes, youjust have to say..
    • 37. … but how shouldI do it?
    • 38. What are your main challenges in saying no? What are somecanned phrases you could use to say no in the workplace?
    • 39. Deadly sin #7 Failure to take care of yourself
    • 40. Thank you! Jay Turnerjturner@georgialibraries.org Twitter: lawlesslbrarian
    • 41. Handouts for This Workshophttps://docs.google.com/file/d/0B9W4J84EBjUMZGFocDFoOC1tcUk/edit?usp=sharing

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