Putting Customers First Lasts
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Putting Customers First Lasts

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Customer service is often considered an amorphous set of procedures and practices when, if they are performed well enough, an employee has delivered good customer service. This interactive workshop -- ...

Customer service is often considered an amorphous set of procedures and practices when, if they are performed well enough, an employee has delivered good customer service. This interactive workshop -- filled with discussion and activities -- moves beyond glittering generalities and challenges attendees to map concrete behaviors to customer service practices, so that a consistently excellent customer service experience is delivered by library staff.

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  • Activity:Tell group they have 5 mins to line up according to the years of service they have within their organization, starting with theindividual with the most years of service. Identify that individual and designate where they should go toposition themselves. Instruct the rest of the group to communicate among themselves and to accomplishthe task now.After they have lined up, have each person say aloud the number of years they have served the library. Thank them.Now have the group count off, based on number of tables in the room, (ie, if 5 tables, then count off 1,2,3,4,5, repeat. 1s sit at table 1. 2s sit at table 2, etc)After people are seated at their tables ask, to them to take 2mins and discuss at their table “What happened? Why did we just do that?”Lecture:Those were all good answers and you hit several of the key points of why we are beginning our workshop this way. This activity highlights much of what customer service is about in the library. We have deadlines to keep. We bring differing numbers of years of service and expertise to the library. We have to communicate with each other solve problems and get things done. We don’t necessarily all take the same approach to accomplishing a task, but chaos is overcome as leadership emerges. At the end of the day, we work with each other – within our own department and across departments – to serve the people of Rockdale Co. And that’s what this workshop is about today
  • Peter drucker; 1951 refrain here on screenThis might sound trite, but our customers are THE reason we exist. Imagine how difficult it would be for your leadership to sell the case to your funding sources if people were to stop coming here. Particularly in these economic times, each one of us should be doing all we can to retain our customers. Loyal library customers use more services; are easier to serve; and serve as free advertising for your system. You really have to do whatever is reasonable necessary to keep them. It is more costly to get new customers or regain lost customers than it is to keep them in the first place.5 Principles of Gandhi About Customer (taken from lecture on service quality and customer satisfaction done by MS Sridhar)Customer is the most important personHe is not dependent on us, rather we depend on himHe is never an interruption to work, but rather he is the purpose of our workIn serving him, the library does no favor to him, rather he obliges us by providing an opportunity to serve himHe is not someone to argue with because no one can win an argument with him
  • http://www.slideshare.net/mssridhar/serivce-quality-and-customer-satisfaction-presentation [slide 11]If customers are the lifeblood of our business, customer satisfaction must be a strategic priority of the library. It is THE priority; all else is secondary.Customer satisfaction is what a customer expects and how she perceives that the service she receives lives up those expectations. Satisfying customers can be tricky because the target moves from person to person, transaction to transaction to transaction, minute to minute. Satisfaction is based on perception, and a person’s perception is all encompassing and all-powerful. User perceptions go deep: “feelings are facts”. Ppl hold on to old ideas and beliefs as if they were valuable, personal possession.Satisfying a patron differs from satisfying a need. Needs are situational; satisfying the patron is long-term. Expectations play a crucial role in satisfaction and these are derived from personal experience.Today, we’re going to examine 3 elements of customer service that, when fulfilled, will lead to long-term customer satisfaction. Since we have these 3 elements, our time together will be split into three parts…
  • we’ll talk about the basics of good customer service, and what model behaviors are associated with them.We’ll spend some time discussing communication, because human interaction is often involved in customer service, and as such, we have to be masterful verbal and non-verbal communications to serve the public.Finally, we’ll deal with building relationships with our patrons and leveraging those relationships to best connect them to library products or services.
  • My name is Jay and I’m an addict. Addicted to Thai food. Better yet, addicted to Dan Thai. Tell about DT and how they meet the 3 elements of service that lead to satisfaction even though their product or location is not superior to other Thai spots in my area-- They are courteous, polite, ethical-- Great communicators-- They know me and preferences, and make recommendations based on them
  • We all serve the community – some of us more directly than others. From the outset, I just want to say that all of the customer service principles we discuss today will be relevant to you whether you work on the front lines or behind the scenes. Good service is good service, no matter how you slice. When you work with the public, you’re giving service to our external customers, external customer service. When you work with other staff members, you are giving internal service.
  • ALWAYS REMEMBER, THE CUSTOMER IS THE REASON YOU HAVE A JOBWhat has happened to customer service? More often than not, customers are met with boredom, indifference, and even rudeness or condescension. When they are greeted with a friendly smile, they are thrilled. When they are approached with a helpful attitude, they are likely to tell their friends. When they get good service, they are grateful. Customers should never have to feel grateful for being treated well. Being treated well should be the standard.Think, for a moment, about your own interactions as a customer. In the past few days, how many times were you a customer? Did you go to the grocery store or the mall? Did you visit the post office, doctor’s office, bank, dry cleaners, or your child’s school? Did you eat any meals out? Did you call a company to ask a question or visit a Web site and order products online?You probably were a customer more times then you realized. And as a customer, you have choices. How many stores are in your mall? How many doctors are in your phone book? How many restaurants are nearby? How easy is it to place an order by phone or online? If you are not happy with the service at one business, you have options. You can go elsewhere.As a service provider, keep in mind that your customers have the same choices you do. If they are not happy with the way you treat them, they can go elsewhere.How you treat your customers does matter. Think again about your own interactions as a customer. Which ones stand out in your mind? You are likely to remember service that is either outstanding or awful. Mediocre service is soon forgotten.
  • First impressions matterAppearance is the first thing customers notice about: your personal appearance and the appearance of the environment.Your demeanor sets the stage. If you look bored, indifferent, or down right mean, customers will be less inclined to interact with you.Courtesy countsUse your manners (yes please, thanks, you’re welcome. Use sir and ma’am. Use the person’s name if you know it.)Say it with a genuine smile.Attitude is everythingLeave negative emotions at the door. If you are having a bad day, own it and let others know (rely on your team).Keep an open mind. Don’t prejudgeBelieve that what you’re doing can and does make a difference.Do the right thingAlways be honestEnforce policies fairly and consistentlyDo what you say you will when you say you will
  • We are all customers on any given day, whether we’re visiting a restaurant, paying a bill online, buying groceries at the store, or getting the answer to a question you sent to a colleague via email. We all know good customer service when we see it. We know bad service when we see it, so I’m not going to insult your intelligence by lecturing about what good service looks like. In my experience, we too often think of customer service as this amorphous mass of something we do, rather than critically examining what we do and how we do it. The organizations that have renowned customer service, like Nordstrom, the Apple Store, and American Express to name a few, are constantly reviewing individual behaviors that are associated with specific customer service practices. These orgs recognize that there are several main points of contacts that their business has with customers. These are called “contact points”. At each contact point, employees are expected to exhibit model behaviors. For example, in the Apple Store, employees have a practice of greeting every customer. The expected behaviors for greeting every customer are to greet people within 10 seconds of when they walk in the store or when they are within 10 feet of an employee. Orgs that have award-winning customer service get very granular with their touch points, but frankly, we don’t have time to go that deeply today. However, let’s look at 3 major contact points of service in the public library: working with a customer f2f, over the phone, on online. Here is where you get to do the work.Model behaviors map to customer service practices. Let’s consider what model behaviors should be at various touchpoints in your system. Think of the following 4 touch points:Model behaviors for key customer touch points:Giving face-2-face help (ie, circ assistance, ref assistance, finding a book, etc)TelephoneEmailWhat model behaviors should be associated with each. I want each table to tackle a touch point. For your TP, you will work together as a group to create a poster that captures the model behaviors staff should exhibit when giving f2f service, or assistance by phone, by email, or interfacing via social media. Remember, customer service is internal and external. 10 minutes for this exercise and then each group will have 2 mins to present. As the groups present, take note on your “Model Behaviors/Actual Behaviors” [make this!!!] worksheet for what the model behavior should be.Finally, take 3 minutes and self-reflect on what the model behaviors for a given TP is and what your behaviors are. Are you performing the model behaviors or something else? If something else, what concrete steps can you take to change your behavior.Everything you need to know about good customer service, you learned in Kindergarten. These are truisms for both types of customer service – internal and external.Internal cs – your colleagues as customersExternal cs – the public as customers
  • [20-25 mins total]15 minsT1: f2fT2: phoneT3: emailT4: choose 1 of 3T5: choose 1 either x or xEach group has 2 minutes to presentWe are all customers on any given day, whether we’re visiting a restaurant, paying a bill online, buying groceries at the store, or getting the answer to a question you sent to a colleague via email. We all know good customer service when we see it. We know bad service when we see it, so I’m not going to insult your intelligence by lecturing about what good service looks like. In my experience, we too often think of customer service as this amorphous mass of something we do, rather than critically examining what we do and how we do it. The organizations that have renowned customer service, like Nordstrom, the Apple Store, and American Express to name a few, are constantly reviewing individual behaviors that are associated with specific customer service practices. For example, in the Apple Store, Apple has a practice of greeting every customer. The expected behaviors for greeting every customer are to greet people within 20 seconds of when they walk in the store or when they are within 20 feet of an employee. Model behaviors map to customer service practices. Let’s consider what model behaviors should be at various touchpoints in your system. Think of the following 4 touch points:Model behaviors for key customer touch points:Giving face-2-face help (ie, circ assistance, ref assistance, finding a book, etc)TelephoneEmailSocial media presenceWhat model behaviors should be associated with each. I want each table to tackle a touch point. For your TP, you will work together as a group to create a poster that captures the model behaviors staff should exhibit when giving f2f service, or assistance by phone, by email, or interfacing via social media. Remember, customer service is internal and external. 10 minutes for this exercise and then each group will have 2 mins to present. As the groups present, take note on your “Model Behaviors/Actual Behaviors” [make this!!!] worksheet for what the model behavior should be.Finally, take 3 minutes and self-reflect on what the model behaviors for a given TP is and what your behaviors are. Are you performing the model behaviors or something else? If something else, what concrete steps can you take to change your behavior.Everything you need to know about good customer service, you learned in Kindergarten. These are truisms for both types of customer service – internal and external.Internal cs – your colleagues as customersExternal cs – the public as customers
  • I believe in providing proactive CS because not every customer is going to come to you to find answers or to get help.Not sure of what they needNot sure of what library hasDon’t want to look stupidWe reach out to EVERYONE and offer assistance. On the screen are model communication behaviors that all staff members should be using when working with customers. Although this model is traditionally called MRBs, they apply to all levels of work and can ensure that your customers receive the best service
  • Small group discussion: 2 minutes to discuss in your small group. 3 minutes to share with the rest of the class.
  • The next step is to summarize the patron's problem by describing, in your own words, what you understand the problem to be. Try to describe the facts and your patron's concern. Restating the problem lets the patron know that you listened and lets you know that you understand the situation correctly. If you're not familiar with using summarizing statements, you might want to use some of these phrases as starting points: • "Let me see if I understand you correctly: __________" • "You're saying that _____________, do I have that right?" • "You're ________[feeling], because ____________." • "In other words, ______________________________." When faced with an angry patron, there are also expressions that you should avoid. Here are some examples: • "I'm sorry, but __________." • "I know how you feel, but __________." • "I know it's an unfair rule, but __________." • "I never said that __________." • "Sorry, we simply cannot do that for you."
  • I believe in providing proactive CS because not every customer is going to come to you to find answers or to get help.Not sure of what they needNot sure of what library hasDon’t want to look stupidWe reach out to EVERYONE and offer assistance. On the screen are model communication behaviors that all staff members should be using when working with customers. Although this model is traditionally called MRBs, they apply to all levels of work and can ensure that your customers receive the best service
  • Whether working on the front lines or behind the scenes supporting the people on the front lines, we’re all here to connect people to resources. You can’t make connections if you don’t know your organization, products, and services. Even if you do know those things, you can make even better connections if you know your customers.

Putting Customers First Lasts Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Putting Customers First Lasts
  • 2. Customers are the reason we stay in business.
  • 3. Expectations Perceptions=~
  • 4. Everything you need to know about customer service you learned in Kindergarten. Model communication: when poison does not mean Poison. Know your customers. Know your $h*zz (stuff).
  • 5. Insert picture of Dan Thai Looks can be deceiving. Best service ever, even if the place looks like a dump from the outside.
  • 6. Internal External
  • 7. Everything you need to know about customer service... …you learned in Kindergarten
  • 8. First impressions matter. Courtesy counts. Attitude is everything. Do the right thing.
  • 9. CustomerContact Points
  • 10. Consider the main contact points in the library where you assist customers: f2f, phone, and email. Work with your table to develop a list of model behaviors that employees should exhibit while assisting customers at that touch point. Be specific, and also remember that customer service is internal and external. Now, make a poster using words and images from magazines that illustrate the behaviors on your list. Each group will present their poster to the rest of the class.
  • 11. When poison... …does not mean
  • 12. Welcome Gather info Confirm question Provide solution/ Hand off Follow up Model Communication
  • 13. Can you tell me more about that? I need a little more information… It would help me better understand if you gave a more details…
  • 14. Welcome Gather info Confirm question Provide solution/ Hand off Follow up Model Communication
  • 15. Know your $h*t(stuff). Know your customers.
  • 16. Chain of command Mission and vision Strategic goals Red rules/Blue rules Collection Services Value Add
  • 17. Learn customers’ names. Remember something about your customers. Learn your customers’ preferences.
  • 18. Snowball Fight!