American english dialects

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American english dialects

  1. 1. American English dialects
  2. 2. Lets face it – English is a crazy language!– There is no egg in eggplant;– no ham in hamburger;– neither apple nor pine in pineapple;– English muffins werent invented in England or French fries in France;– sweetmeats are candies while sweetbreads, which arent sweet, are meat; and– boxing rings are square.
  3. 3. English in the U.S.• English is the most common language in the United States.• Though the U.S. federal government has no official language, English is the common language used by the federal government and is considered the de facto language of the United States because of its widespread use.
  4. 4. English language prevalence in the United States. Darker shades of blue indicate higher concentrations of native English speakers in the corresponding states.
  5. 5. English as a changeable language1. Cakes not done in the middle2. Big hat, no cattle4. We’ve howdied, but we ain’t shook yet5. He’s got tongue enough for 10 rows of teeth6. Just because a chicken has wings doesn’t mean it can fly7. Don’t call him a cowboy until you’ve seen him ride8. This ain’t my first rodeo
  6. 6. English words that survived in the United States and not Britain• A number of words and meanings that originated in Middle English or Early Modern English and that always have been in everyday use in the United States dropped out in most varieties of British English.• Terms such as fall ("autumn"), faucet, diaper, candy, skillet, and eyeglasses, are often regarded as Americanisms. – Fall for example came to denote the season in 16th century England, a contraction of Middle English expressions like "fall of the leaf" and "fall of the year". – While the term fall gradually became obsolete in Britain, it became the more common term in North America.

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