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Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK
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Report - Home | Glasgow Caledonian University | Scotland, UK

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  • 1. GLASGOW CALEDONIAN UNIVERSITY ENHANCEMENT LED INTERNAL SUBJECT REVIEW SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND SOCIAL CARE MARCH 2009
  • 2. Contents Page EnhancementLed Internal Subject Review(ELISR) OverarchingReport 1 ELISR Outcomes 2 Appendix1 6 ELISR PanelMembership Appendix2 8 JointGCU/HPC/SSSCProgrammeApproval/Re-approvalReport Appendix2a 14 JointGCU/HPC/SSSCProgrammeApproval/Re-approvalPanelMembership Appendix2b 17 BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy(WorkPractice) BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy(Psychosocial Interventions) BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy (AgeingandWell-being) MSc Occupational Therapy(pre-registration) Appendix2c 21 MSc Physiotherapy(pre-registration) BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Appendix2d 25 BA (Hons) Social Work BA (Hons) Social Work(part-time employmentbased route) MSc/PgDipSocial Work Appendix2e 28 BSc (Hons) Podiatry Appendix2f 30 BSc (Hons) RadiotherapyandOncology BSc (Hons) DiagnosticImaging Appendix2g 34 SHSCInter-professionalEducation (IPE) FrameworkModulesfor separateapproval Appendix3 35 Schoolof Health and Social Care EnhancementLed InternalSubjectReview Self Evaluation Document
  • 3. 1 SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND SOCIAL CARE ENHANCEMENT LED INTERNAL SUBJECT REVIEW –OVERARCHING REPORT 25, 26 & 27 March 2009 Introduction An Enhancement Led Internal Subject Review (ELISR) of the School of Health and Social Care (HSC) was conducted from 25th – 27th March 2009 by a Panel with membership as detailed in Appendix 1. The aim of the review was to evaluate the student experience and to identify good practice and areas for enhancement. The scope of the subject review process encompassed all aspects of the School’s remit. Process The review was held in two parts over a three week period. The first element considered for re-approval all pre-registration programme provision within the School. All programmes under consideration received continuing indefinite approval subject to the fulfilment of certain requirements and recommendations. Appendix 2 contains the outcomes of these events. The second element of the review considered the Self Evaluation Document (Appendix 3) submitted by the School to the ELISR Panel (Appendix 1) which considered the School’s strengths, limitations and areas for development in the following areas:-  Overall aims of subject provision  Intended learning outcomes  Curricula and assessment  Quality of learning opportunities  Maintenance and enhancement of standards and quality  Quality enhancement planning  Implementation of the University’s Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy  Continuing Professional Development provision  Research Students  Support Department engagement with the School It is intended that this summary report be read in conjunction with the Self Evaluation Document prepared by the School (Appendix 3). The School of Health and Social Care
  • 4. 2 The School of Health and Social Care was created in August 2002 and is responsible for the University’s provision within the Allied Health and Social Work Professions. This configuration has allowed the school to respond to the changing face and requirements of a dynamic health and social care sector and has taken a proactive approach to anticipated developments in Health and Social Care and Higher Education to develop skilled practitioners capable of entering their chosen professions prepared to face challenges which face them after qualification. The School works closely with the Scottish Government, local authorities, NHS Trusts and other potential employers to take forward issues related to curriculum development and workforce planning. The School has developed a modern curricula designed to anticipate future professional needs and which allows graduates to acquire a broad range of transferable skills which can also facilitate them seeking employment in “non traditional” roles. During the course of the review the Programme Re-approval Panels and the wider ELISR Panel met separately with teaching, research and support staff, students, graduates, employers, practice placement colleagues and representatives from the School’s Management Team. Outcomes Discussions throughout the course of the review revealed a School which has by way of a highly committed and professional staff, a forward looking approach focussed on the evolution of the School into the next decade combined with proven record of a pro-active approach to quality enhancement in teaching and research and ergo, the student experience. However, the Panel, including members of the various Professional and Statutory Bodies, were concerned that this forward outlook may be compromised in the longer term by what they perceived to be a clear under resourcing, primarily in terms of staffing, in some key areas. Whilst the Panel were aware that the University’s planning round was yet to reach its culmination they urged the University Executive not to expect continued development in a key academic area to continue without a clear commitment to sustained and ongoing resourcing at an adequate level. It was clear to the Panel that staff within the School were being “provided with less but expected to do more” and that this was a situation that unsustainable in the longer term. That said, there was tangible evidence that the student experience remained largely unaffected by resource challenges faced by the School although students with whom the Panel met commented that, although they appreciated staffing and staff time were limited in some areas, their learning to date had not been compromised by this situation.
  • 5. 3 On reviewing the deliberate steps taken by the School to enhance the student experience the Panel found that:  The school comprised motivated and professional staff teams who, despite resource limitations, provided a high quality learning and teaching experience to students;  Students within the school were highly motivated and graduated with a key set of transferable skills. On reviewing areas of good practice that can be usefully disseminated across the School and wider University, the Panel found that:  School staff enjoy an extremely close and productive working relationship with external bodies and employers;  There is a clear evidence of successful engagement with students and the continued development of strategies for motivating students and enhancing their professional attributes;  There is clear evidence of consistent achievement in responding to quality enhancement plans and the University’s continuous quality improvement strategies;  High quality learning, assessment and teaching strategies which enhance the student experience have been embedded into all programmes. On reviewing the areas of School practice that can be enhanced, the Panel found that:  Whilst students reported a high level of support from teaching and administrative staff, discussions with staff revealed that the workload model (and its variations) currently operated by the School may not be providing “best value” in terms of use of staff time. In particular there was clear evidence that more effective use of central support services for students may release a significant amount of staff time for core activities such as teaching, research and associated administrative duties;  Related to the above, the use of PhD students in teaching should be re- considered by the School as it is believed appropriate use of their skill base may provide some respite from the current resourcing issues faced by the school (see * below);  The integration of the Inter-professional Education (IPE) Framework should continue to be closely monitored in light of comments received from students, some of whom did not fully appreciate the role of Inter Professional Learning in the wider context of their learning;
  • 6. 4  The School may also wish to consider how it utilises the expertise of Health Service staff to support the delivery of IPL. It is also hoped that potential support provided may offer useful staff development opportunities for NHS staff and allow ongoing development of relationships between Health Boards and the School.  The engagement of students in Personal Development Planning was not consistent throughout all divisions and levels of study and the School is encouraged to effectively target resources in order to ensure that PDP is seen by the student as an integral part of the learning process;  Whilst acknowledging the challenges that it brings, in order to ensure the concept of “internationalisation” becomes fully embedded across the school and curriculum the School International Strategy should be further developed in full consultation with appropriate stakeholders;  Some students, particularly from within the Division of Radiography, with whom the Panel met indicated they felt unprepared for placement learning early on in their academic study and, as a result, did not feel that they initially gained as much from the learning experience as they could. Therefore, the Panel suggests that the School should consider how best to ensure consistency in preparation for placement learning, not only from the perspective of students but also staff working in a placement setting. On reviewing areas of University-wide practice that can be enhanced, the Panel found that:  Policies surrounding the involvement of PhD students in teaching should be urgently reviewed to ensure consistency and parity across all academic areas*;  In relation to the above, the University should, via the Caledonian Academy, establish processes that allow research students to access appropriate development and support to allow them to undertake teaching duties*;  Similarly, discussions should take place with representatives from the Caledonian Academy to ensure that, where appropriate, research students are able to access appropriate development and support in relation to the skills required for PhD completion*;  The appropriateness of different workload models currently in operation throughout the University should be reviewed to ensure best use is being made of the staff resource;  A method for measuring the potential impact of various University initiatives and projects on overall staff workload should be considered prior to commencement and “rolling out”; similarly, the University should identify a
  • 7. 5 suitable method to disseminate final outcomes of projects to ensure staff are fully conversant with the potential benefits their input may have produced. QO/JKM/Shared/ELISR/HSC2009/REPORTS
  • 8. Appendix 1 6 ENHANCEMENT LED INTERNAL SUBJECT REVIEW 25 – 27 MARCH 2009 Panel Membership Dr Andrew Eadie Chair Director of Quality Glasgow Caledonian University Mr Peter McCrossan Associate Director for Allied Health Professionals/Lead AHP Wishaw General Hospital NHS Lanarkshire Mr Paul Lambert AHP Practice Education Co-ordinator NHS Education for Scotland West of Scotland Region Ms Fiona Roberts Lecturer in Physiotherapy School of Health Sciences Faculty of Health and Social Care The Robert Gordon University John Campbell Depute Head (Learning and Teaching) Glasgow School of Social Work University of Strathclyde Mr Gerry Reid Head of Learning Teaching and Quality School of Nursing, Midwifery and Community Health Glasgow Caledonian University Ms Denise McCaig Vice President Support and Advice Students’ Association Glasgow Caledonian University Professor David McConnell Professor of Learning Innovation The Caledonian Academy Mr Tom Finnegan Director
  • 9. Appendix 1 7 Learner Support Glasgow Caledonian University Ms Jenny Malcolm Secretary Assistant Director of Quality Quality Office
  • 10. Appendix 2 8 SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND SOCIAL CARE ENHANCEMENT LED INTERNAL SUBJECT REVIEW JOINT GCU/HPC/SSSC PROGRAMME APPROVAL/RE-APPROVAL EVENT 11- 13 MARCH 2009 Introduction As part of the 2nd School Enhancement Led Internal Subject review, a joint approval/re-approval Panel (see Appendix 2a), comprising representation from the following bodies, was convened at Glasgow Caledonian University between 11 and 13 March 2009:-  Glasgow Caledonian University  The Health Professions Council  Scottish Social Services Council The Panel was also joined by representatives from Professional Bodies relevant to the profession specific areas represented namely:-  The College of Occupational Therapists  The Society of Chiropodists and Podiatrists  The Society and College of Radiographers  The Chartered Society of Physiotherapists Remit The remit of the Panel was to consider in detail documentation submitted by individual Programme Teams and the School with a view to assessing the validity and academic viability of all programmes with, if appropriate, a view to recommending formal approval or re-approval of the following:- MSc Physiotherapy (pre-registration) BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy BSc (Hons) Podiatry BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy (Work Practice) BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy (Psychosocial Interventions) BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy (Ageing and Well-being) MSc Occupational Therapy (pre-registration) BA (Hons) Social Work BA (Hons) Social Work (part-time employment based route) MSc /PgDip Social Work BSc (Hons) Radiotherapy and Oncology BSc (Hons) Diagnostic Imaging
  • 11. Appendix 2 9 Process Meetings were held with the School Management Team and senior representatives from each Programme in order to discuss generic issues common to all programmes. Programme Specific meetings were also held with individual Programme teams, students and placement providers. The Panel was also provided with a tour of University and school-specific facilities, and a tour of the podiatry-related facilities at the Southern General Hospital. In assessing the validity and academic viability of the programmes the following, although non exhaustive list of key issues were fully explored by the Panel/s:- School Management Team and Senior School Representatives  Fit with University and School strategic objectives  Programme viability and demand  Adequacy of the resource provision, staffing and physical, including generic modules  Staff development/interface with divisions and impact on learning and teaching  Succession planning  Role of Research Staff  Progression  Service Users  Recruitment, marketing and ethnic mix  Equality and Diversity Strategy  Disclosure Scotland  Employability initiatives and impact on the Programme  Peer Support system  Approach to Practice Education  Knowledge transfer  Fit of generic modules Programme Development Boards  Student Profile  Progression  Service users  Recruitment  Practice learning  Curriculum scope, depth and level  Anti discrimination content  Transition to employment  Rationales for changes to programmes  Staff development  Input from stakeholders  Preparation of student for workplace  Student support
  • 12. Appendix 2 10  Personal Learning Audits  Credit rating of modules  Appropriateness of syllabus and curriculum  Resources to underpin programmes Placement Providers/Employers  Graduate attributes/preparedness of graduates to enter employment  Students with disabilities on placement  Placement preparation/audit  Fulfillment of Learning Outcomes within placement setting  Student Support  Communication with School staff  Involvement in re-approval/approval process  GCU response to failing students Students/Graduates  Experience on Programme  Strengths/weaknesses of Programme  Teaching and assessment workload  Funding  Why did students choose GCU in particular  VLE  Feedback to students  involvement in monitoring process  Support whilst on placement  Appropriateness of Placement in supporting learning  Private Practice vs NHS experience  Access to support and learning resources whilst on placement  Personal tutors  Relationship with academics  IPL/IPE The requirements, recommendations and commendations for each Programme are attached as follows:- Appendix 2b BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy (Work Practice) BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy (Psychosocial Interventions) BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy (Ageing and Well-being) MSc Occupational Therapy (pre-registration) Appendix 2c MSc Physiotherapy (pre-registration) BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy
  • 13. Appendix 2 11 Appendix 2d BA (Hons) Social Work BA (Hons) Social Work (part-time employment based route) MSc/PgDip Social Work Appendix 2e BSc (Hons) Podiatry Appendix 2f BSc (Hons) Radiotherapy and Oncology BSc (Hons) Diagnostic Imaging Programme Board Response Receipt by the Quality Office of the School/Programme Board response to the requirements and recommendations of each Programme Re- Approval Panel is 29th May 2009 School specific and IPE module requirements School specific and IPE module requirements and recommendations are highlighted below although are also contained in each individual Programme report:- School specific requirements BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy (Work Practice) BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy (Psychosocial Interventions) BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy (Ageing and Well-being) MSc Occupational Therapy (pre-registration) 1. That whilst the Panel are aware that the two additional substantive posts for the Division of Occupational Therapy, in addition to current staffing including temporary posts, are included in the School’s bid under the current planning round it should be noted that these posts are considered as critical, not only in terms of part-compliance for the College of Occupational Therapy (COT) accreditation, but also to sustain the quality of student learning, including learning in the practice environment. BSc (Hons) Diagnostic Imaging BSc (Hons) Radiotherapy and Oncology
  • 14. Appendix 2 12 2. that a statement on the School proposals for ongoing r sourcing of the Programmes be provided; this should include information on how staff development to support each module will be embedded; 3. That the School should provide an assurance that appropriate equipment and software, eg VERT and CR monitors are in place prior to commencement of the new programmes in September 2009. School specific recommendations BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy (Work Practice) BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy (Psychosocial Interventions) BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy (Ageing and Well-being) MSc Occupational Therapy (pre-registration) 1. That the School reviews the physical skills related resources for example, ADL required for successful delivery of the new programmes, for example HSCO162 Foundations for Practice in Health and Social Care and HSCO263 Inclusive Environments for Occupational Performance. 2. That a school-wide policy is developed for service users and carers involvement in the programme and its ongoing development. Requirements relating to the Interprofessional suite of modules BSc (Hons) Diagnostic Imaging BSc (Hons) Radiotherapy and Oncology 1. that learning and teaching strategies on all Inter Professional Education Modules are reviewed to ensure that:- a. appropriate content is explicitly covered; b. and learning outcomes are appropriate to that content; Recommendations relating to the Inter professional suite of modules BA (Hons) Social Work BA (Hons) Social Work (part-time, employment based route) MSc/PgDip Social Work
  • 15. Appendix 2 13 1. That further opportunities to optimise the inter professional learning for part- time students be considered; BSc (Hons) Podiatry 2. That that professional identity of Podiatry is sustained within the suite of IPE modules;
  • 16. Appendix 2a 14 GLASGOW CALEDONIANUNIVERSITY(GCU) HEALTH PROFESSIONS COUNCIL(HPC) SCOTTISH SOCIAL SERVICES COUNCIL (SSSC) MULTI PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMMERE-APPROVAL EVENT 11-13 MARCH 2009 JOINT PANEL MEMBERSHIP Mrs Alison Britton Head of Learning. Teaching and Quality School of Law and Social Sciences GCU Chair Podiatry Mr Gerry Reid Head of Learning. Teaching and Quality School of Nursing, Midwifery and Community Health GCU Chair Physiotherapy Professor Elaine McFarland Professor of History, Div. of Social Sciences School of Law and Social Sciences GCU Chair Occupational Therapy Mrs Elaine Smith Acting Head of Learning, Teaching & Quality School of Engineering & Computing GCU Chair Social Work Dr Kathryn Strachan Academic Lead for Business Development & Commercialisation School of Nursing, Midwifery and Community Health GCU Chair Radiography Dr Kay Currie Head of Division, Div. of Post-registration Nursing School of Nursing, Midwifery and Community Health GCU Internal Panel Member Social Work Dr Anna McGee Senior Lecturer,Div. of Psychology School of Life Sciences GCU Internal Panel Member Radiography Professor Paul Flowers Division of Psychology School of Life Sciences GCU Internal Panel Member Occupational Therapy Mr Patrick Quinn Lecturer,Division of Computing and Creative Technologies School of Engineering and Computing GCU Internal Panel Member Physiotherapy Mrs Dora Howes Lecturer in Nursing School of Nursing, Midwifery and Community Health GCU Internal Panel Member Podiatry Professional Body Representatives/GCU External PanelMember Mrs Ruth Heames Occupational Therapy Professional Subject Lead Coventry University Occupational Therapy Mrs Susan Griffiths Occupational Therapy Professional Lead,University of Occupational Therapy
  • 17. Appendix 2a 15 Northampton, Centre for Healthcare Education Mrs Jacqui Potter Subject Head University of East London Physiotherapy Ms Nina Thomson The Chartered Society of Physiotherapy Physiotherapy Mr Allan Wood Private Practitioner Podiatry Dr Wilfred Foxe Director of Education Society of Chiropodists and Podiatrists Podiatry Dr Maryann Hardy Division of Radiography University of Bradford Radiography Ms Erica White Department of Radiography Education Cardiff University Radiography Mr Brian Smith Learning and Development Adviser, Scottish Social Services Council Social Work Ms Brenda Gillies Learning and Development Adviser Scottish Social Services Council Social Work Mr Bobby Park Service User Social Work Ms Beryl Middleton Section Head Service Improvement West Dunbartonshire Service – Social Work Ms Anne Ritchie Senior Lecturer in Social Work University of West of Scotland Ms Remy Reyes Education Manager (Quality and Standards) College of Occupational Therapists Academic – Social Work COT Observer HPC Visitors Ms Vivien Kilgour Assistant General Manager for Medicine & Diagnostics Bedford Hospital Occupational Therapy Dr Nicola Spalding Associate Dean,Teaching, Learning and Quality University of East Anglia Occupational Therapy
  • 18. Appendix 2a 16 Prof Karen Harrison Head of Department Coventry University Physiotherapy Mr Anthony Power Senior specialist physiotherapist York and North Yorkshire NHS Trust Physiotherapy Ms Emma Supple Barnet Hospitals Podiatry Ms Penny Renwick Associate Dean Manchester Metropolitan Podiatry Ms Linda Mutema Lecturer, Cardiff University Radiography Mr Derek Adrian-Harris Head,Centre for Radiography Portsmouth University Radiography In Attendance Ms Gill Paterson Quality Officer GCU Panel Secretary Occupational Therapy Ms Morven Gillies Quality Officer GCU Panel Secretary Social Work Mr Ben Rogers Quality Officer GCU Panel Secretary Radiography Ms Jenny Malcolm Assistant Director GCU Panel Secretary Podiatry Mr Alen MacKinlay Quality Manager GCU Panel Secretary Physiotherapy Ms Mandy Hargood Educational Officer HPC Ms Anne Shomefun Educational Officer HPC Ms Paula Lescott Educational Officer HPC Ms Clair Parkin Officer COT
  • 19. Appendix 2b 17 BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy (Work Practice) BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy (Psychosocial Interventions) BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy (Ageing and Well-being) MSc Occupational Therapy (pre-registration) CONCLUSIONS, REQUIREMENTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS Following consideration of Programme Re-approval Submission Documentation for the BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy and MSc Occupational Therapy (pre- registration) programmes and informative and wide-ranging discussions with members of the Senior School Staff, Programme Team, and various stakeholders, the Joint Programme Re-approval Panel is pleased to recommend to the Learning and Teaching Sub-Committee of the University, that, subject to the satisfactory completion of the under noted requirement/s and recommendation/s the both programmes be placed in indefinite approval from September 2009. This approval is subject to the University’s normal arrangements for review, and re- approval in 5 years and is in line with the requirements and procedures of the Education and Training Committee of the Health Professions Council and the College of Occupational Therapists. REQUIREMENTS The aforementioned approval is subject to the satisfactory completion, by the Programme Team, of the following requirements: 1. That whilst the Panel are aware that the two additional substantive posts for the Division of Occupational Therapy are included in the School’s bid under the current planning round it should be noted that these posts are considered as critical, not only in terms of part-compliance for the College of Occupational Therapy (COT) accreditation, but also to sustain the quality of student 2. The Assessment Regulations for both the Under-graduate and Masters programmes should be consistent and must specify that successful completion of a programme includes successful completion of a minimum of 1000 practice hours as required by the World Federation of Occupational Therapists (2002). RECOMMENDATIONS In addition, the following recommendations are commended to the Programme Development Team and School:- 1. That the School reviews the physical skills related resources for example, ADL required for successful delivery of the new programmes. Some of the most relevant modules here include: HSCO162 Foundations for Practice in
  • 20. Appendix 2b 18 Health and Social Care and HSCO263 Inclusive Environments for Occupational Performance. 2. That a school-wide policy is developed to promote the ongoing involvement of service users and carers in the design and delivery of School programmes. 3. That the educational aims in the Programme Specifications and other related documentation offer a more explicit reflection of the centrality of Occupation and the Occupational Science basis of the new programmes. 4. That module descriptors are reviewed to incorporate: a) more explicit emphasis on transferable skills b) more explicit linkage between the learning, teaching and assessment strategies and the intended learning outcomes. For example HSCO263, HSCOM62, and IPE modules HSCS462, HSCSM62. c) Indicative reading lists are reviewed for currency. COMMENDATIONS AND GOOD PRACTICE The Panel identified the following elements of good practice and commendations to the Programme Team: 1. The evident collegiality and commitment shown by members of the Team 2. The strong relationship with practice as evidenced by the innovative use of practice partners in the supervision of Role Emerging Placements and Dissertations 3. Student support 4. Continued development of the Role Emerging Placements 5. The move to embrace social enterprise in the new curriculum. MODULES APPROVED AT THE PROGRAMME RE-APPROVAL EVENT BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy (Work Practice) BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy (Psychosocial Interventions) BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy (Ageing and Well-being) MSc Occupational Therapy (pre-registration) The following modules will be approved subject to the satisfactory response to the requirements: Module Code Module Title Level Credit HSCO161 Occupational Performance 1 1 20 HSCO162 Introduction to Occupational Science 1 20 HSCO163 PE1:Occupational Performance 2 + PE Hrs 1 20
  • 21. Appendix 2b 19 HSCO261 Occupational Therapy Theories and Approaches 2 20 HSCO262 PE2: Understanding Occupational Therapy in Practice 2 30 HSCO263 Inclusive Environments for Occupational Performance 2 20 HSCO264 Measuring & Promoting Health & Wellbeing Through Occupation 2 20 HSCO361 Reasoning, Decision making & Ethics in OT Practice 3 20 HSCO362 PE3: Occupation for Health & well-being in emerging settings 3 20 HSCO363 Critical Perspectives on Creativity in Occupation 3 20 HSCO364 PE4: Developing Readiness for Practice 3 40 HSCO461 PE 5: Occupational Therapy and Social Enterprise 4 20 HSCO462 Occupational Therapy and Work Practice (e-module) (WP) 4 20 HSCO463 Health Ergonomics (WP) 4 20 HSCO464 Investigating Group Work (PSI) 4 20 HSCO465 Enhancing Practice with Cognitive Behavioural Approaches 4 20 HSCO466 Wellbeing in later life (Ageing & Wellbeing) 4 20 HSCO467 Contemporary perspectives on Working with People in Later Life (Ageing & Wellbeing) 4 20 HSCO468 Independent Learning 4 20 HSCO444 Practice Based Education 4 12 HSC0469 Practice Based Education (on-line) 4 12 HSCOM61 Occupational Therapy Foundations for Practice M 30 HSCOM62 Challenges to Occupational Health and Wellbeing M 15 HSCO291 PE1: Understanding Occupational Therapy in Practice 2 30
  • 22. Appendix 2b 20 HSCOM63 Occupational in Health and Social Care M 15 HSCO391 PE2: Investigating Practice Interventions 3 40 HSCO392 PE3: Practice Implementation and Evaluation 3 40 HSCOM64 Professional Development in the Work Environment M 15
  • 23. Appendix 2c 21 BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy MSc Physiotherapy (pre-registration) CONCLUSIONS, REQUIREMENTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS Following consideration of Programme Re-approval Submission Documentation for the BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy and MSc Physiotherapy (pre-registration) programmes and informative and wide-ranging discussions with members of the Senior School Staff, Programme Team, and various stakeholders, the Joint Programme Re-approval Panel is pleased to recommend to the Learning and Teaching Sub-Committee of the University, that, subject to the satisfactory completion of the under noted requirement/s and recommendation/s both programmes be placed in indefinite approval from September 2009. This approval is subject to the University’s normal arrangements for review, and re- approval in 5 years and is in line with the requirements and procedures of the Education and Training Committee of the Health Professions Council and The Chartered Society of Physiotherapists. REQUIREMENTS The aforementioned approval is subject to the satisfactory completion, by the Programme Team, of the following requirements: 1. That the Programme Team review the module descriptors for both programmes for completeness (this is specifically in respect to the inclusion of the full module teaching teams) and the respective assessment schedules for the UG and PG programmes for accuracy (cross-referring to the modules). 2. That the Programme Team ensures that contemporary practice is explicitly reflected. 3. That the Programme Team updates the documentation to articulate the approach to induction and transition for both the UG and PG programmes (the Programme team made reference to a specific Programme of activities tailored for the physiotherapy students). RECOMMENDATIONS No recommendations to report COMMENDATIONS AND GOOD PRACTICE The following points are commended to the School and Programme Team: 1. The cohesive nature of the School (as presented in meetings with the School Management Team, Programme Leaders and the Programme re-approval event)
  • 24. Appendix 2c 22 2. The ongoing efforts to give the students a ‘profession’ identity from the outset of the programmes (particularly the UG Programme) and sense of community (the Panel meet with a group of UG/PG students who were very positive about the programmes and their student experience) 3. The Divisional held MSc Dissertation conference in providing a rewarding end point to students completing and presenting their clinical outcomes from their dissertation 4. The restructuring of the UG Programme to introduce earlier to students the wider aspects of health perspectives and themes in public health (student role not just health but wider promotion and removing ‘narrow’ perception of the Programme) 5. The increasing awareness of transferable skills to support employability and graduate attributes and where relevant this embedded in the programmes either in modules e.g. core IPE Framework module Organisations, Policy and Professional Practice or overall LTAS 6. VLE and technological developments for learning and teaching The Panel also endorses the set of IPE modules and associated Framework and commends the School for the development. (note by Secretary – comments were received from other Panels regarding the IPE modules and these will be approved once a satisfactory response from the School has been received in relation to relevant requirements and/or recommendations) MODULES APPROVED AT THE PROGRAMME RE-APPROVAL EVENT BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy The following modules will be approved subject to the satisfactory response to the requirements: Module Code Module Title Level Credit HSCT161 Applied Anatomy for Physiotherapists 1 SHE1 20 HSCT162 Movement & Exercise SHE1 20 HSCT163 Applied Anatomy for Physiotherapists 2 SHE1 20 HSCT261 Neuromusculoskeletal Management SHE2 30 HSCT262 Cardiovascular & Pulmonary Care SHE2 20 HSCT263 Health Perspectives SHE2 10
  • 25. Appendix 2c 23 HSCT264 Neuro-rehabilitation SHE2 20 HSCT265 Practice Education 1 SHE2 10 HSCT361 Practice Education 2 SHE3 20 HSCT362 Practice Education 3 SHE3 20 HSCT363 Gender and Health (optional module) SHE3 10 HSCT364 Sports Injury Rehabilitation (optional module) SHE3 10 HSCT365 Oncology and Palliative Care (optional module) SHE3 10 HSCT366 Paediatrics (optional module) SHE3 10 HSCT367 Lifespan Fitness Activity & Health SHE3 20 HSCT368 Vocational Rehabilitation SHE3 10 HSCT369 Practice Education 4 (Elective) SHE3 20 HSCT461 Practice Education 5 SHEH 20 HSCT462 Practice Education 6 SHEH 20 HSCT463 Practice Education 7 SHEH 20 MSc Physiotherapy (Pre-registration) The following modules will be approved subject to the satisfactory response to the requirements: Module Code Module Title Level Credit HSCT491 Neuromusculoskeletal Therapeutics: Fundamental Theory and Clinical Studies SHEH 15 HSCT492 Neuromusculoskeletal Therapeutics: Skills Acquisition SHEH 15 HSCT493 Neuromusculoskeletal Therapeutics: Evaluation of Practice SHEH 15 HSCRM64 Cardiovascular and Respiratory SHEM 45 HSCRM65 Practice Education 1 SHEM 15
  • 26. Appendix 2c 24 HSCRM66 Neurorehabilitation SHEM 30 HSCRM67 Neuromusculoskeletal 2 SHEM 15 HSCRM68 Practice Education 2+3 SHEM 30 HSCRM69 Practice Education 4+5 SHEM 30 HSCRM70 Practice Education 6 SHEM 15 HSCRM71 Practice Education 7+8 SHEM 30
  • 27. Appendix 2d 25 BA (Hons) Social Work BA (Hons) Social Work (part-time, employment based route) MSc/PgDip Social Work CONCLUSIONS, REQUIREMENTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS Following consideration of Programme Re-approval Submission Documentation for the BA (Hons) Social Work, BA (Hons) Social Work (part-time, employment based route) and the MSc/PgDip Social Work Programme and informative and wide- ranging discussions with members of the Senior School Staff, Programme Teams, and various stakeholders, the Joint Programme Re-approval Panel is pleased to recommend to the Learning and Teaching Sub-Committee of the University, that, subject to the satisfactory completion of the under noted requirement/s and recommendation/s all programmes be placed in indefinite approval from September 2009. This approval is subject to the University’s normal arrangements for review, and re-approval in 5 years. Dr Brenda Gillies and Mr Brian Smith will also be recommending the renewal of approval of all programmes to the Scottish Social Services Council. REQUIREMENTS The aforementioned approval is subject to the satisfactory completion, by the Programme Development Teams, of the following requirements: 1. That the documentation should make explicit how the Postgraduate Diploma meets the requirements and standards of the Framework for Social Work Education in Scotland; 2. That the Division continues to engage with Learning Network West partners, and wider stakeholders, to plan and develop strategies to fulfill their responsibilities in relation to practice learning opportunities across all programmes; 3. That an audit tool for quality assuring practice learning be introduced; 4. That, in line with GCU requirements, the process and timescales for feedback to students on all assessments, be clarified. RECOMMENDATIONS In addition, the following recommendations are commended to the Programme Development Teams and School:- 1. That the inclusion of service users and carers, in particular user-led organisations, in all aspects of the programmes be strengthened; 2. That the pre-practice learning information provided to employers be enhanced;
  • 28. Appendix 2d 26 3. That further opportunities to optimise the inter professional learning for part- time students be considered; 4. That all Module Descriptors across all programmes be revisited to ensure consistency of terminology and to clarify the distinction between SCQF levels. COMMENDATIONS AND GOOD PRACTICE The Panel identified the following elements of good practice and commendations:- 1. The overall professionalism of staff within the division, illustrated by their responsiveness, approachability, accessibility and flexibility towards their students. 2. The support for practice teachers and rapid responsiveness to employers. 3. The part-time Programme, which is an excellent example of the team’s responsiveness to employers. 4. The Programme Team’s commitment to the University’s Widening Access agenda. 5. The continued commitment to the use of accessible e-learning and Virtual Learning Environment. 6. The development and use of Personal Learning Audits MODULES APPROVED AT THE PROGRAMME RE-APPROVAL EVENT MSc/PgDip Social Work BA (Hons) Social Work BA (Hons) Social Work (Part-Time Employment-Based Route) The following modules will be approved subject to the satisfactory response to the requirements: Module Code Module Title Level Credit HSCW161 Skills, Technology and Social Work 1 20 HSCW162 Understanding Social Work 1 20 HSCW163 Social Justice, Values and Ethics 1 20 HCSW164 Social Policy 1 20 HSCW261 Social Work and Human Development 2 20 HSCW262 Social Work Theory 2 20 HSCW263 Social Work Law: Policy and Process 2 20
  • 29. Appendix 2d 27 HSCW264 Social Work Skills 2 20 HSCW265 Risk and Protection 2 20 HSCW317 Supervised Direct Practice 1 3 40 HSCW362 Social Work Law and Practice 3 20 HSCW363 Social Work Process and Practice 3 20 HSCW364 Partnership, Power and Practice 3 20 HSCW412 Supervised Direct Practice 2 4 60 HSCWM61 Social Work Theory M 20 HSCWM62 Social Work Skills M 20 HSCWM63 Social Work Contexts M 20 HSCWM64 Law for Social Work Practice M 20 HSCWM65 Supervised Direct Practice 1 M 40 HSCSM63 Organisational Behaviour and Professional Practice M 15 HSCWM66 Research for Social work M 20 HSCEM67 Effective Practice in Social Work M 20 HSCWM68 Dissertation M 60 HSCEM69 Supervised Direct Practice 2 M 60
  • 30. Appendix 2e 28 BSc (Hons) Podiatry CONCLUSIONS, REQUIREMENTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS Following consideration of Programme Re-approval Submission Documentation for the BSc (Hons) Podiatry Programme and informative and wide-ranging discussions with members of the Senior School Staff, Programme Team, and various stakeholders, the Joint Programme Re-approval Panel is pleased to recommend to the Learning and Teaching Sub-Committee of the University, that, subject to the satisfactory completion of the under noted requirement/s and recommendation/s the programmes be placed in indefinite approval from September 2009. This approval is subject to the University’s normal arrangements for review, and re- approval in 5 years and is in line with the requirements and procedures of the Education and Training Committee of the Health Professions Council and the Society of Chiropodists and Podiatrists. REQUIREMENTS The aforementioned approval is subject to the satisfactory completion, by the Programme Development Team, of the following requirements: 1. That the desirability and viability of the part-time route should be re-visited; 2. That all documentation should be proof-read to ensure the new Programme title is reflected throughout; 3. That all module descriptors be re-visited for to ensure consistency and accuracy. RECOMMENDATIONS In addition, the following recommendations are commended to the Programme Development Teams and School:- 1. That professional identity of Podiatry is sustained within the suite of IPE modules; 2. That the method of auditing and monitoring placements should be kept under review and that robust feedback mechanism are put in place; 3. That in order to help students towards a more seamless transition into Professional Practice and to further advance Graduate Attributes it is suggested some study of business skills is included in the curriculum; 4. That Placements Providers receive appropriate information to ensure that they are sufficiently briefed on the Programme, philosophy, structure, Learning Outcomes and Assessment. COMMENDATIONS AND GOOD PRACTICE
  • 31. Appendix 2e 29 The Panel identified the following elements of good practice and commendations:- 1. Quality of the Documentation 2. Student Learning: the integration between theory and practice 3. Excellent collaboration between Podiatry at Glasgow Caledonian University and Southern General Hospital 4. The students and how keen, engaged and enthused they were with the subject (including clinical experience) 5. All staff clinically involved in their area of specialty. 6. Staff Research Profile MODULES APPROVED AT THE PROGRAMME APPROVAL EVENT BSc (Hons) Podiatry The following modules will be approved subject to the satisfactory response to the requirements: Module Code Module Title Level Credit HSCP160 Clinical Podiatry 1 1 20 HSCO161 Podiatric Theory 1 1 20 HSCP162 Anatomy for Podiatrists 1 20 HSCP260 Clinical Podiatry 2 2 20 HSCP261 Podiatric Theory 2 2 30 HSCP262 Surgery and Radiology for Podiatrists 2 20 HSCP263 Medicine for Podiatrists 2 30 HSCP360 Clinical Podiatry 3 40 HSCP361 Podiatric Theory 3 3 20 HSCP362 Aspects of Health Promotion for Podiatrists 3 20 HSCP461 Clinical Podiatry 4 4 40 HSCP462 Podiatric Theory 4 4 20
  • 32. Appendix 2f 30 BSc (Hons) Diagnostic Imaging BSc (Hons) Radiotherapy and Oncology CONCLUSIONS, REQUIREMENTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS Following consideration of Programme Re-approval Submission Documentation for the BSc (Hons) Radiotherapy and Oncology and the BSc (Hons) Diagnostic Imaging and informative and wide-ranging discussions with members of the Senior School Staff, Programme Team, and various stakeholders, the Joint Programme Re- approval Panel is pleased to recommend to the Learning and Teaching Sub- Committee of the University, that, subject to the satisfactory completion of the under noted requirements both programmes be placed in indefinite approval from September 2009. This approval is subject to the University’s normal arrangements for review, and re-approval in 5 years and is in line with the requirements and procedures of the Pre Registration, Education and Training Working Group of the Health Professions Council and The Society and College of Radiographers. REQUIREMENTS The aforementioned approval is subject to the satisfactory completion, by the Programme Development Teams, of the following requirements: BSc (Hons) Diagnostic Imaging and BSc (Hons) Radiotherapy and Oncology 1. That within the Critical Review a clearer rationale for changes to both programmes be provided. This should include a contextualisation of the external environment combined, where appropriate, with relevant professional practice issues; 2. That, in order to ensure clarity for 1st post competencies, the Team should map the Learning and Development Framework for Clinical Imaging and Oncology across all modules in both programmes. In doing so, it should be ensured that the “spiral” [horizontal/vertical] nature of the programme structures is made explicit, including subject content. It is envisaged that this may impact on the syllabus content for each module descriptor; 3. That all module descriptors across both programmes be reviewed to ensure the module structure reflects reasonable student contact hours; that learning outcomes are appropriate for each level and that explicit and appropriate learning and teaching strategies are clearly outlined; 4. That assessment loading on all modules should be reviewed with a clear statement of rationale for the approaches adopted; this statement should include information relating to the role of formative assessment in modules; 5. That, if appropriate, a clear rationale should be provided for the use of post graduate students and clinical staff in teaching;
  • 33. Appendix 2f 31 6. That the appropriateness and currency of the skills of Practice supervisors should be continually reviewed in order to support learning of students in practice; this is particularly relevant where new skills are being developed within the programmes; 7. That the Practice Education document should be revised to reflect developing levels of practice and student expectation across each level of the Programme; BSc (Hons) Radiotherapy and Oncology 8. That a clear justification be provided for the introduction of new areas of practice; 9. That student access to learner support facilities across all placements should be reviewed for parity of experience; The approval is also subject to a satisfactory response by the School Management Team in relation to the following requirements:- 10.That a statement on the School proposals for ongoing resourcing of the Programmes be provided; this should include information on how staff development to support each module will be embedded; 11.That the School should provide an assurance that appropriate equipment and software, eg VERT and CR monitors are in place prior to commencement of the new programmes in September 2009. Recommendation In addition, the following recommendations are also commended to both Programme Development Teams:- 1. That the weighting of practice element within practice modules, in relation to competence to practice, be reconsidered. COMMENDATIONS AND GOOD PRACTICE The Panel identified the following elements of good practice and commendations:- 1. There is clear evidence that both Programme Development Teams are committed and supportive to all students; 2. There is evidence of a passion for sharing knowledge; 3. There is evidence of excellent relations with clinical staff and a responsive approach to practitioner and service needs; 4. The Panel was particularly pleased to note the extension of clinical practice hours and consider this a positive move.
  • 34. Appendix 2f 32 MODULES APPROVED AT THE PROGRAMME RE-APPROVAL EVENT BSc(Hons) Diagnostic Imaging BSc(Hons) Radiotherapy and Oncology The following modules will be approved subject to the satisfactory response to the requirements: Module Code Module Title Level Credit HSCR161 Fundamentals of Professional Practice 1 20 HSCR162 Skeletal & Thoracic Imaging 1 20 HSCR163 Applications of Professional Practice 1 20 HSCR164 Introduction to Radiotherapy and Oncology 1 20 HSCR165 Applications of Radiotherapy Practice 1 20 HSCR261 Skeletal Trauma Image Interpretation (Conventional Imaging) 2 20 HSCR262 Abdomino - Pelvic Imaging 2 20 HSCR263 Neuro Imaging 2 20 HSCR264 Professional Practice Education & Application 2 2 40 HSCR265 Imaging in Oncology 2 20 HSCR266 Integrated Radiotherapy and Oncology Studies 1 2 20 HSCR267 Radiotherapy Physics and Equipment 2 20 HSCR268 Practice Education (Therapy) 2 2 40 HSCR361 Oncology: Diagnosis & Treatment 3 20 HSCR362 Interventional Therapy & Preventative Medicine 3 20 HSCR363 Strategies for Best Practice in Diagnostic Imaging 3 20 HSCR364 Professional Practice Education & Application 3 3 40
  • 35. Appendix 2f 33 HSCR365 Radiotherapy Treatment Planning and Technology 3 20 HSCR366 Integrated Radiotherapy and Oncology Studies 2 3 20 HSCR367 Practice Education (Therapy) 3 3 40 HSCR368 Integrated Radiotherapy and Oncology Studies 3 3 20 HSCR461 Professional Practice Education and Application 4 4 40 HSCR462 Practice Education (Therapy) 4 4 40 HSCR463 Development in Professional Practice 4 20 HSCR464 Development in Radiotherapy and Oncology Practice 4 20
  • 36. Appendix 2g 34 SHSC Interprofessional Education (IPE) Framework Modules for separate Approval: Module Code Module Title Level Credit PSYP107 Introductory Psychology and Sociology for Health and Social Care Practitioners 1 20 HSCS162 Foundations for Practice in Health and Social Care 1 20 HSCS261 Research in Health & Social Care Practice 2 20 HSCS361 Investigating Effective Practice 3 20 HSCS461 Honours Project 4 40 HSCS462 Organisations, Policy & Professional Practice 4 20 HSCSM60 Interprofessional Context of Practice M 15 HSCSM61 Practice Evaluation M 15 HSCSM62 Dissertation M 60 HSCSM63 Organisational Behaviour and Professional Practice. M 15
  • 37. Appendix 3 35 ENHANCEMENT LED INTERNAL SUBJECT REVIEW SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND SOCIAL CARE MARCH 2009
  • 38. Appendix 3 36 CONTENTS INTRODUCTION ..............................................................................................................................................................39 1. OVERALL AIMS OF THE SUBJECT PROVISION ...................................................................................41 1.1 The School of Health and Social Care - Provision within the Subject Area ............................... 41 1.2 Objectives.................................................................................................................... 42 1.3 Student and Staff Information.......................................................................................... 42 1.4 Strengths..................................................................................................................... 42 1.5 Limitations .................................................................................................................. 43 1.6 Plans for Further Development........................................................................................ 43 2 INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES ...........................................................................................................44 2.1 Key Learning Outcomes ................................................................................................. 44 2.2 Practice Relevance........................................................................................................ 45 2.3 Interprofessional Learning.............................................................................................. 45 2.4 Shared Understanding of Learning Outcomes..................................................................... 46 2.5 Strengths..................................................................................................................... 46 2.6 Limitations .................................................................................................................. 46 2.7 Plans for Further Development........................................................................................ 46 3 CURRICULA AND ASSESSMENT ..................................................................................................................47 3.1 Curricula .................................................................................................................... 47 3.2 Assessment .................................................................................................................. 49 3.3 Strengths..................................................................................................................... 49 3.4 Limitations .................................................................................................................. 50 3.5 Plans for Further Development........................................................................................ 50 4 QUALITY OF THE LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES .................................................................................51 4.1 Range and Appropriateness of Teaching Methods ............................................................... 51 4.2 Quality of the Learning Materials .................................................................................... 53 4.3 Effective Engagement and Student Participation ................................................................. 54 4.4 Strategies for Staff Development ...................................................................................... 54 4.5 Underpinning of Teaching by Research and Scholarly Activity .............................................. 55 4.6 Student Workload.......................................................................................................... 56 4.7 Strengths..................................................................................................................... 57 4.8 Limitations .................................................................................................................. 57 4.9 Plans for Further Development........................................................................................ 57 5. MAINTENANCE AND ENHANCMEENT OF STANDARDS AND QUALITY ..................................58 5.1 Quality Assurance and Enhancement Processes.................................................................. 58 5.2 Professional Responsibilities........................................................................................... 59 5.3 Quantitative Measures................................................................................................... 59 5.4 Qualitative measures ..................................................................................................... 65 5.5 Strengths..................................................................................................................... 68 5.6 Limitations .................................................................................................................. 68 5.7 Plans for Further Development........................................................................................ 68 6. QUALITY ENHANCEMENT PLANNING .....................................................................................................69 6.1 Planning Process.......................................................................................................... 69 6.2 Programme Quality Enhancement Plans ........................................................................... 70 6.3 Quality and Learning and Teaching Plans ......................................................................... 70 6.4 SHEFC/QAA Quality Enhancement Themes ....................................................................... 70 6.5 Strengths..................................................................................................................... 71 6.6 Limitations .................................................................................................................. 71
  • 39. Appendix 3 37 6.7 Plans for Further Development........................................................................................ 71 7. IMPLEMENTATION OF THE UNIVERSITY LEARNING, TEACHING AND ASSESSMENT STRATEGY .........................................................................................................................................................................72 7.1 The School Learning Teaching and Assessment Strategy....................................................... 72 7.2 Student Support............................................................................................................ 72 7.3 Employability............................................................................................................... 72 7.4 Personal Development Planning...................................................................................... 72 7.5 Careers Education, Information and Guidance................................................................... 73 7.6 Academic Guidance....................................................................................................... 73 7.7 Student Induction/ Transition Strategy .............................................................................. 74 7.8 Strengths..................................................................................................................... 74 7.9 Limitations .................................................................................................................. 74 7.10 Plans for further development......................................................................................... 74 8. CONTINUING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT (CPD) PROVISION ...........................................76 8.1 Professional Doctorate Programme.................................................................................. 76 8.2 Strengths..................................................................................................................... 77 8.3 Limitations .................................................................................................................. 77 8.4 Plans for Further Development........................................................................................ 77 9. RESEARCHSTUDENTS .......................................................................................................................................78 9.1 Postgraduate Research Students ...................................................................................... 78 9.2 Culture and Structure .................................................................................................... 78 9.3 Strengths..................................................................................................................... 79 9.4 Limitations .................................................................................................................. 79 9.5 Plans for Further Development........................................................................................ 79 10. SUPPORT DEPARTMENTS ENGAGEMENT WITH HSC ..........................................................................80 10.1 Library ....................................................................................................................... 80 10.2 IT Services .................................................................................................................. 80 10.3 Registry ...................................................................................................................... 80 10.4 Students Association...................................................................................................... 81 11. CONCLUSION..........................................................................................................................................................82
  • 40. Appendix 3 38 NOTES FOR REVIEWERS 1. The School of Health and Social Care is responsible for the University's provision within the Allied Health and Social Work Professions. Our forward looking approach is concerned with the evolution of the School and in maintaining and improving the quality of learning, teaching and research, focussing particularly on the student learning experience. The scope of this Self Evaluation Document (SED) is particularly focused on the Schools development since the last ELISR in 2004. 2. Together with this SED we have provided a Generic Information Document [4]. This brings together information on the School provision which is relevant to both Internal Subject Review and the Approval and Re-approval Events set to take place between the 11th–13th March 2009. The generic material includes the School Governance Document, a Resource Statement, a Glossary of Acronyms and CVs of the staff. The documentation relating to the undergraduate, pre-registration and postgraduate pre-registration programmes has been provided to inform this event. Following the re-approval event feedback from the panels will be collated and provided to the ELISR panel prior to the 25th March (Day 1 ELISR event). 3. The structure of this SED is based on the Enhancement Led Internal Subject Review process originally approved by Senate in December 2003. Amendments recommended by the Scottish Funding Council were approved by Academic Practice Committee November 2008 and have been incorporated into this document. 4. The numbers in square brackets ([ ]) are references to the relevant documents listed in Appendix I in numeric order as encountered in this Self Evaluation Document. This material is available on request. 5. The Self Evaluation Document and the supporting documentation reflect the need to develop a ‘right touch’ quality enhancement process for Higher Education in Scotland. The document is therefore as succinct as was reasonably possible.
  • 41. Appendix 3 39 Introduction The School of Health and Social Care (HSC) was created in August 2002 and brought together five Divisions concerned with the teaching and research of professional practice in the areas of Occupational Therapy, Physiotherapy, Podiatry, Radiography and Social Work. This configuration has allowed the School to respond to the changing face and requirements of a dynamic health and social care sector. Since the 2004 Enhancement Led Internal Subject Review the School has gone from strength to strength developing a sound underpinning in learning and teaching as well as enhancing its research portfolio considerably. The actions which arose from the previous ELISR were addressed in a timely fashion setting the foundation for future enhancement activities and facilitating the School in developing policies and procedures designed to enhance the student learning experience of all its students. The School has taken a proactive approach with regards to anticipated changes and works closely with colleagues at Government, Local Authority and NHS Board level in areas such as curriculum development and workforce planning, while also taking cognisance of the fact that the NHS and Local Authorities are not the only employers of the School’s graduates. The School has consolidated its pre-registration undergraduate numbers, due to placement availability for practice learning and is holding steady at 1116. Post graduate student numbers have grown in line with the needs of employers in Health and Social Care, NHS Education Scotland and Professional requirements resulting in an expanding postgraduate pre-registration and Continuing Professional Development (CPD) portfolio. We are responsive to changes and are proactive in respect to identified and anticipated developments in Health and Social Care and in Higher Education. We respond to the workforce needs of the National Health Service and Social Care sectors and develop skilled practitioners capable of entering their chosen professions prepared for the challenges which face them after qualification. The School has developed modern curricula designed to anticipate future professional needs. In addition, our graduates acquire a broad range of transferable skills when studying on HSC programmes and these skills facilitate graduates seeking employment in other “non-traditional” roles. We believe our strengths are:  A professional, committed, enthusiastic and responsive staff group “A variety of assessments are used throughout this course. There are several assessments which have been changed over the years to reflect current practice and ways of working. It is encouraging to see child protection issues being addressed and taught in the curriculum. Reflective practice is also increasing evident in the assignments given as are current professional issues. This all makes for a well rounded practitioner. I would like to commend the staff for their approach and hard work”. Dr Michaela Davis 2008, External Assessor. [1]  Programmes appropriate to the needs of graduates and professionals in Health and Social Care.  Consistent achievement in responding to the School’s quality enhancement plans and the University's continuous quality improvement strategies.  A proven track record of engaging with students and developing strategies for motivating students and enhancing professional attributes.  Active engagement between staff and students to achieve participation and partnership in the learning process.
  • 42. Appendix 3 40  High quality Learning Teaching and Assessment strategies which enhance the student learning experience.  High quality applied research.  Commitment to interprofessional working and learning. We recognise that there are some areas where we can develop and improve:  We will continue to develop our entrepreneurial activities, building upon existing good links with employers and professional bodies.  We will build on current systems of student representation to encourage more effective student engagement in policy processes within the School.  The School has made some progress in developing international links and in reviewing the curricula to reflect appropriate international dimensions. The School recognises, however, that ‘Internationalisation’ is an area for enhancement which will strengthen the School’s ability to meet the GCU LTAS objectives [11], encouraging all students to develop the knowledge and skills to become global citizens.  Although the School has embraced new technologies in learning and teaching, this is an area of planned investment and development.
  • 43. Appendix 3 41 1. Overall Aims of the Subject Provision The aims of the School are entirely consistent with the University goals and mission [2]. The core values of the 2015 vision are:  Excellence: valuing the highest standards in learning, teaching, research and the dissemination of knowledge.  Achievement: supporting each student to achieve his or her maximum potential.  Leadership: encouraging the development of leadership skills in all staff and students.  Trust and Honesty: acting with integrity in all relationships and interactions within and outside the University.  Diversity: embracing differences in decision-making and approach.  Courage: embracing change. The key principles guiding its operation are:  Equality of Opportunity: promoting social inclusion and social justice.  Good Citizenship: promoting civic society and respect for others at home and abroad, and developing the social capital of the University.  Partnership & Co-operative Working: working with others to achieve results, to maximise impact and to add value to the work that it does.  Good Governance: being accountable, fair and efficient in all that it does.  Accessibility & Approachability: being open and welcoming. 1.1 The School of Health and Social Care - Provision within the Subject Area The School of Health and Social Care (HSC) is committed to excellence in learning and teaching at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels and strives to develop skilled and effective practitioners who understand the distinctive contribution that they as professionals can make to society. The professional programmes provide students with a clear vision of team-working and the goals and benefits of collaborative working in health and social care. Graduates from all programmes will be equipped with a range of transferable skills acquired through in-depth study in a variety of settings and will be capable of assuming leadership roles. Initiating and expressing ideas and perceiving and acting upon the health and social needs of individuals and society are core attributes of HSC graduates. The School offers a range of programmes at both undergraduate and postgraduate level, on both a full and part-time basis. Postgraduate education opportunities for health and social care professionals are offered at a range of levels, including CPD short courses, Masters’ and Doctoral level. We acknowledge and value diversity in our staff, in our students and in the learning experiences provided within and out with the School. The School is committed to staff development and supports a number of staff studying at masters’ and doctoral levels. The School is committed to developing high quality research, related to academic and professional disciplines and to exploiting opportunities for interdisciplinary research [3]. Research is an essential activity in an academic department and is required to underpin all undergraduate and postgraduate programmes. The School’s research activity impacts both indirectly and directly upon taught programmes. The vision of the School is a partnership with clear linkages between research and teaching.
  • 44. Appendix 3 42 The School has pioneered a number of UK and world first programme developments both at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. These have included the first BSc Honours Physiotherapy programme in the UK, the first UK Master’s pre-registration programmes in Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy and a world first Master’s degree in Podiatric Surgery. The profile of the academic staff ensures the school has strong presence across a range of national and international specialist groups, which directly influence the development of health policy and professional frameworks. Furthermore, the staff are active members of the relevant regulatory and professional bodies governing their professions, ensuring programmes remain at the forefront of health and social care education. Programmes within the School are characterised by rigorous academic standards, learner- oriented objectives, flexibility and relevance to professional practice. The School management systems support agreed priorities in enhancing the learning experience of students and ensure the resources to sustain these. 1.2 Objectives  To promote excellence in learning and teaching at undergraduate and postgraduate levels.  To ensure that all students receive high quality education consistent with lifelong learning.  To undertake high quality research to underpin learning and teaching, knowledge transfer and continuous professional development.  To respond to the University's strategies for widening access and participation.  To provide students with a supportive environment, responsive to their learning needs.  To pioneer interprofessional and profession-specific developments in Health and Social Care.  To encourage and provide staff development opportunities to address the needs of the School and the aspirations of staff. 1.3 Student and Staff Information Information about student numbers and staff is provided in the School of Health and Social Care Generic Information Document [4]. 1.4 Knowledge exchange The School invested in the post of Head of Recruitment and External Development, to formalise and streamline its efforts in the areas of Recruitment, Knowledge Transfer and Commercialisation. The School’s previous activities in these areas were fragmented and not always the most cost efficient. While taking cognisance of the financial restraints of the majority of the School’s customers i.e. public sector bodies, the School has looked to develop business models to allow CPD, consultancy and other activities to be carried out in the most cost efficient manner. As a result of this there have been some occasions where requests to carry out consultancy or develop programmes have had to be turned down as the funds available did not cover the costs of the School and it would not have been financially prudent to continue. A balance has had to be struck between engaging in cost neutral activities and rejecting opportunities where the School would not at any point break even; such decision making has meant a culture change within some areas of the School. 1.4 Strengths
  • 45. Appendix 3 43 In relation to the overall objectives of our subject provision, our strengths as noted within External Assessor reports include:  Staff skills in delivering high quality learning and teaching opportunities.  Professional, supportive, committed and enthusiastic teaching teams.  Comprehensive learning experience provided to students.  Excellent student support and supervision.  Excellent relationships with professional, statutory and regulatory bodies.  Existing and developing partnerships with employers and practitioners.  The motivation of academic, administrative and technical staff to ensure high standards in all aspects of our provision.  The social and professional relevance of our programmes. 1.5 Limitations  The nature of professional programmes which are intense in their demands on staff time.  Conflicting demands of undertaking high quality teaching, high quality research and external developments.  Availability of practice education placements in partner organisations.  Internationalisation of school activities. 1.6 Plans for Further Development  To establish a world centre in motion analysis research - HSC and our collaborators (within and outwith GCU) require a world class research facility that meets the expectations of our funders and partners and the needs of our expanding research portfolio. We now aim to establish state of the art laboratory facilities. Current laboratory facilities are used extensively throughout the year for both teaching and research purposes, and, at present, research growth in this area is curtailed by a lack of access to appropriate facilities.  In addition, due the expanding number of PhD students and Research Fellows, pressures are growing with regard to office accommodation. Addressing these areas is a key priority for development in order to meet our current and predicted research needs.  To extend the portfolio of the School in relevant areas such as interprofessional
  • 46. Appendix 3 44 2 Intended Learning Outcomes Programmes are developed at undergraduate, postgraduate, research and CPD levels to enable students to engage in both professional and personal development. The design, content and delivery of these programmes aim to support the development of the necessary, knowledge, skills and leadership capabilities required by health and social care professionals. Learning outcomes are designed within taught programmes to produce graduates who recognise the expectations of their chosen profession, who possess the necessary up-to-date knowledge, skills, and values and who are able to effectively integrate theory and practice. They are planned to provide progressive intellectual challenge and stimulation appropriate to the relevant level(s) of study [1]. Curricula, including learning outcomes, are constructed to meet the standards of key stakeholders including the relevant professional and statutory bodies [5]. Learning outcomes are also linked to QAA subject benchmark statements [6], regulatory body standards of practice [7] and the level descriptors outlined in the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework [8]. Programmes are clearly specified in these terms at the appropriate level in programme documentation [9]. The provision of clear learning outcomes is highlighted within the External Assessors reports [1]. Principles of constructive alignment are consistently used in curriculum design to ensure effective links are made between learning outcomes, assessment tasks and learning and teaching methods in ways that are meaningful to students. [Evidence is provided in the programme specifications, module packs and module descriptors]. 2.1 Key Learning Outcomes The currency and relevance of the aims, objectives and outcomes for each programme are reviewed regularly through a partnership approach which includes external partners, students, service users and staff. In all pre-registration programmes the intended learning outcomes reflect the aims of the programmes and include:  Knowledge and skill development.  The integration of theory and practice.  The assessment of competence in practice.  Critical thinking, reflection and reasoning.  Interprofessional learning and working. In pre-registration MSc programmes and our post registration education provision, learning outcomes build on students’ existing experience and qualifications with additional emphasis on skills of critical enquiry and research, the development of personal and professional confidence and, where appropriate, the promotion of abilities to challenge, lead and innovate within the professions.
  • 47. Appendix 3 45 2.2 Practice Relevance The continued relevance of the aims, objectives and learning outcomes for each programme are maintained by regular dialogue between School staff and practice educators, managers, employers, professional bodies and regulatory bodies. Practice based learning is an integral feature of all pre-registration programmes accounting for 120 of the 480 credits achieved at undergraduate level. In the Masters pre-registration programmes, practice education accounts for between 30-50% of student learning time. 2.3 Interprofessional Learning The School of Health and Social Care (HSC) has a proven track record of success in the field of Interprofessional Education (IPE) (McFadyen et al, 2007, 2008). Building the essential skills and attributes that are necessary components of competencies required for all health and social care professions to successfully engage in interprofessional learning and working is the key focus of IPE. Students acquire these through participating in learning methods based on interdisciplinary teamwork; skills and knowledge gained in IPE learning situations are transferable to a variety of complex health care issues. The School has been a driving force in pioneering two key initiatives in the University – Interprofessional Education at undergraduate level and the Professional Doctorate for Health & Social Care Professionals, at postgraduate level. The IPE initiative not only involves colleagues and students from across the University but also in other higher education institutions. The professional doctorate programme is delivered collaboratively with colleagues from across the institution. The School is at the forefront of developments in Scotland in the field of interprofessional education and collaboration for effective teamwork among health and social care workers. It has led the development and introduction of programmes directed at innovative learning, collaborative research and best practice which address the requirements of all the professions involved. The School has now moved this approach one stage further with a planned IPE framework spanning all four levels of the programmes hosted by HSC. The Year 1 module with partner organisations will continue, as will the theme days in levels 2 and 3; but in addition 4 new modules have been developed to engage students in learning and working interprofessionally across their programme. The modules will be delivered on an interprofessional education basis and cover key areas of the curriculum. The modules are as follows: Foundations for Practice in Care (Year 1) People, Society and Practice (Year 1) Research in Health and Social Care Practice (Year 2) Evidence Based Practice (Year 3) Understanding Organisations, Policy and Practice (Year 4) [10]. In addition the School has built on the successful implementation of themed days with the Masters pre-registration occupational therapy and physiotherapy programmes to develop interprofessional modules which also include social work students. These modules will be introduced following re-approval in March 2009.
  • 48. Appendix 3 46 2.4 Shared Understanding of Learning Outcomes Staff are conscious of the need to ensure that all students understand what is expected of them. Details of the learning outcomes for each programme are available to current and prospective students on the University website and in recruitment literature. Student awareness is increased through student handbooks, issued at the start of every academic year during induction sessions. Module handbooks, and practice placement handbooks, are provided to every student at the beginning of module teaching and practice learning and are also provided for external assessors, practice teachers/educators and clinical supervisors, where appropriate. Module leaders and module teams regularly ensure that awareness of learning outcomes is maintained through discussion in class and seminars. 2.5 Strengths  Realistic learning outcomes which encourage the integration of theory and practice are readily reported as a strength by the External Assessors to all Divisions “Assignments were relevant to practice and would help encourage students to reflect on their practice” Dr Davis 2008, External Assessor. [1]  Placement learning consolidates links between theory and practice in the workplace environment and builds good relationships with practitioners and employers.  High levels of student achievement and qualifications combined with positive feedback from regulatory bodies, professional bodies, employers regarding the quality of the graduates, provides evidence that the learning outcomes are appropriate to the needs of the health and social care professions.  Effective monitoring systems ensure that appropriate action is taken to modify and develop curricula, including learning outcomes, as part of ongoing module and programme development. 2.6 Limitations  Student engagement in the development and delivery of programmes could be more effective.  Service Users engagement has developed over the last 2 years but is not fully embedded in all appropriate activities.  Securing sufficient, appropriate quality practice based learning opportunities. 2.7 Plans for Further Development  Develop interprofessional learning opportunities for all disciplines.  Interprofessional learning across all levels (UG & PG) will be introduced, building on the experience of the implementation of the Interprofessional Studies for Health and Social Care Module in Level 1 [10], pending successful re-approval in March 2009.  To maintain and enhance the involvement of practitioners, students and service users in all aspects of curriculum design.  To further develop innovative learning opportunities and flexible modes of study across all programmes.  Development of a service user and carer hub to facilitate effective service user and carer engagement in programme design and delivery
  • 49. Appendix 3 47 3 Curricula and Assessment The recent review of the School’s portfolio has afforded the opportunity to embed the principles of the new GCU Learning and Teaching and Assessment (2008-2015) [11] and be implemented through the relevant School Committees and the School’s Quality and Learning and Teaching Plan [12]. This is addressed in greater detail in Section 7 of this Self Evaluation Document (SED). The learning and teaching strategies adopted by all disciplines focus upon entrepreneurialism, reflective thinking, reasoning, time management, creativity and critical appraisal skills. Feedback from students and external assessors confirms that staff have been successful in devising curricula to encourage ‘deep’ rather than ‘surface’ learning and in facilitating learning opportunities which provide meaningful coherence for the students [9]. The process of programme design is that of a developmental continuum with horizontal and vertical integration where the principles of constructive alignment have been used to ensure a coherent approach to curriculum design. The philosophy underpinning the assessment process is based on the concept of assessment as an integral component of a learning system, and that the various components of the assessment process are constructively aligned (Biggs, 2002). As such, there is clear articulation between assessment activities, the syllabus, teaching and learning strategies and learning activities assumed in the learning outcomes. Assessment formats chosen for every module reflect the primary knowledge and skills’ acquisition intended as a consequence of having undertaken that particular module. Through the relevant Programme Development Boards, programme design, approval/ reapproval and review are based on University and professional and statutory body requirements and linked to national and international good practice (QAA benchmark statements, etc). All pre-registration programmes are approved by both the University and the relevant professional and regulatory bodies. The currency of the curricula within our programmes is assiduously maintained in the light of developments within the relevant professions and government policy in Higher Education. 3.1 Curricula External Assessors reports confirm an appropriate and increasing level of demand as students progress through the levels of the programmes [9]. There is a progressively greater emphasis on student initiative to organise and orchestrate individual and group learning throughout all undergraduate programmes [9]. Programmes have been designed with gradually decreasing staff contact with increasing student independent learning as students progress across their programme from year 1 to year 4. A variety of approaches are used to facilitate students developing the necessary skills to be able to identify and address their learning needs [e.g. group supervision of occupational therapy students where students are encouraged to meet outside staff supervision sessions to facilitate peer support]. In order to meet the GCU LTAS, a range of learning and teaching approaches have been embedded within programmes, including interactive and keynote lectures, student centred open learning packages, learning portfolios, tutorials, seminars, seminar presentations, extended seminars, practical workshops, case studies, role plays, experiential observation/participation visits, task oriented approaches and reasoning panels.
  • 50. Appendix 3 48 Flexible structures for programme delivery at both undergraduate and post graduate have been employed to enable responsiveness to student and employer requirements. Where relevant, programmes within the School will consider admission to an appropriate point in a programme of study with credit on the basis of prior learning and/or prior experiential learning. Such learning may be certificated or un-certificated. Applicants wishing to be considered for entry via this route will be required to complete the necessary School and University documentation in order that the specific programme can consider the application. http://www.gcal.ac.uk/quality/handbook/documents_index.html QAA and University guidelines on accreditation of prior learning are utilised to support advanced entry to programmes, for example the part time advanced entry route to the BA Honours in Social Work. Postgraduate pre-registration programmes in Occupational Therapy, Physiotherapy and Social Work offer accelerated routes to professional qualification and registration in these professions. Learning and teaching strategies have been adapted on these programmes to reflect the balance between masters education and the demands of practice. Although conforming to SCQF and GCU masters requirements, these programmes extend over the calendar year due to the requirements of practice education. The Head of Learning Teaching and Quality is the defined School contact for all quality and continuous quality improvement activities. He/she is responsible for the consistent implementation of the Quality Assurance policies/ procedures of the University within the School, including consideration of flexible entry applications. Development planning for e learning and increased use of assistive technologies in the delivery of modules has been supported by the work of the SHSC Academic Practice Committee. An audit of e learning was conducted during Session 2007-08, the results of which have been used to inform the LTAS and staff development plans for the School. Additionally, cross-school sharing of good practice through working groups, school seminars, divisional champions and staff development opportunities have been introduced to further support student learning. Placement based education challenges students with the highest level of academic and intellectual demand and requires them to integrate theory and practice in the work setting. It is an integral element of curricula and requires students to learn effectively in practice, to demonstrate their developing skills, to reflect on practice and to become confident, professional workers with a range of transferable employability skills. Placement learning opportunities are designed and managed to reflect the professional and statutory body requirements and meet the QAA Code of Practice on Placement Learning, HPC Standards for Practice and the SSSC Standards in Social Work Education (2003). Academic and practice elements are integrated throughout programmes with opportunities to develop reflective and analytical skills through portfolio work, shared problem based learning and tutorials. These elements are designed to assist students in their transition to learning on practice and clinical placements. Practice is assessed against professional and academic criteria and enables students to demonstrate their integration of theory and practice. In implementing our traditional partnership ethos, current practitioners and service users, where appropriate, provide specialist input in all programmes to strengthen the integration of theory and practice e.g. visiting subject specialists. The addition of a joint appointment in Radiography at Consultant level further ensures currency of a highly specialised area of practice. Furthermore, within the Schools’ LTAS action plan [12], in response to the University LTAS (2008-2015) [11], a working group has been established to explore the creation of a national multiprofessional training programme for practice educators (in
  • 51. Appendix 3 49 association with University of Strathclyde and NHS Education Scotland (NES)), fulfilling regulatory and professional body requirements. 3.2 Assessment Assessment is an integral part of the learning process in which the experience of completing the work and receiving feedback from each assessment is of value to the students. Assessment formats chosen for every module reflect the primary knowledge and skills’ acquisition intended as a consequence of having undertaken that particular module. Although it could be argued that an element of examinations in the first year of professional programmes is designed to ‘test’ knowledge at the stage in the programme when professional ‘building bricks’ are being put in place, the assessment in the first year of the programme is never designed simply to test ‘declarative and or procedural knowledge’. It is structured in such a way that the students’ learning must be placed in a context. The employment of this strategy allows students to ‘construct’ their own learning as they develop their professional knowledge and skills base. This process is continued at successive levels of the programme as increasingly involved scenarios are produced for assessment. In this way, the ‘testing’ of the students’ ability to integrate knowledge with the competent application of skills is undertaken in an increasingly complex way. The use of this form of assessment allows students greater freedom to express different aspects of their learning and to demonstrate increasing ‘functioning knowledge’ which is an important pre-requisite for the professional component of their programme. The range of assessment approaches used include portfolios, poster presentations, group presentations, case studies, peer and self assessment, reflective diaries as well as traditional essay assignments and examinations. In addition experienced senior practitioners work in partnership with academic staff to support and assess student learning [e.g. Occupational Therapy project developments]. Students on the postgraduate pre-registration programme in Physiotherapy present their research findings to their peers, University staff and clinical colleagues at the Student Conference held annually in January. The SHSC Assessment Handbook has put in place rigorous quality procedures for the development, scrutiny and security of assessment documentation. Standard School feedback proforma and school-wide assessment criteria have been developed to assist staff in providing consistent, critical feedback of students work and are detailed in the SHSC Assessment Handbook. The proforma may be adapted by Programmes, for example for the provision of feedback on practice placements. Students are encouraged to meet with Academic Advisers to discuss their progress on a planned basis. External Assessors reports highlight challenging, varied, innovative, rigorous and fair assessment methods; alongside high quality, balanced, comprehensive, constructive student assessment feedback. Reports also regularly commend the high standard of the double marking/ anonymous marking system; alongside rigorous, transparent and consistent moderation of assessment [1]. 3.3 Strengths  The School has developed a reputation for innovation and creativity in curriculum design whilst maintaining academic rigour and fitness for purpose, practice and award [9]. For example, the part-time Social Work programme allows practitioners to study two modules
  • 52. Appendix 3 50 as CPD and then transfer the credit into the Social Work programme. Employers have welcomed this approach - it allows them to support social work assistant level staff and provides an opportunity for evaluation of their suitability, before funding them as part- time students. Similarly, the revised Masters framework is designed to facilitate learning (on a part-time and full time basis) leading to accredited awards, for those in full time employment in professional practice.  All Divisions within the School have developed part time routes through their undergraduate programmes to facilitate greater choice and flexibility for students than previously offered [Being put forward for approval March 2009].  Progression and completion rates for previous sessions (2004-2008) indicate that the quality of provision within the School of Health and Social Care is high.  School is proactive in the monitoring of student progression and retention to facilitate the development of timely interventions designed to meet identified issues.  Good progression rates across the School have been achieved through the commitment of staff and students [1, 13]. 3.4 Limitations  Staff time to provide appropriate student support, deliver high quality learning and teaching, engage in high quality applied research and external developments.  Use of assisted technologies to enhance the student learning experience is not exploited fully across the School.  Turnaround time to provide student feedback at 4 weeks is longer than GCU recommendation of 3 weeks. 3.5 Plans for Further Development  The School has a developing e-learning strategy to facilitate students’ learning and assessment and to allow these to be self paced within a more flexible framework.  Staff development in the use of assisted technologies.  School investment in simulated and virtual learning.
  • 53. Appendix 3 51 4 Quality of the Learning Opportunities The School continues to deliver high quality learning experiences for its students [1]. Taught programmes are founded on the principles of effective adult learning and provide environments which challenges and stimulates learners whilst assuring appropriate student support. The programmes promote individual and group learning as well as facilitating interactive multiprofessional learning and working. E.g. Social Work external assessor recently commented very favorably on the value of the group learning environment in the assessing and managing risk module. Foundations of interprofessional learning are laid in the IPE module in year 1 and enhanced by the mixed discipline seminar groups. The School has as part of the review of all pre-qualifying undergraduate and postgraduate programmes embedded the new GCU Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy in each programme [9]. The School will roll out the programmes over the next 3 years [subject to successful re-approval March 2009]. All staff within the School have a role to play in assuring the quality of the student learning experience. The ongoing monitoring of the School’s Quality Enhancement/Quality Assurance procedures and the quality of the student learning experience is a key function of the SHSC Academic Practice Committee (SAPC). The programme leaders are all members of the committee to ensure clear and transparent communication between the University, the SAPC and the programme teams in matters relating to quality and/ or learning and teaching. All Divisions have links with the appropriate Learning, Teaching Support Network (LTSN) and, for example, the Scottish link person for SWAP LTSN is a member of HSC staff. Staff are also active with professional and regulatory bodies and as external assessors for other universities. These positive links are used to assist staff in keeping abreast with current developments in learning, teaching and assessment within their discipline. While providing students with considerable support in their learning [includes Studies Advisors, Academic Development Tutor, Technical and Administration teams as well as general academic support]. Staff equally committed to encouraging and enabling students to manage their own learning. A range of strategies have been developed which seek to empower students to develop their learning skills. These include for example peer learning [Podiatry], group working [Physiotherapy Health Perspectives] and peer assessment [Social Work skills module], group supervision for Honours projects [Occupational Therapy], poster presentations, student led seminars, problem based learning [Radiography]. The School has not traditionally offered a great deal of Flexibility in its programmes but as part of the 2009 re-approvals part time routes have been developed to offer flexible study pathways for students. At post graduate/post qualification level however, the school offers significant flexibility in the learning opportunities available. The SHSC Masters Framework is a major example of this [14]. The framework utilises a block delivery pattern which incorporates a range of learning strategies including managed independent learning. Teaching blocks allow peer support and opportunities for networking appreciated by many professionals who reported that they had felt isolated in professional practice. The Framework enables the delivery of core and profession-specific modules and the opportunity to bring students from different professional backgrounds together at postgraduate level [15]. 4.1 Range and Appropriateness of Teaching Methods Across the School a range of learning and teaching strategies continue to be adopted to provide students with a variety of learning experiences. The approaches taken are not only
  • 54. Appendix 3 52 designed to meet the diverse needs of each professional programme but to also facilitate the successful learning of a diverse student population which include school leavers, adult returners, articulation students, international students and students with disabilities. A variety of methods are used to bring the student experience closer to the world of practice and there is an increasing emphasis on encouraging service user involvement in aspects of education. For instance, the Podiatry Division runs patient-led tutorials, the Social Work Division involves service users in class teaching within the skills modules, Radiography are planning service user involvement in selected seminars, Physiotherapy have service users from the Murray Foundation and Cardiac rehabilitation involved in student learning. Practice based learning constitutes a significant proportion of each of the professional programmes, ranging from almost half to a third of the programmes. Students undertake their practice learning in a variety of environments with a wide variety of client groups. The student learning experience within practice has a clear academic orientation and must meet professional, regulatory body and University requirements. The Practice Educators are educated prior to taking HSC students and are supported in their role by academic staff [16]. In addition regular update sessions take place between HSC staff and placement providers and educators. Occupational Therapy also prepares and circulates a Newsletter to keep practice staff abreast of university developments. All pre-qualifying programmes have established systems to prepare students for placement education in order to maximise their learning in a wide range of learning environments. A range of mechanisms are used to support students in their learning and assessment on placement. These include; dedicated Practice Educator, clinical module leader, academic link tutor, students’ studies advisor, Practice Education leads (in each division), on line discussion boards in blackboard and peer support provided by other students. Practice learning integrates theory and practice and enables students to consolidate their knowledge and skills in a real world environment. Students must achieve all of the learning outcomes required for professional practice in order to pass practice placements [9,16]. Students value their Practice learning experiences [17]. The School works in partnership with a range of health and social care providers allowing access to a wide range of placement learning opportunities [1, 9]. The School led the UK in developing Role Emerging Placements which allow students to learn in placements located in environments not traditionally offering health and social care learning environments and/or new areas where health and social care professionals can contribute positively e.g. Centres for the Homeless, Charities, Voluntary Organisations etc. Student numbers on Allied Health Professions programmes are agreed with Professional and Statutory Bodies as part of the Approval process. In part, the number of students we admit to our programmes is determined by the availability of placements and there is considerable evidence that a shortage of placements in each of our professions is a national and increasing problem, providing the School with an ongoing challenge to secure sufficient, appropriate quality placements. The School conducted a review of the use of information technologies in learning and teaching which although it identified significant progress in the use of for example the VLE it also identified a number of actions which if implemented would enhance the student learning experience [18]. The School has identified a minimum standard for all staff and has introduced staff development seminars to assist in achieving this aim. These seminars also allow the dissemination of good practice across the school. In addition when new staff
  • 55. Appendix 3 53 commence employment, an experienced member of staff, will as part of the mentoring process, support staff in developing the necessary skills. Innovative teaching and learning strategies are embedded within each of the Divisions and examples include:  The use of the Blackboard Managed Learning Environment (MLE) for self-assessment and independent learning in Physiotherapy  The Functional, Anatomy and Bio mechanics (FAB) IT package and IT based problem solving packages in Podiatry.  The 3-D Computerised Radiotherapy Treatment Planning system within the purpose built Radiography Unit.  The computer programme on social work legislation and the Community Profile Project in Social Work.  TRIAD – interactive anatomy and pathology teaching and assessment tool used in Radiography  Developing evidence based practice in year 3 in Occupational Therapy is linked to practice learning and delivered on line. In postgraduate, MSc and CPD programmes, negotiated learning and student led approaches are valued by students in enabling learning to link directly to work experience and in developing analytical and research skills to enhance leadership and professional practice. 4.2 Quality of the Learning Materials Programme materials have been designed to support achievement of programme aims, provide clear learning objectives and promote active learning. The quality of learning materials is the responsibility of all staff. Module leaders are responsible for developing and monitoring all aspects of the learning experience undertaken to meet the learning outcomes of each their module. I n addition Module leaders /module teams contribute fully to programme developments and reviews thus ensuring the integrity of the entire learning experience provided by the programme. Programmes are designed based around the principles of constructive alignment with horizontal and vertical integration clearly identified for students [9]. It is important that high quality learning materials are used to facilitate student learning and the development of learning within and across levels. The quality of support material is integral to the programme monitoring process. Locating responsibility at this level encourages the sharing of expertise and good practice between modules. Routine programme monitoring, module reports, external assessor reports and the Annual Programme Analyses provide regular feedback on the quality of provision [19]. All modules have Module handbooks which expand on the information included in module descriptors and, in many instances, provide detailed information on a week to week basis to assist students’ learning and preparation for class. All Divisions within the School make use of personal development planning with students. The uptake of PDP has been highly variable so as part of programme re approval PDP activities have been embedded within the programmes. Although the format and structure of these varies among Divisions, the underlying aim is to encourage students to be reflective, self critical and self-directed in their learning. For example in week 4 of the undergraduate physiotherapy programme, students undertake a practical exam. Feedback is provided very quickly and students are given time to reflect on the experience and consider how their learning strategies relate to the task, within Social Work PDP is embedded in academic and
  • 56. Appendix 3 54 practice based modules. We have also mapped out PDP tasks and developed checklists for studies advisors and students to identify the attainment of key outcomes. In addition the School is currently undertaking a pilot using two different electronic PDP resources i.e. Blackboard and Pebble Pad. The School is piloting before deciding which approach is most useful to students. Pebble Pad has been adopted by some Professional Bodies and, as members of these organizations, some students have used PP to develop their PDPs. 4.3 Effective Engagement and Student Participation Programmes have been designed using a student centred approach and School governance procedures encourage student participation at all levels [2, 9]. Strategies to develop students’ independent learning and to meet the university I-learn framework have been employed by all programme teams. Students are engaged in a wide range of activities designed to develop their skills as individuals and as team members and leaders, such as; group work, individual and group presentations, peer assessment, peer assisted learning, poster generation, practice based learning opportunities and the setting of independent learning outcomes in certain contexts. A problem solving approach is utilised in seminars and practical sessions at all levels of provision. Web resources, video materials and case studies are used to encourage observation, problem solving, analysis, critical thinking and reasoning. Students have to actively engage with a range of information to arrive at an outcome e.g. Social Work students engage with Clydetown a virtual resource to engage in real life scenario problem solving and Radiographers engage in real life problem solving in areas such as Hospital Acquired infection. As part of our commitment to improving progression and retention, the School appointed a Learning Support Tutor in June 2003 (which was later renamed as Academic Development Tutor following feedback from students who felt learning support was a term synonymous with poor images labeling students negatively). The ADT plays a substantial role in the school supporting both students and staff and providing an additional confidential route where students can feedback to staff regarding individual teaching sessions, modules and programmes. The ADT also allows us to identify any cross school issues to be addresses. The ADT works closely with the HLTQ and with the student representatives in the School [20]. Support or appropriate referral is also provided for students with disabilities. This innovative appointment has since our last ELISR been established across the university. The HSC ADT works collaboratively with the other ADTs and the Caledonian Academy to enhance student support and effective engagement and participation. Full student participation in School boards and committees is still not as good as we would like it to be but the School continues to actively encourage students to engage by hosting informal feedback lunches, appointing staff mentors and by working with the Students Association. In addition, the Dean has an open door policy for students. Students Association membership of School Board has been a very positive step in engaging with the student body. 4.4 Strategies for Staff Development The School is committed to the development of its entire staff and as such HOD and support staff Heads engage fully in the PAR process identifying staff aspirations and development needs. The School’s Staff Development Policy reflects University priorities and is consistent
  • 57. Appendix 3 55 with the University Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy [11]. It addresses development needs and priorities for all staff groups within the School and describes staff development processes to ensure the achievement of strategic objectives. New and part time staff are supported through their orientation by a mentor as well as receiving a comprehensive induction to the school. The School supports a number of staff studying at doctoral and masters levels. School staff are active and recognised members of their professional and statutory bodies, have appropriate teaching qualifications and have active research and/or consultancy roles within their respective disciplines. The current teaching qualifications of staff in the School of Health and Social Care are outlined in their CVs [21]. New staff, who are inexperienced are required to undertake the University Postgraduate Certificate in Learning and Teaching as part of their contractual commitment. A significant number of staff within the School are fellows of the HEA. Although a school wide staff peer support system for learning, teaching and assessment was implemented in academic session 2002-03 to support staff development and help to disseminate good practice this has not been formally reviewed. The School adopts a team approach to teaching modules to assure not only peer support but to keep module content and delivery up to date. If any part of the curriculum is taught by a single academic then an academic peer provides a sounding board and peer reviewer to prevent aspects becoming to insular or dropping below expected standards. This culture of module delivery by module teams also supports and facilitates the dissemination of good practice. Staff members actively participate in Organisational Development (OD) activities. In addition the School with OD support engaged a large number of staff in a mini change academy event to help staff develop new approaches and skills in managing change. These strategies were then used to develop a new integrated interprofessional framework for all pre qualifying programmes. This event was well received by staff and helped divisional teams move forward with their programme reviews. Staff development and engagement is facilitated and monitored as part of the PAR process 4.5 Underpinning of Teaching by Research and Scholarly Activity The School is fully committed to research teaching linkages being fully developed within its activities. The School Research Strategy states that every member of staff should engage in research and scholarly activity [3]. All staff are allocated a half day per week for research or scholarly activity. All programme teams take an evidence based approach to curricula design and delivery using most current research in their areas to inform teaching and student learning activities. This arrangement ensures that subject matter is current and up-to-date and that staff are seen by the students as leaders in their chosen field. Consultancy work by staff members who are seen to be at the leading edge of their professions is valued by employers as part of our partnership approach to education and training e.g. a member of physiotherapy staff is part of a team developing UK Respiratory Guidelines. Many members of staff are actively engaged in research directly related to aspects of health or social care [21] and this is reflected in their teaching. Since the appointment of a Chair of Health and Social Care the School has developed its research activity significantly. A number of strategies have been adopted to ensure research dissemination and underpinning of teaching. The Schools recent success in the RAE shows how far the School’s research has come. Active researchers contribute to learning and
  • 58. Appendix 3 56 teaching by providing teaching in their specialist area, delivering staff seminars and by disseminating across the School their research areas. To further enhance the linkages PhD students are involved in teaching in the School. A significant number of staff members contribute scholarly work to professional journals and books and are involved in influencing policy development at national level. Other staff members have involvement with the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network which is responsible for the production of clinical guidelines as part of the NHS Clinical Governance agenda. Many members of staff are also involved as External Assessors at other Universities and they disseminate examples of good practice to and from other institutions. All School staff are appropriately qualified in their respective professions. A number of staff are in shared academic/practice posts, and this ensures that links with theory and practice and credible and current for students e.g. Radiography Senior Lecturer/Consultant Sonographer, NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde, Podiatry, Occupational Therapy, Physiotherapy and Social Work all have lecturer practitioner posts i.e. part time staff in practice and part time in the School. 4.6 Student Workload Staff strive to ensure a realistic balance between module workload and assessment demands. All Divisions engage in programme and assessment planning, particularly at key points in the academic year, such as at the end of semesters. Student workload is reviewed at individual, class and programme levels. Student workload is planned at module and programme levels by programme teams. Staff are experienced in calibrating and reviewing learning and assessment activities within modular programmes. The majority of educational provision in the School leads to professional registration and these programmes have a statutory and professional requirement for students to undertake a set minimum number of practice based learning (hours or days). This is consistent with the University 2015 vision and the new University LTAS which seeks to offer all students real work related learning opportunities [11]. Staff have extensive experience of planning appropriate workloads within the context of practice learning to enable students to meet identified learning outcomes. In all learning settings, student workload levels are agreed and monitored. Discussion of teaching and learning strategies and learning styles previously took place during induction week with students being encouraged to seek early help from Academic Advisers if difficulties were experienced. For session 2008-2009 the school has implemented enhanced induction spread across the year to support student learning and to spread the workload for students. The impact of these activities is being monitored and will be used to inform next session’s activities [20]. An advantage of professional programmes is that staff and students develop close working relationships and any difficulties are usually picked up at an early stage. For example, student with a stammer when stressed was identified at viva during week 4 – strategies therefore put in place for all practical assessments and clinical practice well ahead of time to facilitate student successful progression, provisions made for student with dyspraxia, more recently, student with stress came in from clinical referred and seen by student counsellor within 1 hour.
  • 59. Appendix 3 57 4.7 Strengths  Staff in the School are strongly commitment to enhancing learning and teaching.  Integration of research and teaching strengthens the learning experience for students.  The School has an established culture, including internal and external academic and professional networks which ensures innovation and high quality provision in learning and teaching and relevant practice-based education.  All programmes within the School are subject to external scrutiny by Professional and Regulatory bodies which helps to ensure the quality of academic and practice learning opportunities.  Commitment to further developing the use of simulation and assisted technologies in all HSC programmes.  Clear focus to the educational programmes shaped by government policies and strategies  Currently developing a service user and carer network to strengthen programmes 4.8 Limitations  Staff development required to ensure all staff develop the necessary skills to take full advantage of new technologies.  Staff are working at capacity 4.9 Plans for Further Development  To develop further training opportunities for staff to develop skills and confidence in the use of simulation and learning technologies.  To continue to be proactive in developing innovative learning environments using assisted technologies and second life.  Staff development to support interprofessional learning initiatives.
  • 60. Appendix 3 58 5. Maintenance and Enhancement of Standards and Quality The School of Health and Social Care subscribes to the Glasgow Caledonian University Quality Enhancement Strategy, which focuses upon the student experience. The strategy is guided by five key principles which seek to:  improve all of the activities of the University which have an effect on the student experience. The University is therefore committed to the enhancement of learning and teaching, research and knowledge transfer activity, and the improvement of academic and business related support services in order to improve the experience of all stakeholders  assist the University in achieving its 2015 Vision and therefore will encourage innovation, responsiveness, and self-reflection by both students and staff and include input from all stakeholders  make the best use of staff competencies and skills, seek to maximise staff satisfaction, and link staff development activity to enhancement  maintain academic standards  identify national and international best practice and embed it across the University. A variety of approaches are adopted to ensure the maintenance and enhancement of the quality of the student learning experience; whilst providing a positive, enriching experience which prepare students for employment. Within HSC this is considered to be the responsibility of every member of staff and requires that staff work in partnership with a variety of stakeholders. The nature of the School’s portfolio means that approximately one third of all pre-registration programmes involve students undertaking placement education opportunities. It is therefore important that the maintenance and enhancement of quality extends to all aspects and is not confined purely to those aspects of the student experience undertaken within the university. An example of partnership working is the approval and re- approval of programmes which involves programme teams consulting with students, practice educators, managers, recent graduates, professional and regulatory bodies to make sure that students are not only fit for purpose but also practice and award. Quality enhancement and management within the School of Health and Social Care conforms to University Regulations and Policies as detailed in the Quality Assurance and Enhancement Handbook (Version 2). [First version approved by Academic Policy and Planning Committee on behalf of Senate, February 2005; Version 2 approved by Academic Policy Committee, February 2008]. The School Governance Document [2] is consistent with these policies and provides details of appropriate implementation mechanisms. 5.1 Quality Assurance and Enhancement Processes The School quality assurance structures, processes and procedures are regularly reviewed within the School. Key staff involved in quality assurance and enhancement include the Head of Learning Teaching and Quality, the Programme Leaders, Heads of Division, Administration staff and students. The School’s Academic Practice Committee (APC) is responsible not only for monitoring quality and standards, as laid out in the GCU Quality procedures, but also for leading academic debate and discussion regarding learning, teaching, assessment and the overall student experience [2]. Any revisions to School Quality Assurance and Enhancement procedures are agreed, approved and monitored by APC, the
  • 61. Appendix 3 59 School Management Team (SMT) and School Board. In addition learning, teaching, assessment and ‘Quality’ feature highly within the annual School plan, thus ensuring actions, planned developments and responsibilities are clearly identified and contribute fully to the vision of the School. 5.2 Professional Responsibilities In addition to being fit for award, professional programmes have a responsibility to ensure that graduates are fit for practice and eligible for professional registration. Eligibility to apply for registration as qualified practitioners occurs only on successful completion of all aspects and requirements of the programmes. In addition within Social Work, all students must be registered with the Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC) throughout their programme of study. As per Government Legislation all students within HSC studying on programmes which confer eligibility to work within the health and social care sector require on admission to be subject to Scottish Enhanced Disclosure (or equivalent). The arrangements for this are currently under review but to date the School has been fully compliant. All applicants to School programmes which lead to a qualification in a Healthcare setting should be immunised against Hepatitis B (HBV) before commencing on their programme and their response to the vaccine should also be checked. Evidence of immunity will be required by the programme organiser before practice education components can be undertaken. If a student is found to be a carrier of HBV, the application and potential implication for exposure to practice is considered on an individual basis by the programme concerned. A recent government directive (2008) requires all Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) to provide health screening for all Allied Health students. This includes offering screening and vaccination where required to all students entering HSC health programmes [2]. We therefore provide access to Hep B vaccination and testing and offer screening for Hep C and HIV if requested. The University has also decided to support a prescribed Occupational Health Service (OHS) for students. The School implemented its Fitness to Practice Policy and Procedures [22] in Session 2006- 2007 and all students are provided with information about Fitness to Practice and Consent prior to commencing their studies. Information is also available on the School web site for both current and prospective students. The policy and procedures align with the professional, regulatory and university codes of conduct and university student appeals procedures. A health screening element was introduced in session 2008-2009 (forms part of the Fitness to Practice Policy and Procedures) to assist the school in supporting students much more proactively should they opt to declare a disability or additional study support to facilitate successful progression through our programmes. The new OH service will review Health Screening Questionnaires and advise programmes on the best approaches to support students through their studies. The screening questionnaire has been designed to be inclusive and not as a tool to exclude students from studying within the School. In addition the service will undertake vaccinations and take referrals from the Dean or Heads of Division on an ad hoc basis. The university is currently engaged in the procurement process. 5.3 Quantitative Measures Admissions statistics
  • 62. Appendix 3 60 The School of Health and Social Care is one of only four providers of AHP education in Scotland and in terms of student numbers is the largest provider of graduates for the health and social care services in Scotland. Admissions statistics and details of entry qualifications on admission are provided in the programmes’ annual reports [23]. Recruitment data reflects the University’s commitment to widening access to include non-standard entrants and mature students. A major change since the last ELISR is the gradual alignment between centrally held figures regarding recruitment, progression and retention and those recorded by the School. Although application rates have been down nationally to health and social care programmes, the School retains healthy recruitment and selection, with the average application to place ration being at 6:1. This trend has been true in all programmes with the exception of the BA Honours Social Work (where applications are continuing to increase) and these numbers reflect national trends in the decline in applications to AHP programmes, possibly as a result of the negative press regarding employment prospects. In session 2008-2009 the number of applications to all programmes was down on the 2007-2008 figures but so far for 2009- 20010three of the five main discipline areas are experiencing a slight increase. The final position for this year, however, remains to be seen. The School is mindful of the need to broaden the portfolio to include programmes that have a broader impact than the NHS per se. The School has developed plans to create general degrees in health and social care that will integrate with the pre-registration Masters programmes which provide entry into the professions after completing 2 years of study. The School has also received an approach from other educational providers wishing to relocate their programmes within the health and social care portfolio of GCU. The School is consulting with the Planning Office with regard to all of these initiatives. International Market Activity The number of non-EU international students registered on School based programmes is relatively low, but demonstrates an upward trend due to staff efforts to address this target. The School has however, through close monitoring noticed an issue with conversion rates - in fact for this current session 2008-2009, three international students paid their deposits but did not register for their programme of study. The school is actively engaged in a number of activities to explore recruitment and conversion, as well as off campus delivery opportunities to international students [24, 25]. One of the main constraints regarding numbers of international students (as highlighted earlier regarding general student numbers) are the availability of practice placements (lack of appropriate placements is an ongoing challenge for the School) and the number of places validated by the professional and regulatory bodies. The time to develop new or emerging placements is very time consuming and the Divisions have not been in the position to address this. The School is developing a placement data base and is working with NHS Education Scotland and service partner organisations to try and identify all potential placement opportunities available across Scotland. Additionally, due to the professional nature of the programmes within the School, where all of the undergraduate degrees are compulsory Honours programmes, there is limited business potential within the FTUG international market as it is difficult, in the extreme, to compete with the 3 year honours programmes in England. In an attempting to address this issue, however, the School is actively exploring the potential of establishing articulation arrangements with institutions in Malaysia and Singapore from where a number of students have previously transferred in to 3rd and 4th year
  • 63. Appendix 3 61 with successful outcomes being achieved. To this end the Head of Recruitment and External Development is currently working with the International Office to facilitate discussions with institutions and agents from the region, for example, Nanyang Polytechnic in Singapore. The Occupational Therapy diploma to degree conversion programme has been developed on line to facilitate international and home students who are normally in employment to access higher education. The School has also been successful in developing links with Canadian institutions to facilitate students accessing the masters pre-qualifying programme in physiotherapy. For session 2009-2010 (students start in January of each year) half the current cohort are Canadian students. Over the period 2003/04 to 2007/08, a particular success in relation to market demand is found in relation to taught post graduate student FTEs. Over this five year period to 2007/08 the School has achieved an increase of 139% in student FTEs studying at taught post graduate level. At PG level the School is achieving increasing success in attracting international students to its taught M level portfolio. A particular trend noted has been applications received for Pre-registration Masters programmes from Canadian students. In an attempt capitalise on this the former Dean and Head of Recruitment and External Development completed visits to institutions within Canada to explore the potential for the setting up of articulation agreements relating to these programmes and to identify any potential for other collaborative ventures such as student / staff exchange and research collaborations. Feedback from these visits suggest that at least three institutions have definite potential (and expressed interest) for such collaborations, namely, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Kings College (Social Work) at University of Western Ontario, Ontario. In order to target a growing market in international post-registration Masters education, and following on from market intelligence gathered by the International Office, since 2006/07 the School has undertaken work to develop a suite of full time programmes to suit international students at Masters level. These programmes are professionally relevant and tailored to the needs of international students, providing an international, Masters’ level curriculum which allows the students to study alongside UK professionals and other student professionals from other parts of the world. The programme teams have spent time working with colleagues from across the University to ensure the curriculum and support is appropriate. They have also drawn on the experience of other Schools and institutions to ensure the problems of poor student retention and success are overcome. The first of these developments was the full time MSc Physiotherapy programme introduced for session 2007/08 and the other full time routes in each discipline were approved as part of the Masters Framework re-approval event held in May 2008. These initiatives appear to be having the required effect in that the number of post graduate international applications received by end of April 2008 reflected an increase of 33% (n=20). This is due in particular to the early and ongoing marketing / recruitment work carried out by the School (with the assistance of the International Office) in connection with the aforementioned MSc Physiotherapy where 39 applications have been received which reflects an increase in applications of some 179%. The School plans to undertake similar levels of recruitment activity for the newly approved programmes. FE/ HE Articulation Articulation issues are addressed by admissions teams and include, for example, the collaboration between the Occupational Therapy Division and Langside College for the HNC in Occupational Therapy Support which can lead to advanced entry to the BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy degree. HNC Articulations also exist in Physiotherapy, Social Work
  • 64. Appendix 3 62 and Radiography, although within the health disciplines, very small numbers of students have been recruited through these routes. Longstanding articulations between Further Education (FE) and Higher Education (HE) exist for Social Work, which allows entry to year 1 and advanced entry to years 2 and 3. In addition, the School has a number of access arrangements with FE Colleges such as Cardonald and Stow and it is pleasing that students who enter the school via these routes have been as equally as successful as students who enter via standard ones. Equal Opportunities The School of Health and Social Care, in conformity with Glasgow Caledonian University’s Equality and Diversity policy, is committed to promoting quality, diversity and an inclusive and supportive environment free from discrimination and discriminatory practices for its students and staff. It strives to ensure that individuals are treated equally, regardless of their gender, marital status, race, colour, ethnic or national origin, economic background, disability, religion, sexual orientation, age or other inappropriate distinction. The School endeavours to ensure that no applicant for study is disadvantaged or discriminated against unlawfully and that all are treated on the basis of their relevant merits and abilities. Progression Statistics Table 1 demonstrates that School average progression and completion statistics for academic session 2007-8, across all levels were generally high, although lower than previous sessions. A similar downward trend was evident across University progression and retention figures. Within programmes, a decrease in level progression rates was evident across a number of programmes, most notably L1 and L2 BSc Hons Podiatry, L1 BSc Hons Diagnostic Imaging Science and L3 BSc Hons Radiation Oncology Science.
  • 65. Appendix 3 63 Academic session Level of Programme Overall Progression Figure L1 L2 L3 Final Award 2004-5 93% 92% 76% 100% 90% 2005-6 90% 94% 97% 97% 95% 2006-7 92% 94% 96% 97% 95% 2007-8 87% 91% 92% 94% 91% Table 1. Progression and completion rates for sessions 2004-2008 At programme level, progression and retention varied, details of all programmes can be found in [13]. Interrogation at School level of the progression and retention statistics has identified the reasons given formally and informally for failure to progress or remain on the programme. It is to the credit of the programme teams that few students leave the programmes for academic failure. Staff are usually aware of the reasons for non-progression of students on their programmes and regular discussion takes place at Programme Boards [26]. In the early stages of programmes, the main reason for withdrawal within SHSC is wrong career choice. Beyond the first few months of the programmes the main reasons for non-progression are financial, personal or health [13]. It should also be remembered that some programmes such as the Radiation Oncology programme statistics are affected by small cohort sizes. Module Statistics Overall Progression and Retention within the School remains at high levels, with a progression figure of 91%. Twenty six modules delivered this session had 9 students or less registered on the module. A pass rate of 90% or above was achieved by 80% (155) of all HSC modules (193). When the undergraduate modules are looked at separately then 90% (108 of 120) of those had pass rates of 90% or above. The proportion of all modules achieving 100% pass rate stayed the same as the previous session at 45% (86 modules). However, the proportion achieving 100% pass in undergraduate modules dropped from (55 modules) 51% to 46%. Modules with small numbers of students, such as those modules which were being run out this session, may have affected the statistics. It should be noted that the School of Health and Social Care hosts professional programmes delivered to consistently high standards and it is inevitable that some students will not reach the necessary standard to be permitted to progress, ultimately exiting with a licence to practice. Award Statistics Details and analysis of award statistics are provided in Annual Programme Analyses (APAs) [23] and Programme reports to professional and statutory bodies to confirm eligibility for registration. Table 1 demonstrates that a high percentage of students who entered the final level of the pre-registration programmes, successfully completed their studies. For clarity it should be noted that an apparent marked increase in progression rate observed at Final Award level for BSc Hons Occupational Therapy (from 88% to 98%) is largely due to the move to compulsory Honours, which skews the percentage when comparing with previous years. In the other programmes it appears that final award figures have mainly decreased, however, this is not a true reflection as a number of students had to retake practice placements, or to
  • 66. Appendix 3 64 complete additional professional requirements which could only be organised at specific times and thus missed the second diet assessment board. There has been extensive discussion and review of honours calculation within the School. Nationally within professional programmes there has been concern regarding the potential skewing of awards based on practice education marks. In addition External Examiners in Radiography have expressed concern regarding the current calculation method (taking the best 180 credits from levels three and four) and the interpretation of student profiles and mean [1]. The school has implemented a number of actions to ensure that practice education assessment is designed to alleviate this, however, during discussions it became apparent that in order to ensure a consistent learning experience for all students studying within HSC a common approach should be taken. This was further reinforced by the embedding of Interprofessional learning across all four years of all programmes [being put forward for approval March 2009] which prompted the School to consider parity for students. Feedback from students also highlighted their concern that all of year 3 did not contribute in some way to their final award. It was therefore decided to seek a deviation to the University Assessment Regulations regarding the calculation of honours for HSC students. The revised calculation takes into account the weighted mean of years 3 and 4, with a 30:70 split for years 3 and 4 respectively [27]. Graduate employment The first destination for the School’s graduates are analysed within the APAs. The quality of these graduates is reflected in the high level of demand from employers [24]. While traditionally the professions within the School have enjoyed near 100% employment rates on successful completion of the programme, these have dropped over the past three sessions, predominantly as a result of changes within the Healthcare sector, with fewer entry level positions being made available, despite the identified service need for them. Radiography and Social Work have not been significantly affected by this change, where Physiotherapy has been the profession suffering the greatest effect. The Division of Physiotherapy has, however, been working closely with Scottish Government and the NHS in addressing graduate unemployment with the development of the Physiotherapy Solutions Group. This partnership has seen new employment opportunities being developed as well as for the first time accurate data being collected at national level regarding the workforce. They have also hosted weekend skills courses for graduates seeking employment. The School in recognising the problems facing graduates has also undertaken additional activities across the School, including curriculum redesign to re-enforce the transferrable skills graduates have and open up the newer, non-traditional posts now available to graduates from our programmes. The School continues to encourage graduates to seek employment not only out with the traditional employers of NHS and Local Authorities but also the private sector, self employment and work overseas; a number of HSC graduates have gained employment in Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the USA over the past few years. The development of role emerging placements has also helped students to gain employment in non-traditional areas. The School has recognised the need for a new type of professional to meet the needs of the Health and Social Care sector and through the planned changes in curriculum looks to address this, producing a dynamic, entrepreneurial, socially aware professional graduate able to contribute to the economy at community and national levels.
  • 67. Appendix 3 65 5.4 Qualitative measures Direct Student Feedback Student feedback in different forms is a fundamental measure of the student experience of programmes operating throughout the School. Mechanisms for gaining student feedback on the quality of teaching/ learning experience across the School of Health and Social Care include student representatives on Programme Board, School Board, Senate, Student-Staff Consultative Committee, student feedback to class tutors/Programme Leaders and Practice Education Questionnaires. Class representatives are elected for every programme of study within HSC and play an important role in the quality assurance and enhancement systems within the School, providing valuable informed feedback on a regular basis with regards to the student learning experience and how it can be improved. In addition, the School hosts an annual informal lunch with student representatives from across the programmes, to discuss any potential changes, proposals being discussed and to identify if there are any issues not previously highlighted through the usual channels. This allows students to feedback out with their programme, facilitating students raising issues they may feel constrained in raising through their programme routes. This has proved to be a successful approach undertaken over the last 4 years. The Academic Advisory system is also a rich source of student feedback to staff which is incorporated into the review process. Students are encouraged to approach staff freely to discuss any problems with their learning experience. Many concerns are addressed in response to informal consultations. The School Academic Development Tutor (ADT) is also a rich source of feedback. Her cross school role has meant that students have felt able to raise points they may have felt reluctant to raise directly with staff. In addition should she be approached from a number of students with the same issue, she will arrange to discuss the students’ concerns/issues with the module leader or Programme Leader depending on the matter in hand. An ADT service has also been set up in Second Life to offer students an alternative anonymous source of help. Student feedback and response to any issues are detailed at length within each of the programme APAs. Examples of feedback leading to modification can be found within these reports and where appropriate, issues are also referred to the School Board. Student feedback is also gathered with regard to placement learning experiences. Practice Education Questionnaires are completed by students and also their practice educators and employers [17]. Module Evaluation Questionnaires (MEQ) Module evaluation questionnaires (MEQs) are regarded as a major source of information on how students are experiencing their learning environment [28]. MEQ feedback is used to reshape the design of module content and delivery; however, concerns have arisen regarding poor completion rates following a move towards electronic module evaluation questionnaires [1]. Programme Leaders are encouraged to remind students and module leaders about the importance of MEQ completion, but it has been acknowledged that this is a university wide issue. National Student Survey
  • 68. Appendix 3 66 The results of the National Student Survey (NSS) 2008, (for the School) were extremely positive, with few action points requiring addressed [29]. It is, however, difficult for the School to address accurately some aspects of feedback as the groupings which include some of the disciplines hosted in the School are in categories with other disciplines, making attribution of comments specifically to one discipline impossible. Anatomy, Physiology and Pathology (Physiotherapy) Anatomy, Physiology and Pathology had increased in the areas of teaching (97% as compared to 91%), assessment and feedback (68% as compared to 65%), academic support (91% as compared to 86%), learning resources (70% as compared to 69%), and personal development (93% as compared to 89%), when compared to the 2007 survey results. Anatomy, Physiology and Pathology were above the upper quartile for teaching, academic support, personal development and overall satisfaction; equal to the upper quartile in organisation and management and above the sector median in assessment and feedback Complementary Medicine (Podiatry) Complementary Medicine had increased in the areas of teaching (94% as compared to 83%), academic support (90% as compared to 86%), and personal development (86% as compared to 83%) when compared to the 2007 survey results. In addition, Complementary Medicine was above the upper quartile for teaching, assessment and feedback, academic support and overall satisfaction; equal to the upper quartile in personal development and equal to the sector median in organisation and management. Medical Technology (Radiography) Medical Technology had increased in the areas of teaching (94% as compared to 87%), assessment and feedback (72% as compared to 69%), learning resources (82% as compared to 74%) and overall satisfaction (91% as compared to 90%) when compared to the 2007 survey results. Medical Technology was above the upper quartile for teaching, assessment and feedback, academic support and overall satisfaction; equal to the upper quartile in learning resources and personal development and equal to the sector median in learning resources and personal development. Others Allied to Medicine (Occupational Therapy) Others Allied to Medicine was above the upper quartile for assessment and feedback and organisation and management Staff Feedback Informal staff feedback and formal module reports are integral to the monitoring work of the Programme Boards. Regular staff discussions in a range of contexts are used as a means of expressing views about the delivery, scope and future of modules and programmes. Additionally, in keeping with University policy, support departments are represented at appropriate Programme Boards. External Assessors’ Reports External assessors are appointed to all programmes in line with University and professional and statutory body requirements. New External Assessors currently complete an online University External Assessors’ Briefing induction and are provided with additional information and opportunities for discussion/ engagement by Programme Leaders. The
  • 69. Appendix 3 67 External Assessors annual reports are considered by the Programme Board and written responses are provided. The reports highlight many areas that are working well, and some areas for improvement [1]. In their reports, External Assessors regularly commend the planning and execution of the Programme Assessment Boards and the actions taken following their recommendations. Professional Bodies and Employers Views The School Advisory Committee membership comprises key external advisors in Health and Social Care. This committee provides relevant external advice to ensure that the core activities retain relevance and that the School maintains an appropriate strategic alignment, making best use of available resources. The membership of Programme Boards also comprises external, senior practitioners; who serve to ensure that curricula meet the needs of current practice. Each Division has a Practice Team of academic staff and professional colleagues, who meet on a regular basis and address a range of issues related to practice education provision [2]. Involvement with clinical supervisors, practice teachers, informal contact with placement employers, all indicate that the programmes are preparing graduates with the skills required by employers. Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy Implementation of the University Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy (2008-2015) [11] is addressed at School level through the School Strategic Plan [25], including the School LTAS Action Plan [12]. The School Academic Practice Committee has a responsibility to implement and direct, on behalf of the School, the University’s Learning Teaching and Assessment Strategy. Programme Boards integrate LTAS within programmes and analysis and action plans are addressed in the annual programme reports. Issues relating to the LTAS are addressed throughout this document and especially in Section 7 of this SED. Action Plan and/or Continuous Improvement Plan It is acknowledged that despite robust quality assurance and enhancement processes and lengthy discussion by programme teams, Module leaders have not consistently completed the module action plans within module reports [30] as required under the university procedures introduced 2006-7. On exploring this with staff, a misunderstanding and misinterpretation of the guidance is evident i.e. the previous system required an action plan only if module progression fell below 85% and as it is a rare occurrence for modules in the school to fall below this benchmark within HSC, staff did not appreciate that a quality enhancement plan was required regardless of progression statistics. This has been rectified and all staff are now clear regarding the new requirements. Heads of Division are monitoring completion of plans with their Programme Leaders. Programme Boards within the School also provide comprehensive Continuous Quality Improvement Plans which set out how the Programme Board will improve both the quality and standards of the programme. Collaborative Arrangements At the time of the last ELISR, the Interprofessional Learning Module for Year 1 students had just been approved for implementation in session 2004-2005. The module has developed
  • 70. Appendix 3 68 significantly over the intervening 4 years and now includes 8 different professional disciplines including Orthotics and Prosthetics students from Strathclyde University. In September 2009 Speech and Language therapy students, from Strathclyde University will also join the module at GCU. Interprofessional collaborations are also being developed in practice with for example, medical, occupational therapy, physiotherapy, speech and language and nursing students focused around stroke rehabilitation. If this pilot work proves successful then other collaborations involving different student groups will be rolled out. In addition other health programmes have expressed interest in the new IPE Framework as their programmes come forward for review and the school is delighted to work with colleagues from across disciplines. 5.5 Strengths  The School provides a high quality learning experience for students.  The School complies with the Quality Enhancement processes approved by Senate.  The robustness of our policies and processes has been regularly commended by the External Assessors, employer representatives, external visitors/partners and Advisory Committee members.  Student support provided.  Staff and students develop close working relationships as a result of the professional programmes delivered, with concerns addressed at an early stage.  All programmes within the School are subject to external scrutiny by professional and regulatory bodies, which assist in ensuring the high quality of academic and practice learning opportunities.  Administrative and technical support within the School supports the high quality of our programmes through effective communication and clarity of roles and responsibilities. 5.6 Limitations  Poor student response to module evaluation questionnaires  Despite significant in-roads in engaging students in School policy and processes we believe this could be enhanced further. 5.7 Plans for Further Development  To continue to effectively integrate all aspects of the quality assurance processes within the School in order to enable effective analysis and implementation of continuous improvement plans.  Monitoring of the Fitness to Practice Policy and procedures including development of the Occupational Health procedures.  Monitoring the implementation of the re-approved programmes (March 2009) to ensure the innovations in learning and teaching are successfully embedded.  General degrees in health and social care that will integrate with the pre-registration Masters programmes which provide entry into the professions after completing 2 years of study.
  • 71. Appendix 3 69 6. Quality Enhancement Planning The underpinning philosophy of the School quality enhancement planning strategy is the intention to improve the experience of students and to ensure that graduates are appropriately prepared for employment. We aim to identify and disseminate existing best practice for quality enhancement within and beyond the School. The curricula and student learning experience is developed and delivered taking full account of advances in professional practice, discipline evidence base, knowledge and understanding, employability attributes & skills, employer and other stakeholder expectations, within a both a national and international context. Staff in our programme development teams have reflected on SHEFC/QAA enhancement themes/ employers contributions and recent advances in practice in order to develop assessment policy and practice for the programmes currently being re-approved [9]. All programmes are fully underpinned by evidence based practice, thus ensuring currency of learning. The School is actively engaged in the Moving Forward Project and has already developed enhanced induction for all new students. In addition pre-entry activities undertaken in HSC for many years are now part of the Moving Forward recommendation i.e. Open Evenings for prospective students and their families, where staff not only inform prospective students about their programme, but answer any questions and concerns they may have. The students who assist in these endeavours have been excellent ambassadors for both the School and the University and we have received very positive feedback regarding both staff and students, and the format of these activities. Information on the background and experience of students on our programmes also comes from the Student Evaluation Project, a longitudinal survey of students at GCU being undertaken by the Centre for Research in Lifelong Learning (CRLL). Staff on the project team have been invited to School APC to disseminate findings and to identify any particular areas HSC should concentrate upon. The current review work in re-approving nine undergraduate and pre-registration programmes within the School, is an example of the implementation of continuous quality improvement planning. The rationale is discussed in greater depth in the re-approval documentation, but in summary, staff within the School are seeking to maximize new opportunities in learning, teaching and technology and to embed the new GCU LTAS (ensuring the i-learn framework is addressed), while preserving curricula integration and alignment and ensuring the requirements of the School, the University and Professional and Statutory bodies are met. Programmes will be reviewed during the 11th-13th March 2009 and a summary of the outcome of the re-approval event will be provided to the ELISR team following the reviews and immediately prior to the ELISR. 6.1 Planning Process The quality enhancement process is embedded at School and Divisional level. This involves the systematic review of the School’s achievement of objectives and targets and identification of the necessary resources. Although this is an ongoing process, formal aspects are regularly monitored by the SMT. Specific events and activities include Planning Days for SMT held at the end of Semester A and the Annual Programme Monitoring and analyses (including Quality Enhancement Plans) submitted in January of each year. The School APC monitors all proposed amendments to school modules/programmes and disseminates good practice e.g. APC members review and discuss the APAs of other programmes, thus ensuring transparency, parity of quality assurance and enhancement
  • 72. Appendix 3 70 processes and the identification of good practice. In addition staff contribute to Divisional objectives and in the updating/review of the School Plan [25], including the environmental scan and the SWOT analysis as required. The Staff Consultative Committee meets twice per session, although additional meetings can be called if staff have issues they wish to raise. This provides all staff with the opportunity to contribute to the operation of the School and acts as an informal forum for staff to raise pertinent issues e.g. staff raised questions regarding office accommodation, which was then followed up by the Dean and SMT; who subsequently followed up with estates and fed back the outcome of discussions to staff. Formal planning processes involve collation, via Divisions, of proposed or considered developments e.g. review of last session’s plan by SMT and identification of strategic imperatives for the School. School planning days allow for debate and discussion of all aspects of the Schools business i.e. learning and teaching, research, business development, programme development, external partnership, internationalisation etc. Key objectives emerge from these discussions and are positioned within the first draft of the new School Plan. Follow up sessions are arranged where the SMT review and develop the plan. The school works closely with its business partners in Human Resources and Finance throughout the year, but even more so during the planning round. Strategic, forward thinking has been crucial to the successful development of the school. 6.2 Programme Quality Enhancement Plans Quality Enhancement Plans were introduced in 2003 – 04 and the school is compliant with this aspect. The Head of Learning Teaching and Quality reviews all programme Quality Enhancement Plans and provides School Board with a report [31]. This allows issues which are affecting more than one programme/division to be collected and explored by School Board and recommendations are then made as to any actions required. Occasionally, University issues are gathered in this process e.g. several student groups highlighted the noise levels in the Saltire Centre and this was fed back to learner support. 6.3 Quality and Learning and Teaching Plans Although a positive outcome was experienced in relation to the 2004 ELISR the action plan developed to address points raised by the review team was monitored through School Board and the School Plan. All matters raised were addressed in the following two sessions which has assisted the School in developing a strong foundation focusing on enhancing the learning experience of all its students. Following the approval at Senate of the revised GCU LTAS the School LTAS Action Plan was developed and illustrates how the School will address the new 2008-2015 University LTAS strategy [12]. 6.4 SHEFC/QAA Quality Enhancement Themes The School/ programme quality enhancement planning processes and learning and teaching seminars are informed by sector wide developmental activities such as the QAA Enhancement Themes e.g. First Year Experience, Research Teaching Linkages, Employability. Staff and students within the School have participated directly in a range of events including focus groups and internal/ external workshops. One initiative, building on the theme of responding to student needs, has been the student mentoring project which is established in a number of Divisions. The Division of Podiatry
  • 73. Appendix 3 71 led by the previous School Learning Support Tutor recruited senior students as peer mentors for all Level 1 students and all direct entry students. This was seen by staff and students as a very positive initiative and the initial impact was very encouraging. A drop off in the uptake of this system has recently been reversed through engagement with the GCU Peer Mentoring Project. 6.5 Strengths  There is a strong culture of quality enhancement and assurance within the School. Significant numbers of staff are motivated to participate in relevant School and university initiatives.  Willingness to engage in debate in all matters relating to teaching and learning, research and external developments.  Established research culture with growing critical mass with clear linkages between research and teaching..  External Assessors’ reports are for the most part extremely positive about our provision and the experience of students. Their recommendations and requirements for development generally involve the sharing of best practice across the School/Sector and are addressed by Programme Boards [1] e.g. Mark Hulse 2008. 6.6 Limitations  The demands of an initiative driven system.  Previous lack of joined up approach to policy development and implementation at University level has left staff unsure of priorities. 6.7 Plans for Further Development  To continue to respond and participate SHEFC/QAA Quality Enhancement Themes and activities.  To incorporate appropriate quality assurance and enhancement developments into all programmes.  To actively seek ways to engage students more effectively in the formal processes of the School in order to extend the student-centred ethos.  Generation and dissemination of good practice  Further engagement with the Caledonian Academy
  • 74. Appendix 3 72 7. Implementation of the University Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy The focus of the learning, teaching and assessment strategy [11] is a commitment to student- centred methods and making changes to enhance the student experience in keeping with the SHEFC/QAA enhancement approach. The School is responsible for ensuring that appropriate structures and supports are in place to enable students to take responsibility for their learning, to adopt active learning strategies and to progress from dependent to independent learners with the skills and attitudes necessary to engage in lifelong learning. The School is strongly committed to excellence in learning and teaching. 7.1 The School Learning Teaching and Assessment Strategy The School learning, teaching and assessment approaches reflect the University LTAS and identifies implementation strategies within the School provision. The overall responsibility for implementation of the LTAS strategy lies with all staff, as well as the Head of Learning Teaching and Quality and the School’s Academic Practice Committee - which was amalgamated from the previous Learning and Teaching and Quality Enhancement Committees [12]. 7.2 Student Support In implementing the University LTAS the School acknowledges the diverse range of previous academic and practice experience and strives to enable every student to attain their highest possible level of professional and personal development. All the programmes within the School attract students from a variety of educational backgrounds, from recent school leavers to mature students, from those who meet non-traditional entry requirements and students who are disabled. Each Division also has a special needs co-ordinator [2]. Additional student support within the School is provided by the Academic Development Tutor (ADT), through group or one-to-one approaches. 7.3 Employability In order to ensure that SHSC graduates completing professional programmes are eligible for professional registration, programmes have been designed to incorporate credit rated work place learning. On completion of programmes of study, graduates are equipped with a range of transferable employment attributes which include team-working and leadership skills, communication and presentation skills, ICT skills, numeracy and literacy. Within programmes, students develop a commitment to continuing professional development and lifelong learning. This is evident in the significant numbers of our graduates who return to continue their studies on our Masters and Continuing Professional Development courses. 7.4 Personal Development Planning All students within the School of Health and Social Care are expected to engage in the Personal Development Planning (PDP) process. PDP provides an opportunity for students to develop their capacity for learning, through focusing on reflection, reviewing, planning and responsibility for learning. The key objectives of PDP can be summarized as assisting in the development of more effective, independent and confident self-directed learners; allowing insight as to the learning process and being able to relate that learning to a wider context;
  • 75. Appendix 3 73 improving general skills for study and career management; articulating personal goals and evaluating progress towards achievement and encouraging the development of a positive attitude to learning throughout professional life. As members of the professional graduate community, students will be required to undertake Continuing Professional Development (CPD) throughout their career and learning must therefore be viewed as a lifetime activity. The introduction of the PDP at the early stages of a career in health and social care prepares students for these requirements. A School strategy and template for Personal Development Planning is currently in place for all students (implemented Session 2004 – 05) [32]. However, in line with the new University LTAS, the School has established a number of working groups to pilot different methods of electronic e-portfolios/ PDP, which may also assist with student learning while on placement. Recommendations from the working groups will then be presented to SMT and School Board. In addition, the Interprofessional Studies for Health and Social Care Module introduces reflective practice and encourages a positive model for personal development planning. Currently, within each discipline, several modules incorporate assessment portfolios which require reflection on the skills linked to practice placement outcomes. 7.5 Careers Education, Information and Guidance Each programme has developed an employability strategy that integrates four distinct strands of activity across all years of a programme: learning, teaching and assessment strategies to develop independent learners; the provision of opportunities for reflecting on work experiences; support for personal development planning; the provision of careers information and education guidance. Each programme uses an employability audit tool to evaluate its approach to fostering employability at least once and preferably more than once, during agreement of approval. The School also hosts annual Careers Conventions/Workshops for final year students, attended by employers and some professional bodies. In addition, final year tutors arrange CV and Interview preparation workshops, which are well received by students; while informal opportunities to discuss career aspirations are provided by staff, including Studies Advisers. Personal Development Planning activities throughout programmes help students to prepare effectively for their careers. 7.6 Academic Guidance Students are appointed an academic advisor on commencement of their studies and tutors provide appropriate support on a regular basis. Additionally, within the School a full time Academic Development Tutor (ADT) provides confidential, tailored student learning support, with referral to appropriate services if required. The ADT adopts a flexible and shared approach that allows students to identify the skills that they would like to develop e.g. essay- planning, note-taking, interpreting coursework feedback, balancing university with work and other commitments and revising effectively for exams. In addition, students can also make use of the University Effective Learning Service, whether on a one-to-one, small or large group basis. The team provides tailored, confidential support on all aspects of academic study and learning specific to degree programmes. The service is inclusive and committed to providing guidance that meets the specific learning and teaching needs of all students including students with disabilities and those with dyslexia.
  • 76. Appendix 3 74 7.7 Student Induction/ Transition Strategy On first entering the School all students take part in an Induction programme delivered prior to the first week of their studies. This induction is an integrated activity incorporating university, school and programme elements. This induction serves four key purposes i.e.: social: to provide a welcoming environment which facilitates students’ social interaction between themselves and with the staff teaching on the programme of study on which they are embarking orientation to the university: to provide students with necessary information about the university, its facilities and regulations registration and enrolment: to carry out the necessary administrative procedures to ensure students are correctly enrolled on their course of study supporting learning: to provide an introduction to a programme of study at the university and to lay the foundations for successful learning in higher education. It is clear that in order for students to successfully move through their programme they must have a clear understanding of the requirements and demands of each successive year. In the School of Health and Social Care all programmes hosted by the School provide a comprehensive and integrated Induction Programme for all new students to each programme of study and a Transition Induction to all subsequent years. The School has for session 2008- 2009 implemented enhanced induction utilising a series of activities led by the School ADT to support student transition into and through year 1 in particular. All students have been issued with a learning portfolio which builds into a personal repository and resource file which will support students in developing their learning strategies including time management etc [33]. 7.8 Strengths  A very committed staff, who ensure high quality learning and teaching and a very positive student experience [1].  A series of systems designed to support students’ learning, with evidence that they work effectively [20]. 7.9 Limitations  A need to develop and strengthen strategies to enable students to establish greater independent learning skills.  A need to highlight to students their transferable skills, through linking with PDP and employability 7.10 Plans for further development  Review the School’s transition strategy  Continued engagement with the employability strategy  Increase/ diversify links with employers – voluntary sector, local authorities etc.  Explore the increased involvement of service users across Divisions, in relation to teaching and learning, but also at programme/ School board level  Explore the use of mobile technology in learning and teaching  Explore the use of new technology in clinical skills development  Revisit staff peer support in the School of Health and Social Care.
  • 77. Appendix 3 75  Encourage staff participation in the HSC Caledonian Associates and Scholars scheme  Develop the service user and carer hub to facilitate greater involvement of service users in the learning and teaching of students.
  • 78. Appendix 3 76 8. Continuing ProfessionalDevelopment(CPD)Provision Provision for External Stakeholders The majority of CPD delivered by the School is part of the Masters Framework [14]. Changes in regulation generated by the professional and statutory bodies in Health and Social Care and the strategic push in the Higher Education sector to encourage Universities to meet the needs of employers resulted in greatly increased demand for Continuing Professional Development provision and Lifelong Learning over the last four years. There has, however, more recently been a reduction in demand in some areas, mainly due to lack of financial/time support by employers e.g. two students have recently withdrawn from the Professional Doctorate due to lack of support from their employer either in the form of study time or fee support. In addition the recent global economic downturn is expected to further influence this area of school business. The School has engaged in a number of strategies to support CPD development, such as working in partnership with NHS Education Scotland (NES) to develop specific CPD opportunities in government priority areas e.g. Falls. The possibility of service level agreements as a way of supporting the future development of qualified professionals in a cost efficient way is also being explored. In addition the School has developed work-based learning and distant learning modules to meet the needs of current learners. Other areas of CPD include for example ‘Red Dot Study Days’ for Radiographers, Local Analgesia for Podiatrists and Counselling Skills which has experienced consistent demand for many years. These are delivered in one and two day programmes focused at particular disciplines. The College of Radiographers accredited Intravenous Injection course supports a range of departments across Scotland. Recent potential cross discipline opportunities have been identified in areas such as Sports Rehabilitation and Medical Ultrasound. The School developed a Practice Development Unit in partnership with the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Community Health called Caledonian Future Care. A Business Development Manager was responsible for co-ordinating and maximising the commercial activity derived from CPD provision. It has however, been decided to suspend the unit temporarily to allow the School to review and refresh its CPD provision to ensure market viability and potential opportunities are fully explored. 8.1 Professional Doctorate Programme A major development that illustrates the enterprising approach to learning and teaching within the School has been the Professional Doctorate programme. Approved in 2006, the Professional Doctorate, drawing on academic strengths from across the University has now recruited 38 students from across the health and social care sector, including University staff. This programme continues to thrive and is now receiving very positive recognition from employers.
  • 79. Appendix 3 77 8.2 Strengths All Divisions within the School currently provide high quality, appropriate CPD programmes as part of the HSC Masters Framework [14]. Customer satisfaction from current CPD provision has been extremely positive, thus enhancing our growing national reputation. The Head of Marketing and External Relations and HLTQ work in partnership with Divisions to support the development of CPD opportunities. 8.3 Limitations  Limited business management skills across the School, for example in Divisional responses to the tendering process and the individual skills required to successfully negotiate a realistic price which takes account of the current market forces.  Staff time available for development and delivery.  Inconsistent mechanisms to ensure that provision continues to link to employer needs. 8.4 Plans for Further Development  Review of Caledonian Future Care  Exploration of feasibility of Service Level Agreements with Health Boards for AHP CPD provision.  Exploration with Regional Authorities to identify current and future CPD needs of Social workers.
  • 80. Appendix 3 78 9. ResearchStudents The overall research activities of the School can be designated under the general banner of "Health and Social Care” addressing the major national and international priorities. The School operates four, interdisciplinary, active research groups – Musculoskeletal, Activity and Function, Neurological Disability and Rehabilitation and Gerontology. These groups are at different stages of development but they encompass the activities of all research active staff within the School. The School has now developed an international reputation in a number of areas and has built up significant research programmes with key research active staff leading growing research groups. Substantial progress has been made across the range of research activities within the School. As part of the HealthQWest consortium, we have achieved an outstanding result in the RAE2008, demonstrating the international importance of our research. Recent research awards which have included funding from the EU (3.7M Euro 13 multi-partner consortium) and the EPSRC demonstrate the outstanding relevance of research in scientific, clinical and commercial contexts. Pooling research partnerships such as HealthQWest and the Glasgow Research Partnership in Engineering have ensured substantial growth in School research activity over recent years. The School has a developing research culture and is committed to developing high quality research related to professional practice in health and social care [3, 34]. It is recognized that the growth in the School’s research activities since the last ELISR has been due to the implementation of a number of strategic initiatives by the School; investment by the School, engagement in the pooling initiatives and an enhanced research culture with supporting structures. The key is to move forward from RAE2008 and to develop all areas of research potential. The major factors contributing to the School’s success have been the appointment of lead researchers responsible for the development of research across the school, the setting up of clearly focussed research groups and the development of policies designed to engender an active research culture. Professor Malcolm Granat (formerly Associate Dean Research and now Lead Research Professor within the School) has made a substantial contribution to this ongoing development. 9.1 Postgraduate ResearchStudents Postgraduate research students form a central feature of the School Research Strategy and it is our intention to significantly increase their number. Support for research students is detailed in the SHSC Research Strategy and includes a Director of Studies for each student, who provides regular supervisory meetings, co-ordinates the supervisory teams and manages the project. Research students may also be involved in teaching on undergraduate programmes. The School recognizes the importance in developing high quality research capable of underpinning taught programmes and emerging professional practice. Research Students are central to these developments and the School is currently developing strategies to increase Research Student numbers as well as supervision capacity and capability. 9.2 Culture and Structure The Research Committee oversees all research within the School and all other groups report to this committee. The Research Committee reports directly to SMT. The groups which report to the Research Committee are the: four research groups; doctoral supervisors’
  • 81. Appendix 3 79 committee; grants committee; Research Fellows; doctoral students group; and various representatives from other groups such as HealthQWest. The Research Committee will continue to develop policies to meet the School’s research objectives and to enhance the interdisciplinary nature of the research culture. Some of the developmental policies and activities of the Research Committee have been: recruitment of PhD students; alignment of PhD projects, encouragement of staff to study for PhD or ProfD; the formation of Doctoral Supervisors’ Committee; the integration of all student research projects to our research groups; the development of a high quality seminar series and the running of our annual School Research conference [CORE]. 9.3 Strengths  An outstanding result in the RAE2008  A strong research culture and a commitment to developing high quality research  A strong Staff Development and Performance Review system where staff research interests and needs are identified and supported.  An excellent technical team able to support research activity  A growing number of Research Assistants and Fellows with a range of skills. 9.4 Limitations  The ability of the staff in the School to meet the substantial growth in supervision requirements at doctoral level.  There is a need to expand the skills of the School technical team 9.5 Plans for Further Development  Build on the existing research culture and structures  Develop a state of the art laboratory facilities  To develop an internationally competitive and leading research portfolio.  Promote staff development  Integrate research streams with NMCH and with the new Institutes as appropriate  To review School level support for Research students and to increase supervision capability and capacity.  To implement the new University research strategy through the revised School research strategy and to align the research outputs to be maximally compliant with the REF.
  • 82. Appendix 3 80 10. Support Departments Engagementwith HSC 10.1 Library The School enjoys excellent relationships with the GCU librarian services. The School’s key contact is keeps the programme leaders and programme team updated regarding resources and new developments. A number of core texts for HSC programmes are now offered online. The library representative at Programme Boards is very proactive in attending boards and in responding to any issues raised by students. The students have in the past complained about the noise levels in the Saltire Centre which has been fed back through a variety of channels. 10.2 IT Services The School did for a period experience significant issues with the IT infrastructure, mainly with equipment in teaching rooms not working or not being up to spec for the needs of lecturers. This meant that HSC technical staff spent considerable periods of time supporting staff by providing equipment and technical support to staff when teaching in rooms outside HSC. The upgrade of rooms being carried out over the last two sessions has gone a long way to alleviating this problem. The School has also withdrawn the issuing of equipment to staff teaching in rooms which already have university equipment in situ. Working in partnership with the Director of IT services the School has encouraged staff to report problems rather than asking HSC staff to respond, thereby allowing IT staff to have a true picture of issues in rooms. The School technical staff have also ran workshops regarding the new podiums in room for staff who felt they lacked the confidence to operate the equipment smoothly and within the time constraints of classes. The School does still provide additional support to external speakers as we are as yet not 100% re-assured that all room equipment will work and if an issue arises that timely IT support will arrive from central services. 10.3 Registry The School has been working closely with staff in registry as admissions procedures have moved centrally. The School had developed very robust processes for recruitment and admission which has helped to smooth the engagement with the new systems. The School actively engages with registry staff whenever the need to clarify academic points arises. The tight turnaround time for Graduation does cause the School some difficulties on occasion especially when completion of placements goes beyond the semester dates. The issuing of parchments for international students has been an issue which the school is discussing currently. Canadian students who complete the MSC pre registration physiotherapy programme in January are unable to sit the examination to work as a physiotherapist in Canada without submitting their parchment, a transcript will not suffice. This means that students are currently seriously disadvantaged in that they are barred from work until 7 months after completing their programme of studies. This situation will damage seriously the School’s ability to recruit international students.
  • 83. Appendix 3 81 10.4 Students Association The School seeks to work closely with the students association and the appointment of a student association officer to the School Board has helped this process considerably.
  • 84. Appendix 3 82 11. Conclusion This document concludes with a summary of the School’s plans for further action. Research  To establish a world centre in motion analysis research  In addition, due the expanding number of PhD students and Research Fellows, pressures are growing with regard to office accommodation. Addressing these areas is a key priority for development in order to meet our current and predicted research needs.  Build on the existing research culture and structures  Develop a state of the art laboratory facilities  To develop an internationally competitive and leading research portfolio.  Integrate research streams with NMCH and with the new Institutes as appropriate  To review School level support for Research students and to increase supervision capability and capacity.  To implement the new University research strategy through the revised School research strategy and to align the research outputs to be maximally compliant with the REF. Involvement of service users  To maintain and enhance the involvement of practitioners, students and service users in all aspects of curriculum design.  Explore the increased involvement of service users across Divisions, in relation to teaching and learning, but also at programme/ School board level  Development of a service user and carer hub to facilitate effective service user and carer engagement in programme design and delivery. Links with employers  Increase/ diversify links with employers – voluntary sector, local authorities etc.  Exploration of feasibility of Service Level Agreements with Health Boards for AHP CPD provision.  Exploration with Regional Authorities to identify current and future CPD needs of Social workers. Learning and teaching  To extend the portfolio of the School in relevant areas such as interprofessional working and advanced practice.  Develop interprofessional learning opportunities for all disciplines across all levels (UG & PG) will be introduced  Staff development to support interprofessional learning initiatives.  To continue to foster staff participation in cross-school/ university community of practice; to develop learning and teaching seminars for staff and students  To further develop innovative learning opportunities and flexible modes of study across all programmes.  Explore options for international exchange/ modules/ elective – both at undergraduate and postgraduate level
  • 85. Appendix 3 83  General degrees in health and social care that will integrate with the pre-registration Masters programmes which provide entry into the professions after completing 2 years of study.  Establish working groups to assess the use of e-portfolios to support PDP; to assess the use of assisted technologies on placement; to explore the creation of a national multiprofessional training programme for practice educators Use of assisted technologies in learning and teaching  The School has a developing e-learning strategy to facilitate students’ learning and assessment and to allow these to be self paced within a more flexible framework.  School investment in simulated and virtual learning  Explore the use of new technology in clinical skills development  To develop further training opportunities for staff to develop skills and confidence in the use of simulation and learning technologies.  To continue to be proactive in developing innovative learning environments using assisted technologies and second life.  Explore the use of mobile technology in learning and teaching  Continued implementation of HSC e-learning strategy Quality Assurance and Enhancement Processes  Monitoring of the Fitness to Practice Policy and procedures including development of the Occupational Health procedures.  To continue to effectively integrate all aspects of the quality assurance processes within the School in order to enable effective analysis and implementation of continuous improvement plans.  Monitoring the implementation of the re-approved programmes (March 2009) to ensure the innovations in learning and teaching are successfully embedded.  To continue to respond and participate SHEFC/QAA Quality Enhancement Themes and activities.  To incorporate appropriate quality assurance and enhancement developments into all programmes.  To actively seek ways to engage students more effectively in the formal processes of the School in order to extend the student-centred ethos.  Generation and dissemination of good practice Engagement with School/ University initiatives  Review the School’s transition strategy  Continued engagement with the employability strategy  Revisit staff peer support in the School of Health and Social Care.  Further engagement with the Caledonian Academy  Encourage staff participation in the HSC Caledonian Associates and Scholars scheme  Enhanced student induction/ transition strategy  Continuing engagement with GCU moving forward/progression initiatives  Continuing engagement with GCU employability strategy
  • 86. Appendix 3a 84 1 HSC External Assessors Reports (2004/5; 2005/6; 2006/7; 2007/8) 2 HSC Governance Document (September 2008; Version 8) 3 HSC Research Strategy (2008-2010) 4 HSC Generic Information Document 5 Professional and Regulatory Body Standards 6 QAA Benchmark Statements 7 Standards in Social Work Education (SSWE) / HPC Standards of Education and Training (SETs) and Standards of Proficiency (SOPs) 8 Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework (SCQF) 9 HSC Definitive Programme Documents (available in hard copy upon request) 10 HSC Interprofessional Education Document (Reapproval Event 2009) 11 GCU Learning Teaching and Assessment Strategy (LTAS) 2008-2015 12 HSC Learning Teaching and Assessment Strategy Plan 13 HSC Progression and Retention Reports (2004/5; 2005/6; 2006/7; 2007/8) 14 HSC Masters Framework Document 15 Framework APAs (available in hard copy upon request) 16 HSC Practice Education Guidance (available in hard copy upon request) 17 HSC Placement Evaluation Questionnaires 18 HSC e-Learning Audit (2008) 19 GCU Quality Assurance and Enhancement Handbook (Version 2) 20 Academic Development Tutor Report (2008) 21 HSC CV Documentation (available in hard copy upon request) 22 HSC Fitness to Practice Documentation 23 HSC Annual Programme Analsyes (APA) - (available in hard copy upon request) 24 HSC Marketing Strategy 25 HSC School Plan 2009/10 26 HSC Programme Board Minutes 27 HSC Programme Specific Assessment Regulations 2008 (Approval Pending) 28 GCU Module Feedback Questionnaire (available in hard copy upon request) 29 National Student Survey 2008 Action Plan (NSS) 30 HSC Module Reports (available in hard copy upon request) 31 APA Summary/ Quality Enhancement Plan Reports 32 Personal Development Plan Pro Forma (PDP) 33 Year 1 Learning File (available in hard copy upon request) 34 HSC Research Challenge Document (2009)

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