Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Powerpoint 1
Powerpoint 1
Powerpoint 1
Powerpoint 1
Powerpoint 1
Powerpoint 1
Powerpoint 1
Powerpoint 1
Powerpoint 1
Powerpoint 1
Powerpoint 1
Powerpoint 1
Powerpoint 1
Powerpoint 1
Powerpoint 1
Powerpoint 1
Powerpoint 1
Powerpoint 1
Powerpoint 1
Powerpoint 1
Powerpoint 1
Powerpoint 1
Powerpoint 1
Powerpoint 1
Powerpoint 1
Powerpoint 1
Powerpoint 1
Powerpoint 1
Powerpoint 1
Powerpoint 1
Powerpoint 1
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Powerpoint 1

483

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
483
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Animal research has played a vital role in virtually every major medical advance of the last century – for both human and animal health. Animal systems provide invaluable and irreplaceable insights into human systems.
    The use of animals in research is a privilege that must be carefully guarded to assure the continued use of this essential resource. The UTHSC has and continues to be committed to an animal program then ensures the responsible care and use of animals.
  • I am here today to provide you an overview of the instiutional program and resources, the pertinent federal laws, and the ethical considerations in planning and conduct of an animal activity.
  • Animal research at UTHSC is the responsibility of several entities at the institution. These components work in concert to assure compliance with Federal laws and the highest level of care and use for laboratory animals.
  • Research animal legislation came to being along with regulations relating to human research. In the mid 1960’s in response to a Life Magazine article on stolen pet dogs that were being used at a presitgious Medical School in the midwest – the public demanded action.
  • The Animal Welfare Act was passed and congress mandated that the Unites States Department of Agriculture draft regulations that would protect the animals used in research. Then again in the mid 1980’s congress passed the Health Research Extension Act that mandated that the Public Health Service enact policies and guidelines for institutions seeking federal funding of research involving vertebrate animal species.
  • All animal activities performed at UT facilities or funded by UT are covered by these laws. Even if UT funds are not used, the institution has to ensure that there is a federally mandated committee approving and overseeing the activity.
  • The institutional entity that must assure compliance with these federal laws – the go to jail guy – is Peter Davies. So he has a great deal of interest in making sure that all components of the animal care and use program understand their responsibilities and have the resources to carrying them out.
  • The backbone of the animal program is the federally mandated animal welfare committee. The committee is Chaired by Dr. Cynthia Chappell and coordinated by Catherine Sanders of the Office of Research Support Committees directed by Cynthia Edmonds.
  • As required by law, the committee is appointed by the President and composed of veterinarians, scientists, nonscientists, and lay members that represent the community’s interest in animal welfare. The primary function of the committee is to approve all animal activities before initiation, to biannually review and inspect the animal resources and program and to report their findings to Dr. Davies. In addition they must investigate any concerns registered by inside or outside individuals regarding animal care use, and, if validated, seek their resolution while keeping our regulators abreast of our findings and actions. It is a tremendous amount of work – but done by some very dedicated individuals who are committed to the responsible use of animals in research.
  • The means by which the committee reviews animal activities is by having the investigator complete an Animal Protocol form that you can find online. If this is your first time, please consult with Catherine Sanders in the Committee office and if the project might involve potentially painful procedures, you must also consult a member of the veterinary staff. Allow adequate time to prepare a well written and comprehensive document that reflects thoughtful consideration of the animal’s welfare. Approval is for one year, renewed annually for two years, and then expires at the end of three years. Changes to the approved procedures must be approved prior to initiation. Changes are done through an email to the AWC office, citing the protocol numbers, the propsed changes, and the justification for such changes.
  • In planning and preparing your animal protocol you must address the following ethical considerations:
    Is the cost to the animal worth the potential benefits derived from your study? Have your chosen the most appropriate system and methods for answering the scientific question? Seek the help of others in critiquing your plan, especially if it will not receive a formal independent review for scientific merit.
  • The people that will be involved in carrying out your proposed work should be qualified and trained in the methods needed to ensure animal welfare, as well as, to ensure valid results.
  • Probably one of the most recurrent issues that come up in the protocol review is the use of improper statistical methods for the type of study to be conducted. If needed, seek assistance from others who have more experience in study design and statistical analysis. If you don’t know of anyone – call the AWC office and Catherine can provide you some committee guidelines and references.
    The ultimate goal is to use the minimum amount of animals in answer the scientific question. Use the appropriate species and work with the CLAMC to assure the quality. Spending the time upfront carefully planning for all aspects of the study will significantly decrease the chance of animals being used without benefit.
  • When selecting methods for the conduct of the experiment, special consideration should be given to procedures that will minimize discomfort and distress to the animal. Such things as placing a venous catheter in the jugular vein of a rat, so when you do serial blood sampling the animal does not need to be restrained and poked with a needle. Or place an osmotic pump for releasing drugs over time, rather than injecting the animal several times a day.
  • But if your project requires potentially painful procedures, make sure they are performed with pain relieving agents such as anesthetics and analgesics. Furthermore, make sure the people conducting the procedure are well qualified, so the surgical intervention is done with minimal disruption to the tissues using proper aseptic technique. The veterinary staff should be involved when you are developing such projects in order to assist you in developing a plan for minimizing pain, distress and discomfort to the animals.
  • Some studies will result in unrelieved pain and distress, and these demand increased scrutiny by the Animal Welfare Committee. The justification must be compelling, the methods well proven and practices in place to ensure the termination of the animals as soon as scientifically possible.
  • Together with the Center for Laboratory Animal Medicine and Care the animal’s environment and well being must be optimal. Socialization and environmental enrichment enhances the well-being of the animals.
  • Along with these ethical considerations that I have outlined, the protocol must adhere to all federal laws, guidelines and policies.
  • The Center for Laboratory Animal Medicine and Care is oversee by Dr. Brad Goodwin and is
  • the centralized program for animal, housing, care and use at the HSC. We have a large staff including veterinarians and veterinary technicians to carry out our charge.
  • The Center is located in 6 UTHSC buildings as well as one, post-flood UTMDA resource. We are really looking forward to two new large resources that will be opening over the next year. In a couple of months the new animal resource located in this building will open for the housing of primarily rodent species. And about this time next year, the new centralized resource at the Medical School should open and occupy the 5th and 6th floors of the Research Replacement Building. This resource will be able to house the larger animal species such as monkeys, rabbits, pigs, and dogs, as well as rodent species.
  • Services and resources in the Animal Care Center extend beyond veterinary care and husbandry, including surgical resource and support, hematology and clinical chemistry lab, technical assistance, import and export of animals, transportation of animals and the canine breeding program.
  • Other HSC animal- related resources that you may be interested in include Rick Wetsel and Eva Zsigmond’s resource at IMM for developing transgenic and knockout mouse strains and the cryopreservation of embryos.
  • And the research dedicated MRI resource directed by Pan Narayana at the Medical School the offers noninvasive ways of assessing animal models.
  • Other instutional entities such as the Environmental Health and Safety Program, as well as, Occupation Health can assist you in the proper and safe conduct of your research.
  • The institutional training program offers introductory, species specific, and one-on-one training for all personnel involved in animal research. Participation in these courses is mandatory for all personnel listed on approved animal protocols. You can sign up for these courses by contacting the Animal Welfare Committee or Center for Laboratory Animal Medicine offices. These courses are offered monthly, usually the second week of the month.
  • The Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Programs at UTHSC ensure the safety and health of the environment and you and your personnel. Together the risks must be identified, the personnel made aware of them, and procedures in place to minimize the hazards.
  • All of these various components of the institutional animal care and use program is driven by the need of scientists to use research animals to assist them in unlocking the mysteries of disease.
  • This partnership between the scientists and the animal care and use program is an essential component in achieving this goal.
  • Thank you for your time and now I would be more than happy to answer any questions.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Responsible Conduct of Animal Research at UTHSCH Chris S. Smith, DVM Center for Laboratory Animal Medicine and Care
    • 2. Objectives  Federal laws  Overview of the UTHSC Animal Care and Use Program  Ethical considerations in planning an animal activity  UTHSC resources for animal activities
    • 3. UTHSC ANIMAL PROGRAM METRICS  2.5 million dollar CLAMC budget  15% of all active and pending UTHSC grants include animals  150 UTHSC scientists use animals  325 approved animal protocols  11,000 animals cared for daily
    • 4. Federal Laws UTHSC-Animal Care and Use Program Federal Laws AWC AWC Office Animal Care Program (CLAMC) Animal Care Program CLAMC Veterinarian Dr. Brad Goodwin AWC Office AWC Chair Dr. C. Chappell Research Staff Institutional Training Environ. Safety Occup. Health Federal Regulations And Policies Institutional Official Dr. Peter Davies R. Isaguirre Investigator
    • 5. Federal LawsFederal Laws AWC AWC Office Animal Care Program (CLAMC) Veterinarian Dr. Brad Goodwin Chair Dr. C. Chappell Research Staff Institutional Training Environ. Safety Occup. Health Federal Regulations And Policies Institutional Official Dr. Peter Davies R. Isaguirre investigator UTHSC-Animal Care and Use Program
    • 6. Federal Laws Federal Regulations And Policies Animal Welfare Act Health Research Extension Act USDA PHS Animal Welfare Regulations PHS Policy and Guide Federal Agencies Federal Laws Regulating Animal Research
    • 7. Covered Animal Activities  All animal activities performed at UTHSC facilities.  All animal activities, even off site, where UTHSC funds are used to purchase the research animals.  Animal research activity performed offsite without UTHSC funds, but not approved by any other animal committee.
    • 8. Federal Laws UTHSC-Animal Care and Use Program AWC AWC Office Animal Care Program (CLAMC) Veterinarian Dr. Brad Goodwin Chair Dr. C. Chappell Research Staff Institutional Training Environ. Safety Occup. Health Federal Regulations And Policies Institutional Official Dr. Peter Davies R.Isaguirre Investigator
    • 9. Federal Laws UTHSC-Animal Care and Use Program AWC AWC Office Animal Care Program (CLAMC) Veterinarian Dr. Brad Goodwin AWC OFFICE AWC Chair Dr. C. Chappell Research Staff Institutional Training Environ. Safety Occup. Health Federal Regulations And Policies Institutional Official Dr. Peter Davies R. Isaguirre Investigator
    • 10. UTHSC Animal Welfare Committee  Mandated committee  Appointed by the President  Composition of membership  Responsibilities  Protocols  Inspections  Concerns  Authority
    • 11. AWC Animal Protocol  Form available online  Consult with AWC Coordinator if this is an initial application  Final document must be comprehensive and well written  Approval is for one year, and can be renewed for two subsequent years, prior to expiring at the end of three years  Modifications of approved protocols can be done by memo
    • 12. Animal Protocol Ethical Considerations: Justification  Research should be justified  Purpose is sufficient to justify the use of animals  Model system is the best suited to answer the scientific question  Reasonable expectation that the research methods employed will provide valid results
    • 13. Animal Protocol Ethical Considerations: Personnel  Must be qualified through training or experience to accomplish experimental manipulations in a humane and scientifically acceptable manner
    • 14. Animal Protocol Ethical Considerations: Species Selection and Quantity  The animals selected for a procedure should be of an appropriate species and quality and the minimum number required to obtain valid results.
    • 15. Animal Protocol Ethical Considerations: Proper Use of Animals • It is imperative to utilize methods that will avoid or minimize discomfort, distress and pain, when consistent with sound scientific practices.
    • 16. Animal Protocol Ethical Considerations: Painful Procedures  Procedures that are known to cause more than momentary pain or distress, should be performed with appropriate sedation, analgesia, and/or anesthesia.
    • 17. Animal Protocol Ethical Considerations: Unrelieved Pain or Distress  Animals that would otherwise suffer severe or chronic pain or distress that cannot be relieved, should be euthanized at the end of the procedure or if appropriate, during the procedure.
    • 18. Animal Protocol Ethical Considerations: Environment and Well-being  The living conditions of animals should be appropriate for their species and contribute to their health and comfort.
    • 19. Pertinent Laws, Policies, and Guidelines  The transportation, care and use of animals shall be in accordance with applicable federal laws, guidelines and policies.
    • 20. Federal Laws UTHSC-Animal Care and Use Program AWC AWC Office Animal Care Program (CLAMC) Animal Care Program CLAMC Veterinarian Dr. Brad Goodwin Chair Dr. C. Chappell Research Staff Institutional Training Environ. Safety Occup. Health Federal Regulations And Policies Institutional Official Dr. Peter Davies R. Isaguirre Investigator
    • 21. Center for Laboratory Animal Medicine and Care  Centralized program for animal housing, care, and use  40 staff members including 5 veterinarians and 7 veterinary health and surgery technicians  CLAMC managed resources located in 6 UTHSC buildings
    • 22. Center for Laboratory Animal Medicine and Care  Present Locations - MSB/E - IMM - DB - Denton Cooley - MSI - UCT  Future Locations - BREF (2009/10)
    • 23. Center for Laboratory Animal Medicine and Care  Services and resources  Animal housing and husbandry  Veterinary consultation & care  Surgical resource & support  Clinical laboratory  Technical assistance  Import and export  Transportation  Canine breeding program
    • 24. Other UTHSC Animal Resources: Genetically Manipulated Rodent Models  IMM - Development of transgenic and knockout mouse strains  IMM – Cryopreservation of embryos Dr. Rick Wetsel Dr. Eva Zsigmond
    • 25. Other UTHSC Animal Resources: FMR Imaging Research Resource  3.0 and 7.0 T dedicated for research Dr. Ponnada Narayana – Radiology, MS
    • 26. Federal Laws UTHSC-Animal Care and Use Program AWC AWC Office Animal Care Program (CLAMC) Veterinarian Dr. Brad Goodwin Chair Dr. C Chappell Research Staff Institutional Training Environ. Safety Occup. Health Federal Regulations And Policies Institutional Official Dr. Peter Davies R. Isaguirre Investigator
    • 27. Institutional Training in Animal Care and Use  Coordinated by CLAMC  Institutional courses  Introductory  Species specific  Offered monthly  One-on-one training
    • 28. Occupational Health Environmental Health and Safety  Health and environmental risks are identified  Personnel are aware of the risks  Practices in place to minimize the risks  Procedures in place to monitor exposure and to provide medical intervention, if needed.
    • 29. Federal Laws AWC AWC Office Animal Care Program (CLAMC) Veterinarian Dr. Brad Goodwin Chair Dr. C. Chapell Research Staff Institutional Training Environ. Safety Occup. Health Federal Regulations And Policies Institutional Official Dr. Peter Davies R. Isaguirre Investigator UTHSC-Animal Care and Use Program
    • 30. Good Animal Care = Good Science

    ×