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Change Happens Stress Scale
 

Change Happens Stress Scale

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The Social Readjustment Rating Scale, designed in 1967 by psychiatrists, Thomas Holmes and Richard ...

The Social Readjustment Rating Scale, designed in 1967 by psychiatrists, Thomas Holmes and Richard
Rahe, evaluates the stress levels of important life changes (both planned and unplanned) and correlates
them with illness. The scale measures stress in Life Change Units (LCU) and has been used in
hundreds of studies on life change and illness onset.


To measure your stress according to the Holmes and Rahe Stress Scale add the number of "Life Change
Units" that apply to events you experienced in the past year. If the event occurred more than once,
multiply that number by the life change units. The cumulative score will give a rough estimation of your
potential risk for illness.

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    Change Happens Stress Scale Change Happens Stress Scale Document Transcript

    • CHANGE HAPPENS!  Moving Through Challenges with Confidence Measuring the Potential Impact of Change on Health The Social Readjustment Rating Scale, designed in 1967 by psychiatrists, Thomas Holmes and Richard Rahe, evaluates the stress levels of important life changes (both planned and unplanned) and correlates them with illness. The scale measures stress in Life Change Units (LCU) and has been used in hundreds of studies on life change and illness onset. To measure your stress according to the Holmes and Rahe Stress Scale add the number of "Life Change Units" that apply to events you experienced in the past year. If the event occurred more than once, multiply that number by the life change units. The cumulative score will give a rough estimation of your potential risk for illness. Life Life change change Life event units Life event units Death of a spouse 100 Trouble with in-laws 29 Divorce 73 Outstanding personal achievement 28 Marital separation 65 Spouse starts or stops work 26 Imprisonment 63 Begin or end school 26 Death of a close family member 63 Change in living conditions 25 Personal injury or illness 53 Revision of personal habits 24 Marriage 50 Trouble with boss 23 Dismissal from work 47 Change in working hours or 20 Marital reconciliation 45 conditions Retirement 45 Change in residence 20 Change in health of family member 44 Change in schools 20 Pregnancy 40 Change in recreation 19 Sexual difficulties 39 Change in church activities 19 Gain a new family member 39 Change in social activities 18 Business readjustment 39 Minor mortgage or loan 17 Change in financial state 38 Change in sleeping habits 16 Change in frequency of arguments 35 Change in number of family reunions 15 Major mortgage 32 Change in eating habits 15 Foreclosure of mortgage or loan 30 Vacation 13 Change in responsibilities at work 29 Christmas 12 Child leaving home 29 Minor violation of law 11 Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holmes_and_Rahe_stress_scale Studies show a modest correlation between the number of life change units experienced in the previous year with a persons health in the present year. Interpretation of Your Score ≥ 300: high risk of illness. 150-299: moderate risk of illness < 150: reduced risk of illness ***Please note: This self-assessment tool provides only a rough estimation of your risk for illness as correlated with your stress level. An individual’s response to life events can vary greatly from one person to another and factors such as personality, coping strategies, lifestyle, and availability of resources also alter the effect the situation has on health and risk of illness. When “change happens” in your life, we hope you’ll implement the strategies discussed in the webinar to help you move through life’s challenges with greater ease and confidence and reduce your risk of illness. References: Richard Rahe’s website: www.drrahe.com. (Revised and updated “Life Changes Stress Test” and “Stress and Coping Inventory” tools are available for a small fee) T.H. Holmes and R. H. Rahe, “The Social Readjustment Rating Scale,”, Journal Psychosomatic Research 11(2): 213-8, 1967. Stress Recess Series Lenore Woodley, RN, MSN, CEAP