Connect2Literacy: Communication Supports for Guided Reading

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Presentation with Helen Tainsh at the AGOSCI 2013 National Conference

Presentation with Helen Tainsh at the AGOSCI 2013 National Conference

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  • 1. CONNECT 2LITERACYCOMMUNICATION SUPPORTS FOR GUIDED READINGHELEN TAINSH AND JANE FARRALL
  • 2. CENTRE FOR LITERACYAND DISABILITYSTUDIESWe would like to acknowledge the Centre for Literacy andDisability Studies at the University of North Carolina for thegenerous sharing of their expertise and knowledge.
  • 3. GUIDED READINGHelp students to understand that:•  Reading involves thinking and meaning making;•  They can use a range of strategies in their reading to collectinformation, understand text, etc.Must use a wide variety of books and other print materials:•  Commercial books;•  Personal experience books;•  Custom books.NOT listening comprehension.
  • 4. PURPOSES FORREADINGNeed to set a purpose every time you do guided reading;If you don’t set a purpose students think they have toremember everything – or become passive;Purpose needs to be broad enough to motivate processing ofentire text.
  • 5. 3 CHARACTERISTICS OF GOODPURPOSES“Read so that you can...”Requires processing of entire text, at least initially:•  Yes: tell in 10 words or less what this story is about•  No: tell where the hero livedRequires search for main idea:•  Yes: tell how you think the story will end•  No: tell which words on pg7 have a short /i/ soundHelps the reader focus attention:•  Yes: tell which of these adjectives describe the boy and whichdescribe the girl in the story•  No: answer the questions at the end of the chapter
  • 6. GUIDED READING1 book per week;Different purpose each day;Build confidence;Some students will participate in the repeated readings or insetting purposes as they become more skilled;Help students become independent.
  • 7. TYPES OF GUIDEDREADINGPicture walk;Before-During-After (Three Part);Directed Reading-Thinking Activity;KWL (What do I Know, what do I Want to know, what have ILearned).
  • 8. GUIDED READINGFOLLOW-UPSAction purposes – Reader’s Theatre, Drawing, etc;Linguistic purposes – sentence ordering, word ordering,write our own version.
  • 9. 5 PART GUIDEDREADINGBefore reading:1. Build or activate background knowledge2. Purpose “Read so that you can”During reading:3. Read/listenAfter reading:4. Task directly related to the purpose5. Feedback/Discussion (typically woven into follow-up)•  What makes you say that? How do you know? Why do youthink so?•  Help students gain cognitive clarity so they can be successfulagain or next time
  • 10. THE VERY HUNGRYCATERPILLAR1.  Read to learn which food the caterpillar eats is yourfavourite (before reading, list the foods in the book)
  • 11. The very hungry caterpillarBy Eric Carle
  • 12. PARTICIPATION FORSTUDENTS WITH CCNIf they have a comprehensive communication system (egPODD) then they can use that to participate across the day;If they don’t then we need to provide ways for them toparticipate;AND we need to work towards getting them a comprehensivecommunication system.
  • 13. CUSTOM SUPPORTS FORSTUDENTS WHO NEED AACCan be developed for each purpose for each book while wework on a more comprehensive system for each student.Positives:•  Students with CCN can participate in discussing the purposeNegatives:•  The language is shown once or twice and then disappears•  Language generally isn’t useful throughout the day•  Student has no way of communicating through the whole day•  Lots of ongoing work constantly preparing these resources•  Limited to the language provided
  • 14. READ TO LEARN WHICH FOOD THECATERPILLAR EATS IS YOUR FAVOURITE
  • 15. CUSTOM SUPPORTS FORSTUDENTS WHO USE AACOnly ever a temporary solutionNeed to pair them with aided language displays as soon aspossible
  • 16. AIDED LANGUAGEDISPLAYSProspective users must be provided with frequent examplesof interactive, generative use to acquire any semblance orproficiency.No-one would dispute the fact that it would be very difficultto become a fluent speaker or French, if you instructorseldom used French in your presence.Goossens’, Crain and Elder (1988); Goossens’ (1989)
  • 17. Input OutputSpoken language developmentSpoken Language Spoken LanguageSpoken Language Aided LanguageChild learning aided symbolsGayle Porter, 2004
  • 18. Input OutputChild learning aided symbolsAided LanguageSpoken Language(Sign language)Aided Language(Spoken Language)(Sign language)Gayle Porter, 2004
  • 19. GENERAL INTERACTIVEAIDED LANGUAGE DISPLAY
  • 20. BOOK READINGAIDED LANGUAGEDISPLAY
  • 21. AIDED LANGUAGEDISPLAYSAided Language Displays provide access to a range ofvocabulary that can be used repeatedly within an activity.Lots of opportunities to make language visibleGreat resources on aided language athttp://praacticalaac.org/tag/aided-language-input/
  • 22. GUIDED READING WITHAIDED LANGUAGEDISPLAYS
  • 23. AIDED LANGUAGEDISPLAYSGeneric across a range of booksPositives:•  Students with CCN can be more interactive in the bookreading•  Students can have more control over book reading•  Work for guided reading and self-selected reading•  Lots of opportunities to repeatedly model languageNegatives:•  Don’t have specific language needed for books•  Limited to the language provided on each ALD
  • 24. AIDED LANGUAGEDISPLAYSShort term solutionNeed to provide students with a more comprehensive AACsystem as soon as we can so they have language for thewhole activity and the whole day
  • 25. COMPREHENSIVE AACSUPPORTSUsed across the whole dayPositives:•  Long term solution, all day every day•  Can be used across a wide range of purposes•  Rich links to language development•  Students with CCN can:•  Share an opinion•  Ask a question•  Change the ending•  Predict the title•  Lots of opportunities to repeatedly model language•  Generic templates are available•  Don’t need to constantly make moreNegatives:•  Takes support staff a while to learn•  Core vocabulary arrangements require language before use
  • 26. COMPREHENSIVE AACSUPPORTSEnables teachers to:•  Model and expand an extensive vocabulary•  Activate background knowledge with a student•  Set a wide range of purposesEnables students to:•  Relate information about life experiences and other texts
  • 27. USING PODD TO SET THEPURPOSE AND ACTIVATEBACKGROUND KNOWLEDGE
  • 28. USING PODD TO DISCUSSTHE PURPOSE
  • 29. PARTICIPATION FORSTUDENTS WITH CCNIf they have a comprehensive communication system (egPODD) then they can use that to participate across the day;If they don’t then we need to provide ways for them toparticipate;AND we need to work towards getting them a comprehensivecommunication system.