Engaging International Students in Effective Educational Practices

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  • A better way to measure quality; Allows measurement of learning, by use of self reports in 5 benchmarks
  • “Because individual effort and involvement are the critical determinants of impact, institutions should focus on the ways they can shape their academic, interpersonal, and extracurricular offerings to encourage student engagement.” Pascarella & Terenzini (2005) How College Affects Students (p.602)
  • Results for international students indicated EEE and SFI was low and impacted outcomes
  • Engaging International Students in Effective Educational Practices

    1. 1. Jane N. Irungu, PhDUniversity of Oregon
    2. 2.  New 2010-11:  Total 723, 277 214,490 Undergraduates  Graduates 291,439 296,574 IIE (2012). Open Doors Report
    3. 3. 750000 700000 650000 600000 550000 500000 2000- 2001- 2002- 2003- 2004- 2005- 2006- 2007- 2008- 2009- 2010- 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011Total International Students 547867 582996 586323 572509 565039 654766 582984 623805 671616 690923 723277 International students mobility Institute of International Education (2012)
    4. 4. 2010-2011180000160000140000120000100000 80000 60000 40000 20000 0 Top sending countries Institute of International Education (2012)
    5. 5.  Cultural diversity Tuition dollars ◦ 5th largest service industry in the US ◦ $ 20.2 billion in 2010-2011NAFSA: Association of International Educators State by state analysisThe Economic Benefits of International Education to the United Stateswww.nafsa.org
    6. 6.  Broad range of majors Immersion in new culture Job placement A QUALITY education A QUALITY college experience Overall SUCCESS in lifelong learning
    7. 7.  How are they doing? How are they engaged ? Are they thriving ? Are they well integrated academically ? Are they well integrated socially? How can we make their experience better? What must they do to SUCCEED? What must we do to help them SUCCEED? What must the institution do to facilitate SUCCESS ?
    8. 8.  Institutional ◦ Enrollment numbers ◦ Retention rates ◦ Graduation rates ◦ Diversity of student body, staff and faculty ◦ Career placement ◦ National rankings ◦ Standardized test results ◦ GPA ◦ Learning outcomes [ observable and measurable ] ◦ Level of student engagement  institution and students
    9. 9.  The Theory of Student Engagement “the time and energy students devote to educationally sound activities inside and outside of the classroom, and policies and practices that institutions use to induce students to take part in these activities” (Kuh, 2003, p.25)Effort | Purposeful activities | Institutional facilitationLevel of student engagement in educationally purposeful activities is the best way to measure quality for students and institutions( NSSE)
    10. 10.  National Survey on Student Engagement (NSSE) “nessie” Assessing success/learning by use of self- reports in 5 benchmarks Have a series of outcomes in the survey http://nsse.iub.edu/ http://nsse.iub.edu/html/survey_instruments.cfm
    11. 11.  1. Number of assigned textbooks, books or book-length packs of course readings 2. Number of written papers or reports of 20 pages or more 3. Number of written papers or reports between 5 and 19 pages 4. Number of written papers or reports of fewer than 5 pages 5. The extent coursework emphasized analyzing the basic elements of an idea, experience, or theory 6. The extent course work emphasized synthesizing and organizing ideas, information, or experiences into new, more complex interpretations 7. The extent course emphasized making judgments about the value of information, arguments, or methods 8. The extent course work emphasized applying theories or concepts to practical problems or in new situations 9. Worked harder than you thought you could to meet an instructor’s standards or expectations 10. Numbers of hours per 7-day week spent preparing for class (studying, reading, writing, ding homework or lab work, analyzing data, rehearsing, and other academic activities) 11. The extent the institution emphasized on you spending significant amounts of time studying and on academic work
    12. 12.  1. How often asked questions in class or contributed to class discussions 2. How often made a class presentation 3. How often worked with other students on projects during class 4. How often worked with classmates outside of class to prepare class assignments 5. How often tutored or taught other students (paid or voluntary) 6. How often participated in a community-based project (e.g., service learning) as part of a regular course 7. How often discussed ideas from your readings or classes with others outside of class (students, family members, co-workers, etc.)
    13. 13.  1. How often discussed grades or assignments with an instructor 2. How often discussed ideas from your readings or classes with faculty members outside of class 3. How often talked about career plans with a faculty member or advisor 4. How often received prompt written or oral feedback from faculty on your academic performance 5. How often worked with faculty members on activities other than coursework (committees, orientation, student life activities, etc.) 6. Worked or plan to work on a research project with a faculty member outside of course or program requirements
    14. 14.  1. Serious conversations with students who are very different from you in terms of their religious beliefs, political opinions, or personal values 2. Conversations with students of a different race or ethnicity than your own 3. The extent institution emphasized or encouraged contact among students from different economic, social, and racial or ethnic backgrounds 4. How many hours per 7-day week spent participating in co-curricular activities (organizations, campus publications, student government, fraternity or sorority, intercollegiate or intramural sports, etc?) 5. How often used an electronic medium (listserv, chat group, Internet, instant messaging, etc.) to discuss or complete an assignment 6. Have done or plan to do a practicum, internship, field experience, co-op experience, or clinical assignment 7. Have done or plan to do community service or volunteer work 8. Have participated or plan to participate in a learning community or some other formal program where groups of students take two or more classes together 9. Have done or plan to do a foreign language coursework 10. Have or plan to study abroad 11. Have done or plan to do Independent study or self-designed major 12. Have done or plan to do a culminating senior experience (capstone course, senior project or thesis, comprehensive exam, etc.)
    15. 15.  1. The extent to which institution emphasized providing the support you need to thrive socially 2. The extent to which institution emphasized providing the support you need to help you succeed academically 3. The extent to which institution emphasized helping you cope with your non-academic responsibilities (work, family, etc.) 4. Quality of your relationships with other students 5. Quality of your relationships with faculty 6. Quality of your relationships with administrative personnel and offices
    16. 16. N=1624• Undergraduate international students• Research I universities Male=769 47.4% Female=855 52%
    17. 17.  Descriptive statistics ◦ Frequencies on benchmark items ◦ Means for each benchmark ◦ Correlations benchmarks against outcomes Regression analysis benchmarks VS outcomes ◦ To determine which benchmarks account for, and by what percentage, for various outcomes
    18. 18.  M Level of Academic Challenge 57.544 Supportive Campus Environment 57.119 Active Collaborative Learning 48.676 Student-Faculty Interaction 40.652 Enriching Educational Experiences 39.775
    19. 19.  Level of Academic Challenge M: 57.544 ◦ International students spend a lot of time studying  Reading  Writing  At the library ◦ Key words: analyzing, synthesizing, making judgments, application Challenges: ◦ Language skills [ proficiency and interference ] ◦ Creativity [ difference in pedagogical styles] ◦ Originality [ issues of plagiarism and style]
    20. 20.  Supportive Campus Environment 57.119 ◦ Campus personnel and offices: 57% helpful ◦ Other students: 76.7% friendly ◦ Providing support you need to succeed academically 67% Very Low- not feeling supported ◦ Social support: 66.1% - networking outside class ◦ Help to cope with non-academic issues: 71%  Work, family
    21. 21.  Active Collaborative Learning M: 48.676 ◦ Participating  Asking questions in class 55.8 %  Collaborative projects/ discussion 48 %  Peer Advising 27.6 %  Community based projects- service learning 14.8% Advisor Role: ◦ Remind benefits of out of class activities ◦ Guide to relevant opportunities
    22. 22.  Work on a research project with a faculty member outside of course or program requirements NOT DONE* 75.5% Worked with faculty members on activities other than coursework (committees, orientation, student life activities, etc.) *80% Discussed ideas from your readings or classes with faculty members outside of class NOT OFTEN ** 71.5 % Worked with faculty members on activities other than coursework (committees, orientation, student life activities, etc.) ** 80.0% Talked about career plans with a faculty member or advisor ** 62.6 % Discussed grades or assignments with an instructor ** 50.1%** Mandatory advising/ referrals; Freshmen Interest Groups; LearningCommunities; Freshmen Seminars; Office hours** International students’ perception of authority figures** Cultural lens
    23. 23.  Acquiring a broad general education Acquiring job or work related knowledge and skills [ career development Thinking critically and analytically Working effectively with others [interpersonal and intrapersonal] Learning effectively on your own Understanding yourself [ more listed on the survey ]
    24. 24. Outcomes Engagement Benchmarks SCE LAC ACL EEE SFIAbroad andgeneral X X X X XeducationWork or jobrelated X X X X Xknowledge andskillsThinkingcritically and X X X X XacademicallyWorkingeffectively with X X X X XothersAbility to learneffectively on X X X X Xtheir ownAbility tounderstand X X X X Xthemselves
    25. 25.  Are we changing policies and protocols to accommodate surging enrollments? Are we working with student affairs / international affairs and other campus departments to meet advising needs? Any intentional programs to monitor or assist in directing them to purposeful activities related to satisfaction, persistence, success? What are our major concerns as advisors?
    26. 26.  Kuh, G. D. (2001). Assessing what really matters to student learning: Inside the National Survey of Student Engagement. Change, 33(3), 10-17, 66. Kuh, G. D. (2003). What we‟re learning about student engagement from NSSE: Benchmarks for effective educational practices. Change, 35(2), 24-32. Institute of International Education. (2012). "Top 25 Places of Origin of International Students, 2009/10-2010/11." Open Doors Report on International Educational Exchange. Retrieved from http://www.iie.org/opendoors Institute of International Education. (2012). "International Student Totals by Place of Origin, 2009/10 - 2010/11." Open Doors Report on International Educational Exchange. Retrieved from http://www.iie.org/opendoors Institute of International Education ( 2011) What International Students Think About U.S. Higher Education: Attitudes and Perceptions of Prospective Students in Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin AmericaRetrieved from http://www.iie.org/opendoors
    27. 27. QUESTIONS ?

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