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  • 1. Research Portfolio March 11, 2011
  • 2. Today
    • Essay Criteria—AKA How to Do Really Great on the Essay
    • George P. Landow: Main Points
    • George P. Landow Exercise
  • 3. Research Portfolio
    • March 18: Come to Tutorial to Hand In the Portfolio:
      • Final Paper and Final Works Cited List
      • Original Proposal With Marks On It
      • Original Bibliography With Marks On It
      • Peer-Edited Introductory Paragraph With Marks On It
  • 4. Doing Well on the Essay
    • Exactly 7 days until your research portfolio is due!
    • Today, I am offering some tips to ensure you do a great job on your papers, which I am so excited to read.
  • 5. Bibliography Feedback
    • Upstyle for Titles
    • Recent vs Old Sources
    • Primary vs Secondary
    • Italics vs quotations
    • Non-scholarly sources
    • Must have at least 7 sources
    • MLA 2009 vs Older Sources
    • Alphabetize Entries
    • Do Not Put Numbers on Each Entry
  • 6. Bibliography Feedback
    • Upstyle vs. Downstyle for Titles:
      • “ Satisfiers and Dissatisfiers: A Two-Factor Model for Website Design and Evaluation.”
      • “ The Micropolitics of Teacher Induction: A Narrative-Biographical Study on the Teacher Socialisation.”
      • “ The Cinema of Attractions: Early Film, Its Spectator and the Avant-Garde.”
      • http://ia.juniata.edu/citation/mla/mla-capitals.htm
  • 7. Bibliography Feedback
    • Upstyle
      • Capitalize everything except prepositions and articles
      • Capitalize a preposition or article if it begins the title or follows a colon
        • The Luck of the Draw: Casino Gambling and Seniors
        • Of Mice and Men: The Story of Friendship
  • 8. Doing Well on the Essay
    • This is the main criteria we have discussed in class:
    • Format
    • Structure
    • Content
    • Sentence-level
    • Research
  • 9. 1. Format
    • Stick to the formatting of an MLA paper
    • http://www.csus.edu/owl/index/mla/mla_format.htm
    • However, follow Dr. Wickens’ criteria on her WebCT for the title page.
    • EASY!
  • 10. 2. Structure
    • Remember, have a tight structure for your paper and for every single paragraph.
  • 11. 2. Structure
    • Introduction
      • Catchy opening
      • Context
      • Thesis
    • Body
      • Major Point 1 (Several Paragraphs)
        • Topic sentence
        • 3 (or so) examples
        • Concluding Sentence
      • Major Point 2 . . . Major Point 3 . . . .
    • Conclusion
  • 12. 2. Structure
      • Focus
      • Fine Points
      • Flow
      • Finality
    • Remember the 4F test?
  • 13. 2. Structure: Remember this? Topic Sentence Point #3 Point #2 Point #1 Concluding Sentence to Summarize and Transition
  • 14. 3. Content
    • Taking a stance/angle not just summarizing facts.
    • Use facts/details/examples/quotations to support your overall interesting thesis
    • Refer to your thesis in every topic sentence (if possible)
    • 75% details; 25% ideas
    • Relates to course material
    • Everyone should be on the right track here based on proposal feedback and peer edit feedback! 
  • 15. 3. Helpful Link for Theses
    • http://www.unc.edu/depts/wcweb/handouts/thesis.html
  • 16. 4. Sentence-Level
    • Spelling
    • Grammar
    • Punctuation
    • Challenging for you? Book an appointment with writing help at the library. It’s VERY helpful and free!
    • Check this (or many, many other websites) out!
    • http://www.writingcentre.uottawa.ca/hypergrammar/
  • 17. 5. Research
    • Absolutely No plagiarism
    • Are all citations according to MLA? Exactly to MLA?
    • http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/
    • Are sources scholarly?
    • http://pegasus.cc.ucf.edu/~janzb/courses/scholarly1.htm
  • 18. 5. Research
    • How integrated are your sources? When integrating any sources, you have three choices:
    • 1) Direct quotation
    • 2) Summary (taking the original, putting it in your own words, and shaving your new version down to a much smaller version than the original)
    • 3) Paraphrase (taking the original, putting it in your own words, and keeping the length nearly the same as the original.
    • ****Whichever you choose, you MUST put a citation after******
  • 19. 5. Research
    • MLA: put a citation after the quote, paraphrase, or summary.
    • Showalter explains that “patience is necessary” in examining each painting (76).
    • Many writers explain that “patience is necessary” in examining each painting (Showalter 76).
    • Several writers focus on patience in viewing art (Showalter 76).
  • 20. 5. Research
    • The comma before a quotation is only necessary IF it could be replaced by the word “that.”
    • Never drop a quotation into your paragraph without framing it in someway with your own words.
    • Never include a block quotation unless you plan to spend an equal length discussing (eg do not put 20 lines of a quotation in your paper unless you have 20 lines to spare of your own text to discuss it thoroughly).
    • http://more.headroyce.org/research/writing/argumentation/quoteinteg.html GOOD SOURCE
  • 21. 5. Research
    • http://www.westga.edu/~writing/quotationspdf.pdf
    • Another good source
  • 22. George P. Landow Main Points
  • 23. “Hypertext as Collage-Writing”
    • Words describing this jumbling-together:
      • Assemblage (cinema)
      • Metatext
      • Docuverse
      • Hypertext
    • These concepts “foreground the writing process”
  • 24. Landow: Main Points
    • Landow creates a hypertext to accompany Joris’ work on Collage Between Writing and Painting
    • Landow’s creation (including links to definitions, Picasso’s work etc) = open-ended, “a kind of Velcro-text to which various kinds of materials began attaching themselves”
    • Landow: translated/transferred his hypertext into the essay we are currently reading—he mentions that much had to change/get reduced.
  • 25. Landow: Main Points
    • Hypertext definition:
      • “ Text composed of lexias . . . Linked electronically by multiple paths, chains, or trails in an open-ended web” (Landow 137)
      • Multisequential/multilinear
  • 26. Landow: Issues with Hypertext
    • Difficulties with Hypertext (in 1997):
    • Some systems don’t allow the clickable menu and the text being read to be viewed at the same time
    • Burdensome for the writer (lots of time and energy)
    • Single screen means text is always replaced by another text; difficult to retrieve
    • Web must be large to make a “true” hypertext with many different options
    • We need networked computing
  • 27. Landow: Hypertext
    • With a hypertext, the power moves from the author to the reader.
  • 28. PRACTICE
    • YOUR TURN!
    • I have created a wiki so we can practice Landow’s multilinear, multiauthor hypertext. Follow these steps:
    • http://www.wikispaces.com/ Click here and sign in (top right corner)
    • Username: JaneFACS
    • Password: FACS2011