How to Teach Children to be Sex Offenders

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This powerpoint is really about how to raise healthy children. It shows the parenting styles that lead to healthy child development, as well as factors associated with children not doing well, including becoming sex offenders. It also identifies protective factors that are associated with good outcomes even when children have risks.

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How to Teach Children to be Sex Offenders

  1. 2. How to Teach Children to be Sex Offenders Jane F. Gilgun, Ph.D, LICSW School of Social Work University of Minnesota, Twin Cities [email_address] Texas Council on Family Relations April 1, 2011
  2. 3. Contents <ul><li>Basic Guidelines from Adult Attachment Theory </li></ul><ul><li>Simple Steps to Teach Children How to be Sex Offenders </li></ul><ul><li>Difficult Steps: The Prevention </li></ul><ul><li>of Sex Offending Behaviors </li></ul>
  3. 4. Attachment Theory <ul><li>Secure/Resolved </li></ul><ul><li>Dismissive </li></ul><ul><li>Preoccupied </li></ul><ul><li>Disorganized </li></ul><ul><li>Are my inner working models just and caring? </li></ul>
  4. 5. Becoming a Sex Offender: What Parents Can Do <ul><li>Teach children </li></ul><ul><ul><li>That using others for their own gain is the way to go </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Do whatever it takes to get what you want—just don’t get caught </li></ul></ul>
  5. 6. Becoming a Sex Offender: What Parents Can Do <ul><li>Teach children </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Not to ask you questions about sexuality </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Not to talk about sexuality in front of you </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To use sexual language to degrade others </li></ul></ul>
  6. 7. Becoming a Sex Offender: What Parents Can Do <ul><li>Teach children </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Not to talk about things that bother them </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Never to disappoint their parents </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Always to protect their parents who are easily hurt </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Be afraid of angering their parents because of the consequences </li></ul></ul>
  7. 8. Becoming a Sex Offender: What Parents Can Do <ul><li>Look the other way when children are exposed to sexually explicit media </li></ul><ul><li>Fight really hard to keep sex education out of the schools </li></ul><ul><li>Ignore children when they behave in prosocial ways </li></ul><ul><li>Ignore children’s accomplishments </li></ul>
  8. 9. Becoming a Sex Offender: What Parents Can Do <ul><li>Be emotionally unavailable to your children </li></ul><ul><li>No matter what, do not seek professional help </li></ul><ul><li>Never deal with your own traumas & losses </li></ul>
  9. 10. Becoming a Sex Offender: What Parents Can Do <ul><li>Never allow children to take responsibility for their own hurtful behaviors </li></ul><ul><li>Hit back hard when anyone says your children did something wrong </li></ul><ul><li>Protect your own image at any cost </li></ul>
  10. 11. Four Cornerstones of Prevention <ul><li>Healthy Sex Education </li></ul><ul><li>Promotion of Emotional Expressiveness </li></ul><ul><li>Develop Programs That Encourage and Support Parents to Deal with Their Own Issues </li></ul><ul><li>Parent Education Programs </li></ul>
  11. 12. Social Skills Training <ul><li>Family Etiquette </li></ul><ul><li>Classroom Etiquette </li></ul><ul><li>Peer Etiquette </li></ul><ul><li>If children are disorganized…. </li></ul>
  12. 13. Direct Instruction 10 Minutes a Day <ul><li>How to ask for something </li></ul><ul><li>How to disagree </li></ul><ul><li>How to accept no </li></ul><ul><li>How to take responsibility </li></ul><ul><li>How to make up for doing something hurtful </li></ul><ul><li>How to accept an apology </li></ul>
  13. 14. Teaching Moments <ul><li>Conflict Management </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Children require guidance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sylvia & Maggie </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Problem-Solving </li></ul><ul><li>Alternative Behaviors </li></ul>
  14. 15. Summary <ul><li>Adult attachment theory provides basic concepts upon which educators can build programs </li></ul><ul><li>Children require guidance: Executive Function </li></ul><ul><li>Children require role models, warmth </li></ul><ul><li>& safety: Attachment Theory </li></ul><ul><li>Children require structured, predictable settings: Executive Function </li></ul>

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