Handout - "Assessment, Like Revision, Is Recursive"
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Handout for 2010 NISOD presentation, "Assessment, like revision, is recursive: Re-designing and re-thinking metrics and methods for the assessment of student writing"

Handout for 2010 NISOD presentation, "Assessment, like revision, is recursive: Re-designing and re-thinking metrics and methods for the assessment of student writing"

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Handout - "Assessment, Like Revision, Is Recursive" Handout - "Assessment, Like Revision, Is Recursive" Document Transcript

  • WRIT101 Objectives - 2004 <br />Given the need to write clearly and concisely for future classes, for the world of work, and for personal satisfaction, the student will learn to:<br />Reflect a world view and reasoned thought in an effort to appreciate cultural diversity as an important professional awareness needed in today's social structure. Native American, Hispanic and African American writers are studied as both cultural representatives and writing models. Authors covered may include, Sherman Alexie, Sandra Cisneros, Judith Ortiz and Martin Luther King.<br />Throughout the semester, patterns of thought and critical thinking, as well as problem solving skills will be taught.<br />Strengthen team work and collaborative learning skills through peer-editing techniques.<br />Practice the process steps for writing: prewriting, drafting, revising, editing.<br />Utilize prewriting strategies, such as journals, cubing, free writing, listing, focusing, clustering, and brainstorming.<br />Analyze the writer's audience, and draw audience profiles.<br />Organize and write effective thesis, topic and transitional sentences within short essays and develop strategies for introductions and conclusions for different types of writing.<br />Develop topics using patterns of exposition: example, comparison and contrast, definition, causal analysis and process analysis among others.<br />Apply the principles of the structure of language regarding word choice and word form by using reference materials to discriminate among the levels of language and using appropriate grammar and usage guidelines to express complex thought.<br />Organize and present research papers using the MLA format for parenthetical reference citations and bibliographical notations, including electronic source documentation.<br />Exhibit comfort in writing situations in which the student has had practice in the class.<br />WRIT101 Objectives - 2006 <br />Philosophy and Practices<br />Practice the process steps for writing (prewriting, drafting, revising, editing)<br />Apply various strategies and tools supporting steps of the writing process: journaling, free writing, brainstorming at the prewriting stage; models and patterns at the drafting stage; collaboration at the revision stage; and using a handbook’s guidance at the editing stage.<br />Participate in collaborative learning activities, including peer-review and peer-editing<br />Reflect a world view in order to demonstrate awareness of diverse viewpoints, values, and cultures. <br />Apply MLA style, including parenthetical references and Works Cited page, and MLA manuscript format to essays<br />Writing<br />Write essays<br />Write, at minimum, four essays (750-1250 words), at least one requiring research, within themes or modes, e.g., narration, description, example, comparison and contrast, process analysis, causal analysis, or argument <br />Write one argument-based research paper (at minimum 2500 words) <br />Develop effective, e.g., conceptually rich, logical, and judiciously qualified, thesis statements and concluding paragraphs <br />Demonstrate competent control of grammatical constructions, conventions, and stylistic devices<br />Reading and Critical Thinking<br />Synthesize ideas from multiple sources<br />Evaluate and use supporting evidence while maintaining academic integrity<br />Integrate quotations, paraphrases, and summaries in research-based writing proficiently<br />Identify logical fallacies<br />Identify textual elements comprising rhetorical triangle (text, reader, writer)<br />Analyze audience and draw audience profiles.<br />Engage a variety of texts and their ideas, including popular media, scholarly articles, literature, and reference materials<br />Information Literacy<br />Conduct a search in an interdisciplinary database (e.g., Expanded Academic ASAP) using Boolean operators <br />Limit searches in databases and the Library’s online catalog, e.g., publication date range, full-text<br />Identify and search within relevant subject databases (e.g., JSTOR) <br />Use database features to mark/save/print/email citations <br />Use interlibrary loan services as needed<br />WRIT101 Objectives - present <br />1.      Use writing as a means to engage in critical inquiry by exploring ideas, challenging assumptions, and reflecting on and applying the writing process.Write, at minimum, five essays (750-1500 words), at least one requiring research, within themes or modes, e.g., narration, description, example, comparison and contrast, process analysis, causal analysis, or argument. 2.      Read texts thoughtfully, analytically, and critically in preparation for writing tasks. Engage a variety of texts and their ideas, including popular media, scholarly articles, literature, and reference materials.Reflect a world view in order to demonstrate awareness of diverse viewpoints, values, and cultures. Analyze audience and draw audience profiles.Identify textual elements comprising rhetorical triangle (text, reader, writer)Identify logical fallacies.3.      Develop multiple, flexible strategies for writing, particularly inventing, organizing, drafting, revising, and copyediting.Practice the process steps for writing (prewriting, drafting, revising, editing).Apply various strategies and tools supporting steps of the writing process: journaling, free writing, brainstorming at the prewriting stage; models and patterns at the drafting stage; collaboration at the revision stage; and using a handbook's guidance at the editing stage.Participate in collaborative learning activities, including peer-review and peer-editing.4.      Demonstrate an understanding of research as a process of gathering, evaluating, analyzing, and synthesizing appropriate primary and secondary sources. Integrate their own ideas with those of others.Conduct a search in an interdisciplinary database (e.g., Expanded Academic ASAP) using Boolean operators.Limit searches in databases and the Library's online catalog, e.g., publication date range, full-text.Identify and search within relevant subject databases (e.g., JSTOR).Use database features to mark/save/print/email citations. Use interlibrary loan services as needed.5.      Formulate an assertion about a given issue and support that assertion with evidence appropriate to the issue, position taken, and given audience.Develop effective, e.g., conceptually rich, logical, and judiciously qualified, thesis statements and concluding paragraphs.Synthesize ideas from multiple sources.Evaluate and use supporting evidence while maintaining academic integrity.Integrate quotations, paraphrases, and summaries in research-based writing proficiently.6.      Demonstrate proficiency in the use of the conventions of language and forms of discourse, including grammar, syntax, punctuation, spelling, and mechanics.Correctly identify, name, and discuss the nature of errors and their correction: parallel structure, conciseness & clarity, word choice, sentence combiningSelf-correct errors with the support of a handbook or textbook.7.      Use conventions of format and structure appropriate to the rhetorical situation and audience.Apply MLA style, including parenthetical references and Works Cited page, and MLA manuscript format to essays.<br />WRIT101 Rubric - 2005<br />Benefits: It's a bouncing, baby rubric! <br />Drawbacks: privileges superficial qualities; relatively subjective; relatively mean; no models of student writing included; no distinction between writing requiring source use (which we consider more complex) and personal writing (which we consider less technical and often more difficult)<br />English 121--Uniform Essay Grading Criteria<br />“A” Criteria --An excellent Essay--All of the criteria below must be present<br />
    • Essay Shape.
    • Creative title
    • Dynamic Intro
    • Clear, well-focused thesis
    • Complex body
    • A strong conclusion
    • The essay is rich with detail
    • Language. The language and style is distinctive. Word choice is convincing and vivid. The details are clearly expressed with significant impact.
    • Mechanics. Standard usage of the language is clearly evident. Punctuation, spelling and usage are correct. Sentences are clear and complex.
    • Organization. This is a tight organized, fully united work. There are no digressions or wanderings. Topic sentences in paragraphs are clear and transitions are present. Logic prevails.
    • Development. The essay does develop. The points raised are discussed. It has the point of completeness and it does conclude after the discussion.
    “B” Criteria<br />
    • The title may be ambiguous or “generic”.
    • The Introduction is lacking in pizzazz.
    • The thesis may be flat.
    • The body paragraphs, while present, may be simplistic rather than complex and elegant.
    • The conclusion may be there, but pro-forma – ie. “In conclusion”.
    • There is detail but it is more perfunctory. It is a “good” essay but falls short of the “A” range in one or more ways. Standard English usage is present but there may be a few errors.
    “C” Criteria<br />
    • Essay Shape.
    • The title is trite or missing.
    • The introduction is flat.
    • The thesis is ambiguous and needs to be more specifically narrowed.
    • The body paragraphs lack rich detail and topic sentences are vague or missing.
    • The conclusion is weak.
    • Language. Details are present but not well explained. The style is pedestrian and word choice is ordinary or clichéd.
    • Mechanics. Standard English usage is there, but somewhat haphazard. Pattern errors are evident. Sentences are short and somewhat choppy. There are no more than an average of two mistakes per page in punctuation, grammar, spelling, usage and agreement.
    • Organization. The structure waffles off target. Digressions occur. Topic sentences are weak or missing. Developmental details are missing. Paragraphs are short.
    • Development. The development is fragmenting the points and their discussion is not clear. Meanderings occur. The conclusion is not present and/or does not relate clearly to the discussion.
    “D” or “F” Criteria<br />
    • Essay shape.
    • The introduction is either missing or does not appear to connect with the essay.
    • The reader has no idea what is forthcoming.
    • Title is generic or not present.
    • The thesis is missing.
    • There is a scattered body with little detail.
    • There is no logical conclusion.
    • Language. Word choice is vague. Generalities abound. Ambiguity dominates. No precise use of language/style elements. Non-sequitur present.
    • Mechanics. Mechanics are incorrect to the point that they interfere with reader’s comprehension. Run-ons, fragments and comma splices are frequent.
    • Organization. The paragraphs do not support a missing thesis. There is no true discussion. Paragraphs lack topic sentences. Paragraphs do not connect with the introduction and adequate paragraph development is absent.
    • Development. The essay is underdeveloped and missing important content. There are few concrete details and little description so that there is little of a sense of importance to discuss.
    WRIT101 Rubric - Present<br />Essay content rubric for assignment requiring sources<br />
    • Description of performance levelFeedbackWriting at the A level is characterized by: Organization. The organizational structure fits the topic, and the writing is easy to follow. The writer's ideas are effectively, perhaps creatively, sequenced. There are smooth, effective transitions between sentences, paragraphs, and ideas. Focus. Sustained attention to topics within the body provides a thorough explanation of each main idea and connection between points. Development. Relevant details provide pointed support for main ideas. Details fit where placed. Each topic stands out, and is the elaboration of each topic is thorough and clear. The body features a thorough, balanced, in-depth explanation/exploration of the topic. The writing makes connections and shares insights. Form: Introduction. A strong, inviting beginning draws the reader in. The thesis clearly articulates the writer's position.  The introduction defines the scope or range of the discussion within the paper. Form: Conclusions. Commentary or reflection on the ideas in the body of the paper provides a strong, satisfying sense of resolution or closure. Ideas clearly connect to the thesis, closing the gap between introduction and conclusion. Voice and Audience Awareness. Content and selected details are well-suited to audience. Writing shows an effective level of closeness to or distance from the audience. Writing is engaging, lively, or interesting. The writer seems to be aware of the reader and of how to communicate the message most effectively. Reader likely discerns the writer behind the words, feels a sense of interaction, and senses that the topic has come to life. The writing likely shows originality, liveliness, honesty, conviction, excitement, humor or suspense. Use of resources. Where appropriate, use of resources provides strong, accurate, credible support. Writing features seamless integration of resources in varied formats: quotation, paraphrase, and summary. Exceeds Expectations The organization enhances the central ideas and their development. The order and structure are compelling and move the reader through the text easily. The writing is exceptionally clear, focused and interesting. It holds the reader's attention. Main ideas stand out and are developed by strong support and rich details suitable to audience and purpose. The writer has chosen a voice appropriate for the topic, purpose, and audience. The writer seems deeply committed to the topic, and there is an exceptional sense of "writing to be read." The writing is expressive, engaging, or sincere.  Required resources are seamlessly integrated into the essay, enhancing and supporting the writer's message.Writing at the B level is characterized by: Organization. The organizational structure fits the topic, and the writing is easy to follow. The ideas are effectively sequenced. There are effective transitions between sentences, paragraphs, and ideas. Focus. Attention to topics within the body provides an explanation of each main idea and connection between points. Development. Details provide relevant support for main ideas and fit where placed. clarity, focus and control. Main ideas are clear and stand out. The body features a thoughtful, balanced, exploration of the topic. The writing makes connections and shares some insights. Form: Introduction. An inviting beginning draws the reader in. The thesis clearly articulates the writer's position. The introduction provides some insight into the scope or range of the discussion within the paper. Form: Conclusions. Commentary or reflection in the ideas in the body provides a satisfying sense of resolution or closure within the paper's conclusion. Voice and Audience Awareness. Content and selected details are suited to audience. Writing shows an appropriate level of closeness to or distance from the audience. The writer seems to be aware of the reader and of how to communicate the message effectively. The reader may discern the writer behind the words, feel a sense of interaction, or sense that the topic has come to life. The writing is likely engaging and may show originality, liveliness, honesty, conviction, excitement, humor or suspense. Use of resources. Where appropriate, use of resources provides strong, accurate, credible support. Writing features a balance of quotation, paraphrase, and summary. Experienced The organization enhances the central ideas and their development. The order and structure are strong and move the reader through the text. The writing is clear, focused and interesting. It holds the reader's attention. Main ideas stand out and are developed by supporting details suitable to audience and purpose. The writer has chosen a voice appropriate for the topic, purpose, and audience. The writer seems committed to the topic, and there is a sense of "writing to be read." The writing is expressive, engaging, or sincere. Use of required resources enhances and supports the writer's message.Writing at the C level is characterized by: Organization. The organization of the ideas in the paper helps the reader despite weaknesses. The organizational structure may fit the topic, but the writing is likely difficult to follow in places or may be predictable. The sequence of ideas may not appear logical or premeditated. Transitions between sentences, paragraphs, or ideas are likely missing in places or formulaic.  Focus. Topics within the body are relevant to the paper's argument. Development. Details provide adequate support for the paper's main ideas but may be overly general or limited in places. Most details fit where placed. The body features an earnest, good-faith exploration of the topic. The writing makes some connections between ideas and may share some insights. Form: Introduction and Conclusion. The paper has a recognizable beginning, but the beginning may not be particularly inviting or may not be well connected to the paper's main ideas. The paper has a recognizable conclusion, but the conclusion likely provides summary over reflection or commentary. Voice and Audience Awareness. Content may not be consistently suited to audience. Writing likely shows questionable or inconsistent level of closeness to or distance from the audience. The writer seems to be aware of the reader, but has not consistently employed an appropriate voice. The reader may glimpse the writer behind the words and feel a sense of interaction in places. The writing may be lively, sincere, engaging, or funny in places; however, at times the writing may be either inappropriately casual or personal, or inappropriately formal and stiff. The reader may get the sense that the writer doesn't want the audience to know him or her well. Use of resources. Where appropriate, resources are used to provide support although connections between resources and the paper's main ideas may be tenuous or hit and miss. Competent Organization is clear and coherent. Order and structure are present, but may seem formulaic.The writing is clear and focused. The reader can easily understand the main ideas. Support is present, although it may be limited or rather general. A voice is present. The writer demonstrates commitment to the topic, and there may be a sense of "writing to be read." In places, the writing is expressive, engaging, or sincere. Use of required resources supports the writer's message.Writing at the D level is characterized by: Organization. The writing shows an attempt at sequencing ideas, but the order or the relationship between ideas may be unclear. Transitions may be awkward or missing. A limited range of transitional expressions or grammatical constructions may be overused in linking ideas. Focus. A range of topics may be covered in the body of the paper, and the relationship between those topics and the paper's thesis is likely unclear or missing. Development. The writing shows an attempt to support the paper's thesis, but details that are often limited in scope, uneven, off-topic, predictable, or overly general. The writing likely doesn't move smoothly from general observations to specifics. The argument may rely on predictable or overly-obvious main ideas.  Form: Introduction and Conclusion. The paper has an introduction and a conclusion which, although present, may be undeveloped or too obvious, e.g., "My topic is . . .," "This paper seeks to address . . .," "These are all the reasons that . . .," "In conclusion . . . ," "As you can see . . ." Voice and Audience Awareness. The paper meets the needs and expectations of the audience intermittently. Word and content choice may not coincide with readers' sensibilities or expectations. There is an occasional sense of the writer behind the words; however, the voice may be intermittently rote, mechanical or stiff. Use of resources. Details may not be supported by credible resources; support instead may take the form of cliché, stereotype or questionable source of information. Alternatively, required resources are present, but there is likely little connection between those resources and the paragraphs in which they appear. There are a number of problems resulting from the use of resources: the argument relies on too much or too little source information; paraphrase, summary, or quotation isn't done correctly; parenthetical citations and Works Cited page entries are inaccurate or improperly formatted; or the interpretation or analysis of resources is poorly done or disconnected from the essay's ideas. Developing An attempt has been made to organize the writing; however, the overall structure is inconsistent or skeletal. The reader can understand the main ideas, although they may be overly broad or simplistic, and the results may not be effective. Supporting detail is often limited, insubstantial, overly general, or occasionally slightly off-topic.The writer's commitment to the topic seems inconsistent. A sense of the writer may emerge at times; however, the voice is either inappropriately personal or inappropriately impersonal.Use of required resources does little to support the writer's message and may even undermine the writer's credibility.Writing at the F level is characterized by: Organization. The writing shows some attempt at sequencing ideas, but the relationship between ideas is frequently unclear and the reader has to figure out its logic. Transitions between sentences, paragraphs, or ideas are missing, ineffective, or overused. Focus and Development. The paper's main ideas may require extensive inferences by the reader. The relationship between topics within the paper is unclear. There is likely minimal development of main ideas, including insufficient detail within paragraphs, irrelevant details that clutter the text, or extensive repetition of detail. Form: Introduction and Conclusions. The paper may have a missing or extremely underdeveloped introduction, body, and/or conclusion. Voice, Audience Awareness, and Purpose. The writing is likely overly informal or personal. There is little sense of "writing to be read" in that the writer does not appear to be aware of the needs or expectations of the audience, e.g., inappropriate or offensive word or content choice. There is little sense of the writer behind the words, and the voice may be largely flat, lifeless, stiff, or mechanical. There is rarely a sense of interaction between reader and writer. The writing may be expository instead of argumentative, e.g., the paper relies on narrative or causal analysis instead of supporting the thesis. Use of resources. Resources, when present, likely undermine rather than enhance the writer's credibility. There are a number of problems resulting from the use of resources: the argument relies on too much or too little source information; paraphrase, summary, or quotation isn't done correctly; parenthetical citations and Works Cited page entries are inaccurate or improperly formatted; the interpretation or analysis of resources is poorly done or missing; quotations are taken out of context; or the resources themselves are irrelevant, inaccurate, out of date, of unknown origin, or otherwise undesirable. Emerging The writing lacks a clear organizational structure. An occasional organizational device is discernible; however, the writing is either difficult to follow and the reader has to reread substantial portions, or the piece is simply too short to demonstrate organizational skills. Main ideas and purpose are somewhat unclear or development is attempted but minimal.The writing provides little sense of involvement or commitment. There is no evidence that the writer has chosen a suitable voice.Required resources are not included.
    WRIT101 Rubric - Present<br />Conventions rubric<br />
    • MasteryThe writing demonstrates manipulation of conventions for stylistic effect. Errors are rare. The writing is characterized by:Effective use of a wide range of punctuation marks and grammatical structures (including low-frequency punctuation marks or grammatical structures) in a sufficiently long and complex pieceCorrect spelling, and word choice commensurate with topic, and audience.Correct capitalization; errors, if any, are minor.Consistent manipulation of syntax or grammar that contributes to stylistic effect.CompetencyThe writing demonstrates effective control of conventions. Errors are few and minor. The writing is characterized by:Effective use of a range of punctuation marks and grammatical structures in a sufficiently long and complex piece.Correct spelling, and word choice appropriate to topic.Correct capitalization; errors, if any, are minor.Manipulation of syntax or grammar that contributes to stylistic effect.ProficiencyThe writing demonstrates control of conventions. Minor and/or sporadic errors do not impede readability. The writing is characterized by:Correct end-of-sentence punctuation; internal punctuation my sometimes be incorrect.Spelling that is usually correct, especially on common words.Correct capitalization; errors, if any, are minor.Occasional lapses in correct grammar and usage; problems are not severe enough to distort meaning or cause confusion.DevelopingThe writing demonstrates limited control of conventions. Errors complicate readability. The writing is characterized by:End-of-sentence punctuation that is usually correct; however, internal punctuation contains frequent errors.Spelling errors that distract the reader; misspelling of common words occurs.Capitalization errors.Distracting, frequent errors in grammar and usage.EmergingThe writing demonstrates little control of conventions (e.g., punctuation, spelling, capitalization, grammar and usage). Frequent and/or significant errors impede readability. The writing is characterized by:Many end-of-sentence punctuation errors; internal punctuation contains frequent errors.Spelling errors that frequently distract the reader; misspelling of common words often occurs.Capitalization that is inconsistent or often incorrect.Consistent, major errors in grammar and usage that interfere with readability.