COMMERCIAL COOKING
SUBTITUTING INGREDIENTS
Allspice, also called Jamaica pepper,
pepper, myrtle pepper, pimenta,
pimento,[1] English pepper[2] or
newspice, is a spic...
CINNAMON
• Cinnamon (/ˈsɪnəmən/ SIN-ə-mən)
is a spice obtained from the inner
bark of several trees from the
genus Cinnamo...
NUTMEG
• The nutmeg tree is any of
several species of trees in genus
Myristica. The most important
commercial species is M...
CARDAMOM
Cardamom (or cardamon) refers to several
plants of the
similar genera Elettaria and Amomum in
the ginger family Z...
CLOVES
• Cloves are the aromatic flower
buds of a tree in the family
Myrtaceae, Syzygium
aromaticum, native to the
Maluku ...
APPLE PIE SPICE
Apple pie spice is a blend of
spices commonly used in
apple pies, but it can also be
used in other recipes...
ARROWROOT
• Arrowroot is a starch obtained
from the rhizomes (rootstock) of
several tropical plants,
traditionally Maranta...
CREAM OF TARTAR
• Potassium bitartrate, also
known as potassium
hydrogen tartrate, with
formula KC4H5O6, is a
byproduct of...
YOGURT
• Yogurt or yoghurt or yoghourt (/ˈjoʊɡ
ərt/ or /ˈjɒɡərt/; from Turkish: yoğurt;
other spellings listed below) is
a...
MOLASSES
• Molasses (Canadian & American
English) or treacle (English) is a
viscous by-product of the refining
of sugarcan...
BAY LEAF
• Bay leaf (plural bay leaves) refers to
the aromatic leaves of several plants
used in cooking. These include:
• ...
BREAD CRUMBS, CRACKER CRUMBS,
ROLLED OATS
The common oat (Avena sativa) is a
species of cereal grain grown for its
seed, which is known by the same name...
BROTH
• Broth is a liquid food preparation, typically consisting of either water or an already
flavored stock, in which bo...
BOUILLON CUBE
• A bouillon
cube /ˈbuːjɒn/ (US and Canada)
or stock
cube (Australia, Ireland, New
Zealand, South Africa, UK...
BUTTER
• Butter is a dairy product made by churning
fresh or fermented cream or milk. It is
generally used as a spread and...
MARGARINE
• Margarine (Listeni/ˈmɑrdʒərɨn/,
/ˈmɑrɡərɨn/, /ˈmɑrdʒrɨn/, or
/ˈmɑrdʒəriːn/) is a spread used for
spreading, ba...
SHORTENING
• Shortening is any fat that is solid
at room temperature and used
to make crumbly pastry.
Shortening is used i...
LARD
• Lard is pig fat in both its rendered
and unrendered forms. Lard was
commonly used in many cuisines as
a cooking fat...
KETCHUP AND CATSUP
Ketchup (Listeni/ˈkɛtʃəp/ or Listeni/ˈkɛtʃʌp/, also catsup,
tomato sauce, or red sauce) is a sweet and ...
TOMATO SAUCE
Tomato sauce is any of a very large number of sauces
made primarily from tomatoes, usually to be served as
pa...
CHIVES
• Chives are a commonly used herb and can be found
in grocery stores or grown in home gardens. In
culinary use, the...
Cooking ingredients
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Cooking ingredients

  1. 1. COMMERCIAL COOKING SUBTITUTING INGREDIENTS
  2. 2. Allspice, also called Jamaica pepper, pepper, myrtle pepper, pimenta, pimento,[1] English pepper[2] or newspice, is a spice that is the dried unripe fruit ("berries") of Pimenta dioica, a mid-canopy tree native to the Greater Antilles, southern Mexico, and Central America, now cultivated in many warm parts of the world.[3] The name allspice was coined as early as 1621 by the English, who thought it combined the flavour of cinnamon, nutmeg, and cloves.[4]
  3. 3. CINNAMON • Cinnamon (/ˈsɪnəmən/ SIN-ə-mən) is a spice obtained from the inner bark of several trees from the genus Cinnamomum that is used in both sweet and savoury foods. While Cinnamomum verum is sometimes considered to be "true cinnamon", most cinnamon in international commerce is derived from related species, which are also referred to as "cassia" to distinguish them from "true cinnamon".[1][2]
  4. 4. NUTMEG • The nutmeg tree is any of several species of trees in genus Myristica. The most important commercial species is Myristica fragrans, an evergreen tree indigenous to the Banda Islands in the Moluccas (or Spice Islands) of Indonesia. • The nutmeg tree is important for two spices derived from the fruit: nutmeg and mace.[1]
  5. 5. CARDAMOM Cardamom (or cardamon) refers to several plants of the similar genera Elettaria and Amomum in the ginger family Zingiberaceae. Both genera are native to India, Nepal and Bhutan; they are recognised by their small seed pods, triangular in cross-section and spindle- shaped, with a thin, papery, outer shell and small black seeds. Guatemala is the biggest producer and exporter of cardamom in the world, followed by India. Some other countries, such as Sri Lanka, have also begun to cultivate it. Elettaria pods are light green while Amomum pods are larger and dark brown. It is the world's third most expensive spice by weight, outstripped in market value only by saffron and vanilla.
  6. 6. CLOVES • Cloves are the aromatic flower buds of a tree in the family Myrtaceae, Syzygium aromaticum, native to the Maluku islands in Indonesia, commonly employed as spice. Cloves are harvested primarily in Indonesia, India, Madagascar, Zanzibar, Pakistan, Sri Lanka- and the largest producer, Pemba Island, just off the coast of Tanzania.
  7. 7. APPLE PIE SPICE Apple pie spice is a blend of spices commonly used in apple pies, but it can also be used in other recipes. The combination consists of some of the following spices: cinnamon nutmeg allspice cardamom
  8. 8. ARROWROOT • Arrowroot is a starch obtained from the rhizomes (rootstock) of several tropical plants, traditionally Maranta arundinacea, but also Florida arrowroot from Zamia pumila, and tapioca from cassava (Manihot esculenta), which is often labelled as arrowroot.[1] Japanese arrowroot, Pueraria lobata, also called kudzu, is used in similar ways
  9. 9. CREAM OF TARTAR • Potassium bitartrate, also known as potassium hydrogen tartrate, with formula KC4H5O6, is a byproduct of winemaking. In cooking it is known as cream of tartar. It is the potassium acid salt of tartaric acid, a carboxylic acid.
  10. 10. YOGURT • Yogurt or yoghurt or yoghourt (/ˈjoʊɡ ərt/ or /ˈjɒɡərt/; from Turkish: yoğurt; other spellings listed below) is a fermented milk product (soy milk, nut milks such as almond milk, and coconut milk can also be used) produced by bacterial fermentation of milk. The bacteria used to make yogurt are known as "yogurt cultures". Fermentation of lactose by these bacteria produces lactic acid, which acts on milk protein to give yogurt its texture and its characteristic tang.[
  11. 11. MOLASSES • Molasses (Canadian & American English) or treacle (English) is a viscous by-product of the refining of sugarcane, grapes, or sugar beets into sugar. The word comes from the Portuguese melaço, ultimately derived from mel, the Latin word for "honey".[1] The quality of molasses depends on the maturity of the source plant, the amount of sugar extracted, and the method employed Ang pulot, pulut o pulut-tubo ay ang matamis at malapot na arnibal o sirup na nakukuha mula sa paggawa ng asukal mula sa halamang tubo. Tinatawag din itong inuya
  12. 12. BAY LEAF • Bay leaf (plural bay leaves) refers to the aromatic leaves of several plants used in cooking. These include: • Bay laurel (Laurus nobilis, Lauraceae). Fresh or dried bay leaves are used in cooking for their distinctive flavor and fragrance. The leaves are often used to flavor soups, stews, braises and pâtés in Mediterranean cuisine. The fresh leaves are very mild and do not develop their full flavor until several weeks after picking and drying.[1]
  13. 13. BREAD CRUMBS, CRACKER CRUMBS,
  14. 14. ROLLED OATS The common oat (Avena sativa) is a species of cereal grain grown for its seed, which is known by the same name (usually in the plural, unlike other grains). While oats are suitable for human consumption as oatmeal and rolled oats, one of the most common uses is as livestock feed. Ang karaniwang obena, abena, owt o ot ay isang uri ng halamang pinagkukunan ng butil at ginagawang mga angkak. Bagaman nakakain ng tao ng mga ito bilang otmil, isa pa sa kalimitang gamit nito ang pakain bilang darak para sa mga hayop
  15. 15. BROTH • Broth is a liquid food preparation, typically consisting of either water or an already flavored stock, in which bones, meat, fish, cereal grains, or vegetables have been simmered.[1] Broth is used as a basis for other edible liquids such as soup, gravy, or sauce. It can be eaten alone or with garnish. If other ingredients are used, such as rice, pearl barley or oats, it is then generally called soup. Commercially prepared liquid broths are available, typically for chicken broth, beef broth, and vegetable broth. Dehydrated meat stock, in the form of tablets, is called a bouillon cube. Industrially produced bouillon cubes were commercialised by Maggi in 1908 and by Oxo in 1910. Using commercially-prepared broths allows cooks to save time in the kitchen.
  16. 16. BOUILLON CUBE • A bouillon cube /ˈbuːjɒn/ (US and Canada) or stock cube (Australia, Ireland, New Zealand, South Africa, UK) is dehydrated bouillon (French for br oth) or stock formed into a small cube about 15 mm wide. It is typically made by dehydrating vegetables, meat stock, a small portion of fat, salt and seasonings and shaping them into a small cube. Vegetarian and vegan types are also made. Bouillon is also available in granular form
  17. 17. BUTTER • Butter is a dairy product made by churning fresh or fermented cream or milk. It is generally used as a spread and a condiment, as well as in cooking, such as baking, sauce making, and pan frying. Butter consists of butterfat, milk proteins and water. • Most frequently made from cows' milk, butter can also be manufactured from the milk of other mammals, including sheep, goats, buffalo, and yaks. Salt, flavorings and preservatives are sometimes added to butter. Rendering butter produces clarified butter or ghee, which is almost entirely butterfa
  18. 18. MARGARINE • Margarine (Listeni/ˈmɑrdʒərɨn/, /ˈmɑrɡərɨn/, /ˈmɑrdʒrɨn/, or /ˈmɑrdʒəriːn/) is a spread used for spreading, baking, and cooking. It was originally created as a substitute for butter in 1869 in France by Hippolyte Mège- Mouriès. Margarine is made mainly of hydrogenated or refined plant oils and water. While butter is made from fat from milk, margarine is made from plant oils and may also contain milk. In some locales it is colloquially referred to as "oleo", short for oleomargarine.
  19. 19. SHORTENING • Shortening is any fat that is solid at room temperature and used to make crumbly pastry. Shortening is used in pastries that should not be elastic, such as cake.[1] Although butter is solid at room temperature and is frequently used in making pastry, the term "shortening" seldom refers to butter, but is more closely related to margarine.
  20. 20. LARD • Lard is pig fat in both its rendered and unrendered forms. Lard was commonly used in many cuisines as a cooking fat or shortening, or as a spread similar to butter. Its use in contemporary cuisine has diminished; however, many contemporary cooks and bakers favor it over other fats for select uses. The culinary qualities of lard vary somewhat depending on the part of the pig from which the fat was taken and how the lard was processed.
  21. 21. KETCHUP AND CATSUP Ketchup (Listeni/ˈkɛtʃəp/ or Listeni/ˈkɛtʃʌp/, also catsup, tomato sauce, or red sauce) is a sweet and tangy sauce, typically made from tomatoes, vinegar, a sweetener, and assorted seasonings and spices. The sweetener is most commonly sugar or high-fructose corn syrup. Seasonings vary by recipe, but commonly include onions, allspice, cloves, cinnamon, garlic, and celery.[1] Ketchup is often used as a condiment with various dishes that are usually served hot, including french fries (chips), hamburgers, sandwiches, hotdogs and grilled or fried meat. Ketchup is sometimes used as a basis or ingredient for other sauces and dressings
  22. 22. TOMATO SAUCE Tomato sauce is any of a very large number of sauces made primarily from tomatoes, usually to be served as part of a dish (rather than as a condiment). Tomato sauces are common for meat and vegetables, but they are perhaps best known as sauces for pasta dishes. CHILI SAUCE A blend of tomatoes, chiles, onions, peppers, vinegar, sugar and spices used as a condiment or seasoning. Sriracha is the generic name for a Southeast Asian hot sauce, named for the town of Si Racha. It is made from chile peppers, vinegar, garlic, sugar and salt.
  23. 23. CHIVES • Chives are a commonly used herb and can be found in grocery stores or grown in home gardens. In culinary use, the scapes and the unopened, immature flower buds are diced and used as an ingredient for fish, potatoes, soups, and other dishes. Chives have insect-repelling properties that can be used in gardens to control pests.[5]
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