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Chapter v network
 

Chapter v network

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This presentation is created for BBEMNHS students references

This presentation is created for BBEMNHS students references

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    Chapter v network Chapter v network Presentation Transcript

    • Chapter V NETWORK Mr. Jesus F. Obenita Jr. BBEMNHS ICT Teacher
    •  
    • NETWORK
      • Are multiple computers linked together to make simultaneous information sharing and exchange by multiple users.
      • Make it possible for its connected user to share tools, resources and information.
    • 3 BASIC NETWORK CATEGORIES
      • LOCAL AREA NETWORK (LAN)
      • METROPOLITAN AREA NETWORK (MAN)
      • WIDE AREA NETWORK (WAN)
    • LOCAL AREA NETWORK (LAN)
      • THE SMALLEST OF THE 3 NETWORK TYPES, CONSIST OF PCs CONNECTED TOGETHER WITHIN A LIMITED AREA, SUCH AS WITHIN THE SAME BUILDING, FLOOR OR DEPARTMENT.
    •  
    •  
    • METROPOLITAN AREA NETWORK (MAN)
      • ARE NETWORK THAT SPANS NO MORE THAN 50 MILES. IT DESIGNED TO CONNECT LANs SPANNING A TOWN OR CITY
    •  
    • WIDE AREA NETWORK (WAN)
      • USED TO DISTRIBUTE INFORMATION THOUSAND OF MILES AMONG THOUSANDS OF USERS.
      • IT SPANS CITIES, COUNTRIES EVEN CONTINENTS.
    •  
    •  
    • NETWORK TERMS
    • NETWORK SERVER
      • A POWERFUL COMPUTER WHOSE SOLE PURPOSE IS TO SERVE NETWORK CLIENTS.
      • SERVERS RUN NETWORK-CONTROLLING SOFTWARE AND PROVIDE WORKSTATIONS WITH REQUESTED RESOURCES.
    • HOSTS
      • ANY COMPUTER WHETHER MAINFRAME, SERVER, OR EVEN A PC THAT ACTS AS AN INFORMATION SOURCE ON A NETWORK.
      • ANY COMPUTER THAT HAS A TCP/IP NETWORK ADDRESS CAN BE A HOST.
    • PEERS
      • MEANS ANY COMPUTER SHARING THE SAME PROTOCOL LAYER WITH ANOTHER COMPUTER.
      • WHEN TWO COMPUTERS SHARE RESOURCES SECURITY LEVELS AND USER GROUP, THEY ARE CONSIDERED PEERS.
    • WORK STATION
      • IS ANY NETWORK COMPUTER THAT CONNECTS TO AND REQUEST RESOURCES FROM A NETWORK.
    • PROTOCOL
      • REFERS TO THE SPECIFIC STANDARDS GOVERNING THE SENDING AND RECEIVING OF DATA.
      • DATA TRANSMISSION SYSTEM FOLLOW PREDETERMINED RULES SO DATA TRAVELS N UNIVERSALLY ACCEPTED MANNER.
    • 2 TYPES OF NETWORK ARCHITECTURE
      • PEER TO PEER NETWORK
      • CLIENT /SERVER NETWORK
    • PEER TO PEER NETWORK
      • PEER TO PEER NETWORK- no centralized computer oversees the networks, no server, and computers simply connect with each other in a work group to share files, printers, and internet access. Networking equipment: NIC, Cables and network hub.
    • CLIENT/SERVER NETWORK
      • USE A NETWORK OPERATING SYSTEM TO MANAGE THE ENTIRE NETWORK. THERE IS USUALLY AN NT DOMAIN CONTROLLER , WHICH ALL THE COMPUTERS LOG ON TO.
    • NETWORK MEDIA
    • EXAMPLE OF NETWORK MEDIA
      • UTP (UPSHIELDED TWISTED PAIR)
      • COAXIAL CABLE
      • FIBER OPTICS
      • STP (SHIELDED TWISTED PAIR)
    • UTP (UNSHIELDED TWISTED PAIR)
      • The least expensive and most popular network media. One of the advantages is its special coating that shrinks in high fire temperatures, eliminating toxic fumes emissions.
      • A UTP disadvantage is its lack insulation, which makes the cable susceptible to electrical interference.
    •  
    • STP (Shielded Twisted Pair)
      • Is twisted, plastic coated, shealth-wrapped copper wire. The main difference between UTP and STP is the STP’s aluminum or polyester shielding surrounding individual wires.Shielding allows STP to reduce or eliminate interference.
    •  
    • FIBER OPTIC CABLES
      • Are thin, glass strand that carry light waves and are wrapped by an outer protective sheath. Interpreted by computer as data, the light waves in a fiber optic can travel great distances and deliver vast amounts of data. Fiber optic cabling system are extremely powerful and efficient but they are also quite expensive.
    •  
    • COAXIAL CABLES
      • Are commonly used by cable TV companies. A center cable insulated by plastic or foam, wrapped in a copper mesh wire and sheathed in a plastic or rubber jacket.
      • Coaxial cable is relatively inexpensive to produce and install.
      • It is useful when connecting a small number of computers using pre-existing hardware, or when sharing small amount of data.
    •  
    • NETWORK HARDWARE
    • NETWORK INTERFACE CARD (NIC)
      • A PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARD, AN ADAPTER THAT PLUGS INTO THE COMPUTER’S MOTHERBOARD WHEN CONNECTED WITH A CABLE NETWORK, PROVIDES THE PHYSICAL LINK BETWEEN YOUR COMPUTER AND THE NETWORK.
      • ITS MAIN FUNCTION IS TO CONVERT DATA INTO CABLE-TRANSMITTABLE DATA, AND PROVIDE A CONNECTION TO NETWORK MEDIA
    •  
    • NETWORK HUB
      • A HARDWARE DEVICE THAT ALL PCs ON A NETWORK ARE CONNECTED TO BY CABLING. THE HUB MANAGES RECEIVING AND TRANSMOTTING DATA FROM NETWORKED DEVICES. IT ALLOWS DATA TO FLOW ON AND OFF THE NETWORK BETWEEN PRINTERS, COMPUTERS, AND OTHER DEVICES BY SHARING THE LANES TRAFFIC.
    •  
    • REPEATER
      • A DEVICE THAT STRENGTHEN SIGNALS AND ALLOW THEN TO STAY CLEAR OVER LONGER DISTANCES.
    • NETWORK BRIDGE
      • DEVIDES NETWORK INTO SMALLER, MORE MANAGEABLE SECTIONS HELPING REDUCE NETWORK TRAFFIC.
      • DATA SIGNALS ARRIVING AT A BRIDGE CONTAIN INFORMATION ABOUT THEIR DESTINATIONS. THE NETWORK BRIDGE ALLOWS ONLY SPECIFIC INFORMATION TO TRAVEL OVER A CERTAIN PATHS. WHEN SIGNAL ARRIVING AT A BRIDGE DOES NOT POSSE THE APPROPRIATE ADDRESS IT IS FILTERED OUT COMPLETELY.
    •  
    • NETWORK SWITCH
      • BRIDGES MAKE A SIMPLE DO/DON’T DECISION ON WHICH PACKETS TO SEND ACROSS TWO SEGMENTS THEY CONNECT. IT HELPS DETERMINE HOW DATA MOVES OVER VERY LARGE NETWORKS. IT WORKS LIKE A STOPLIGHT AT A BUSY INTERSECTION. IT ALLOWS DATA TO TRAVEL IN ITS OWN LANE OF TRAFFIC.
    •  
    • ROUTER
      • A DEVICE THAT FORWARDS DATA PACKETS BETWEEN LOCAL OR WIDE AREA NETWORK GROUPS. USING ROUTING TABLES AND PROTOCOLS, ROUTERS READ A SIGNAL’S NETWORK ADDRESS AND DECIDE ITS MOST EXPEDIENT ROUTE.
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