The mission tailored, modular force:
1. The ‘one box’ storage/shipping/functional container system enhances mission capabi...
3:1 shelter, easily expandable, suitable
for multipurpose applications.

Inside view of 3:1
expandable shelter,
completely...
BACK-UP

12/23/09

3
Adaptive Thinking

Expert Patterns of Battlefield
Thinking
 Keep a focus on mission
accomplishment and higher
commander's...
Combat Leader’s Guide
100

Soldier’s ability to perform
complex mental functions
decreases by time.

Coordination and Info...
Positive Leadership
Attention
Control
Cognitive
Foundation
s

Goal
Setting

Visualizatio
n

Peak
= Performance
Warrior
Min...
Combat Fitness Concept
Task-based Combat Fitness with Fighting Load with Fire Team Elements
2-mile road march
Scored on bo...
Combat Marksmanship Concept
Combat Marksmanship Concept
• Integrated rifle-optics-ammunition-targets-training strategy
• T...
Regular Army IET Attrition Risk Profile
Organizational
Behavioral
Law Waiver

Bonus

Combat
Arms
MOS

Never thought
about ...
Regular Army IET Attrition Risk Profile
Organizational
Behavioral
Law Waiver

Bonus

Combat
Arms
MOS

Never thought
about ...
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Conex

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  • Experts learn what information is critical and what is not.
    The role of simple practice cannot be underestimated.
    We have to ask ourselves where a LT or squad leader gets 20 repetitions on ‘how to fight’ tasks?
  • There are hundreds of combat procedures, reports, and protocols.
    Who here can remember perfectly how to do everything?
    The answer is we can prompt memory to yield full performance.
    U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences Research Report 1814. Combat Leaders’ Guide (CLG): Leader Handbook 2003, Margaret S. Salter, U.S. Army Research Institute, James H. Centric, Northrop Grumman Mission Systems, November 2003
  • Positive leadership and training resilience are force multipliers.
    Soldiers regardless of their backgrounds can learn to ‘bounce back’ and overcome obstacles.
  • Everything we do should reinforce warfighting tasks and the combat speed, strength, stamina, suppleness, and skill they need to win.
    The effect of training relevance on morale cannot be underestimated.
    MaxWACS study showed women outperforming men on an ARTEP because they used teamwork.
    WWII studies reinforce the need for task-relevant fitness.
  • Traditional BRM model does not reflect dynamic combat.
    We are doing convoy live fire in BCT today as well as carrying blank-loaded weapons daily to train safe weapon handling.
    Perhaps the future Combat Marksmanship range will score killing “tough,” moving, shoot-back targets on a fire-team maneuver range.
    Even a defensive BRM range perhaps ought to have aiming stakes, range cards, defiladed targets, and a OPORD/FRAGO with ROE
  • Transcript of "Conex"

    1. 1. The mission tailored, modular force: 1. The ‘one box’ storage/shipping/functional container system enhances mission capabilities, meets worldwide logistics standards, and saves significant time and resources. It creates the capability for a nearly “instant” FOB. Equipment/supplies are no longer packed/unpacked, loaded/unloaded, et. multiple times. 2. The CONEX unit is rust-proof, self-leveling, has standard wall interfaces for modular interior equipment, and has standard electrical/water/cable runs. Armored/insulated onsite with local materials. 3. Units pre-load supplies/equipment (weapons, ammo, rations, beds, etc.) in the squad ‘box,’ for example, to support the first xx mission days. 4. Containers are configured to functions: a. Barracks/living quarters f. Medical k. Gyms b. Showers g. Power l. Water purification c. Supply/logistics m. Kitchen d. Maintenance/repair h. Tactical (gun towers/sensor & mast arrays) e. Operations/comms i. Laundry 12/23/09 j. Toilets 1
    2. 2. 3:1 shelter, easily expandable, suitable for multipurpose applications. Inside view of 3:1 expandable shelter, completely equipped as operating theatre. 12/23/09
    3. 3. BACK-UP 12/23/09 3
    4. 4. Adaptive Thinking Expert Patterns of Battlefield Thinking  Keep a focus on mission accomplishment and higher commander's intent.  Model a thinking enemy.  Consider effects of terrain.  Use all elements/systems available.  Include considerations of timing.  Exhibit visualizations that are dynamic and proactive.  Consider contingencies and remain flexible.  Consider how your fight fits into the bigger picture from friendly and enemy perspectives. Source: ARI 12/23/09 TLAC training (with classroom instructor) but no OIF/OEF experience no TLAC training and OIF/OEF experience no TLAC training and no OIF/OEF experience Training critical thinking works! 4
    5. 5. Combat Leader’s Guide 100 Soldier’s ability to perform complex mental functions decreases by time. Coordination and Information Processing 80 60 Command & Control 40 20 Mission Hours 24 48 72 96 120 CONFIDENCE 1.0 0.9 WITH CLG 0.8 P E R C E N T 0.7 0.6 0.5 0.4 NO CLG 0.3 How confident are you in your Soldier’s ability to perform their combat missions with and without the CLG? (ARI Research Report (see Notes)) 0.2 0.1 0.0 12/23/09 SGT SSG SFC MSG SGM 2LT 1LT CPT MAJ LTC COL BG RANK 5
    6. 6. Positive Leadership Attention Control Cognitive Foundation s Goal Setting Visualizatio n Peak = Performance Warrior Mindset Stress & Energy Mgmt USMA Peak Performance Model: Training the Warrior Pentathlete Self Regulating Instinctive Adaptive Agile Mental Effort Self critical Analytical Judgmental Physical effort ARI – Infantry Forces Research Unit The most critical training that prepared Soldiers for efficient and effective task accomplishment under lifethreatening, fast-paced, and stressful conditions are: • Time management • Command of the basics • skill mastery • Combat focus • Visualization • Repetition, and • Use of job aids 12/23/09 Emotional Mental Build confidence Control attention Recover energy ‘See’ the battlefield Tactical Technical Physical Combat PT 8-Step AAR Rote Repetition United States Olympic Committee 1998 Human performance at elite levels is heavily dependent upon intangible, mental factors, i.e. • Confidence despite setbacks, • Concentration amidst distractions, • Composure during times of stress. 6
    7. 7. Combat Fitness Concept Task-based Combat Fitness with Fighting Load with Fire Team Elements 2-mile road march Scored on both time and TTP Not to scale C4 pit grenade throw Truck Dismount Or Convoy React to Ambush 12/23/09 low crawl low wall cross dry gulch jump casualty carry/drag Supply or Sandba g stack (time) MILES/Simunition engagement C4 pit high wall cross 3 sec burst up-down assault (time) Reverse the course with 2/4-Soldier combat litter carry 7
    8. 8. Combat Marksmanship Concept Combat Marksmanship Concept • Integrated rifle-optics-ammunition-targets-training strategy • Targets: • Simple, deployable targets (kill-reset) • Rocking or moving • Physiologically-based kill zone scoring • Shoot-back targets (Simunition©/MILES) • Ballistic mass requiring multiple hits • Fire Team Fire and maneuver CTC-like ranges • Possible high-low standards/rifle/sight/ammunition mix by MOS/unit Body armor, rifle, and vehicle interfaces can be critical 12/23/09 8
    9. 9. Regular Army IET Attrition Risk Profile Organizational Behavioral Law Waiver Bonus Combat Arms MOS Never thought about quitting High School Current smoker Hx chest pain Preaccession Injury Health Physical Fitness Demographic High Initial Fitness African American Hispanic Ever suspended Hx fainting /expelled Low BMI Entry Pay ChildGrade ren High BMI Hx shortness of breath Hx depression Hx backpain Old >26 years Young <19 years Not AFQT Tier I IIIB Female • Base-case IET attrition risk is 15% • Further left or right of the center line means increased risk (or less risk) of attrition. • Bubble size is relative size of RA accessions that are associated with that factor. 20% female bubble is about 1/2 the size of the 33% TSC IIIB bubble. • Not Tier 1 (10%) • Female (20%) 12/23/09 • AFQT IIIB (30%) / ASSESSS HAZARDS / DEVELOP CONTROLS / IMPLEMENT CONTROLS / SUPERVISE-EVALUATE 9 15 IDENTIFY HAZARDS
    10. 10. Regular Army IET Attrition Risk Profile Organizational Behavioral Law Waiver Bonus Combat Arms MOS Never thought about quitting High School Current smoker Hx chest pain Preaccession Injury Health Physical Fitness Demographic High Initial Fitness African American Hispanic Ever suspended Hx fainting /expelled Low BMI Entry Pay ChildGrade ren High BMI Hx shortness of breath Hx depression Hx backpain Old >26 years Young <19 years Not AFQT Tier I IIIB Female • Base-case IET attrition risk is 15% • Further left or right of the center line means increased risk (or less risk) of attrition. • Bubble size is relative size of RA accessions that are associated with that factor. 20% female bubble is about 1/2 the size of the 33% TSC IIIB bubble. • Not Tier 1 (10%) • Female (20%) 12/23/09 • AFQT IIIB (30%) / ASSESSS HAZARDS / DEVELOP CONTROLS / IMPLEMENT CONTROLS / SUPERVISE-EVALUATE 9 15 IDENTIFY HAZARDS
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