Nature of education_web_2011
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Nature of education_web_2011

on

  • 866 views

Overview of the contested nature of "education" for an introductory session. Original by Peter Hadfield.

Overview of the contested nature of "education" for an introductory session. Original by Peter Hadfield.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
866
Views on SlideShare
765
Embed Views
101

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0

2 Embeds 101

http://pce2011.blogspot.com 99
http://pce2011.blogspot.co.uk 2

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

CC Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Nature of education_web_2011 Nature of education_web_2011 Presentation Transcript

  • Planning & Preparing to Teach Session One The Nature of Education and the role of the Teacher Peter Hadfield (with additional confusion added by James Atherton)
  • Reference
    • Tummons, J (2010) Becoming a Professional Tutor
    • in the Lifelong Learning Sector (2 nd Ed)
  • Outcomes
    • Define what we mean by the term ‘Education’
    • Appreciate the need to be familiar with the current educational discourse
    • Identify current policies and practices in Post-Compulsory education that impact upon role
    • Examine the role of the teacher in a Post-Compulsory context.
  • Outcomes
    • Define what we mean by the term ‘Education’
    • Appreciate the need to be familiar with the current educational discourse
    • Identify current policies and practices in Post-Compulsory education that impact upon role
    • Examine the role of the teacher in a Post-Compulsory context.
    We are of course expected to announce these at the start of the session; does it help?
  • Education as a ‘Subject’….
  • Education as a ‘Subject’…. Is education a “subject” like these others? It can be seen through all these lenses, and looks different through each.
  • Education as a ‘Subject’…. Is education a “subject” like these others?
  • Population S-curve 30 September 2011 Population Time High Population Turnover Rapid Population Growth Incipient Population Decline This is the Riesman model: see http://www.doceo.co.uk/background/riesman.htm for explication
  • Population and Economy 30 September 2011 Population Time Primary (subsistence) Economy Secondary (Production) Economy Tertiary (Service) Economy Accelerating Change << >
  • Riesman’s model 30 September 2011 Population Time Tradition-directed culture Inner-directed culture Other-directed culture << >
  • Education & Social character 30 September 2011 Population Time Pass on revealed truth Charge up to apply Negotiate << >
  • Education is…
    • ... in all pre-modern societies, including that of agrarian Europe, education was designed to preserve what had already been achieved and to put a brake on the ingenuity and curiosity of the individual , which could undermine the stability of a community that had no means of integrating or exploiting fresh insights. In the madrasahs, for example, pupils learned old texts and commentaries by heart, and the teaching consisted of a word-by-word explication of a standard textbook. Public disputations between scholars took it for granted that one of the debaters was right and the other wrong. There was no idea, in the question-and-answer style of study, of allowing the clash of two opposing positions to build a new synthesis.
    • ARMSTRONG K (2001) Islam: a short history London: Phoenix (pp. 87-88).
    30 September 2011 << >
  • Education is…
    • ... in all pre-modern societies, including that of agrarian Europe, education was designed to preserve what had already been achieved and to put a brake on the ingenuity and curiosity of the individual , which could undermine the stability of a community that had no means of integrating or exploiting fresh insights. In the madrasahs, for example, pupils learned old texts and commentaries by heart, and the teaching consisted of a word-by-word explication of a standard textbook. Public disputations between scholars took it for granted that one of the debaters was right and the other wrong. There was no idea, in the question-and-answer style of study, of allowing the clash of two opposing positions to build a new synthesis.
    • ARMSTRONG K (2001) Islam: a short history London: Phoenix (pp. 87-88).
    30 September 2011 << > Karen Armstrong is describing education in a tradition-directed culture
  • Education is…
    • “ As civilised human beings, we are the inheritors, neither of an enquiry about ourselves and the world, nor of an accumulating body of information, but of a conversation , begun in the primeval forests and extended and made more articulate in the course of centuries. It is a conversation which goes on both in public and within each of ourselves... Education, properly speaking, is an initiation into the skill and partnership of the conversation in which we learn to recognise the voices, to distinguish the proper occasions of utterance, and in which we acquire the intellectual and moral habits appropriate to conversation”
    • Michael Oakeshott (1962).
    30 September 2011
  • Education is…
    • “ As civilised human beings, we are the inheritors, neither of an enquiry about ourselves and the world, nor of an accumulating body of information, but of a conversation , begun in the primeval forests and extended and made more articulate in the course of centuries. It is a conversation which goes on both in public and within each of ourselves... Education, properly speaking, is an initiation into the skill and partnership of the conversation in which we learn to recognise the voices, to distinguish the proper occasions of utterance, and in which we acquire the intellectual and moral habits appropriate to conversation”
    • Michael Oakeshott (1962).
    30 September 2011 Oakeshott’s is the Enlightenment, liberal/humanistic view
  • Education is…
    • Learning is the key to prosperity - for each of us as individuals, as well as for the nation as a whole. Investment in human capital will be the foundation of success in the knowledge-based global economy of the twenty-first century. This is why the Government has put learning at the heart of its ambition. [...]
    • To achieve stable and sustainable growth, we will need a well-educated, well-equipped and adaptable labour force . To cope with rapid change […] we must ensure that people can return to learning throughout their lives…
    • BLUNKETT D (1998) Foreword to The Learning Age: a renaissance for a new Britain Department for Education and Employment Green Paper; London HMSO.
    30 September 2011 <<
  • Education is…
    • Learning is the key to prosperity - for each of us as individuals, as well as for the nation as a whole. Investment in human capital will be the foundation of success in the knowledge-based global economy of the twenty-first century. This is why the Government has put learning at the heart of its ambition. [...]
    • To achieve stable and sustainable growth, we will need a well-educated, well-equipped and adaptable labour force . To cope with rapid change […] we must ensure that people can return to learning throughout their lives…
    • BLUNKETT D (1998) Foreword to The Learning Age: a renaissance for a new Britain Department for Education and Employment Green Paper; London HMSO.
    30 September 2011 << And this is the utilitarian, instrumental view of it; it’s not so much a good in itself as a means to an end--prosperity
  • The cultural heritage ideology
    • Transmission of traditional culture by authoritative teachers is key.
    • Teaching should concentrate on subjects which are traditionally valued and have a perceived high status.
    • The acquisition of worthwhile knowledge is paramount, as is the maintenance of academic standards and the process of passing on a culture from one generation to the next.
    • Formal relations between teacher and learner are more likely.
    • Traditional teaching style is more evident.
    • Rigorous entry qualifications to course are emphasised.
    • Assessment is by examination rather then coursework
  • The equal opportunities ideology
    • Education is valued as a means of redressing the inequalities in society.
    • Learners should have equal chances of success in education (and life) through their own endeavours, irrespective of wealth, gender, or ethic group.
    • Access to courses is as open as possible.
    • Emphasis is placed on learner-centred education, individual performance, collaboration and democratic processes in learning.
    • Self and peer assessment are important, with coursework favoured in place of examinations.
    • Teacher is more a facilitator and learns with the learners, rather than an authority figure.
    • The focus is on problem-solving, creativity, critical thinking and education of attitudes and emotions.
  • The vocational training ideology
    • Education is seen as a means of providing appropriate skills and knowledge which will contribute to the creation of economic wealth.
    • Technological innovation is particularly valued; for example, computer aided learning.
    • Teaching encourages habits of punctuality, self-discipline, obedience and competitiveness.
    • League tables are important, based on various performance indicators such as examination pass rates and learner success rates in finding future employment.
    • Industrial management concepts, such as income generation and performance related pay, are prized.
  • The vocational training ideology
    • Education is seen as a means of providing appropriate skills and knowledge which will contribute to the creation of economic wealth.
    • Technological innovation is particularly valued; for example, computer aided learning.
    • Teaching encourages habits of punctuality, self-discipline, obedience and competitiveness.
    • League tables are important, based on various performance indicators such as examination pass rates and learner success rates in finding future employment.
    • Industrial management concepts, such as income generation and performance related pay, are prized.
    Which finds its ultimate expression in the values underpinning vocational and further education
  • Dual Professionalism… Subject Specialist Professional Educator Professional Codes of Practice
  • Dual Professionalism… Subject Specialist Professional Educator Professional Codes of Practice The role of the tutor is therefore to be not only a practitioner of her subject or discipline, but also a teacher; hence “dual professionalism” and what this course is about
  • The task of the tutor is to induct the learner into a professional identity, represented by this fuzzy green background...
  • Political Background Legal Aspects Research methods Ethics Philosophies / models of Practice Discipline- Specific Theory Professional Studies Practice skills Technology Values The task of the tutor is to induct the learner into a professional identity, represented by this fuzzy green background...
  • Political Background Legal Aspects Research methods Ethics Philosophies / models of Practice Discipline- Specific Theory Professional Studies Practice skills Technology Values The task of the tutor is to induct the learner into a professional identity, represented by this fuzzy green background... But because we teach on organised “courses” which have to be arranged and timetabled in neat boxes, we never cover the messy stuff...
  •  
  • Given that there are so many contested ideas in the field of education, it is not really surprising that it is overrun with regulatory bodies, often with competing and irreconcilable agendas
  • The post-16 curriculum Traditional values of Education Education for all A ‘social good’ Investment in Human Capital
  • The post-16 curriculum Traditional values of Education Education for all a ‘social good’ Investment in Human Capital Here are three of the competing ideologies, all making claims on you: the red one clearly underpins the official (LLUK) curriculum of this course...