Research Proposal 5 - The Formal Meeting and Presentation
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Research Proposal 5 - The Formal Meeting and Presentation

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A student guide to the mechanics, procedures, and parts of a formal meeting and presentation, with photographs

A student guide to the mechanics, procedures, and parts of a formal meeting and presentation, with photographs

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    Research Proposal 5 - The Formal Meeting and Presentation Research Proposal 5 - The Formal Meeting and Presentation Presentation Transcript

    • THE FORMAL PRESENTATION SHL1013 Professional English
    • How to Call a Meeting PARTS OF A MEMO + PARTS OF A FORMAL EMAIL + PARTS OF A MEETING AGENDA = YOUR MEETING ANNOUNCEMENT & AGENDA
    • PREPARE THE AGENDA
    • How to Record a Meeting PARTS OF A MEETING MINUTES + PARTS OF A FORMAL EMAIL = YOUR MEETING MINUTES
    • Formal Meeting WHAT HAPPENS IN A FORMAL MEETING
    • OPEN THE MEETING
    • USE FORMAL MEETING PROCEDURES
    • USE FORMAL MEETING LANGUAGE
    • Formal Presentation WHAT HAPPENS IN A FORMAL PRESENTATION
    • PREPARE ALL PRESENTATION MATERIALS
    • BEGIN YOUR PRESENTATION
    • INTRODUCE YOURSELF
    • SAY WHY YOU FEEL STRONGLY ABOUT THE TOPIC
    • TELL A SHORT, SHORT STORY
    • STATE THE TITLE OF YOUR PROPOSAL
    • INTRODUCE THE TOPIC
    • INTRODUCE THE PROBLEM
    • STATE THE TARGET BENEFICIARIES
    • STATE THE TARGET NEEDS TO BE ADDRESSED
    • GIVE PROOF THAT THE NEED IS URGENT
    • QUOTE, PARAPHRASE, CITE, REFERENCE SOURCES USE A THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK AS SUPPORT
    • PROPOSE YOUR GOALS USE THEORETICAL FRAMEWORKS AS SUPPORT
    • STATE THE PROPOSED SOLUTIONS USE THEORETICAL FRAMEWORKS AS SUPPORT
    • STATE THE TARGET BENEFITS USE THEORETICAL FRAMEWORKS AS SUPPORT
    • USE QUESTIONS TO YOUR ADVANTAGE
    • STATE YOUR PLAN OF ACTION USE THEORETICAL FRAMEWORKS AS SUPPORT
    • STATE YOUR ACTION PLAN & TIMELINE
    • PRESENT YOUR COMMUNICATION STRATEGIES USE THEORETICAL FRAMEWORKS AS SUPPORT
    • PRESENT YOUR ATTENTION-CATCHING STRATEGIES USE THEORETICAL FRAMEWORKS AS SUPPORT
    • PRESENT YOUR INFORMATION STRATEGIES USE THEORETICAL FRAMEWORKS AS SUPPORT
    • PRESENT YOUR INSTRUCTION STRATEGIES USE THEORETICAL FRAMEWORKS AS SUPPORT
    • CONNECT TO YOUR CONCLUSIONS
    • PRESENT YOUR RECOMMENDATIONS USE THEORETICAL FRAMEWORKS AS SUPPORT
    • INDICATE THE END OF THE PRESENTATION
    • RECORD PEER INPUT
    • RECORD SUGGESTIONS
    • USE THE SUGGESTIONS TO POLISH THE PRESENTATION
    • Formal Presentation WHAT YOU SHOULD DO
    • USE THE RUBRICS TO POLISH THE PRESENTATION
    • USE PROFESSIONAL ATTIRE
    • USE PROFESSIONAL ATTIRE
    • PROVIDE CONTACT INFORMATION
    • LISTEN TO WHAT THEY SAY, AND WHAT THEY DO NOT SAY
    • RECORD WHAT THEY SAY
    • LOOK AT YOUR AUDIENCE
    • TALK TO YOUR AUDIENCE
    • ESTABLISH EYE CONTACT WITH YOUR AUDIENCE
    • USE BIG LETTERS SO THE AUDIENCE CAN READ IT
    • FACE TOWARDS THE AUDIENCE
    • MAINTAIN EYE CONTACT WITH THE AUDIENCE
    • TALK TO THE AUDIENCE
    • EXPLAIN TO THE AUDIENCE
    • LOOK DIRECTLY AT YOUR AUDIENCE
    • Formal Presentation ONE MORE TIME
    • START WITH A GREETING & INTRODUCTION
    • STATE YOUR GOALS IMMEDIATELY
    • STATE THE RESEARCH PROBLEM
    • TALK TO THE AUDIENCE
    • USE TRANSITION SLIDES FOR EVERY SECTION
    • SHOW YOUR INSTRUCTION STRATEGY
    • SHOW YOUR INFORMATION STRATEGY
    • SHOW YOUR PROMOTION STRATEGIES
    • DIFFERENT STRATEGIES
    • ASK WHICH ONE WORKS
    • ASK WHICH ONE DOES NOT WORK
    • ASK FOR SUGGESTIONS
    • END COURTEOUSLY, WITH GRACE AND DIGNITY
    • NEXT A FEW IDEAS THAT CAN HELP
    • How to Start an Original Topic TARGET AREA + IGNORED RESOURCE OR MATERIAL + URGENT NEEDS + CONNECTION = YOUR PROBLEM-SOLUTION IDEA
    • How to Start an Original Topic At any step where you have possible ideas, write them down and select later. 1. Choose a place (target area) with problems. Home country, school, community, peer group, family, friends, government office, cafeteria, library, market
    • How to Start an Original Topic At any step where you have possible ideas, write them down and select later. 2. Think of a resource or material that is plentiful, available (ignored by people), and cost-free in the target area. Salt, potatoes, soil, smiles, manpower, language, music Waste matter from homes, kitchens, or stores: poop, urine, garbage Waste material from exports, industries, or factories: bagasse, sawdust, wood pallets, wood shavings, pineapple peel, banana peel
    • How to Start an Original Topic At any step where you have possible ideas, write them down and select later. 3. Think of some urgent needs in your target area. Specify. health [malaria], mortality [infant], technology [pencils], nature [deforestation, locust plague], culture [disappearing recipes], finance [work, trade], knowledge [math, language, diseases], housing [materials]
    • How to Start an Original Topic At any step where you have possible ideas, write them down and select later. 4. Search for uses of the resource or material. Search online. [uses of salt] [waste matter uses]
    • How to Start an Original Topic At any step where you have possible ideas, write them down and select later. 5. Create a problem-solution idea by connecting resources or materials to an urgent need. Google and discover. [Soil dirt house housing] [garbage education] [malaria salt] [poop fuel]
    • How to Start an Original Topic At any step where you have possible ideas, write them down and select later. 1. Choose a place (target area) with problems. Home country, school, community, peer group, family, friends, government office, cafeteria, library, market 2. Think of a resource or material that is plentiful, available (ignored by people), and cost-free in the target area. Salt, potatoes, soil, smiles, manpower, language, music Waste matter from homes, kitchens, or stores: poop, urine, garbage Waste material from exports, industries, or factories: bagasse, sawdust, wood pallets, wood shavings, pineapple peel, banana peel 3. Think of some urgent needs in your target area. Specify. health [malaria], mortality [infant], technology [pencils], nature [deforestation, locust plague], culture [disappearing recipes], finance [work, trade], knowledge [math, language, diseases], housing [materials] 4. Search for uses of the resource or material. Search online. [uses of salt] [waste matter solutions] 5. Create a problem-solution idea by connecting resources or materials to an urgent need. Google and discover. [Soil dirt house housing] [garbage education] [malaria salt] [poop fuel]
    • How to State Your Topic SPECIFIC TARGET BENEFICIARIES + SPECIFIC NEED + URGENCY OF NEED + PROPOSED SOLUTION = YOUR ONE-SENTENCE STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM
    • How to State Your Research Problem Target Beneficiaries General (No good): Children in Thailand who do not speak English Specific (Good): Street children in Bangkok up to 10 years old who do not speak English
    • How to State Your Research Problem Urgent Needs The need should be clear or implied in the description of the target beneficiaries. Prove that this is a need by citing a theory (Abraham Maslow, 1943; Simon Hertnon, 2005; Clayton Alderfer, 1969; William Glasser, 1998; John Burton, 1990; Lewis Coser, 1956)
    • How to State Your Research Problem Urgent Needs There should be proof of the urgency of the need. The proof can be a quote or paraphrase (source, citation, reference). Use theory for support (John Kotter, 2008;
    • How to State Your Research Problem Proposed Solution State your proposed solution, why you choose this (plentiful, free, ignored resource or material), how it solves a problem in your target area, the parts of this idea that can be found in other sources (Related Literature) and your original contribution in this idea.
    • How to State Your Research Problem Target Beneficiaries General (No good): Children in Thailand who do not speak English Specific (Good): Street children in Bangkok up to 10 years old who do not speak English Urgent Needs: The need should be clear or implied in the description of the target beneficiaries. Prove that this is a need by citing a theory (Abraham Maslow, 1943; Simon Hertnon, 2005; Clayton Alderfer, 1969; William Glasser, 1998; John Burton, 1990; Lewis Coser, 1956) There should be proof of the urgency of the need. The proof can be a quote or paraphrase (source, citation, reference). Use theory for support (John Kotter, 2008; Proposed Solution State your proposed solution, why you choose this (plentiful, free, ignored resource or material), how it solves a problem in your target area, the parts of this idea that can be found in other sources (See Related Literature) and your original contribution in this idea (See How to State Your Original Contribution).
    • What You Will Not Do SPECIFIC BENEFICIARY + SPECIFIC NEEDS + PROPOSED SOLUTIONS + RESOURCE LIMITATIONS + TIME LIMITATIONS = YOUR RESEARCH LIMITATIONS
    • How to State Your Research Limitations Target Beneficiaries This proposal is limited to the needs of street children in Bangkok up to 10 years old who do not speak English
    • How to State Your Research Limitations Urgent Needs This proposal is limited to providing the target beneficiaries with a poster for learning 30 English adjectives, designed suitably for their age with elements familiar to their lifestyle.
    • How to State Your Research Limitations Proposed Solution This proposal is limited to solutions that can be designed, revised, produced, and presented within ___ weeks.
    • How to State Your Research Limitations Target Beneficiaries This proposal is limited to the needs of street children in Bangkok up to 10 years old who do not speak English Urgent Needs: This proposal is limited to providing the target beneficiaries with a poster for learning 30 English adjectives, designed suitably for their age with elements familiar to their lifestyle. Proposed Solution This proposal is limited to solutions that can be designed, revised, produced, and presented within ___ weeks.
    • How to Create Your Outline PARTS OF A RESEARCH PROPOSAL + THE APA PAPER FORMAT + YOUR KEYWORDS + ORDER OF IDEAS + HIERARCHY OF IDEAS = YOUR RESEARCH PROPOSAL OUTLINE
    • How to State Your Outline Google how to write an APA-style outline.
    • How to Use Others’ Ideas YOUR IDEAS + OTHERS IDEAS RELATED TO YOURS + QUOTE OR PARAPHRASE IDEAS + INTEGRATE IDEAS + CITE + REFERENCE = YOUR RELATED LITERATURE
    • Related Literature • • • • • • Some of your key words (nouns) Some of your processes (verbs) Repeating your ideas Agreeing with your ideas Disagreeing with your ideas Adding to your ideas
    • How to State What Others Say Related Literature – Your topic is composed of several ideas. Each idea can be found in other sources (this is called “literature”). Search to know what they say. See Keyword Searching Techniques. Record what they say. Google How to Write Research Notes.
    • How to State What Others Say Quoting – The ideas of others copied exactly, and used to support your own ideas. Each quote must be cited. Google How to Quote in the APA Style.
    • How to State What Others Say Paraphrasing – The ideas of others stated in your own words, your own style of expression. Each paraphrase must be cited. Google How to Paraphrase.
    • How to State What Others Say Integrating Sources – The ideas of others should be smoothly connected to your ideas. Google How to Integrate Sources.
    • How to State What Others Say Citing Sources – Citations in the text, right after every sourced (or borrowed) idea. Google APA format for citations.
    • How to State What Others Say Referencing Sources – A list of references at the end of your proposal. Google the APA format for referencing.
    • How to State What Others Say • Related Literature – Your topic is composed of several ideas. Each idea can be found in other sources (this is called “literature”). Search to know what they say. See Keyword Searching Techniques. Record what they say. Google How to Write Research Notes. • Quoting – The ideas of others copied exactly, and used to support your own ideas. Each quote must be cited. Google How to Quote in the APA Style. • Paraphrasing – The ideas of others stated in your own words, your own style of expression. Each paraphrase must be cited. Google How to Paraphrase. • Integrating Sources – The ideas of others should be smoothly connected to your ideas. Google How to Integrate Sources. • Citing Sources – Citations in the text, right after every sourced (or borrowed) idea. Google APA format for citations. • Referencing Sources – A list of references at the end of your proposal. Google the APA format for referencing.
    • How to State Your Originality CREATE NEW AWARENESS + CREATE NEW FORMAT + CREATE NEW SYNTHESIS = YOUR ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION
    • How to State Your Originality You can combine or modify these New awareness of existing ideas New format of existing ideas Combination or synthesis of existing ideas
    • How to State Your Originality NEW AWARENESS OF EXISTING IDEAS: This proposal may, for the first time, bring to my target area some knowledge about [content or information, procedures, processes, attitudes].)]
    • How to State Your Originality NEW FORMAT OF EXISTING IDEAS: This information seems to have never been presented in [language, format, level] to [(benefit my) (meet the needs of my)] target population.
    • How to State Your Originality COMBINATION or SYNTHESIS OF EXISTING IDEAS: This proposal combines [one idea] and [another idea] to produce [proposed original idea], which seems to be unknown [(in target area) (among target population)]
    • How to State Your Originality You can combine or modify these examples. NEW AWARENESS OF EXISTING IDEAS: This proposal may, for the first time, bring to my target area some knowledge about [content or information, procedures, processes, attitudes]. NEW FORMAT OF EXISTING IDEAS: This information seems to have never been presented in [language, format, level] to [(benefit my) (meet the needs of my)] target population. COMBINATION or SYNTHESIS OF EXISTING IDEAS: This proposal combines [one idea] and [another idea] to produce [proposed original idea], which seems to be unknown [(in target area) (among target population)]
    • How to Use Theory EXISTING THEORY + SUPPORT AN IDEA, ANALYZE AN IDEA, UNDERSTAND AN IDEA = YOUR THEORETICAL SUPPORT
    • How to Use Theory If you don’t know these, you won’t be doing it right: • Google How to integrate quotations APA style • Google How to integrate paraphrase APA style • Google How to quote APA style • Google How to paraphrase APA style
    • How to Use Theory Know the theories related to your work
    • How to Use Theory When you present an idea, use a theory to support your idea
    • How to Use Theory When you analyze an idea, use a theory to support your analysis
    • How to Use Theory When explaining an idea, use a theory to support your explanation
    • How to Use Theory • Know the theories related to your work • When you present an idea, use a theory to support your idea • When you analyze an idea, use a theory to support your analysis • When explaining an idea, use a theory to support your explanation
    • One More Time ... If you don’t know these, you won’t be doing it right: • Google How to integrate quotations APA style • Google How to integrate paraphrase APA style • Google How to quote APA style • Google How to paraphrase APA style
    • How to Balance Your Ideas PROJECTED CHALLENGES & THEORY SUPPORT+ PROPOSED SOLUTIONS & THEORY SUPPORT + RELATED LITERATURE = YOUR PROJECTED CHALLENGES & SOLUTIONS
    • How to Balance Ideas Your work should not be all positive or all negative. That’s called bias.
    • How to Balance Ideas To project objective, your work must present both sides of an idea.
    • How to Balance Ideas State why your ideas might be wrong or might fail. Use a theory to support your statements.
    • How to Balance Ideas State how you might avoid, neutralize, or meet the challenges or correct errors. Use a theory to support your statements.
    • How to Balance Ideas • Your work should not be all positive or all negative. That’s called bias. • To project objective, your work must present both sides of an idea. • State why your ideas might be wrong or might fail. Use a theory to support your statements. • State how you might avoid, neutralize, or meet the challenges or correct errors. Use a theory to support your statements.
    • How to State Your Meanings EXISTING DEFINITIONS + YOUR OWN DEFINITIONS + CONTRAST OR COMPARE = YOUR DEFINITION OF TERMS
    • How to Define Terms All key terms of your research must be defined in two ways.
    • How to Define Terms First, it must be defined according to a dictionary definition. According to Webster (1999), the term triptych means “insert definition here.”
    • How to Define Terms Then it must be defined according to what you mean when you use it in your work. In this paper, the terms is used to mean “insert definition here”.
    • How to Define Terms If the two meanings are the same, there is no need to state the second definition. The dictionary definition should be enough.
    • How to Define Terms If your terms comprise more than one word, define each word, then define them together. Webster (2001) says that the term tabula means “a table or slate for writing” while the term rasa means “blank”. The term “blank slate” refers to “a young mind with little or no knowledge or training”.
    • How to Define Terms The definition of terms is arranged alphabetically. Rasa, adj. – Definition here Tabula, n. – Definition here Torch, v. – Definition here Triptych, n. – Definition here
    • How to Define Terms • All key terms of your research must be defined in two ways. • First, it must be defined according to a dictionary definition. • Then it must be defined according to what you mean when you use it in your work. • If the two meanings are the same, say so. • If your terms comprise more than one word, define each word.
    • How to Create Your Title PROBLEM + TARGET BENEFICIARIES + TYPE OF RESEARCH = YOUR RESEARCH PROPOSAL TITLE
    • How to Create Your Title Problem + target focus + research type • Deforestation in Yala: A Cause-Effect Analysis • Plagiarism among UGP scholars in AiU: An Analysis Based on Bloom’s Taxonomy
    • How to Create Your Title Problem + target focus + proposed solution • Deforestation in Yala: Strip-farming Against Soil Erosion • Plagiarism among UGP scholars in AiU: Strategies to Deter Academic Dishonesty
    • How to Create Your Conclusion SUMMARY OF KEY FINDINGS + RECOMMENDATION = YOUR RESEARCH PROPOSAL CONCLUSION
    • How to Create Your Summary SUMMARY OF KEY CONCEPTS + ARRANGED ACCORDING TO OUTLINE = YOUR RESEARCH PROPOSAL SUMMARY
    • How to Present a Project Summary PARTS OF A PROPOSAL + SUMMARY OF EACH PART + THREE-MINUTE SLIDESHOW = YOUR PROJECT SUMMARY SLIDESHOW
    • How to Call Attention in Print PARTS OF A PROMOTION POSTER + MAIN IMAGE + MAIN IDEA + CONTACT DATA = YOUR ATTENTION POSTER
    • How to Inform in Print PARTS OF AN INFORMATION POSTER + MAIN IDEA (image or text ) + SUPPORTING IDEAS (images or text ) + CONTACT DATA = YOUR INFORMATION POSTER
    • How to Instruct in Print PARTS OF AN INSTRUCTION POSTER + MAIN IDEA (image or text ) + SUPPORTING IDEAS (images or text ) + CONTACT DATA = YOUR INSTRUCTION POSTER
    • How to Call Attention in Motion PARTS OF A PROMOTION SLIDESHOW + MAIN IMAGE + MAIN IDEA + CONTACT DATA = YOUR ATTENTION SLIDESHOW
    • How to Inform in Motion PARTS OF AN INFORMATION SLIDESHOW + MAIN IDEA (image or text ) + SUPPORTING IDEAS (images or text ) + CONTACT DATA = YOUR INFORMATION SLIDESHOW
    • How to Instruct in Motion PARTS OF AN INSTRUCTION SLIDESHOW + MAIN IDEA (image or text ) + SUPPORTING IDEAS (images or text ) + CONTACT DATA = YOUR INSTRUCTION SLIDESHOW
    • End of Presentation Send comments to mr.jaime.aiu@gmail.com THANK YOU