Windows XP Basics Tuesday, Oct. 20     1:30 p.m.
What is covered in this class? <ul><li>What is an OS?  </li></ul><ul><li>What is Windows? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the p...
What is Windows? <ul><li>Remember, there are two “parts” to a computer – Hardware and software </li></ul>
An Operating System <ul><li>There are also two types of software. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Applications </li></ul></ul><ul><u...
What is an OS? <ul><li>Directly controls and manages  hardware  and basic system operations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Tells ap...
<ul><li>Windows (or any other operation system) essentially m akes it  possible  for you to interact with the computer . <...
Before Windows <ul><li>DOS (Disk operating system) </li></ul>
We need something easier!
Mac got there first <ul><li>Around 1981, Steve Jobs shows Bill Gates a prototype of the Apple Macintosh OS </li></ul><ul><...
Windows 1.0 <ul><li>Nov. 20, 1985 </li></ul><ul><li>Mouse and menu driven </li></ul><ul><li>Not very functional, but bette...
Windows 2.0 <ul><li>Dec. 9, 1987 </li></ul><ul><li>Included if you purchased Excel or Word </li></ul>
Windows 3.0 <ul><li>Released May 22, 1990 </li></ul><ul><li>Finally, multi-tasking* </li></ul><ul><li>Sold more than 10 mi...
Windows 3.1
Microsoft Bob <ul><li>Released in early 1985 </li></ul><ul><li>Created for adults, but many thought it was for kids </li><...
Windows 95 <ul><li>Introduced basic look and feel of Windows as it is on these computers </li></ul><ul><li>Much better int...
Windows 98 <ul><li>Not many changes but didn’t crash as often </li></ul><ul><li>Still on some computers </li></ul>
Windows 2000 <ul><li>Widely adopted for corporate use </li></ul><ul><li>Not really marketed to home users </li></ul><ul><l...
Windows Me <ul><li>Me = Millennium Edition </li></ul><ul><li>Critics: Me = Mistake Edition  </li></ul><ul><li>The home ver...
Current operating systems <ul><li>Windows XP </li></ul><ul><li>Windows Vista </li></ul><ul><li>Mac OS X </li></ul><ul><li>...
Windows XP <ul><li>What you’re using here today </li></ul><ul><li>However, is set to look and feel like 2000 </li></ul><ul...
Windows Vista <ul><li>Current version </li></ul><ul><li>Better graphic abilities </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on security/prote...
 
Coming soon: Windows 7 <ul><li>Public beta by December? </li></ul>
Mac OS X
What’s on your screen <ul><li>There’s a lot to Windows! </li></ul><ul><li>We’ll start with what’s on your screen, which is...
Library desktop vs. home desktop <ul><li>More “locked down” </li></ul><ul><li>Some things not accessible </li></ul><ul><li...
Starting a program <ul><li>Desktop shortcuts/icons </li></ul><ul><li>The Start Button/Start Menu </li></ul><ul><li>Each pr...
The Start Menu <ul><li>Use your mouse to click the  button in the lower left corner of your screen  </li></ul><ul><li>OR <...
Opening a program <ul><li>Use your mouse to click the Start button or click the  key on your keyboard. </li></ul><ul><li>O...
Minimize, maximize, restore & close Minimize Restore Close Maximize
Resizing windows <ul><li>If full-sized, click  restore down . </li></ul><ul><li>Position mouse over the frame of the windo...
Resizing windows
Moving windows <ul><li>Open Microsoft Word. </li></ul><ul><li>If Word is full-sized, click  restore down . </li></ul><ul><...
Moving windows
Moving between windows <ul><li>Buttons on  taskbar </li></ul><ul><li>Click on document you want </li></ul><ul><li>Active w...
Closing a window <ul><li>Closing a window ≠ closing Windows </li></ul><ul><li>Closing a window closes a document (and mayb...
Closing Windows <ul><li>Please  don’t do this at the library. </li></ul><ul><li>At the library, just click the “Done” butt...
Close a document <ul><li>To close an open window, click on the close button  </li></ul><ul><li>If you close a window that ...
Dialog boxes <ul><li>How Windows talks to you </li></ul><ul><li>Can come from Windows OS or from programs </li></ul><ul><l...
Viewing files with Windows Explorer <ul><li>A glimpse into Windows filing system </li></ul><ul><li>At home, you’ll probabl...
Other ways of viewing <ul><li>Click on  on the toolbar </li></ul><ul><li>Click  Details </li></ul><ul><li>Click column hea...
Navigating between folders <ul><li>Three ways </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Click the name of the folder  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><...
Viewing files from a program <ul><li>In the program, select File, Open </li></ul><ul><li>Normally see only files created b...
Special folder types <ul><li>You don’t see them at the library, but Windows automatically recognizes several types of fold...
Sample video folder
Sample music folder
Sample pictures folder
Using the My Pictures folder <ul><li>Navigate to the Varanrat folder inside the Pictures folder on the CD </li></ul><ul><l...
Windows Picture and Fax Viewer Go to next or last picture View full size or best fit View as slideshow Zoom Flip/rotate De...
Printing photos
Moving a file from one folder to another <ul><li>Open Windows Explorer and navigate to the Word I folder in the Word folde...
Moving files <ul><li>Use the same method to move a file from one disk to another </li></ul><ul><li>You can’t move a file t...
Deleting a file <ul><li>In My Documents: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Select file but  do not  open it. (Click  one  time.) </li>...
Creating a new folder <ul><li>Helps with organization </li></ul><ul><li>In location where new folder should be, click  Fil...
Using a USB Flash drive <ul><li>Plug in your flash drive. </li></ul><ul><li>Navigate to it through My Computer in Windows ...
Finishing up with a USB/Flash drive <ul><li>You  MUST  stop your drive before you unplug it.  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Click ...
Will it fit? File sizes <ul><li>Smallest unit is a byte </li></ul><ul><li>1 byte = 1 character </li></ul><ul><li>I love yo...
File sizes Abbreviation Term Rough size —— byte 1 byte KB kilobyte 1,000 bytes MB megabyte 1,000,000 bytes  or 1,000 KB GB...
Will it fit? Disk space <ul><li>Open Windows Explorer </li></ul><ul><li>R ight-click the 3½ Floppy (A:) icon  or the icon ...
Floppy disk refresher <ul><li>Metal part goes in first </li></ul><ul><li>Metal circle towards the floor </li></ul><ul><li>...
More disk refresher <ul><li>If you’re having trouble saving to your disk, make sure it isn’t locked!  </li></ul><ul><li>On...
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Windows xp basics army greent

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The very, very basics of Windows XP, created for adult learners with almost no computer experience.

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Windows xp basics army greent

  1. 1. Windows XP Basics Tuesday, Oct. 20 1:30 p.m.
  2. 2. What is covered in this class? <ul><li>What is an OS? </li></ul><ul><li>What is Windows? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the parts of a window? </li></ul><ul><li>How do I open/close programs? </li></ul><ul><li>How do I resize/move windows? </li></ul><ul><li>How can I organize my files? </li></ul><ul><li>How do I use a floppy disk? </li></ul>
  3. 3. What is Windows? <ul><li>Remember, there are two “parts” to a computer – Hardware and software </li></ul>
  4. 4. An Operating System <ul><li>There are also two types of software. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Applications </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Operating system (OS) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Application = Microsoft Word </li></ul><ul><li>OS = Windows </li></ul>
  5. 5. What is an OS? <ul><li>Directly controls and manages hardware and basic system operations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Tells applications about the computer’s hardware </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Manages applications </li></ul><ul><ul><li>When to respond </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Which are most important </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Manages files and puts into folders, like a filing cabinet </li></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>Windows (or any other operation system) essentially m akes it possible for you to interact with the computer . </li></ul>In short …
  7. 7. Before Windows <ul><li>DOS (Disk operating system) </li></ul>
  8. 8. We need something easier!
  9. 9. Mac got there first <ul><li>Around 1981, Steve Jobs shows Bill Gates a prototype of the Apple Macintosh OS </li></ul><ul><li>No command line! Menu, mouse and GUI driven </li></ul><ul><li>In early 1984, the Macintosh goes on sale to public </li></ul>
  10. 10. Windows 1.0 <ul><li>Nov. 20, 1985 </li></ul><ul><li>Mouse and menu driven </li></ul><ul><li>Not very functional, but better than DOS </li></ul>
  11. 11. Windows 2.0 <ul><li>Dec. 9, 1987 </li></ul><ul><li>Included if you purchased Excel or Word </li></ul>
  12. 12. Windows 3.0 <ul><li>Released May 22, 1990 </li></ul><ul><li>Finally, multi-tasking* </li></ul><ul><li>Sold more than 10 million copies and made Bill Gates a millionaire </li></ul><ul><li>Windows 3.1, the update, sold over 3 million copies in its first two months on the market </li></ul><ul><li>Dominant over Apple products </li></ul>
  13. 13. Windows 3.1
  14. 14. Microsoft Bob <ul><li>Released in early 1985 </li></ul><ul><li>Created for adults, but many thought it was for kids </li></ul><ul><li>Notice how your “desktop” is an actual desk </li></ul>
  15. 15. Windows 95 <ul><li>Introduced basic look and feel of Windows as it is on these computers </li></ul><ul><li>Much better interface </li></ul><ul><li>Desktop, start button, task bar </li></ul><ul><li>Now multi-tasking was easy! </li></ul>
  16. 16. Windows 98 <ul><li>Not many changes but didn’t crash as often </li></ul><ul><li>Still on some computers </li></ul>
  17. 17. Windows 2000 <ul><li>Widely adopted for corporate use </li></ul><ul><li>Not really marketed to home users </li></ul><ul><li>Behind-the-scenes operation much better </li></ul><ul><li>Secure, stable </li></ul>
  18. 18. Windows Me <ul><li>Me = Millennium Edition </li></ul><ul><li>Critics: Me = Mistake Edition </li></ul><ul><li>The home version of Windows 2000? </li></ul><ul><li>Rushed to market </li></ul>
  19. 19. Current operating systems <ul><li>Windows XP </li></ul><ul><li>Windows Vista </li></ul><ul><li>Mac OS X </li></ul><ul><li>Various installations of Linux </li></ul>
  20. 20. Windows XP <ul><li>What you’re using here today </li></ul><ul><li>However, is set to look and feel like 2000 </li></ul><ul><li>Much more stable </li></ul>
  21. 21. Windows Vista <ul><li>Current version </li></ul><ul><li>Better graphic abilities </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on security/protection from bugs, attacks </li></ul><ul><li>Pretty much requires a new(ish) computer </li></ul>
  22. 23. Coming soon: Windows 7 <ul><li>Public beta by December? </li></ul>
  23. 24. Mac OS X
  24. 25. What’s on your screen <ul><li>There’s a lot to Windows! </li></ul><ul><li>We’ll start with what’s on your screen, which is called your desktop . </li></ul><ul><li>At the bottom, look for the Start Button . </li></ul><ul><li>Beside the Start Button, look for the taskbar . </li></ul><ul><li>There’s also a session timer at the top of your screen. </li></ul>
  25. 26. Library desktop vs. home desktop <ul><li>More “locked down” </li></ul><ul><li>Some things not accessible </li></ul><ul><li>Prevents any serious problems (hopefully) </li></ul><ul><li>Looks even more different than it acts </li></ul>
  26. 27. Starting a program <ul><li>Desktop shortcuts/icons </li></ul><ul><li>The Start Button/Start Menu </li></ul><ul><li>Each program opens in a new window . </li></ul>
  27. 28. The Start Menu <ul><li>Use your mouse to click the button in the lower left corner of your screen </li></ul><ul><li>OR </li></ul><ul><li>Click the key on your keyboard. </li></ul><ul><li>Some programs are shown directly on Start Menu </li></ul><ul><li>Others are in folders – the ones with  beside them </li></ul>
  28. 29. Opening a program <ul><li>Use your mouse to click the Start button or click the key on your keyboard. </li></ul><ul><li>On the Start Menu, click Accessories. </li></ul><ul><li>In the Accessories Submenu, click Multimedia. </li></ul><ul><li>In the Multimedia Submenu, click Windows Media Player. </li></ul>
  29. 30. Minimize, maximize, restore & close Minimize Restore Close Maximize
  30. 31. Resizing windows <ul><li>If full-sized, click restore down . </li></ul><ul><li>Position mouse over the frame of the window, but don ’ t click. </li></ul><ul><li>When you see your mouse pointer turn into a double-headed arrow, press and hold the left mouse button. </li></ul><ul><li>With the mouse button still held down, drag the window to its new size. (Notice the size indicator line that moves as you move your mouse.) </li></ul>
  31. 32. Resizing windows
  32. 33. Moving windows <ul><li>Open Microsoft Word. </li></ul><ul><li>If Word is full-sized, click restore down . </li></ul><ul><li>Position your mouse pointer over the title bar of the window you want to move. </li></ul><ul><li>Click and hold down the left mouse button. </li></ul><ul><li>With the mouse button still down, drag the window to its new location. </li></ul>
  33. 34. Moving windows
  34. 35. Moving between windows <ul><li>Buttons on taskbar </li></ul><ul><li>Click on document you want </li></ul><ul><li>Active window has dark blue title bar & taskbar button looks pressed in </li></ul>
  35. 36. Closing a window <ul><li>Closing a window ≠ closing Windows </li></ul><ul><li>Closing a window closes a document (and maybe a program) </li></ul><ul><li>Closing Windows turns the computer off </li></ul>
  36. 37. Closing Windows <ul><li>Please don’t do this at the library. </li></ul><ul><li>At the library, just click the “Done” button on your session timer. </li></ul>
  37. 38. Close a document <ul><li>To close an open window, click on the close button </li></ul><ul><li>If you close a window that has unsaved information in it, you will see a dialog box asking if you want to save your changes. It’s just Windows’ way of giving you a friendly reminder. </li></ul>
  38. 39. Dialog boxes <ul><li>How Windows talks to you </li></ul><ul><li>Can come from Windows OS or from programs </li></ul><ul><li>Read and respond </li></ul>
  39. 40. Viewing files with Windows Explorer <ul><li>A glimpse into Windows filing system </li></ul><ul><li>At home, you’ll probably have icons on desktop for folders </li></ul><ul><ul><li>My Documents </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>My Computer </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A: disk </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>CD </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Here, open Windows Explorer </li></ul>
  40. 41. Other ways of viewing <ul><li>Click on on the toolbar </li></ul><ul><li>Click Details </li></ul><ul><li>Click column headings to sort by </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Name </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>File type </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Date modified </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Any other heading there! </li></ul></ul>
  41. 42. Navigating between folders <ul><li>Three ways </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Click the name of the folder </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Click the Up a Level icon </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Click the Back button </li></ul></ul><ul><li>To open a folder or a file, double-click in the right pane </li></ul><ul><li>Or, to open a folder, single-click in the left pane. </li></ul>
  42. 43. Viewing files from a program <ul><li>In the program, select File, Open </li></ul><ul><li>Normally see only files created by the program you are opening from </li></ul><ul><li>To see all files from all programs, click the  at the bottom of the Open dialog. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>On drop-down menu, click: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>All Files [*.*] </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>But remember, the program may not be able to open the file! </li></ul></ul></ul>
  43. 44. Special folder types <ul><li>You don’t see them at the library, but Windows automatically recognizes several types of folders. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Audio/Music </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Video </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pictures </li></ul></ul>
  44. 45. Sample video folder
  45. 46. Sample music folder
  46. 47. Sample pictures folder
  47. 48. Using the My Pictures folder <ul><li>Navigate to the Varanrat folder inside the Pictures folder on the CD </li></ul><ul><li>Let your mouse rest on an image without clicking for photo information </li></ul><ul><li>Click a photo to start the Windows Picture and Fax Viewer </li></ul>
  48. 49. Windows Picture and Fax Viewer Go to next or last picture View full size or best fit View as slideshow Zoom Flip/rotate Delete Edit in Paint Save Print
  49. 50. Printing photos
  50. 51. Moving a file from one folder to another <ul><li>Open Windows Explorer and navigate to the Word I folder in the Word folder on the CD. </li></ul><ul><li>Now open Windows Explorer again . </li></ul><ul><li>Resize and move the windows so you can see both at the same time. </li></ul><ul><li>Click the file you want to move. With the mouse button held down, drag it to My Documents. </li></ul><ul><li>Let go when you see the +. </li></ul>
  51. 52. Moving files <ul><li>Use the same method to move a file from one disk to another </li></ul><ul><li>You can’t move a file to the CD because these computers don’t have CD writers. </li></ul><ul><li>To copy a file, use the menu bar in Windows Explorer. </li></ul>
  52. 53. Deleting a file <ul><li>In My Documents: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Select file but do not open it. (Click one time.) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>When file name is highlighted, hit the Delete key on keyboard </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Windows will always double check </li></ul><ul><li>If you click Yes , the file is gone forever </li></ul>
  53. 54. Creating a new folder <ul><li>Helps with organization </li></ul><ul><li>In location where new folder should be, click File , then New , then Folder . </li></ul><ul><li>Enter name for folder </li></ul><ul><li>Hit the Enter key or click anywhere in white space on screen </li></ul>
  54. 55. Using a USB Flash drive <ul><li>Plug in your flash drive. </li></ul><ul><li>Navigate to it through My Computer in Windows Explorer (or any program). </li></ul><ul><li>Open from/save to just like any other disk. </li></ul>
  55. 56. Finishing up with a USB/Flash drive <ul><li>You MUST stop your drive before you unplug it. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Click the “Safely Remove Hardware” icon in the lower right beside the clock </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Click the pop-up that says “Safely Remove USB Mass Storage Device” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Wait until Windows tells you the device can be safely removed from the system </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Unplug your drive </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Don’t forget the cap! </li></ul>
  56. 57. Will it fit? File sizes <ul><li>Smallest unit is a byte </li></ul><ul><li>1 byte = 1 character </li></ul><ul><li>I love you = 10 bytes, 8 for characters & two for spaces </li></ul><ul><li>Most files are between 1 KB and 1,000 KB </li></ul><ul><li>Floppy disks hold 1.44 MB </li></ul><ul><li>CDs hold 700 MB </li></ul>
  57. 58. File sizes Abbreviation Term Rough size —— byte 1 byte KB kilobyte 1,000 bytes MB megabyte 1,000,000 bytes or 1,000 KB GB gigabyte 1,000,000,000 bytes or 1,000,000 KB or 1,000 MB
  58. 59. Will it fit? Disk space <ul><li>Open Windows Explorer </li></ul><ul><li>R ight-click the 3½ Floppy (A:) icon or the icon for your flash disk </li></ul><ul><li>Click Properties </li></ul><ul><li>Information about used and free space appears in a pop-up window </li></ul>
  59. 60. Floppy disk refresher <ul><li>Metal part goes in first </li></ul><ul><li>Metal circle towards the floor </li></ul><ul><li>Should feel some resistance </li></ul>Top Bottom
  60. 61. More disk refresher <ul><li>If you’re having trouble saving to your disk, make sure it isn’t locked! </li></ul><ul><li>On the bottom of the disk, on the side opposite the metal slider, is a lock mechanism. </li></ul>Unlocked Locked

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