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Draft civilian orientation

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  • Before launching into the specifics, the 41 st Judge Advocate General of the Navy, Vice Admiral James Houck would like to welcome you to the Navy JAG Corps. CLICK ON THE PICTURE WHEN READY TO LAUNCH VIDEO.
  • When we use the phrase “our Corps” it includes YOU!
  • JAG Corps Insignia The history of the distinctive JAG Corps insignia, which incorporates the mill rinde, is shown to the right. In ancient France, the fer de moline, or mill rinde, was a symbol of equal justice for all under the law. The two counterbalancing oak leaves are identical and connote the scales upon which justice is weighed. Oak leaves denote a corps and symbolize strength, particularly the strength of the oak-timbered hulls of the early American Navy ships. In the milling of grains, the mill rinde was used to keep the stone-grinding wheels an equal distance apart to provide consistency in the milling process. Thus, it symbolizes the wheels of justice that must grind exceedingly fine and exceptionally even. In the 16th century, the mill rinde was adopted in England as a symbol for lawyers and later brought to America.
  • Navy JAG History Judge Advocate General’s Corps In 1775, the Continental Congress enacted the Articles of Conduct, governing the ships and men of the Continental Navy. However, all of these ships were soon sold and the Navy and Marine Corps were disbanded. In July 1797, Congress authorized the construction of six ships and enacted the Rules for Regulation of the Navy as a temporary measure. Then, in 1800 Congress enacted a more sophisticated code adopted directly from the British Naval Code of 1749. There was little or no need for lawyers to interpret these simple codes, nor was there a need for lawyers in the uncomplicated administration of the Navy prior to the Civil War. Washington Navy Yard, D.C., Lithograph Published Circa 1862 During the Civil War, however, Secretary of the Navy Gideon Welles named a young assistant U.S. Attorney in the District of Columbia to present the government’s case in complicated courts-martial. Without any statutory authority, Secretary Welles gave Wilson the title of “Solicitor of the Navy Department,” making him the first House Counsel to the U.S. Navy. By the Act of March 2, 1865, Congress authorized the President “To appoint, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, for service during the rebellion and one year thereafter, an officer of the Navy Department to be called the ‘Solicitor and Naval Judge Advocate General.’” Congress maintained the billet on a year-to-year basis by amendments to the Naval Appropriations Acts. In 1870, Congress transferred the billet to a newly established Justice Department with the title of Naval Solicitor. Colonel William Butler Remey, USMC, was the first uniformed chief legal officer of the Navy, in 1878. Colonel Remey was able to convince Congress that the Navy Department needed a permanent uniformed Judge Advocate General and that naval law was so unique it would be better to appoint a line officer of the Navy or Marine Corps. The bill to create the billet of Judge Advocate General of the Navy was signed in 1880. The Naval Appropriations Act of 1918 elevated the billets of Navy Bureau Chiefs and Judge Advocate General to Rear Admiral. In July 1918, Captain George Ramsey Clark was appointed the first Judge Advocate General to hold the rank of Rear Admiral. In 1947, the Navy created a “law specialist” program to allow line officers restricted duty to perform legal services. By the Act of May 5, 1950, Congress required that the Judge Advocate General be a lawyer. The Act also required each Judge Advocate General of any service be a member of the bar with not less than eight years of legal duties as a commissioned officer. The Act also enacted the first Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ). By 1967, the Navy had 20 years of experience with the law specialist program. There was, however, increasing pressure to create a separate corps of lawyers. That year, Congress established the Judge Advocate General’s Corps within the DoN. The legislation was signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson on December 8, 1967, and ensured Navy lawyers’ status as members of a distinct professional group within the Navy, similar to physicians and chaplains. History At A Glance 1775 Continental Congress enacts Articles of Conduct. 1797 Congress enacts Rules for Regulation of the Navy. Civil War Secretary of the Navy names first House Counsel. 1865 President Abraham Lincoln appoints Solicitor and Naval Judge Advocate General. 1870 Congress transfers billet to Justice Department with title of Naval Solicitor. 1878 Colonel William Butler Remey, USMC, is first uniformed chief legal officer of the Navy. 1880 Judge Advocate General of the Navy billet is created. 1918 Billets of Navy Bureau Chiefs and Judge Advocate General elevated to Rear Admiral. 1918 Capt. George Ramsey Clark is appointed first Judge Advocate General to hold the rank of Rear Admiral. 1946 Naval Justice School (NJS) is established at Port Hueneme, CA. 1950 Judge Advocate General’s Corps established within Department of the Navy. NJS moves to Newport, RI. 1950 Act of May 5, 1950 requires the Judge Advocate General to be a lawyer. The first Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) is enacted. 1967 JAG legislation signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson on Dec. 8, ensuring Navy lawyers’ status as members of a distinct professional group within the Navy. 1972 Secretary of the Navy John H. Chaffee approves establishment of Legalman rating. Later this year, 275 petty officers are selected for conversion to the new Legalman rating. Today JAG directs a worldwide organization of more than 730 judge advocates, 30 limited duty officers (law), 630 enlisted and approximately 275 civilian personnel.
  • Our recent JAG Corps Birthday – outlining how our community’s mission has grown, changed and continues to change to meet the demands of a changing world. ALSO – An example of a communication tool within our community - - A “Flag Gram” - - You should read these when they hit your in-box. They’re directly from the desk of the JAG and DJAG.
  • From the Flags is communication tool for the internal JAG Corps audience for time-sensitive information. A “Flag Gram” - - You should read these when they hit your in-box. They’re directly from the desk of the JAG and DJAG. JAG TV is a video message from JAG leadership to the internal audience. JAG TV is available on the World Wide Web ( www.jag.navy.mil ). JAG Public Website Main form of constant communication with external and internal audience. The JAG Magazine is the flag-level communication tool for the internal JAG Corps audience featuring in-depth articles on items of interest to entire JAG Corps community. JAG Radio is an audio message from the JAG’s SEA to the internal audience. JAG Radio is available on the World Wide Web ( www.jag.navy.mil ).
  • NUMBERS FROM 2010 ABA Report Over 2300 individuals comprise the Navy JAG Corps Total Force - - Working together, the JAG Corps is able to offer superior services to Navy leaders and the Fleet. CIVILIAN PERSONNEL : As you can see by the numbers, civilian members of our Corps comprise a significant percentage of our total force. In the JAG Corps, civilians perform various legal duties and supervise staff in areas such as hearings, appeals, litigation or advisory services. In addition, we hire support staff to provide functions such as information technology, supply and public affairs. The JAG Corps, could not effectively operate or fulfill its mission without the contributions of our civilian members. Civilians work side-by-side uniformed members of our Corps in almost every area of practice and geographic location. CLICK ON THE PICTURE WITH THE WHITE BORDER WHEN READY TO LAUNCH THE VIDEO.
  • JAGMAG Article submitted by JAGCAP to PAO December 2010 : In an era of change, when businesses, organizations, and individuals demand and seek a better way to conduct business, the JAG Corps is pursuing change in the way it communicates with its civilian community. Civilians in the JAG Corps have inquired about their role in the community. They requested a representative who could advocate on their behalf and a program manager to work on career development. They looked for a way to express and direct their concerns to a division of JAG where they would be heard and addressed. Those inquiries and requests did not fall on deaf ears. They did have to wait for JAG to develop the appropriate vehicle to execute this mission. On November 4, 2010, JAG established the Judge Advocate General’s Corps Civilian Advisory Panel (JAGCAP): their mission, to create a structured forum for two way communications between JAG senior leadership and the JAG civilian community. This is an ongoing mission to facilitate long term development of a more satisfied and cohesive civilian team within the JAG Corps. The Panel consists of representatives from a cross section of the JAG Corps civilian community in both duties and geographic location. Currently serving are Mr. Daniel Barnes, Human Resources, Washington DC; Mr. Gary Major, Administrative Officer, RLSO, Mid West, Great Lakes, IL; Mrs. Connie Terrell, Administrative Officer, NLSO Southwest, San Diego, CA; Mr. Keith Farney, IT Specialist, Newport, RI; Mrs. Laurie Nagafuchi, Paralegal, RLSO Hawaii, Pearl Harbor, HI; Mr. Mike Humphrey, Paralegal, NLSO Northwest, Bremerton, WA; Mrs. Janet Schmahl, Legal Tech, NLSO North Central, Groton, CT; Mrs. Renee Bentley, Administrative Assistant, NLSO Southeast, Jacksonville, FL; and Mr. Dwain Alexander, Attorney, NLSO Mid Atlantic, Norfolk, VA. Panel members will serve for at least two years with no more than 1/3 of the members rotating every two years. Since its first meeting, JAGCAP met several times developing business rules and mechanisms to solicit and distribute information to and from the civilian community. At the outset, JAGCAP determined that information received from individuals in the community will be considered confidential to allow the free sharing of ideas and concerns. Incoming information will be analyzed for issues and proposed solutions. Person submitting information can indicate if they want the submission acknowledged and if are available for further communication on and development of their issue. The information submitted will be analyzed to identify specific issues, the distribution and impact of the issue, proposed corrective courses of action, associated tangible and intangible costs and benefits associated with the various courses of action, feasibility of the individual courses of action, and the time to implement the proposed course of action. This information will then be submitted to JAG senior leadership for consideration and response back to the community and if appropriate the individual. This is a new direction for both JAG leadership and the civilian community. JAGCAPs first mission is to build credibility and confidence by opening a conduit for communications, providing timely responses, and working to identify or develop answers to questions and concerns. We will work hard to review and understand the submissions and to make sure that JAG is aware of the issues and concerns of the civilians in the field and in Washington. It is our hope that JAGCAP will be a vehicle for positive change in the lives of the civilian work force of the JAG Corps. On November 4, 2010, JAG established the Judge Advocate General’s Corps Civilian Advisory Panel (JAGCAP): their mission, to create a structured forum for two way communications between JAG senior leadership and the JAG civilian community. This is an ongoing mission to facilitate long term development of a more satisfied and cohesive civilian team within the JAG Corps. Panel members will serve for at least two years with no more than 1/3 of the members rotating every two years
  • JUDGE ADVOCATES : Licensed Attorneys Uniformed judge advocates are commissioned naval officers based throughout the world, ashore, and at sea who practice law, support the Navy and serve the Nation. The practice encompasses a broad array of law. The mission is critical to the success of military operations. As we operate in increasingly complex legal and regulatory environments, the Navy is always in need of new legal talent to join its ranks, and bring expertise and innovative thinking. Judge Advocates join the community through the the Student Program (SP), by direct appointment (DA) or through the Law Education Program (LEP). Uniformed judge advocates are commissioned naval officers based throughout the world, ashore, and at sea who practice law, support the Navy and serve the Nation. The practice encompasses a broad array of law. The mission is critical to the success of military operations. As we operate in increasingly complex legal and regulatory environments, the Navy is always in need of new legal talent to join its ranks, and bring expertise and innovative thinking. Numbers taken from 2010 ABA Report Limited Duty Officers – Explain LDOs and roles RESERVE The Navy Reserve Law Program provides critical operational support to prosecute overseas contingency operations while serving as a strategic reserve for the nation. Presently, the Navy Reserve Law Program consists of about 500 judge advocates and 189 legalmen serving either in pay assignments with the selected Reserve or serving in Voluntary Training Units and provide uniformed legal support for credit towards future retirement. Although each of the drilling reservists with the selected Reserve provides a minimum of 38 personnel-days of support to the Navy, many volunteered to serve for longer periods of time and together satisfied approximately 26 percent of the judge advocate and 40 percent of the legalman manning requirements for individual augmentee assignments in combat zones in 2010 . Members of the Reserve legal community continued to contribute record-levels of active duty support and accounted for more than 7,500 personnel-days of work this year. As a testament to the quality and importance of their service, active component commanders continued to call for Reserve support and submitted requests for well over 10,000 personnel-days of Reserve judge advocate and legalmen services for the next fiscal year. In addition, more than 45 reservists from the legal community are serving in some form of mobilization or recall including a significant majority in overseas locations such as Iraq, Kuwait, Guantanamo Bay, Afghanistan, the Horn of Africa, and Bahrain. There are also approximately 35 Reserve judge advocates and legalmen presently serving on extended active-duty in the United States, including nine judge advocates who were mobilized to various locations around the country to provide 27 expanded legal services to wounded, ill and injured servicemembers in response to new Federal legislation. CLICK ON THE PICTURE WITH THE WHITE BORDER WHEN READY TO LAUNCH THE VIDEO
  • Legalman Community - Enlisted Personnel/ LEGALMEN Legalmen possess knowledge and expertise regarding military and civilian legal systems, and substantive and procedural law, which qualify them to perform the work of a legal nature under the supervision of an attorney. Knowledge, skills and abilities of a Legalman include the following: providing legal assistance in areas of the law such as wills and estates, consumer advocacy, landlord / tenant, immigration and naturalization, tax and family law, all of which include drafting and reviewing technical legal documents for attorney signature. Certain military justice duties include preparation of records and hearings, investigations, courts-martial and courts of inquiry, processing appeals, and the coordination of nonjudicial punishment hearings. Legalmen also act as trial paralegals for both trial and defense counsel. They receive extensive military justice training in administrative and civil law, substantive and procedural law, court-martial procedures, and nonjudicial punishment. Skills & Training  On the road to becoming a Legalman, there is an intense 11-week training course in military justice, court-martial procedures, legal assistance, and administrative, civil, operational and procedural law. The course includes classroom instruction and practical application.  Earn College Credits  Upon successful completion of the basic course at the Naval Justice School, a Legalman receives 10 semester hours of American Bar Association-approved classes toward a degree in paralegal studies. The classes include: Ethics; Introduction to Law; Emerging Technology in the Law Office; and Legal Research and Writing. The Legalman community provides opportunities for advanced training in legal assistance, legal research and writing, shipboard Legalman duties and law office management, which may also translate to additional credits at the bachelor’s and associate’s degree level.  The Opportunities Are Endless  As a Legalman, you might assist Judge Advocate General (JAG) officers in the litigation of military cases or provision of legal assistance or you might provide legal support on a command or admiral’s staff. Day-to-day duties include: Providing assistance to Sailors and JAG officers Serving as law office managers Assisting in the preparation of legal forms Conducting legal research Maintaining legal records and official publications Preparing official accounts of investigations and courts-martial Processing appeals Performing various administrative and clerical law office duties CLICK ON THE PICTURE WITH THE WHITE BORDER WHEN READY TO LAUNCH THE VIDEO
  • 2010 ABA Report provided below. Discrepancy in the report regarding the specific number of JAs and legalmen in the reserve community. Chose to go w/ lower number. See pages 1 (464/175) and 26 (500/189) of the report Reserve and Retired Affairs (OJAG Code 62) The Navy Reserve Law Program continued to provide critical operational support to prosecute overseas contingency operations while serving as a strategic reserve for the nation. Presently, the Navy Reserve Law Program consists of about 500 judge advocates and 189 legalmen serving either in pay assignments with the selected Reserve or serving in Voluntary Training Units and provide uniformed legal support for credit towards future retirement. Although each of the drilling reservists with the selected Reserve provides a minimum of 38 personnel-days of support to the Navy, many volunteered to serve for longer periods of time and together satisfied approximately 26 percent of the judge advocate and 40 percent of the legalman manning requirements for individual augmentee assignments in combat zones this year. Members of the Reserve legal community continued to contribute record-levels of active duty support and accounted for more than 7,500 personnel-days of work this year. As a testament to the quality and importance of their service, active component commanders continued to call for Reserve support and submitted requests for well over 10,000 personnel-days of Reserve judge advocate and legalmen services for the next fiscal year. In addition, more than 45 reservists from the legal community are serving in some form of mobilization or recall including a significant majority in overseas locations such as Iraq, Kuwait, Guantanamo Bay, Afghanistan, the Horn of Africa, and Bahrain. There are also approximately 35 Reserve judge advocates and legalmen presently serving on extended active-duty in the United States, including nine judge advocates who were mobilized to various locations around the country to provide extended legal services to wounded, ill and injured Sailors and Marines IAW Federal legislation. Reserve Judge Advocates & Legalmen Officers . The Navy Reserve JAG Corps currently has more than 400 lawyers practicing in the fields of military justice, international and operational law, legal assistance, admiralty, and other specialized areas. They serve throughout the United States and in several foreign countries. . Reserve Drills As a rule, Reserve drills last four hours. Four drills fill a typical drill weekend, Saturday and Sunday, 0730-1630. You drill the equivalent of one weekend a month (48 drills per year). You may also be required to complete two weeks of annual training (AT) each fiscal year. Most Reserve judge advocate billets are in the Selected Reserve, where you are paid for drills and annual training. Annual training provides day-for-day basic pay and allowances. Affiliating with the Reserve But active duty or Navy Reserve officers are eligible to join the Navy JAG Corps Reserve and now direct appointments are permitted. The Navy recently created a Career Transition Office (CTO) that will contact individuals as they leave active duty.  Among other items, the CTO will ascertain whether individuals are interested in affiliating with the Reserve.  But if your release from active duty was before 29 May 2009, and you've already been working with a recruiter, then please continue to work with a Navy recruiter to affiliate with the Reserve. Enlisted An integral part of the Navy Reserve legal team, Legalmen assist attorneys in all areas of practice. Some work in the courtroom and prepare records of trial. Others work on command staffs drafting official correspondence and reports. Legalmen are relied upon for their intelligence and ability to work with little supervision. Their knowledge and advice help countless Sailors throughout the Fleet
  • Cyber Forces (Keyboard)
  • Some places our JAG Corps community is located throughout the world. The list is not, by any means, all inclusive. Horn of Africa Italy, Spain, Greece, Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Kuwait, Bahrain Korea, Japan Honduras Cuba http://www.jag.navy.mil/careers_/careers/mapholder.html
  • Take time to highlight where individuals fit in to the organization and the overall mission of that area of the JAG Corps The Judge Advocate General is assigned to the staff (OPNAV) of the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) as Special Assistant for Legal Services (the designated Code for the offices is OP-09J). The JAG is tasked to advises and assist CNO in formulating and implements policies and initiatives pertaining to the provision of legal services within the Navy. Additionally, as OP-09J, the JAG exercises, for CNO,centralized coordination and provision of legal services by the Naval Legal Service Command and other Judge Advocates, effects liaison with Commandant of the Marine Corps concerning Iegaf service matters of mutual interest to the Navy and Marine Corps; maintains liaison, for CNO, with otber DOD components, other government agencies and agencies outside the Government on other legal service matters affecting the Navy, acts as OPNAV point of contact with CNO operating forces and shore activity commanders to ensure consistency of legal policies, procedures, objectives, training and support, moniters Navy Judge Advocates and support personnel staffing levels and workload trends in order to advice CNO concerning appropriate distribution of assets to ensure the effective and efficient provision of legal services and services as OPNAV’s Command Assist Official for the Commander, Naval Legal Service Command. 103. DEPUTV JUDGE ADVOCATE GENERAL OF TNE NAVY - CODE 001 The DJAG performs duties of Ihc JAG during a vacancy in the Office of the JAG or during absence or disability of the JAG, until a succesor is appointed or the absence or disability ceases. The DJAG is assigned additional duty to the CNO as Commander Naval Legal Service Command (CNLSC). CNLSC is responsible for providing and overseeing Navy-wide legal services and related tasking assigned by CNO. AJAG’s, principal assistnaces and division directgors may be assigned additional duty to CNLSC. JAGINST 5400.1AI ACRONYMS ON THIS PAGE - Different offices are “coded” ADDU – Additional Duty Echelon Commands - . A subdivision of a military or naval force: a command echelon.
  • Our RLSO alignment is consistent with CNIC Map.
  • The NAVAIR Course is an excellent overview of the United States Navy’s history, traditions and overall culture. It was selected because is is a comprehensive study of the subject and allows you, the student, to move from one section to another. So, if you’re familiar with the rank structure of the Navy, but need to know a bit more about its history, you’re free to skip around. GO to NKO Click on Learning Click on “Browse Categories” under the Content section in the lower left corner of the screen Click on “Department of the Navy” at the center of your Screen Click on “General Civilian Training” in the first Column Click on NAVAIR – MEET THE FLEET We encourage you to review as many parts of the training as you can. It will enhance your understanding of the amazing organization you just joined!
  • Our recent JAG Corps Birthday – outlining how our community’s mission has grown, changed and continues to change to meet the demands of a changing world. ALSO – An example of a communication tool within our community - - A “Flag Gram” - - You should read these when they hit your in-box. They’re directly from the desk of the JAG and DJAG.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Welcome to the Navy Judge Advocate General Corps A Community of Legal Professionals
    • 2. From the Judge Advocate General
      • Listen to a welcome message at http://tinyurl.com/JAGHOUCK
    • 3. YOU are now an essential member of the Navy JAG Corps!
      • Part I introduces you to your new community by:
        • Providing a short history of our emblem and Corps
        • Familiarizing you with the different groups of professionals comprising the JAG Corps community
        • Explaining the JAG Corps mission
        • Outlining the organizational structure of the Navy JAG Corps
      • Part II is a Navy “acculturation” session explaining Navy rank structure, customs and traditions.
    • 4.
      • Central to the JAG Corps insignia is the ancient French symbol for equal justice for all; the mill rinde.
      • WHAT IS A MILL RINDE ? The mill rinde was used for milling grain. It ensured stone-grinding wheels were equally separated, resulting in consistency in the milling process. As part of the JAG Corps insignia, the mill rinde symbolizes the wheels of military justice that must grind with precision and evenness.
      • On either side of the mill rinde are two identical oak leaves. These represent the scales that weigh justice. The oak leaves are also representative of a corps and symbolize strength akin to the oak-timbered hulls of the early American Navy ships.
      Our Insignia
    • 5.
      • 1878 Marine Corps Colonel William Butler Remey becomes the first uniformed chief legal officer of the Navy.
      • 1880 the position of Judge Advocate General of the Navy is created after Colonel Remey convinces Congress the complexity of naval law requires a permanent line officer (Navy or Marine Corps) in the position
      • 1947 “law specialist” program permits restricted duty for line officers performing legal duties.
      • 1950 Congress requires the Judge Advocate General of any service be a member of the bar with not less than eight years of legal duties as a commissioned officer and enacts he first Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ)
      • 1967 The Judge Advocate General Corps is established recognizing Navy attorneys as a distinct professional group within the Navy
      • 1972 the Legalman rating is established providing the Navy with personnel trained in court reporting, claims matters, investigations, legal administration, and legal research.
      Our History
    • 6. Our Mission
      • The JAG Corps provides solutions, from a military perspective, to legal issues involving military operations, organization, and personnel, wherever and whenever such solutions are required.
      • The JAG Corps has expanded its portfolio from a core competency of military justice to embrace the increasingly complex laws and authorities that directly enable the Navy's military operations and intelligence activities.
      • The JAG Corps works tirelessly afloat and ashore, at home and deployed around the globe supporting Navy and Joint commanders in Sailor and family assistance, operational law, and command advice.
      A N E X P A N D E D M I S S I O N
    • 7. Our Communication Tools
      • From the Flags
      • JAG News
      • JAG Public Website
      • JAG Radio
      • JAG TV
      • JAG Magazine
    • 8. Our People JAG Corps Total Force is a team with over 2300 individuals Learn more about the JAG Corps’ civilian team at http://tinyurl.com/JAGCIV 410 Civilian Personnel
    • 9. JAG Corps Civilian Advisory Panel (JAGCAP) Facilitating communication between civilian JAG Corps team members and senior JAG Corps leadership
      • Panel of JAG Corps civilians from across disciplines and across the nation
        • Mr. Daniel Barnes, Human Resources, Washington, DC
        • Mr. Gary Major, Administrative Officer , RLSO Midwest (Great Lakes)
        • Mrs. Connie Terrell, Administrative Officer, NLSO SW (San Diego)
        • Mr. Keith Farney, IT Specialist, Naval Justice School (Newport, RI)
        • Mrs. Laurie Nagafuchi, Paralegal, RLSO Hawaii, Pearl Harbor, HI
        • Mr. Mike Humphrey, Paralegal, NLSO Northwest, Bremerton, WA
        • Mrs. Janet Schmahl, Legal Tech, NLSO North Central, Groton, CT
        • Mrs. Renee Bentley, Administrative Assistant, NLSO Southeast, Jacksonville, FL
        • Mr. Dwain Alexander, Attorney, NLSO Mid Atlantic, Norfolk, VA.
      • The JAGCAP gathers input from the civilian community members, analyze that input and work with the Judge Advocate General to address concerns and review ideas. This is an ongoing mission to facilitate long term development of a more satisfied and cohesive civilian team within the JAG Corps.
    • 10. Our People 833 Judge Advocates (Officer Attorneys) 15 Limited Duty Officers (Officers) JAG Corps Total Force is a team with over 2300 individuals Learn more about the JAG Corps officer community at http://tinyurl.com/JAGCORPS
    • 11. Our People
        • 477 Legalmen
        • (Enlisted)
      JAG Corps Total Force is a team with over 2300 individuals Learn more about Legalmen at http://tinyurl.com/Legalman
    • 12. Our Reserve Community
      • Over 400 Judge Advocates
      • Over 175 Legalmen
      • Integral part of the our community
      • Members of the Reserve legal community accounted for more than 7,500 personnel-days of work on 2010.
      • In 2010 satisfied approximately 26 percent of the judge advocate and 40 percent of the Legalman manning requirements for individual augmentee assignments in combat zones.
    • 13. Our Practice
      • Military Justice
      • National Security Litigation
      • Operational/International Law
      • Admin Law
        • Military Personnel Law
        • Ethics/Fiscal
        • Regulations/Legislation
      • Litigation
      • Claims
      • Admiralty and Maritime Law
      • Legal Assistance
      • Environmental Law
      • Cyber Law
    • 14. Learn where the JAG Corps operates at http://www.jag.navy.mil/careers_/careers/mapholder.html
    • 15. Faces of community members deployed on ships and locations around the world
    • 16. OJAG Organization / CNLSC Staff & Support AJAG Civil Law Code 01 International and Operational Law Code 10 Environmental Law Code 12 General Litigation Code 14 Legal Assistance Code 16 Admiralty Code 11 Information Operations & Intelligence Law Code 18 Claims, Investigations, and Tort Litigation Code 15 Administrative Law Code 13 AJAG Director of Operations Code 06/DCOM RLSO Knowledge and Information Services Code 65 Fiscal and Resource Services / Civilian Personnel Management Code 64 Management and Plans Code 63 Military Personnel Code 61 Executive Admin Office Code 60 Reserve and Retired Affairs Code 62 AJAG for Military Law Code 02 Criminal Law Code 20 Appellate Defense Code 45 Admin Support Code 40 Appellate Government Code 46 Chief Judge Navy-Marine Corps Court of Criminal Appeals Code 51 AJAG Chief Judge of the Department of the Navy Code 05 Chief Judge Navy-Marine Corps Trial Judiciary Code 52 National Security Litigation Code 30 Secretary of the Navy Judge Advocate General Chief of Naval Operations (JAG is ADDU as N09J) Command Master Chief Code 004 Deputy Judge Advocate General Code 001 Public Affairs Code 00PA Special Assistant For Transformation (SAT) Inspector General Code 002
    • 17. Office of the Judge Advocate General Organization Naval Justice School Secretary of the Navy Chief of Naval Operations (ADDU as OP-09J) Staff Judge Advocate Line Commanders (DJAG ADDU AS CNLSC) DCOM NLSO Commander, Naval Legal Service Command (CNLSC) (Echelon II) Naval Legal Service Office (8) Region Legal Service Office (9) DCOM RLSO Judge Advocate General Deputy Judge Advocate General Navy-Marine Corps Appellate Review Activity Navy-Marine Corps Trial Judiciary Civil Law Support Activity Navy-Marine Corps Court of Criminal Appeals
    • 18. Office of the Judge Advocate General Organization
      • Civil Law Support Activity : International Law, Admiralty and Maritime Law , Environmental Law, Administrative Law, Civil Litigation, Claims, Legal Assistance, National Security and Intelligence Law
      • Navy-Marine Corps Appellate Review Activity : Criminal Law, Appellate Defense, Appellate Government, Administration
      • Navy-Marine Corps Court of Criminal Appeals:
        • 2000+ Criminal Appeals per year
      • Navy-Marine Corps Trial Judiciary:
        • - Worldwide organization; most circuits 1 or 2 Judges
        • - 35 active Judges; 2600 courts-martial per year (USN&USMC)
      • Operations and Management: Resourcing, Management and Plans for OJAG organization and NLSC (Staffed
      • Naval Justice School
      Legal Advice and Support to SECNAV and CNO and HQ Staffs and JAGC Management and Training Operations & Management Judge Advocate General Deputy Judge Advocate General Navy-Marine Corps Appellate Review Activity Navy-Marine Corps Trial Judiciary Civil Law Support Activity Navy-Marine Corps Court of Criminal Appeals
    • 19. 6 Judicial Circuits CENTRAL SOUTHERN WESTERN NORTHERN EASTERN WESTPAC
    • 20. Staff Judge Advocates
      • Sea Duty – CVN’s, Carrier Strike Groups, Expeditionary Strike Groups, Submarine Tenders
      • Joint Duty – each Combatant Commander, Joint Staff, DOS, DOJ
      • Practice Areas – Military Justice, Environmental Law, International and Operational Law, Cyber Law, Ethics, Installation Legal Issues, e.g., Force Protection and Homeland Defense
      Assigned to line and selected staff commanders, including Joint Commanders Chief of Naval Operations Staff Judge Advocate Line Commanders
    • 21. Naval Legal Service Command Organization
      • CNLSC
      • Naval Legal Service Offices
        • Courts-Martial Defense
        • Legal Assistance
        • Administrative Boards
        • Physical Evaluation Boards
        • Training
      • Region Legal Service Offices
        • TSO/SJA Combined
        • Criminal Prosecution
        • Command Advice
        • SAUSA
        • Training
      Legal Advice and Support to Commander, Sailors, Marines and their families DCOM NLSO Commander, Naval Legal Service Command (CNLSC) (Echelon II) Naval Legal Service Office (8) Region Legal Service Office (9) DCOM RLSO
    • 22. RLSO Midlant -Norfolk - Oceana -Newport -Earle -Brunswick -Willow Grove -Ballston Spa 31 JAGs RLSO Southeast -Jacksonville - Mayport -Pensacola -Fort Worth -Corpus Christi -Ingleside -Key West -Charleston -Kings Bay -Meridian -Gulfport -New Orleans -GTMO 51 JAGs RLSO Midwest -Great Lakes - Tinker AFB -Millington, TN 9 JAGs RLSO Southwest -San Diego - Lemoore -Ventura Co -Monterey -China Lake -Fallon 30 JAGs RLSO Hawaii -Pearl Harbor 9 JAGs RLSO Northwest -Bremerton - Everett -Whidbey Island 11 JAGs RLSO Japan -Yokosuka - Misawa -Sasebo -Kadena -Diego Garcia -Guam -Atsugi 16 JAGs RLSO EURSWA -Naples - Rota -Sigonella -Bahrain -Souda Bay 18 JAGs Navy Region Legal Services Offices (6 CONUS – 3 OCONUS) RLSO NDW -Washington DC - Dahlgren -Annapolis -Pax River 9 JAGs
    • 23. NLSO EUROPE AND SOUTHWEST ASIA -NAPLES -Sigonella -Bahrain 5 JAGs
      • NLSO MID-ATLANTIC
      • Norfolk
      • 28 JAGs
      • NLSO SOUTHEAST
      • - Jacksonville
      • - Mayport
      • - Charleston
      • - Kings Bay
      • Guantanamo Bay
      • 11 JAGs
      *
      • NLSO SOUTHWEST
      • - San Diego
      • - Lemoore
      • - Port Hueneme
      • North Island
      • 26 JAGs
      • NLSO NORTHWEST
      • - Bremerton
      • - Whidbey Island
      • - Everett
      • Bangor
      • 16 JAGs
      * NLSO PACIFIC - Yokosuka - Pearl Harbor -Guam -Sasebo 20 JAGs
      • NLSO NORTH CENTRAL
      • - Washington DC
      • - Great Lakes
      • - Groton
      • - Brunswick
      • - Earle
      • - Newport
      • Annapolis
      • Memphis
      • 31 JAGS
      *
      • NLSO CENTRAL
      • -Pensacola
      • -Gulfport
      • Corpus Christi
      • 8 JAGs
      * * * * Naval Legal Service Offices (6 CONUS – 2 OCONUS) *
    • 24. Questions?
      • PART II
        • Objectives - Understand and appreciate Naval Military History, Structure and function.
        • Self guided, self paced study on NKO after general introduction and review of several sections
        • The NAVAIR “Meet the Fleet” course provides the following lessons: 1)highlights of naval history, 2)organization and structure, 3) uniforms, ranks rates and insignia, 4) protocol and traditions, 5) terminology and jargon, and 6) ships and aircraft.
        • It is thorough, informative and user friendly
    • 25.
      • BACK-UP Information
      • RE: OJAG Codes
    • 26. Principal Areas of Practice Naval Civil Law Support Activity Claims, Investigations, and Tort Litigation (Code 15) Legal Assistance (Code 16) Cyber Law (Code 18) Support to Sailors, Marines, and their Families Immigration Tax Law / Armed Forces Tax Council Income Tax Assistance / Electronic Filing Intelligence Law Cyber Operational Law Litigation (Code 14) Civil Litigation Support FOIA / PA Litigation Information Representational Requests Worldwide responsibility for processing claims for/against the Navy. Provide litigation support to the Department of Justice. Pay claims for injuries caused by negligent acts of Navy employees. ($9.4 Million FY06) Pay claims to Sailors for damages to personal property caused by natural disasters. ($11.3 Million FY06) Collect for medical care for Sailors/ dependents caused by third parties, and return money to TRICARE/Navy medicine. ($13.3 Million FY06)
    • 27. International and Operational Law (Code 10) Admin Law (Code 13) Admiralty Law (Code 11) Environmental Law (Code 12) International Programs and Agreements Law of the Sea REPOPA Maritime Environmental Law Freedom of Navigation Operational Law Law of Armed Conflict Center for Operational Law Training Personnel Law Ethics Advice Legislation and Regulations Military Rights and Benefits Military Affairs / Homeland Security Principal Areas of Practice Naval Civil Law Support Activity Maritime Tort Claims and Litigation Affirmative Claims and Litigation Maritime Advice/Fleet Guidance Maritime Salvage, Contract, Environmental Law Legislation Operational Environmental Law MMPA Compliance Strategy Litigation Support (MFA Sonar, SURTASS LFA sonar) Maritime Sustainability ESG; International Outreach Group Critical Habitat Designation
    • 28. Principal Areas of Practice Navy-Marine Corps Appellate Review Activity Criminal Law (Code 20) Appellate Defense (Code 45) Appellate Government (Code 46) Largest Trial and Appellate caseload in DoD Formulate and Implement Criminal Law Policy Joint Service Committee Naval Clemency and Parole Board Legislation and Instruction Review Article 6, UCMJ Inspections BCNR reviews Requests for Court-Martial Convening Authority Review of CAAF and Supreme Court Certifications Responsible for Military Justice policy and oversight Supports Military Justice Practitioners around the world Represents the appellant before NMCCA, CAAF, and U.S. Supreme Court Extraordinary Writs Joint Services’ Capital Litigation Resource Center Represents the U.S. before NMCCA, CAAF, and U.S. Supreme Court Represents the U.S. on Article 62 Appeals and Extraordinary Writs Trial Counsel Assistance Program National Security Litigation (Code 30) Litigation Support in designated nat’l security cases Lit support in Courts-Martial involving class information National Security Lit Course
    • 29. A N E X P A N D E D M I S S I O N