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  • Marilyn Monroe is found dead on August 5th after apparently overdosing on sleeping pills The first Kmart department store opens in Garden City, MichiganJohn H. Glenn, Jr., becomes first American to orbit the earth during Friendship 7 orbit. Jamaica gains indepenedence
  • Preserving Paradise: The most recent South Florida report that Jim Murley produced at FAU with useful economic/demographic material
  • Preserving Paradise: The most recent South Florida report that Jim Murley produced at FAU with useful economic/demographic material
  • Preserving Paradise: The most recent South Florida report that Jim Murley produced at FAU with useful economic/demographic material
  • Preserving Paradise: The most recent South Florida report that Jim Murley produced at FAU with useful economic/demographic material
  • Preserving Paradise: The most recent South Florida report that Jim Murley produced at FAU with useful economic/demographic material
  • Opening summit for public

    1. 1. Opening Summit Better Region Better Life seven50.org@seven50plan #seven50
    2. 2. Opening Summit Agenda Better Region Better Life 9:00 Registration Opens10:00 Welcome Addresses10:15 Victor Dover: “50 Year Plan: The Impact Starts Now”10:30 Allison DeFoor: “Nine Generations in Florida (and Counting)”10:45 Quick Poll: Participants11:00 Bob Burchell: “State of the Region and Future Trends”
    3. 3. Opening Summit Agenda Better Region Better Life11:20 Bill Spikowski: “The Numbers, and Why They Matter in Regional Planning”11:35 Neal Peirce: “Regions Will Define the Future”12:45 Shaping the Plan: Working Lunch, Meet with Your Group 2:15 Quick Poll: Ideas 2:30 Work Group Highlights 2:50 Next Steps
    4. 4. Better Region Better Life WELCOMEJoe Gillie, Old School Square
    5. 5. Better Region Better Life WELCOMEMayor Ferreri, Greenacres
    6. 6. Thank you Better Region Better Life Exec CommitteeMr. Doug Bournique Ms. Gepsie MetellusMr. Doug Bartel The Honorable Tod MoweryThe Honorable Heather Carruthers** Mr. Jack OsterholtMr. Art Cobb Ms. Susan E. O’RourkeMs. Carla Coleman Mr. Gus PegoMs. Sara E. Fain Mr. William PerryThe Honorable Samuel Ferreri The Honorable Raquel RegaladoThe Honorable Ed Fielding Ms. Kelly SmallridgeMr. Kevin J. Foley Mr. Michael SpringDr. Dennis P. Gallon Mr. Edwin SwiftThe Honorable Suzanne Gunzburger Mr. Norman TaylorThe Honorable Kathryn Hensley Mr. Ramon Trias, AICPThe Honorable Peter O’Bryan Mr. James WolfeThe Honorable Karen Marcus Mr. Barrington WrightDr. Edwin Massey
    7. 7. Thank you Better Region Better Life Chip LaMarca Broward County Commissioner Tom Powers City of Coral Springs Vice Mayor Beam Furr City of Hollywood Commissioner Patricia Asseff City of Hollywood Commissioner Patricia Williams City of Lauderdale Lakes Commissioner Edwina Coleman City of Lauderdale Lakes Vice MayorBenjamin Williams City of Lauderdale Lakes Commissioner Gloria Lewis City of Lauderdale Lakes Commissioner Wayne Messam City of Miramar Commissioner Anne Sallee City of Oakland Park Mayor Shelby Lowe City of Riviera Beach City Councilman Eula Clarke City of Stuart Commissioner Sean McCrackine Comm. Jean Monestime, Miami-Dade, Chief Legislative Aide Dan Liftman Congressman Alcee Hastings, Staff Assistant Miguel Otero Congressman Mario Diaz-Balart, District Director Wendi Lipsich Office of Congressman Ted Deutch Victoria Nowlan Fl House of Representatives, Chief Legislative Assistant Doug Smith Martin County Commissioner Jean Monestime Miami Dade County County Commissioner Abby Ross Staff to Rep Berman Victoria Winslett Staff to Rep Berman Lori Berman State Representative Sandy Berman SFRPC Member
    8. 8. Better Region Better Life WELCOMEMarcela Camblor, AICP, Project Director
    9. 9. Dover, Kohl & Partners Citizen-Based Regional Planning & Visioning doverkohl.com @DoverKohl Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company Planning, Policy, Modeling Tools dpz.com Emerge Consulting Public OutreachRobert Burchell, PhD, Rutgers University Economic Analysis http://policy.rutgers.edu/cupr Spikowski Planning Associates Research & Model Ordinances spikowski.com
    10. 10. Criterion Planners Scenario Modeling and Implementation crit.com HDR Transportation & Infrastructure hdrinc.comHall Planning & Engineering Multimodal Transportation hpe-inc.com Strategic Economics TOD Strategies strategiceconomics.com The Brookings Institution Economic Advisory Panel brookings.edu
    11. 11. Cardno ENTRIXEnviro Economics, Ecology, Sustainability & Climate Change entrix.com Cardno TBE Brownfield Redevelopment tbegroup.com ROAR Media Communications roarmedia.com Gorman & Associates Housing Strategy gormanusa.com Municipal Code Corporation Code Integration municode.comPaul Vrooman, University of Miami Public Education
    12. 12. Dover-Kohl • Windsor, Indian River County • Towns, Villages, and Countryside Land Development Regulations, St. Lucie County& DPZ • Fort Pierce Waterfront & Corridor Plan • Downtown Stuart • South Martin County Regional Plan • Waterfront Quarter, Jupiter • Abacoa, Jupiter30+ years local experience • Lake Okeechobee Regional Plan50+ SE Florida projects • Seven Cities - The U.S. 1 Corridor, Palm Beach County • Water Preserve Areas, TCRPC • Downtown Lake Worth Plan, TCRPC • Fox Property Study, TCRPC • Callery Judge Grove, Loxahatchee • Wellington, Palm Beach County • PBC Agricultural Reserve • West Palm Beach Downtown Plan • Royal Palm Beach Corridor Plan • North Federal Corridor, Delray Beach • Charleston Place, Boca Raton • Davie Downtown Plan • Mirabella, Miramar • Western C-9 Basin, Miami-Dade & Broward Counties • Lake Belt Plan, Miami-Dade County • Miami Lakes Town Center • North Miami Beach Bicycle Masterplan • Aqua, Miami Beach • Miami Springs Downtown Plan • Downtown Doral • Miami 21 • UM Miller School of Medicine, Miami • Miami-Dade County TND Ordinance • Miami-Dade County Agricultural & Rural Area Study • South Miami Hometown Plan • Downtown Kendall • Downtown Homestead Action Plan • Bluewater Carpet Cottages, Tavernier
    13. 13. SE Florida Prosperity Plan Opening Summit50 Year Plan: TheImpact StartsNowVictor Dover FAICP
    14. 14. 2062
    15. 15. 2012
    16. 16. 1962
    17. 17. it’s not very long?
    18. 18. 1962 Palm BeachKey West Fort Lauderdale
    19. 19. 1962
    20. 20. Cuban Missile CrisisHurricane Dona
    21. 21. Chevrolet – Coral GablesNational Airlines – Miami
    22. 22. 1962
    23. 23. The Jackie Gleason Show
    24. 24. 1962
    25. 25. 1962 Streets Neighborhoods
    26. 26. “Here is the giant, plastic,metal, and unbreakableglass city of the 21stcentury. A city of science,of atomic power, of spacetravel, and of high culture.” Frank R. Paul – Amazing Stories, 1939
    27. 27. Disney Magic Highway USASeattle World’s Fair
    28. 28. it’s plenty of time?
    29. 29. Sebastian, Indian River County 1968
    30. 30. Sebastian, Indian River County 2012
    31. 31. Hillsboro BlvdDeerfield Beach, Broward County 1968
    32. 32. Hillsboro Blvd I-95Deerfield Beach, Broward County 2012
    33. 33. Kendall DriveMiami Dade County 1968
    34. 34. Kendall DriveMiami Dade County 2012
    35. 35. confidence.
    36. 36. 1733
    37. 37. Oglethorpe Plan for Savannah,Lines drawn on the ground last for generations, longer than buildings
    38. 38. Savannah, GA
    39. 39. 1791
    40. 40. Plan for Washington, DC
    41. 41. 1909
    42. 42. “Make no little plans….1909 Plan of Chicago – Burnham & Bennett
    43. 43. …They have no magic to stir mens blood and probably themselves will notbe realized. Make big plans; aim high in hope and work, remembering thata noble, logical diagram once recorded will never die, but long after we aregone will be a living thing, asserting itself with ever-growing insistency.Remember that our sons and grandsons are going to do things that wouldstagger us. Let your watchword be order and your beacon beauty. Thinkbig. Daniel Burnham (probably…)
    44. 44. 1921
    45. 45. 1928
    46. 46. “All development is a public-private partnership” 1970s-80s
    47. 47. 1962
    48. 48. 2012
    49. 49. new era
    50. 50. How would you describe Southeast Florida today? Paradise (5 votes, 2%) A good place to live, getting better everyday (70 votes, 31%) A work in progress with a long way to go (119 votes, 53%) Needs work and not getting better (16 votes, 7%) Getting worse everyday (11 votes, 4%)Total Votes: 221 Seven50.org as of June 22, 2012
    51. 51. CO2 and density CO2 (KG) -- mean daily per North Redmond Queen Anne 12.5 12 person 11.5 11 10.5 10 0-4 4-7 7 - 10 10 -15 15+ Net Residential Density (housing units per residential acre) Source: LUTAQH final report, King County ORTP, 2005
    52. 52. CO2 and connectivity North Redmond Queen Anne CO2 (KG) -- mean daily per 13 12 person 11 10 9 8 0 - 0.1 0.1 - 0.2 0.2 - 0.3 0.3 - 0.4 0.4+ Intersections per acre Source: LUTAQH final report, King County ORTP, 2005
    53. 53. CO2 and convenient retail North Redmond Queen Anne CO2 (KG) -- mean daily per 12.5 12 11.5 person 11 10.5 10 9.5 0 1-2 3-9 10 - 29 30 - 165 # of Neighborhood Retail Parcels Source: LUTAQH final report, King County ORTP, 2005 64
    54. 54. national call to actionobesity trends among US adultsNo Data <10% 10%-14% 15-19% 20% 25%Source: Mokdad AHCDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance SystemSource: Marla Hollander
    55. 55. the great convergenceZimmerman/Volk Associates
    56. 56. the great convergence
    57. 57. L.U.D.M. of the F.L.U.E. of the C.D.M.P. per F.S.L.G.C.P.A. of 1985
    58. 58. In the future I would like Southeast Florida to be: More economically resilient (144 votes, 63%) More walkable (95 votes, 42%) More bikable (78 votes, 34%) Safer for children (49 votes, 21%) More environmentally sustainable (108 votes, 47%) More prepared for changes to climate (60 votes, 26%) More sociable/convivial (40 votes, 17%) More equitable, open to diverse communities (58 votes, 25%) More attractive aesthetically (55 votes, 24%) More unified as a region (112 votes, 49%)Total Voters: 226 Total Votes: 799 Seven50.org as of June 22, 2012
    59. 59. In the future I would like Southeast Florida to be: More economically resilient (144 votes, 63%) More walkable (95 votes, 42%) More bikable (78 votes, 34%) Safer for children (49 votes, 21%) More environmentally sustainable (108 votes, 47%) More prepared for changes to climate (60 votes, 26%) More sociable/convivial (40 votes, 17%) More equitable, open to diverse communities (58 votes, 25%) More attractive aesthetically (55 votes, 24%) More unified as a region (112 votes, 49%)Total Voters: 226 Total Votes: 799 Seven50.org as of June 22, 2012
    60. 60. 2014
    61. 61. four summits
    62. 62. models: trend, and…?
    63. 63. data warehouse
    64. 64. 6 workgroups
    65. 65. engage online
    66. 66. start theconversation
    67. 67. SE Florida Prosperity Plan Opening SummitNine Generations(and counting)Allison DeFoor
    68. 68. SE Florida Prosperity Plan Opening SummitState of the Region andFuture TrendsBob Burchell, Rutgers University
    69. 69. The Demographic State of the Region and Future Trends:The Effects of Larger Geographies Seven 50 Opening Summit 11:00 a.m. to 11:20 a.m. Wednesday 27 June 2012 Robert W. Burchell, Ph.D. 88
    70. 70. Demographic Trends in Countries Abroad
    71. 71. Demographic Trends in Countries AbroadIn 2050, world population will reach 9.1 billion. (1) • India will be the most populous country in the world.Projections show that by 2020, of 100 people: • 56 will be from Asia (19 Chinese, 17 Indian*); • 16 from Africa (13 from Sub-Saharan Africa); • 13 from the Western Hemisphere (4 from U.S.); • 7 from Eastern Europe and former Soviet Union; • 5 from Western Europe; 3 from the Middle East. (2)World population growth is trending downward. (1) • Most growth will be in less-developed countries; developed countries’ growth will turn negative by 2030. (1) * 21 and 22, respectively, by 2050. 90
    72. 72. Demographic Trends in Countries Abroad In 1950, the population of Europe and Russia constituted about 22% of world population; by 2050, these countries will constitute just 7.5%. (2) Russia’s population will contract over the next 50 years from 141 million today to 120 million– 2060 will be equivalent to 1960. This decline will result from both lower fertility rates and higher mortality rates. (11)Male unemployment is noticeable in high-income economies (>$12,200 income, per capita). (12)By 2050, within a population of over 1.3 billion, China will have over 300 million people over age 65, with limited social infrastructure to care for that population. (11, 2) 91
    73. 73. Demographic Trends in Countries AbroadBy 2050, India will have 1.7 billion people. The majority is expected to be living in some of the most impoverished conditions in the world. (11)Many families in India (and to a greater extent, in Africa) do not participate in a cash economy. Commodities are grown and bartered; children’s work has value. (15)In Africa, nearly all of the growth increase is expected to be in the sub-Saharan region, where there is expected to be virtually no economic growth, and where AIDS will significantly impact life expectancy. (2)Thus, one should not assume that projected economic and demographic growth of China and India, or Russia and Japan, would relegate the U.S. to a second-class economic power by 2050. (11, 2) 92
    74. 74. Demographic Trends in Countries AbroadJapan’s population is affected by declining fertility and increasing life spans. Fertility declines relate to women marrying later, or not at all. Life expectancy is 7 years longer for women and increasing. (13)World: Working age population (15-64) will decrease in Europe (Italy -39%; Germany -18%; Britain -12%; France -11%) Russia (-8%) and Japan (-3%); it will increase in the United States (+33%) and Canada (+17%). This is related to immigration policies. (4, 2)In Europe, more coordinated immigration policies, resembling those of the United States, could enable this geographic area to address its declining rate of natural increase. (29) 93
    75. 75. Demographic Trends in the United States
    76. 76. Demographic Trends in the United States National and Regional • The U.S. population will be about 380 million in 2040, and 420 million in 2060. (5,39) • From 2000 (281.4M) to 2010 (308.7M), U.S. population increased by 27.3 million: 52.4 % was in the South; 32.0% in the West; 10.8% in the Midwest; and 6.3% in the Northeast. (16) • Average growth over the period 2000-2010 in the U.S. was 9.7%. The South increased by 14.3%; the West by 13.8%; the Midwest by 3.3%; and the Northeast by 3.2%. (16) • These regional patterns are projected to continue for the next 50 years at a reduced rate of growth. (16) 95
    77. 77. Demographic Trends in the United States Immigration • ½ of 2000-2010 growth in the U.S. is due to immigration; half is due to natural increase. (7) • Until the 1960s, immigration to the U.S. was primarily restricted to Europeans. (17, 23) • The 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act eliminated non-European quotas, and opened the doors to immigrants from all parts of the world. (17, 23) • By 2050, for the first time, Caucasian Americans will cease to be a majority (47%). (8) • Differential fertility rates: U.S. average, 2.0; Hispanics, 2.4; non-Hispanic blacks, 2.1; non- Hispanic whites and Asians, 1.8; will affect population growth in different geographic areas at any scale. (8) 96
    78. 78. Demographic Trends in the United States Multigenerational Households (MGHs) • Definition I - Three generations, one roof—3.7% of all households in 2000; 4.4% of all households in 2010. (9) • Definition II – Definition I, plus households comprised of grandparents/grandchildren, and households comprised of parents/adult children: 16.2% of all households, 2008. (18) • Immigrants from Latin America and Asia are especially likely to have these sorts of living arrangements. (18) • In 2010, the share of the U.S. population that lived in MGHs (16.2%) was its highest since the 1960s (when it had reached 15%). This rate was up from a low of 12% in the 1980s. (18) • MGH rate will not fall until 2050 due to economic incapacities of GEN X (1965-81)/GEN Y (82-1999). (18) 97
    79. 79. Demographic Trends in the United StatesMultigenerational Households (MGHs) • Both older women (> 65) and younger men (25-34) have a 20% chance of living in an MGH. (18) • The poverty rate (2009) for all people living in MGHs was 11.5%, versus a poverty rate of 14.6% for people in all other types of households. (10) • For unemployed people, those living in MGHs had a poverty rate of 17.5%, while those with other living arrangements had a poverty rate of 30.3%. (10) • Multi-generational households will diminish in 2050 as baby-boomers’ wealth transfers to their children. (18) • There is also a multigenerational workforce made up of pre-Boomers, Boomers, Gen X, and Gen Y. (19) 98
    80. 80. Demographic Trends in the United StatesMarrying-Out (of Race/Ethnicity) • In 2010, marrying out of one’s ethnicity reached an all-time high in the U.S. Among newlyweds, 9% of whites, 17% of blacks, 26% of Hispanics, and 28% of Asians married members of other racial/ethnic groups. (20) • White-Asian couples (2010) had significantly higher average household incomes ($71,000) than all other pairings; their incomes were higher than those of white ($60,000) and Asian couples ($62,000). (20) • The rate of marrying-out varies by geography. It is highest in the West (22%), followed by the South and Northeast (13%) and the Midwest (11%) (2010). (20) 99
    81. 81. Demographic Trends in the United States The Dominance of the Elderly • In 1970, seniors comprised 10% of the U.S. population (20m); by 2010, they comprised 13% (40m); in 2050, they will comprise 21% (85m). (21) • Households without children (including seniors) were half of the population (52%) in 1960; two-thirds (68%) in 2005; and will be three-quarters (74%) by 2040. (22) • Households without children will represent 90% of the growth of households from 2005-2040. (22) • Every day in the decade of 2010-2020, 8,000 people will turn 65; from 2020-2030 that rate will be 8,250. (23) 100
    82. 82. Demographic Trends in the United States Women’s Workforce Presence • The gender ratio of college admissions in the United States is 60% female and 40% male. (23) • In married-couple households, women now provide 47% of the overall household income. (23) • In 2008, 63.3% of women were breadwinners or co- breadwinners; in 1967 that figure was 27.7%. (23) • Today, men versus women are more adversely affected by unemployment: men bore 80% of the job losses during the recent economic downturn. So bad for men, it has been called the “man-cession”. (23) 101
    83. 83. Implications of Demographic Trendsfor Southeast Florida
    84. 84. Implications of Demographic Trendsfor Southeast Florida World Trends – Population Flows• Increase in growth in Russian and Japanese tourism/residency. Europe linked to euro (+now). (31,32)• Some growth in Chinese tourism/residency from later working-age/affluent population. Asian immigrants now outnumber those from South/Central America. (14, 29, 40)• Sustained growth in immigration from South/Central America, and the Caribbean. (29)• Counter-trend: Economic growth in Brazil, Argentina, and Mexico could draw workers from across Latin America, diverting them from reaching the U.S. Opening up of Cuba could also produce a counter-trend from the U.S. (29) 103
    85. 85. Implications of Demographic Trendsfor Southeast Florida U.S. Trends – Population Flows• Florida was one of the five fastest/largest growing states for most of 70 years. 2040-26m; 2060-31m. (6)• Population growth in Florida slowed or was negative during recession; 2011 Census releases show return to growth with SE leading (38)• The Sunbelt (inc. South) will continue to garner the largest component of growth through 2060 (25), and Florida will be one of 9-11 U.S. super-regions. (24)• The South will get increased Hispanic immigration through 2060. Aging Hispanic immigrants will have different social- service needs than aging Northern migrants. (16) 104
    86. 86. Implications of Demographic Trendsfor Southeast Florida U.S. Trends – Marrying-out-Increasing Average Age• Marrying-out trends will affect Southeast Florida—41% of intermarriages are white/Hispanic couples. (23)• Florida (5th nationally) and Southeast Florida have relatively high percentages of elderly, and both will have higher percentages of seniors in 2030. (27)• Southeast Florida’s population had been getting younger, in contrast to its history as an aging region; this trend will be reversed by retirement of Baby Boomers. (28)• Overall in SE Fla., elderly 23.3% of population in 2030 (16.6% 2010); 28.4% Treasure Coast; 20.7% South Fla. (29) 105
    87. 87. Implications of Demographic Trendsfor Southeast Florida U.S. Trends – Gender Changes• The college gender ratio will hit Southeast Florida as more Hispanic families enter the mainstream. (34)• Women will reverse representation trends on private/ public boards as their education/wealth increase. (37)• Woman’s ascendance in Florida, and within Southeast Florida, could likely exceed national trends. (35)• Women in Southeast Florida will continue with their own blue collar employment (health, service), but will also move into male white collar employment, as well as its hierarchy. (36) 106
    88. 88. Implications of Demographic Trendsfor Southeast Florida Southeast Florida Trends – South/North Immigration• Miami-Dade, and less-so Broward, will continue to be numerically dominated by south/north immigration.(30)• Immigration will be largely from South/Central America and the Caribbean.• Palm Beach, Martin, St. Lucie, Indian River will have larger percent increases in S/N immigration. (30)• Increase of foreign born in all S. E. Fla. counties.• Southeast Florida, older; foreign-born, older. (30)• The tug-of-war between immigration and migration will be won by immigration in terms of numbers. Migration plus general aging will continue to increase overall age. (30) 107
    89. 89. Implications of Demographic Trendsfor Southeast Florida Southeast Florida Trends – North/South Migration• Florida – 19M population 2011; SE Florida, 6.2M (2011) (29)• Continued loss of northern migration to other states, Middle, Northwest, and Northeast Florida. (29)• North to south migration will be concentrated more in Indian River, Martin, and Palm Beach counties; less in St. Lucie, Broward, Miami-Dade, Monroe counties. (29)• Tourism, then northern migration to Southeast Florida, will pick-up an Eastern European-former Soviet Union component who are relatively new U.S. workers/citizens. (31) 108
    90. 90. Implications of Demographic Trendsfor Southeast Florida Southeast Florida Trends – Natural Increase/Job Base• Natural increase in the non-Caucasian Hispanic and black populations, especially in Miami-Dade, Broward, St. Lucie counties. (23) Per capita income may be lower in Southeast Florida but higher than the U.S. and Florida. (29)• Southeast Florida may grow slower than Florida as a whole but faster than the U.S./most southern states. (29)• Middle Florida will increase in job base and pull economic growth from the Southeast Florida region. (29)• Southeast Florida will experience growing trade with South/Central America and the Caribbean; unemployment initially high (<10%-2012) but region poised for recovery. (3, 29) 109
    91. 91. Endnotes (1)1. www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/fandd/2006/09/picture.htm2. https://www.cia.gov/library/reports/general-reports-1/Demo_Trends_For_Web.pdf3. www.thewealthreport.net/The-Wealth-Report-2012.pdf4. www.un.org/esa/population/publications/wpp2006/FS_ageing.pdf5. http://www.macfound.org/media/article_pdfs/FULL_REPORT.PDF6. http://www.bebr.ufl.edu/content/florida-county-population-projections7. www.cis.org/2000-2010-record-setting-decade-of-immigration8. www.pewsocialtrends.org/2012/05/17/explaining-why-minority-births-now-outnumber-white-births9. www.therepublic.com/view/story/a6eceed37547df963197eb9cf1016b/IN--Exchange-Multigenerational- Households10. www.pewsocialtrends.org/2011/10/03/fighting-poverty-in-a-bad-economy-americans-move-in-with-relatives11. http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/international_population/cb11-116.html12. www.tradingeconomics.com/high-income/long-term-unemployment-wb-data.html13. www.forbes.com/2010/06/14/japan-population-aging-business-oxford-analytica.html14. http://www.wttc.org/research/economic-impact-research/regional-reports/asia-pacific/15. http://planningcommission.nic.in/plans/planrel/12appdrft/approach_12plan.pdf16. www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/briefs/c2010br-01.pdf17. www.thenagain.info/webchron/usa/immigrationact.html18. http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2010/03/18/the-return-of-the-multi-generational-family-household/19. http://assets.aarp.org/www.aarp.org_/cs/misc/leading_a_multigenerational_workforce.pdf20. http://pewresearch.org/pubs/1616/american-marriage-interracial-interethnic 110
    92. 92. Endnotes (2)21. http://www.flickr.com/photos/usgao/5509657762/22. www.epa.gov/aging/resources/presentations/2008_1028_nelson_reconstruction.pdf23. www.kenan-flagler.unc.edu/~/media/files/kenaninstitute/UNC_KenanInstitute_2010Census24. www.floridafuturessurvey.com/2009/10/demographic-trends.html25. www.bebr.ufl.edu/news/sun-belts-comeback26. www.forbes.com/sites/joelkotkin/2011/12/22/the-sun-belts-comeback27. www.bebr.ufl.edu/news/census-shows-fewer-seniors-some-south-florida-cities28. www.heraldtribune.com/article/20110818/wire/110819592/-1/news?p=2&+c=pg29. http://www.slideshare.net/Jacqueshart/se-florida-demograghic-trends-dick-ogburn30. http://articles.sun-sentinel.com/2011-03-21/news/fl-census-change-20110318_1_whites-communities-dick- ogburn31. http://blogs.sun-sentinel.com/south-florida-travel/2012/05/29/russias-aeroflot-to-start-flights-to-miami-in- october/32. http://www.miami.us.emb-japan.go.jp/en/bilateral.html33. http://www.travelandleisure.com/slideshows/top-10-asia-spas34. http://www.alligator.org/news/campus/article_206135ea-3bb0-11df-9902-001cc4c002e0.html35. http://www.bpwfl.org/36. http://flwbc.org/37. http://www.theglasshammer.com/news/2009/02/19/breaking-the-glass-ceiling-in-florida/38. http://miami.cbslocal.com/2012/04/05/census-figures-show-people-once-again-moving-to-s-florida/39. http://www.bebr.ufl.edu/news/usa-sees-flattest-growth-population-1940s40. http://articles.sun-sentinel.com/2010-03-05/business/fl-china-tourism-20100305_1_visit-florida-chinese-travel- overseas-trip 111
    93. 93. SE Florida Prosperity Plan Opening SummitThe Numbers, and WhyThey MatterBill Spikowski, FAICP
    94. 94. Regional Transportation
    95. 95. climate change
    96. 96. “lidar” remote sensing
    97. 97. Vehicle-Miles Traveled (VMT) drive everywhere?
    98. 98. Indicators: Measurements thatprovide information about past andcurrent trends to assist communityleaders in making decisions that affectfuture outcomes.Benchmarks: Quantifiabletargets that crystalize communityaspirations. Indicators can be used tomeasure progress over time in achievingthese targets.
    99. 99. Austin Region
    100. 100. Maryland
    101. 101. but what if: energy prices rise? federal government expenditures drop?
    102. 102. Florida
    103. 103. Florida
    104. 104. but what if: energy prices rise dramatically? migration of people and capital shifts? sea-level rise affects coastal communities?
    105. 105. SE Florida Prosperity Plan Opening SummitRegions Will Define theFutureNeal Peirce, Citistates Group
    106. 106. Opening Summit Better Region Better Life Shaping the Plan: Working Lunch,Meet With Your Group
    107. 107. Education, Workforce & Econ DevelopmentGymnasiumDevelopment PatternsGymnasiumEnvironment, Natural Resources & AgricultureGymnasium (Upstairs)Climate ResiliencyClassroom 2Community Assets & CultureClassroom 6Inclusive Regional Leadership & EquityStudio 2
    108. 108. SE Florida Prosperity Plan Opening SummitLightning Round:Workgroup HighlightsClarence Anthony
    109. 109. Better Region Better LifeNEXT STEPS
    110. 110. Better Region Better LifeTHANK YOU

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