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Transcript

  • 1. Lisa Bos An Overview of Content Management for Publishers
  • 2. TODAY’S CHALLENGES
    • New media & new products
      • Re-using content across multiple products and media
      • Re-purposing content to develop new products
    • Efficiency
      • Save time
      • Save money
  • 3. CONTENT MANAGEMENT
    • Content management concepts are designed to address those challenges:
      • Re-use
      • Re-purposing
      • Efficiency
  • 4. DEFINITION
    • A set of processes, methods, and technologies that enable a publisher to capture, create, modify, maintain, interrelate, and deliver content for publication or other purposes affordably and with the needed quality and speed .
  • 5. CMS’S FOR PUBLISHERS
    • There are many flavors of content management systems of interest to publishers.
    • Some address different points in the content life cycle (e.g., manuscript tracking vs. digital asset management)
    • Some address content with different needs (e.g., magazines vs. journals).
  • 6. CMS’S FOR PUBLISHERS
    • Many publishers use multiple systems.
    • For publishers, it’s helpful to think of content management as an approach and collection of systems and processes – not as a single software system.
  • 7. CMS’S FOR PUBLISHERS
    • Types of systems include:
      • Manuscript tracking
      • Peer review
      • Document and content management (e.g., Documentum, XyEnterprise Content@)
      • Production workflow management (e.g., Quark Publishing System (QPS)
      • Digital asset management
  • 8. OTHER CMS’S
    • Most content management products you’ll find on the Web are NOT relevant to most publishers
      • Web content management
      • Enterprise content management
      • Intranet content management
      • Knowledge management
      • Others…
  • 9. WHAT DOES A CMS LOOK LIKE?
    • The technology varies, but most CMS’s are conceptually similar.
      • Inputs are loaded and processed.
      • People create and enhance the content.
      • Content is published automatically or with human involvement.
  • 10. CMS CHARACTERISTICS
    • Content management solutions are characterized by:
      • Centralized content storage
      • Controlled access
      • Tools for tracking and searching for content
      • Authoring/editing tools, including forms for capturing metadata (data about your content)
      • (cont’d)
  • 11. CMS CHARACTERISTICS
      • Workflow management
      • Automation of repetitive steps
      • Tools for loading content
      • Tools for delivering/extracting content
      • Methods for external access
      • Methods for collaboration
  • 12. KEY TECHNOLOGIES
    • Databases
    • XML (SGML)
    • Web technology
  • 13. TRENDS (May, 2002)
    • Bracket Report
      • 54 editorial, production, executive, and IT staff members
      • Publishers of varying sizes (more than 1/3 < $10M revenue)
      • Most in STM market
      • Focused on core content management systems (for editorial and production needs)
  • 14. TRENDS (May, 2002)
    • Primary Need for Content Management
    • Web & print - single system or solution ...... 61.1%
    • Web & print – separate process & solutions ... 25.9%
    • Web or other electronic products only ........ 9.3%
    • Other ........................................ 3.7%
    • Print only ................................... 0.0%
    • Observations one year later: Publishers continue to want to drive print and electronic output from a single solution.
  • 15. TRENDS (May, 2002)
    • Perception of Existing Content
    • Management Products
    • Existing products support all needs .......... 20.8%
    • Existing products support many needs ......... 15.1%
    • Existing products support some/few needs ..... 43.4%
    • Existing products support no needs ........... 15.1%
    • Not sure ..................................... 5.7%
    • Observations one year later: Products are much better.
  • 16. TRENDS (May, 2002)
    • Technical Approach You Would Take if
    • Designing A Content Management
    • Solution Today
    • Select primary product and build solution around it ..................... 24.0%
    • Select a few products that function as components and integrate with custom development where needed ........ 44.0%
    • Develop a mostly custom solution .......... 24.0%
    • Not sure ................................... 8.0%
    • Observations one year later: Appears that more publishers are buying solutions today, but need to do the research to be sure.
  • 17. TRENDS (May, 2002)
    • Cost to Implement CMS, Excluding Staff
    • Costs, and Including Hardware, Software, Fees,
    • Data Conversion
    • Spent almost nothing ............. 5.7%
    • Less than $100,000 ............... 15.1%
    • $100,000 - $250,000 .............. 24.5%
    • $250,000 - $500,000 .............. 18.9%
    • More than $500,000 ............... 24.5%
    • Not sure ......................... 11.3%
    • Costs peaked 2000-2002.
    • Observations one year later: Average investment is decreasing. Still a few >$1M systems.
  • 18. TRENDS (May, 2002)
    • Expectation of Seeing a Measurable Return
    • on Investment – Financial or Otherwise
    • Within 1 year after deployment .... 37.7%
    • 1 – 3 years after deployment ...... 37.7%
    • 5 years after deployment .......... 9.4%
    • Never ............................. 11.3%
    • Not sure .......................... 3.8%
    • Observations one year later: Most publishers now expect measurable benefits almost immediately.
  • 19. LESSONS LEARNED (May, 2002)
    • Would Do Differently If Starting Again
    • Be more structured about requirements definition and sign off ................ 55.6%
    • Spend more time on training/documentation . 48.1%
    • Ask for more time or start earlier ........ 46.3%
    • Develop system incrementally, in phases ... 44.4%
    • Ask for more money ........................ 42.6%
    • Be more structured in software/ technology selection ................... 37.0%
    • Use different software/technology ......... 29.6%
    • Obtain more support from other departments ............................ 25.9%
    • Use a different vendor/consultant ......... 25.9%
    • Obtain more support from management ....... 20.4%
    • Other ..................................... 9.3%
  • 20. TRENDS (May, 2002)
    • Observations one year later: As a result of content management projects and electronic product development projects, publishers are recognizing the importance of project management skills for software development
  • 21. MORE OBSERVATIONS (May, 2003)
    • Publishers are being more careful about how they implement change (more focused on process and results, less on hype and technology)
    • Publishers that invested carefully are seeing real ROI
    • Early adopters are replacing their systems with newer technology
    • (cont’d)
  • 22. MORE OBSERVATIONS (May, 2003)
    • Publishers that invested in editorial and production systems are now able to look to additional systems: peer review, collaborative authoring, digital asset management, subscription management
    • XML continues to be the key technology
  • 23. FIRST STEPS
    • Don’t start with technology
    • Instead, assess your current content management environment and challenges:
      • Identify the most important opportunities for change by looking at key areas in each stage of the content lifecycle
  • 24. FIRST STEPS
    • Examples of stages:
      • Content creation
      • Content submission and approval
      • Content peer review
      • Content development/editing
      • Content categorization
      • Content production
      • Media-specific production
      • Product and content delivery
  • 25. FIRST STEPS
    • For each stage, ask:
      • Does it take too long?
      • Does it cost too much?
      • Does it achieve the ideal outcomes (inputs to next stages)?
    • If not, look for opportunities for improvements within each stage and then among stages.
  • 26. FIRST STEPS
    • Areas to look:
      • Process details and order
      • Content types
      • Content format
      • Content storage
      • Content and product requirements (challenge assumptions)
      • Automation
      • Software
      • Tracking and communication tools
      • User characteristics
  • 27. FIRST STEPS
    • Prioritize needed change based on measurable business objectives .
    • Balance this with an understanding of what is possible in your organization.
    • Determine what kind of projects you want to do first. (You might need to acquire software, and you might not.)
  • 28. FIRST STEPS
    • Remember:
      • Investments should correspond directly business goals.
      • You don’t need to do everything at once. Start with pilot projects.
      • You don’t necessarily need to spend a lot of money to get results, especially at first.
      • Talk to experienced people.
  • 29. OTHER RESOURCES
    • Content Management: http://www.cmswatch.com/
    • XML/SGML (The Cover Pages): http://xml.coverpages.org/
    • Publishing standards: http://www.idealliance.org
    • (Our) newsletter for publishers: http://www.reallysi.com/newsletter.htm
  • 30. THANK YOU Lisa Bos [email_address] www.reallysi.com