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Lisa Bos

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    Lisa Bos Lisa Bos Presentation Transcript

    • Lisa Bos An Overview of Content Management for Publishers
    • TODAY’S CHALLENGES
      • New media & new products
        • Re-using content across multiple products and media
        • Re-purposing content to develop new products
      • Efficiency
        • Save time
        • Save money
    • CONTENT MANAGEMENT
      • Content management concepts are designed to address those challenges:
        • Re-use
        • Re-purposing
        • Efficiency
    • DEFINITION
      • A set of processes, methods, and technologies that enable a publisher to capture, create, modify, maintain, interrelate, and deliver content for publication or other purposes affordably and with the needed quality and speed .
    • CMS’S FOR PUBLISHERS
      • There are many flavors of content management systems of interest to publishers.
      • Some address different points in the content life cycle (e.g., manuscript tracking vs. digital asset management)
      • Some address content with different needs (e.g., magazines vs. journals).
    • CMS’S FOR PUBLISHERS
      • Many publishers use multiple systems.
      • For publishers, it’s helpful to think of content management as an approach and collection of systems and processes – not as a single software system.
    • CMS’S FOR PUBLISHERS
      • Types of systems include:
        • Manuscript tracking
        • Peer review
        • Document and content management (e.g., Documentum, XyEnterprise Content@)
        • Production workflow management (e.g., Quark Publishing System (QPS)
        • Digital asset management
    • OTHER CMS’S
      • Most content management products you’ll find on the Web are NOT relevant to most publishers
        • Web content management
        • Enterprise content management
        • Intranet content management
        • Knowledge management
        • Others…
    • WHAT DOES A CMS LOOK LIKE?
      • The technology varies, but most CMS’s are conceptually similar.
        • Inputs are loaded and processed.
        • People create and enhance the content.
        • Content is published automatically or with human involvement.
    • CMS CHARACTERISTICS
      • Content management solutions are characterized by:
        • Centralized content storage
        • Controlled access
        • Tools for tracking and searching for content
        • Authoring/editing tools, including forms for capturing metadata (data about your content)
        • (cont’d)
    • CMS CHARACTERISTICS
        • Workflow management
        • Automation of repetitive steps
        • Tools for loading content
        • Tools for delivering/extracting content
        • Methods for external access
        • Methods for collaboration
    • KEY TECHNOLOGIES
      • Databases
      • XML (SGML)
      • Web technology
    • TRENDS (May, 2002)
      • Bracket Report
        • 54 editorial, production, executive, and IT staff members
        • Publishers of varying sizes (more than 1/3 < $10M revenue)
        • Most in STM market
        • Focused on core content management systems (for editorial and production needs)
    • TRENDS (May, 2002)
      • Primary Need for Content Management
      • Web & print - single system or solution ...... 61.1%
      • Web & print – separate process & solutions ... 25.9%
      • Web or other electronic products only ........ 9.3%
      • Other ........................................ 3.7%
      • Print only ................................... 0.0%
      • Observations one year later: Publishers continue to want to drive print and electronic output from a single solution.
    • TRENDS (May, 2002)
      • Perception of Existing Content
      • Management Products
      • Existing products support all needs .......... 20.8%
      • Existing products support many needs ......... 15.1%
      • Existing products support some/few needs ..... 43.4%
      • Existing products support no needs ........... 15.1%
      • Not sure ..................................... 5.7%
      • Observations one year later: Products are much better.
    • TRENDS (May, 2002)
      • Technical Approach You Would Take if
      • Designing A Content Management
      • Solution Today
      • Select primary product and build solution around it ..................... 24.0%
      • Select a few products that function as components and integrate with custom development where needed ........ 44.0%
      • Develop a mostly custom solution .......... 24.0%
      • Not sure ................................... 8.0%
      • Observations one year later: Appears that more publishers are buying solutions today, but need to do the research to be sure.
    • TRENDS (May, 2002)
      • Cost to Implement CMS, Excluding Staff
      • Costs, and Including Hardware, Software, Fees,
      • Data Conversion
      • Spent almost nothing ............. 5.7%
      • Less than $100,000 ............... 15.1%
      • $100,000 - $250,000 .............. 24.5%
      • $250,000 - $500,000 .............. 18.9%
      • More than $500,000 ............... 24.5%
      • Not sure ......................... 11.3%
      • Costs peaked 2000-2002.
      • Observations one year later: Average investment is decreasing. Still a few >$1M systems.
    • TRENDS (May, 2002)
      • Expectation of Seeing a Measurable Return
      • on Investment – Financial or Otherwise
      • Within 1 year after deployment .... 37.7%
      • 1 – 3 years after deployment ...... 37.7%
      • 5 years after deployment .......... 9.4%
      • Never ............................. 11.3%
      • Not sure .......................... 3.8%
      • Observations one year later: Most publishers now expect measurable benefits almost immediately.
    • LESSONS LEARNED (May, 2002)
      • Would Do Differently If Starting Again
      • Be more structured about requirements definition and sign off ................ 55.6%
      • Spend more time on training/documentation . 48.1%
      • Ask for more time or start earlier ........ 46.3%
      • Develop system incrementally, in phases ... 44.4%
      • Ask for more money ........................ 42.6%
      • Be more structured in software/ technology selection ................... 37.0%
      • Use different software/technology ......... 29.6%
      • Obtain more support from other departments ............................ 25.9%
      • Use a different vendor/consultant ......... 25.9%
      • Obtain more support from management ....... 20.4%
      • Other ..................................... 9.3%
    • TRENDS (May, 2002)
      • Observations one year later: As a result of content management projects and electronic product development projects, publishers are recognizing the importance of project management skills for software development
    • MORE OBSERVATIONS (May, 2003)
      • Publishers are being more careful about how they implement change (more focused on process and results, less on hype and technology)
      • Publishers that invested carefully are seeing real ROI
      • Early adopters are replacing their systems with newer technology
      • (cont’d)
    • MORE OBSERVATIONS (May, 2003)
      • Publishers that invested in editorial and production systems are now able to look to additional systems: peer review, collaborative authoring, digital asset management, subscription management
      • XML continues to be the key technology
    • FIRST STEPS
      • Don’t start with technology
      • Instead, assess your current content management environment and challenges:
        • Identify the most important opportunities for change by looking at key areas in each stage of the content lifecycle
    • FIRST STEPS
      • Examples of stages:
        • Content creation
        • Content submission and approval
        • Content peer review
        • Content development/editing
        • Content categorization
        • Content production
        • Media-specific production
        • Product and content delivery
    • FIRST STEPS
      • For each stage, ask:
        • Does it take too long?
        • Does it cost too much?
        • Does it achieve the ideal outcomes (inputs to next stages)?
      • If not, look for opportunities for improvements within each stage and then among stages.
    • FIRST STEPS
      • Areas to look:
        • Process details and order
        • Content types
        • Content format
        • Content storage
        • Content and product requirements (challenge assumptions)
        • Automation
        • Software
        • Tracking and communication tools
        • User characteristics
    • FIRST STEPS
      • Prioritize needed change based on measurable business objectives .
      • Balance this with an understanding of what is possible in your organization.
      • Determine what kind of projects you want to do first. (You might need to acquire software, and you might not.)
    • FIRST STEPS
      • Remember:
        • Investments should correspond directly business goals.
        • You don’t need to do everything at once. Start with pilot projects.
        • You don’t necessarily need to spend a lot of money to get results, especially at first.
        • Talk to experienced people.
    • OTHER RESOURCES
      • Content Management: http://www.cmswatch.com/
      • XML/SGML (The Cover Pages): http://xml.coverpages.org/
      • Publishing standards: http://www.idealliance.org
      • (Our) newsletter for publishers: http://www.reallysi.com/newsletter.htm
    • THANK YOU Lisa Bos [email_address] www.reallysi.com