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  • 1. CITY OF FERGUS FALLS Asset Management Plan For Wastewater Treatment Systems April 19, 2006
  • 2. Asset Management, WWT TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 INTRODUCTION......................................................................................................................................1 1.1 Purpose...................................................................................................................................................1 1.2 Approach................................................................................................................................................1 1.3 Advanced Asset Management Software (TEAMS).................................................................................1 2 ASSET MANAGEMENT OVERVIEW..................................................................................................3 2.1 Asset Management Defined....................................................................................................................3 2.1.1 Asset Failure Modes........................................................................................................................3 2.2 Life-Cycle Management.........................................................................................................................4 2.3 Benefits of Asset management................................................................................................................4 2.4 Key Steps of Asset Management.............................................................................................................5 3 WWTP MISSION STATEMENT AND GOALS....................................................................................6 4 WWTP LEVELS OF SERVICE...............................................................................................................7 5 ASSET DETAILS FOR THE WWTP/COLLECTION SYSTEM........................................................8 5.1 Physical..................................................................................................................................................8 5.1.1 Pipelines, Manholes, and Lift Stations............................................................................................8 5.1.2 Wastewater Treatment Plant............................................................................................................8 5.2 Asset Valuation.......................................................................................................................................9 6 THE WWTP ASSET MANAGEMENT TEAM....................................................................................10 7 IMPLEMENTATION STEPS FOR THE WWTP................................................................................11 7.1 Asset Inventory.....................................................................................................................................11 7.2 Asset Valuation.....................................................................................................................................11 7.3 Asset Condition and Criticality Analyses.............................................................................................12 7.4 Asset Maintenance Management..........................................................................................................12 7.5 Asset Renewal and Replacement Planning..........................................................................................13 7.6 Capital Improvement Planning............................................................................................................14 7.7 Asset Disposal Plan..............................................................................................................................17 7.8 WWTP Operations and Energy Management......................................................................................18 8 MONITORING AND PLAN IMPROVEMENT...................................................................................22 9 ACTION PLAN 2006..............................................................................................................................23 i
  • 3. Asset Management, WWT LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1 Historical Power Consumption, kwh/day...................................................................................19 Figure 2 KWH 2002 to 2004.......................................................................................................................20 Figure 3 KWH 2001 to 2004.......................................................................................................................20 LIST OF TABLES Table 1 WWTP Asset Management Team................................................................................................10 Table 2 Five Year CIP Program for Wastewater Treatment..................................................................15 Table 3 Twenty Year CIP Plan...................................................................................................................16 Table 4 Historical O & M Costs.................................................................................................................18 Table 5 2006 Energy Conservation Projects.............................................................................................21 ii
  • 4. Asset Management, WWT 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Purpose The purpose of this ASSET MANAGEMENT PLAN is to ensure that the wastewater physical assets (both treatment and collection systems) are operated and maintained in a sustainable and cost-effective manner in order to provide the required level of services for both present and future customers. 1.2 Approach This plan is organized as follows: • First there is a brief Overview of what is involved in asset management. • Following the Overview section, the plan gets specific and describes the Levels of Service, Mission Statement and Goals for the Fergus Falls Water and Wastewater assets. This section describes what we are trying to accomplish. • The AM Team section identifies the key personnel (the asset management team) and their responsibilities. • The Key Steps to Asset Management section describes actions that need to be accomplished to create our asset management program. • The Action Plan section describes specific objectives that are to be accomplished in the upcoming year. • Finally, the Monitoring and Plan Improvement section provides information on how we will monitor our progress and update this plan. 1.3 Advanced Asset Management Software (TEAMS) We have chosen the software entitled Total Electronic Asset Management System (TEAMS) software for implementing our advanced asset management program. The Maryland Center for Environmental Training (under contract with the EPA) created this software package to assist small communities in implementing advanced asset management programs. The software was created using the data base Access found in Microsoft Office. TEAMS was made available by the EPA in 2005 for small to medium sized public utility systems. 1
  • 5. Asset Management, WWT The TEAMS software integrates the many components of advanced asset management into one cohesive package. The basic components found in TEAMS are: 1. A facility asset inventory 2. A criticality assessment of each asset 3. A condition assessment of each asset 4. An integrated asset valuation 5. Maintenance management 6. Renewal/Replacement planning 7. Financial planning The analysis and evaluation process found in TEAMS incorporates the steps to make: 1. Financial decisions, 2. Prepare a capital improvement program (CIP), and 3. A mechanism to determine system rate structures. The TEAMS software program addresses five core advanced asset management issues: 1. What is the current state of the assets? 2. What is the required level of service for these assets? 3. Which assets are critical to sustained performance? 4. What are the best minimum life cycle cost, CIP, and operation and maintenance strategies? 5. What is the best long-term funding strategy? The TEAMS software provides a sustainable advanced asset management system that makes facilities more efficient in operational, financial, and compliance aspects. Over time, the effects will be noticeable through: 1. Correctly valued inventories, 2. Reduced breakdowns, 3. Efficient use of equipment and personnel, and 4. More precise budgeting. 2
  • 6. Asset Management, WWT 2 ASSET MANAGEMENT OVERVIEW 2.1 Asset Management Defined The term asset management is defined as the “comprehensive management of asset demand, planning, procurement, operation, maintenance, rehabilitation, disposal, and replacement to minimize life cycle cost while delivering the service levels that customers desire”. Most simply put, asset management is a structured program to optimize the life-cycle value of your physical assets. For infrastructure agencies, it usually applies to system assets and may be known as infrastructure management. Its main components are: • Smart investment—Minimize initial investments and invest in assets with the lowest life-cycle ownership costs that meet your service level objectives. • Smart maintenance—Replace reactive maintenance with planned maintenance, and move fixed-interval planned maintenance toward predictive and on-condition maintenance. • Smart refurbishment—Extend the life of your assets through cost-effective refurbishment programs. • Smart replacement—Replace your assets based on known condition, neither too early nor too late. • Smart financing—Put in place now the financial policies that will ensure the integrity of your infrastructure well into the future. • Smart planning—Do all this proactively within a structured forward-looking framework, involving all parts of your organization. Obviously, an organization that can honestly say “We practice good asset management” will be doing everything it can to minimize its long-term asset costs and to ensure the most basic and important element of good customer service: The reliable and uninterrupted delivery of quality service. 2.1.1 Asset Failure Modes Generally, it is assumed that physical failure is the critical failure mode for most assets. However, the TEAMS asset management process recognizes that other failure modes are relevant and are often critical for effective delivery of services and will affect asset remaining useful lives. The range of failure modes includes: • Mortality: o The asset is at the end of its physical life but still performing OK. 3
  • 7. Asset Management, WWT • Performance: o The asset is unreliable because it breaks down too often. • Capacity: o The asset is currently undersized • Cost: o The asset performs OK but costs too much to operate or maintain • Obsolescence: o This occurs when technical change or lack of replacement parts has rendered the asset uneconomic to operate or maintain • Operator error: o This occurs when the available operator skill level negatively impacts asset performance and/or service delivery. 2.2 Life-Cycle Management Every asset has a definitive life. Successful asset management minimizes the asset’s costs over the asset’s life. Assets have a life cycle as they move from the initial concept to the final disposal. Assets used in water and wastewater systems can have lifecycles varying from 10 years to over 100 years. Opportunities for life cycle cost reduction are typically greatest during the planning stage. Diminishing opportunities exist for life cycle reduction in the procurement (design and construction) phase. Once an asset moves into the operation and maintenance stage, the opportunities for life cycle cost reduction become more limited. However, opportunities continue to exist through more effective and efficient operation (including reducing power costs) and maintenance practices (scheduled maintenance versus breakdown and repair). The asset renewal and disposal phase provides an opportunity to revisit past infrastructure investment decisions and to possibly reduce the next round of asset life cycle costs. 2.3 Benefits of Asset management We see the benefits of effective asset management as follows: For our customers: • High value for their tax dollars. • Sustained high service levels. • No excessive cost increases due to inappropriate or unplanned infrastructure investment decisions. For the organization: • Minimum life cycle costs for agreed upon levels of service. • More accurate short and long-term financial planning. • More cost effective investment decisions. • Improved customer satisfaction. 4
  • 8. Asset Management, WWT • A more reliable system. 2.4 Key Steps of Asset Management The following actions are essential for a successful asset management program.  A mission statement, goals, and objectives for the asset management program.  An identified asset management team.  An asset inventory.  An assessment of each asset’s criticality and condition.  An assessment of each asset’s value.  A well document maintenance management program.  A renewal/replacement program.  A financial plan (Capital Improvement Plan)  Active energy conservation and operations management programs. 5
  • 9. Asset Management, WWT 3 WWTP MISSION STATEMENT AND GOALS The mission of the FFWWTP Asset Management Program is to minimize asset life cycle costs without jeopardizing the health of our employees or the service levels provided to our rate payers. To support our asset management mission, we commit to: 1. Maintaining an up-to-date electronic inventory of pipeline and treatment plant assets that includes acquisition, condition, and maintenance cost information. 2. Using a computerized maintenance management program (TEAMS). 3. Maintaining ongoing cost logs that track the maintenance and repair requirements of strategic assets. 4. Proactively planning for renewal and replacement using a formalized program that maximizes opportunities to reduce costs. 5. Maintaining the system so that less than 5% of the system is deficient with respect to operating capabilities and performance standards, as identified in the respective manufactures guidelines. 6
  • 10. Asset Management, WWT 4 WWTP LEVELS OF SERVICE The levels of service determine the amount of funding that is required to maintain, renew and upgrade the wastewater infrastructure in order to provide the customers with the levels of service specified. We are trying to minimize costs, while providing specified levels of service. Levels of service for the wastewater system are specified for the following: • Environmental protection • Reliability and capacity • Responsiveness Category Target Level of Service Effluent discharge Full compliance with NPDES permit Odor Events No more than 2 odor complaints originating from the collection system. No more than 1 odor complaint originating from the treatment plan per year Lift Station Overflows <1 overflow due to wet weather rainfall, equipment, or power outages Collection System <1 blockage in the system per mile of gravity system Customer’s Response Response for urgent reactive maintenance work onsite within 4 hours of call and service restored within 8 hours, 95% of the time 7
  • 11. Asset Management, WWT 5 ASSET DETAILS FOR THE WWTP/COLLECTION SYSTEM 5.1 Physical 5.1.1 Pipelines, Manholes, and Lift Stations At this time, it is estimated that the City of Fergus Falls owns and operates over 1,000 miles of sewers dating back to the early 1900’s and ranging in size from 3 to 48 inches in diameter. The sewer system transports sanitary, storm and some combined flows. Sanitary sewers carry effluent from each home and business to the wastewater treatment plant. Storm sewers carry rain water from catch basins to various storm sewer outfalls. Combined sewers carry a mix of sanitary and storm flows to the wastewater treatment plant. At this time it is estimated that the sewer system also includes 2,500 manholes, 100 storm service connections, 50 inlets and outfalls, and 25 pumping stations. When you combine the value of all of the City of Fergus Falls sewer system assets, the estimated replacement value is over $100 million. 5.1.2 Wastewater Treatment Plant The City of Fergus Falls operates one wastewater treatment plant. This plant was built in 1988 and many of the components have reached, or will soon reach, the end of their original useful life. In broad terms, the treatment plant consists of five building, 48,800 ft2 of concrete tanks, 475 Hp of aeration blowers, 113 Hp boiler, 43 Hp boiler, 25 pumps, over 300 valves and 50 miles of piping valued at over $30,000,000. 8
  • 12. Asset Management, WWT 5.2 Asset Valuation As of March 11, 2006, we have inventoried approximately 60% of the WWTP assets. Asset Category Replacement Cost Historical Cost Depreciated Value Pipes Manholes Pump Stations Treatment Plant $6.9 million Total **replacement cost is the cost to replace all assets in 2006 9
  • 13. Asset Management, WWT 6 THE WWTP ASSET MANAGEMENT TEAM The members of the asset management team for the WWTP are list in Table 1. Table 1 WWTP Asset Management Team Name Position Responsibility Clif Allen Director of Public Works Team leader CIP Steve Hames Collection System, Overall maintenance and Wastewater, and Water budgeting, CIP Rein & Associates Consultant Program maintenance, asset entry, guidance and continuity Rich Armstrong WWTP Supervisor Maintenance, CIP Matt Lemke Operator Maintenance Steven Nelson Operator Maintenance Mark Argil Operator Maintenance 10
  • 14. Asset Management, WWT 7 IMPLEMENTATION STEPS FOR THE WWTP 7.1 Asset Inventory All assets above $1,000 dollars in value are being inventoried. The TEAMS software requires detailed information on the assets, such as pipe diameter, supplier, and motor information. It is important that as much information as possible be completed for each asset entered into the software (although the information can be added at a later date). Part of conducting the inventory is to assign each asset to a category. For the treatment plant, categories are based primarily on treatment phases. Other categories are included, such as an electrical category which includes items such as MCCs, VFDs, and controls. For collection system components, the following categories are utilized: manholes, pipes, and pump stations. 7.2 Asset Valuation The TEAMS software also requires asset valuation information. In particular, it is seeking the original cost for each asset. Often, data regarding the original cost of the assets is not available. In such cases, the original cost is estimated based on the current replacement value of the asset. Once this information is entered into the TEAMS software, it will deflate the current cost back to the asset’s original installation date using the current construction cost index. The total value of an asset includes all costs associated with placing the asset into service. Thus, the total cost of an asset includes the following components: • Engineering costs • Professional services • Materials and equipment cost • Installation costs • Other directly related utility costs Another component of the valuation is the useful life of assets. This is the design life for assets and can be found in several EPA manuals. For example, pumps can be expected to last 20-30 years. Specific knowledge concerning useful lives of various assets will provide more accurate information. The anticipated service life and remaining life of buried infrastructure will likely be the most difficult to estimate. 11
  • 15. Asset Management, WWT 7.3 Asset Condition and Criticality Analyses At this time it is anticipated that condition assessments will be performed on an annual basis for assets in the TEAMS database. Condition assessments are a very critical component of asset management. These assessments help to estimate the remaining useful life of the asset, which is determined by various asset failure modes. Listed below are typical condition assessment techniques for equipment:  Visual inspection  Review of maintenance reports  Wear products/contaminants testing  Vibration, current or temperature analysis (predictive maintenance) Some condition assessment techniques that can be used for the collection system include:  Pump station inspection  Manhole inspection  Smoke testing  Dye testing  Video inspection When conducting annual condition assessments information relating to age, appearance, predictive maintenance information, and maintenance costs (preventative and breakdown) should be reviewed and reflected in the updated condition assessment. When entering the condition of our assets, TEAMS software assesses condition for the following areas: performance, capacity, and estimated percent of effective life consumed. Criticality assessments will be conducted initially when assets are entered into the TEAMS database. Criticality assessments are conducted to help quantify the degree of risk associated with an asset failing. TEAMS software requests input for the following items: number of customers used, redundancy, environmental impacts and plant impacts. The outcome of condition and criticality analyses will be a ranking of the assets based on condition level and criticality level. These rankings can be used to help prioritize work orders and renewal and replacement projects. Condition assessments will guide the renewal and replacement step. 7.4 Asset Maintenance Management Routine and programmed maintenance is the regular ongoing day to day work necessary to keep the assets operating, including instances where portions of the asset fail and need immediate repair to make the asset operational again. TEAMS software is now being utilized for maintenance management. Work orders are being generated from the software. Maintenance personnel are completing the work 12
  • 16. Asset Management, WWT orders (including cost information). Completed work orders are being entered into the TEAMS database. Predictive maintenance techniques are being utilized whenever possible. Some techniques include vibration analysis, thermal, and current draw. Predictive maintenance results are starting to be recorded on work orders. 7.5 Asset Renewal and Replacement Planning Part of minimizing life-cycle costs is to proactively plan for renewal and replacement of assets. We will plan to identify assets that need some level of R&R at least two years prior to the end of their useful lives. By using the TEAMS software we will be able to prioritize assets needing R & R based on condition and criticality and to determine the failure mode of our assets.. Each year there will be an annual R & R planning process. The outcome of this process will include: • Generation of a list of prioritized assets based on condition and criticality, • Feedback from the utility’s O&M staff to add to or modify asset list, • Inspection to verify and observe condition of assets, • Preliminary evaluation of R & R alternatives, • Preparation of proposed R&R project list, • Determination of project delivery methodology, and • Preparation of preliminary budget and schedule. The following decision options should be considered when planning renewal and replacement for each asset: • Do nothing: The financial, service, and risk implications of allowing the asset to continue to deteriorate, usually at an accelerating rate should be considered. Doing nothing is an acceptable option if the asset is still performing within an acceptable range and the risk and consequences of failure are reasonable. o **doing nothing, that is, running assets to failure, is rarely the most cost- effective strategy • Operational procedures: Operational changes such as reducing use or rerouting may be possible to reduce peak demand and stress on the asset. Increased inspection frequency may also be appropriate. • Maintenance procedures: A more intensive maintenance program may slow down deterioration or maintain the existing condition for a period of time. • Asset renewal: Rehabilitation to restore the asset’s performance and condition to “like new” and extend its life should be considered. Options may also include upgrading the design of the asset to reduce operating or maintenance costs, improve performance, or extend its life even further. • Asset replacement: When rehabilitation options are impractical or uneconomical, it may be necessary to replace the asset. Replacement options 13
  • 17. Asset Management, WWT include upgrading the design of the asset because of obsolescence or to reduce operating and maintenance costs, improve performance, or obtain a longer life. • Expansion or enhancement: Anticipated needs to increase capacity or improve performance may require investment to create a new asset or augment the existing asset. Predictions of future demand and levels of required service should be available. This is also the case when new regulations require a change or upgrade to the treatment processes requiring assets to be replaced by facilities of different design or function. • Asset Disposal: It may be determined that the asset is no longer needed by the utility to achieve its objectives 7.6 Capital Improvement Planning Renewal and replacement, which is the primary focus of the TEAMS software, needs to be balanced with growth expansion, regulatory compliance and enhancing assets for improving efficiency. We have completed our first 5 year Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) program. It is shown in Table 1. 14
  • 18. Asset Management, WWT Table 2 Five Year CIP Program for Wastewater Treatment Asset 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Reason Sludge Reservoir Mixer $48,750 End of Useful Life Aeration Tank Diffusers/Header Piping $107,474 Process Efficiency Cover Digester #1 $129,348 End of Useful Life Cover Digester #2 $119,956 End of Useful Life Cover Digester #3 $129,348 End of Useful Life Primary Clarifier Mechanism, West $151,113 End of Useful Life Digester Feed Pump #2 $19,380 End of Useful Life Primary Clarifier Mechanism, East $162,500 End of Useful Life Was Pump #1 $35,347 End of Useful Life Was Pump #2 $35,347 End of Useful Life RAS Pump #3 West $11,759 End of Useful Life Sludge Loading Pump #1 $56,534 End of Useful Life Sludge Loading Pump #2 $56,534 End of Useful Life RAS Pump #4 East $12,186 End of Useful Life Aeration Mixer #2 $7,095 End of Useful Life Aeration Mixer #3 $9,029 End of Useful Life Aeration Mixer #4 $9,029 End of Useful Life Digester Mixer #2 $58,469 End of Useful Life Digester Mixer #3 $58,469 End of Useful Life Digester Mixer #4 $54,224 End of Useful Life Digester Mixer #5 $54,224 End of Useful Life Final Clarifier Mechanism West $186,033 End of Useful Life Final Clarfier Mechanism East $196,447 End of Useful Life Aeration Mixer #10 $10,500 End of Useful Life Aeration Mixer #5 $10,661 End of Useful Life Aeration Mixer #6 $10,500 End of Useful Life Aeration Mixer #7 $10,500 End of Useful Life Aeration Mixer #8 $10,500 End of Useful Life Aeration Mixer #9 $10,661 End of Useful Life Total $338,040 $299,098 $347,560 $387,393 $399,826 All costs are for replacement of assets. Assets may be rehabilitated if found to be more cost effective. Some items have not been condition assessed. This could alter the item's position on the list. A 20 year Master Plan is shown in Table 4. This type of master planning estimates costs for CIP needs including: renewal and replacement, growth expansion, and regulatory compliance needs.) Table 4 assumes that there are no funds in reserve for the CIP program. It also shows the adjusted present worth of the 20 year plan as $2,918,870. 15
  • 19. Asset Management, WWT Table 3 Twenty Year CIP Plan City of Fergus Falls, Current Usage Wastewater Equipment Repair & Replacement Schedule 4.00% Inflation Rate per Year (Assumed) Annual Payment to Repair and Replacement Account: $244,249 5.50% Interest Rate per Year (Assumed) (This is the Minimum Annuity plus the Supplemental Annuity) End of Year Future R&R Cost per Inflation Cost per Interest Account Year Replacement Item Description Item # Items Factor Item Yearly Total Earned Balance Aeration, Final Mech W., Sludge 2007 $338,040 1 1.00 $338,040 $338,040 $0 ($93,791) Pump Digeter Cover, WAS Pumps, Digester 2008 $299,098 1 1.04 $311,062 $311,062 ($5,159) ($165,762) Mixer 2009 Final Mech E., Primary Mech W. $347,560 1 1.08 $375,921 $375,921 ($9,117) ($306,551) Two Digester Covers, RAS Pump, 2010 $387,393 1 1.12 $435,764 $435,764 ($16,860) ($514,927) Digester Mixers Sludge Storage Mixer, Primary Mech 2011 $399,826 1 1.17 $467,740 $467,740 ($28,321) ($766,738) East, Sludge Loadings Pumps 2012 Various $10,478 1 1.22 $12,748 $12,748 ($42,171) ($577,408) 2013 Various $54,618 1 1.27 $69,109 $69,109 ($31,757) ($434,026) 2014 Various $205,323 1 1.32 $270,191 $270,191 ($23,871) ($483,839) 2015 Various $45,381 1 1.37 $62,107 $62,107 ($26,611) ($328,308) 2016 Various $12,817 1 1.42 $18,243 $18,243 ($18,057) ($120,359) 2017 Various $365,093 1 1.48 $540,427 $540,427 ($6,620) ($423,156) 2018 Various $121,097 1 1.54 $186,423 $186,423 ($23,274) ($388,604) 2019 Various $518,509 1 1.60 $830,150 $830,150 ($21,373) ($995,878) 2020 Various $72,272 1.67 $120,338 $0 ($54,773) ($806,402) 2021 Various $69,327 1 1.73 $120,052 $120,052 ($44,352) ($726,557) 2022 Various $12,972 1.80 $23,362 $0 ($39,961) ($522,269) 2023 Various $188,055 1 1.87 $352,223 $352,223 ($28,725) ($658,968) 2024 Various $135,480 1.95 $263,902 $0 ($36,243) ($450,962) 2025 Various $135,480 2.03 $274,458 $0 ($24,803) ($231,516) 2026 Various $84,893 2.11 $178,857 $0 ($12,733) $0 Total inflation-adjusted repair and replacement costs $4,390,200 Adjusted Present Worth Total $2,918,870 Starting Account Balance $0 Present Worth less Starting Account Balance $2,918,870 Minimum Annual Annuity $244,249 Supplemental Annual Annuity $0 16
  • 20. Asset Management, WWT 7.7 Asset Disposal Plan At this time we do not have a disposal plan for assets that are no longer being used but are still installed. This plan will be developed this year. 17
  • 21. Asset Management, WWT 7.8 WWTP Operations and Energy Management Table 4 Historical O & M Costs The historical operations and maintenance costs for the WWTP are summarized in Table 1. Table 1 WWTP O&M Costs Category 1999 2000 2001 2002 2005 Labor $224,690 $196,190 $194,909 $213,821 $201,609 Office Supplies $468 $634 $860 $844 $3,382 Chemicals $74,359 $51,911 $34,109 $40,127 $26,262 Equipment Parts $25,451 $80,613 $7,763 $26,340 $3,919 Building Repair $2,570 $36,500 $2,671 $2,202 $1,327 Professional Services $36,511 $55,122 $61,178 $73,119 $70,022 Telephone $1,893 $2,104 $2,142 $2,068 $3,234 Postage $4 $49 $39 $100 $400 Freight $330 $707 $782 $667 $285 Internet Access $160 Travel $192 $121 $270 $32 Insuance $74 $337 $11,647 Property $4,781 $5,131 $5,907 $5,916 $160 Boiler $140 $187 $127 Electric Utilities $99,362 $96,015 $90,990 $107,207 $107,000 City Utilities $8,925 $10,222 $9,831 $12,404 $13,566 Gas Utilities $39,800 $76,566 $64,758 $58,241 $99,500 Buildings $1,073 $3,700 $5,000 Machinery Equipment $15,185 $21,438 $20,250 $12,713 $41,579 Other Equipment $12,550 $10,418 $20,600 $17,743 $20,518 Sludge Removal $87,915 $55,523 $50,104 $79,192 $43,393 Misc. $400 $22,000 $4,691 $320 $19,180 Operation subtotal $654,188 $701,305 $592,901 $657,792 $653,155 As part of minimizing life-cycle costs, the following actions are being taken: • Monitoring energy consumption and cost; • Identifying opportunities for energy minimization; and • Implementing cost-effective strategies Figure 1 shows the historical electrical power consumption 18
  • 22. Asset Management, WWT Figure 1 Historical Power Consumption, kwh/day Power Consumption Fergus Falls WWTP 9,000 8,000 7,000 6,000 5,000 kwh/day 4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000 0 02 03 04 05 2 3 02 02 2 03 03 3 4 04 04 5 05 05 1 4 1 2 3 4 r-0 r-0 -0 -0 r-0 -0 r-0 -0 -0 -0 -0 -0 n- n- n- n- b- g- b- g- b- g- g- b- ec ec ec ec ct ct ct ct Ap Ap Ap Ap Ju Ju Ju Ju Fe Au Fe Au Fe Fe Au Au O O O O D D D D Month 19
  • 23. Asset Management, WWT Figure 2 KWH 2002 to 2004 Figure 3 KWH 2001 to 2004 Table 4shows the 2006 energy conservation projects. 20
  • 24. Asset Management, WWT Table 5 2006 Energy Conservation Projects Annual Heating = $120,000 per year, over 8 months, $15,000 per month during heating. Electricity = $100,000 per year over 12 months Project Estimated Cost Annual Savings Payback Status Dewatering Bldg. $5,000 $12,000 5 months Completed 2/4/06 Recycle Internal Air Convert Steam $10,000 $12,000 10 months Bert 2/13/06 boiler to hot water Convert Boiler $60,000 $36,000 1.7 years Bert 2/13/06 In- Burner to Biogas house prep for gas delivery to boiler Order biogas meter ($2,000) Convert Course $15,000 $9,000 9 months 15% more efficient bubble Aeration to Fine Bubble Replace one $10,000 $15,000 8 months blower with a 40 hp blower Occupied / $500 $1,000 6 months Unoccupied Timer for Control Building 21
  • 25. Asset Management, WWT 8 MONITORING AND PLAN IMPROVEMENT Monitoring and improvements to the plan will be an on going process. The plan will be reviewed and updated at least once per year. The first updated condition assessments will be conduct this summer. To ensure that we are on track for meeting objectives listed in the Action Plan section, we will strive to have periodic meetings (at least monthly) throughout the year. 22
  • 26. Asset Management, WWT 9 ACTION PLAN 2006 During 2006, we plan to accomplish the following objectives:  Enter 95 percent of the wastewater treatment facility assets into the TEAMS database.  Enter 20 percent of the collection system assets into the TEAMS database.  Create a 5 year Renewal and Replacement schedule for the wastewater treatment plant.  Utilize the TEAMS software for maintenance management at the wastewater plant.  Enter 75 per cent of the water treatment plant assets into the TEAMS database. 23