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    Enterprise Asset Management Enterprise Asset Management Document Transcript

    • Enterprise Asset Management Maximizing Return on Assets and Emerging Trends June 2008 ~ Underwritten, in Part, by ~
    • Enterprise Asset Management Page 2 Executive Summary Aberdeen Group's latest research in Enterprise Asset Management (EAM) Research Benchmark reveals that Best-in-Class companies are using asset management strategies Aberdeen’s Research to reduce operational cost, improve profitability and hence improve the Benchmarks provide an in- competitive edge in the market place. In this research report, Aberdeen depth and comprehensive look Group surveyed more than 160 manufacturing executives to understand the into process, procedure, strategies and business capabilities adopted by manufacturers to maximize methodologies, and Return on Assets (RoA) and reduce risk from failure of critical assets. This technologies with best practice research will also uncover emerging trends around energy management identification and actionable initiatives adopted by companies to reduce energy consumption costs. recommendations Best-in-Class Performance In the following analysis, Aberdeen uses three Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) to identify Best-in-Class performance. Across these metrics Best-in- Class manufacturers averaged: • 93% Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE) • 97% plant throughput • 3% downtime Competitive Maturity Assessment Aberdeen's survey analysis shows that the firms enjoying Best-in-Class “With the increase in costs and being in a highly leveraged performance share several common characteristics: industry, maximum uptime and • Best-in-Class manufacturers are 50% more likely to standardize utilization of assets is very asset maintenance and reliability processes across the enterprise critical for our organization. Also, operating in an asset • Best-in-Class companies are three-times more likely to establish intensive environment, manual continuous improvement teams to focus on condition and Reliability tasks are impossible to perform Centered Maintenance (RCM) to achieve our goals. Hence, maintenance and monitoring of • Best-in-Class companies are two-times more likely to utilize mobile assets is very critical to our devices integrated with the asset management solution industry.” Required Actions ~ Madhukar Rajagopal, CIO In addition to the specific recommendations in Chapter Three of this JSW Steel Ltd report, to achieve Best-in-Class performance, companies must: • Improve visibility into production and asset performance across the enterprise through the use of asset analytics and dashboards • Move from a break-fix maintenance approach to a more predictive approach by adopting advanced capabilities such as RCM • Invest in an Enterprise Asset Management (EAM) solution and establish real time interoperability between EAM and Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) © 2008 Aberdeen Group. Telephone: 617 854 5200 www.aberdeen.com Fax: 617 723 7897
    • Enterprise Asset Management Page 3 Table of Contents Executive Summary....................................................................................................... 2 Best-in-Class Performance..................................................................................... 2 Competitive Maturity Assessment....................................................................... 2 Required Actions...................................................................................................... 2 Chapter One: Benchmarking the Best-in-Class ..................................................... 4 Business Context ..................................................................................................... 4 Dominant Market Pressures.................................................................................. 4 The Maturity Class Framework............................................................................ 5 The Best-in-Class PACE Model ............................................................................ 6 Best-in-Class Strategies........................................................................................... 6 Chapter Two: Benchmarking Requirements for Success .................................... 9 Competitive Assessment......................................................................................10 Chapter Three: Required Actions .........................................................................17 Laggard Steps to Success......................................................................................17 Industry Average Steps to Success ....................................................................17 Best-in-Class Steps to Success ............................................................................17 Appendix A: Research Methodology.....................................................................19 Appendix B: Related Aberdeen Research............................................................21 Featured Underwriters..............................................................................................22 Figures Figure 1: Managing Risks and Maximizing Return on Assets............................... 4 Figure 2: Top Strategic Actions ................................................................................. 7 Figure 3: Technology Enablers .................................................................................13 Figure 4: Empowering Employees with Mobile Solutions..................................14 Figure 5: Establishing Real-time Interoperability..................................................15 Figure 6: Reducing Energy Consumption Costs ..................................................16 Tables Table 1: Top Performers Earn Best-in-Class Status.............................................. 5 Table 2: The Best-in-Class PACE Framework ....................................................... 6 Table 3: The Competitive Framework...................................................................10 Table 4: The PACE Framework Key ......................................................................20 Table 5: The Competitive Framework Key ..........................................................20 Table 6: The Relationship Between PACE and the Competitive Framework .........................................................................................................................................20 © 2008 Aberdeen Group. Telephone: 617 854 5200 www.aberdeen.com Fax: 617 723 7897
    • Enterprise Asset Management Page 4 Chapter One: Benchmarking the Best-in-Class Business Context Fast Facts The rising commodity and energy costs and the uncertain global economy have all put more pressures on manufacturers than ever before to reduce Best-in-Class enterprises operating costs on each and every aspect of manufacturing operations. For significantly out perform their competition in all three KPIs. manufacturers, this requires plants and factories to be available and running These manufacturers enjoy: at peak performance and producing high quality products at the right time. To achieve these goals companies are developing multiple strategies for √ 93% Overall Equipment asset management at an enterprise level. Effectiveness (OEE) This Benchmark Report will uncover the pressures that are driving √ 97% plant throughput companies to focus on Enterprise Asset Management (EAM), the specific √ 3% downtime strategic actions companies are taking to address the pressures, and the business and technology enablers that are adopted by manufacturers to effectively manage manufacturing assets. The findings of this report will also uncover some of the emerging trends in the asset management field around the use of energy management initiatives to achieve the ultimate goal of cost reductions in manufacturing operations. Dominant Market Pressures Manufacturers across different industry verticals have invested heavily in assets. When it comes to asset intensive industries this investment can be a significant portion of the total capital invested in a manufacturing plant. The top pressure driving manufacturers to focus on asset management is to maximize return on the investments on these assets. Figure 1: Managing Risks and Maximizing Return on Assets Maximize Return on Assets (RoA) 65% The risks from failure of critical assets 61% Complexity in manufacturing assets 19% Reduce energy consumption costs 19% Compliance to regulatory requirements 18% (e.g. environmental, OSHA) Aging / Retiring workforce 7% Corporate focus on green initiatives 5% 0% 35% 70% % All Respondents Source: Aberdeen Group, June 2008 © 2008 Aberdeen Group. Telephone: 617 854 5200 www.aberdeen.com Fax: 617 723 7897
    • Enterprise Asset Management Page 5 The second most prevalent pressure in the industry around asset “We have been given the tone management is to manage and mitigate risk due to failure of critical assets at the top: higher focus on asset management in order to (61%). Aberdeen research in March 2008 regarding Risk Mitigation in improve reliability and Manufacturing Operations showed that risk due to asset failure is one of the performance, reduce out of top three risks that have the most impact on manufacturing operations. The service time. The main and science of risk has garnered much attention among manufacturers and is principal decision so far was to critical in terms of asset management. Managing risk is an approach of create an Asset Management identifying the top risks to the operations, quantifying and prioritizing the Group to drive this approach identified risks, and establishing controls to mitigate these risks. From the and concept.” asset management perspective, this approach helps manufacturers to be ~ Gilles Bocabarteille, Vice proactive in nature and move away from the traditional break-fix approach President, Asset Management, by gaining real-time visibility into equipment failures before they actually Pride International, Inc. occur. The focus on transitioning from a reactive to predictive asset management approach will remain central throughout the rest of this analysis and continue to re-emerge in our key findings. The Maturity Class Framework Aberdeen uses three key performance criteria to distinguish the Best-in- Class from Industry Average and Laggard organizations. These are: • Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE) measured as a percentage by multiplying availability times performance times quality • Plant throughput measured as total actual output divided by total theoretical output • Asset downtime measured as the amount of time the asset is offline against total asset availability Respondents were divided among three categories based on their aggregate performances in these three metrics: the top 20% of performers (Best-in- Class), the middle 50% (Industry Average), and the bottom 30% of performers (Laggards). Table 1 displays the aggregated performance of Best- in-Class, Industry Average, and Laggard organizations. Table 1: Top Performers Earn Best-in-Class Status Definition of Maturity Class Mean Class Performance Best-in-Class: 93% OEE Top 20% of aggregate 97% plant throughput performance scorers 3% asset downtime Industry Average: 86% OEE Middle 50% of aggregate 91% plant throughput performance scorers 13% downtime Laggard: 67% OEE Bottom 30% of aggregate 74% plant throughput performance scorers 34% asset downtime Source: Aberdeen Group, June 2008 © 2008 Aberdeen Group. Telephone: 617 854 5200 www.aberdeen.com Fax: 617 723 7897
    • Enterprise Asset Management Page 6 The Best-in-Class PACE Model Manufacturing companies faced with the pressure to maximize Return on Assets (RoA) are looking at multiple strategies to optimize asset utilization at the enterprise level. Table 2 summarizes some of the strategic actions, business process capabilities, and technology enablers Best-in-Class companies have implemented to address these market pressures. Table 2: The Best-in-Class PACE Framework Pressures Actions Capabilities Enablers Maximize Return Optimize asset Standardized processes for Predictive maintenance on Assets (RoA) utilization maintenance and reliability across Reliability Centered Maintenance Improve visibility the enterprise (RCM) into production and Executive ownership and Asset performance dashboards asset performance sponsorship for asset Manufacturing analytics across enterprise management strategies across Condition based maintenance Executive focus on the enterprise Operator training establishing Asset management data is used continuous to analyze, predict, plan, and Mobile solutions improvement schedule maintenance activities Risk management initiatives for asset Asset management system is Corrective and Preventive Actions management integrated with predictive failure (CAPA) analysis data Source: Aberdeen Group, June 2008 Best-in-Class Strategies The top strategic action manufacturers are taking to address the market pressures shown in Figure 1 is to optimize asset utilization (Figure 2). This action is reported by more than two thirds of the total pool of survey respondents. Optimizing asset utilization is a process of balancing trade-offs between different areas of asset management such as asset scheduling, spare parts replenishment, asset downtime, and the maximizing metrics like Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE) and plant throughput. Often this improvement in operational performance can result in the ultimate cost reduction and improved profitability. One of the steps necessary to optimize asset utilization is to move from a reactive to a proactive based asset management approach. This requires manufacturers to have real-time visibility into production and asset performance data. This visibility allows manufacturers to monitor asset condition in real time, deliver that data to decision makers as actionable intelligence and finally use the data to analyze, predict, plan, and schedule maintenance activities across different assets. This is the action being taken by 53% of the responding manufacturers. © 2008 Aberdeen Group. Telephone: 617 854 5200 www.aberdeen.com Fax: 617 723 7897
    • Enterprise Asset Management Page 7 Figure 2: Top Strategic Actions BIC All Respondents 69% Optimize asset utilization 63% Improve visibility into production and asset 53% “Our plant is sitting on over performance across enterprise 47% $600 million in fixed assets. Asset management is vital for municipal infrastructure.” Executive focus on establishing Continuous 38% Improvement initiatives for asset management 32% ~ Bradley Bellows City of Ottawa Create real-time interoperability between asset 19% management and existing technology investments 26% 0% 40% 80% Source: Aberdeen Group, June 2008 Manufacturers are also developing strategies for establishing continuous improvement initiatives and getting attention from the executive team to enable the success of such initiatives. These initiatives are focused on establishing cross functional teams to share and execute best practices for asset management across different departments. Companies are extending this collaborative approach by creating real-time interoperability between asset management solutions and the existing technology investments at the plant and enterprise level. Manufacturers of all performance levels face the same market pressures and are responding with the same strategic actions. When compared, there is no significant difference between the market pressures faced by the Best-in- Class, Industry Average, or Laggard manufacturers. Similarly, there is no significant difference in the strategic actions these different categories of manufacturers are taking. However Best-in-Class manufacturers realize improved performance as compared to Industry Average and Laggard manufacturers (Figure 1). In the next chapter, Aberdeen will link specific business capabilities and technology enablers to Best-in-Class performance and identify how the aforementioned strategic actions can be assured success. Aberdeen Insights — Challenges Seventy-seven percent (77%) of survey respondents indicated that their focus on asset management has increased as compared to last year. Upon further analysis, Aberdeen found that this focus is even higher among Best-in-Class companies, with 84% of the Best-in-Class increasing their focus on asset management. While asset management is top of mind for plant management as well as corporate leadership, there are multiple challenges companies are facing to effectively execute the strategic actions discussed in this chapter. continued © 2008 Aberdeen Group. Telephone: 617 854 5200 www.aberdeen.com Fax: 617 723 7897
    • Enterprise Asset Management Page 8 Aberdeen Insights — Challenges The top two challenges are based on the cultural change required within the organization. Companies are primarily challenged due to the change in culture required to move from break-fix maintenance to proactive maintenance techniques (45%). The second most prevalent challenge among survey respondents was that asset management is still viewed as a necessary cost by senior management (35%) and hence it is difficult to get ownership from the executives. In addition to the cultural challenges, companies are overwhelmed with the data available on the plant floor and face challenges to manage the complex and disparate data sets to improve decision making (31%). Chapter Two will look at the capabilities Best-in-Class are adopting to address these challenges. © 2008 Aberdeen Group. Telephone: 617 854 5200 www.aberdeen.com Fax: 617 723 7897
    • Enterprise Asset Management Page 9 Chapter Two: Benchmarking Requirements for Success The success of asset management initiatives depends heavily on where in the Fast Facts maturity class framework an enterprise falls (Table 1). Maturity affects how Best-in-Class manufacturers are an enterprise should leverage supporting technologies and other business more likely to adopt the capabilities, and in turn, goes a long way to translating the strategies following technology enablers: presented in Chapter One to maximizing RoA. √ Two-times as likely to adopt Case Study - Skånemejerier Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) Skånemejerier is one of the largest dairy companies in the Scandinavian √ 60% more likely to adopt market, best known for its milk and dairy products. Skånemejerier has alert and alarm management three production plants that process over 40,000 order lines daily for products ranging from milk and cheese to highly specialized health foods. √ 62% more likely to adopt asset analytics With such a variety of short shelf-life products, equipment failures, production stoppages, and recalls, could be extremely costly. Skånemejerier wanted to improve the analyses of assembly line breakdowns and allow production and maintenance personnel access to relevant data that would help them make better decisions to improve the overall quality of the plant. Skånemejerier had an outdated, in-house maintenance solution that was beginning to cause problems. The company was looking to computerize preventive maintenance routines, as well as improve the spare parts purchasing and handling process. Skånemejerier decided to adopt an integrated EAM solution to address these issues. The biggest overall benefit Skånemejerier has experienced, since implementing the EAM solution, is the drastic reduction in spare parts inventory. According to Jan Lindskog, CIO of Skånemejerier “We are able to reduce our spare parts stock level by 40% resulting in cost reduction from USD $2.29 million to USD $1.37 million.” Some other benefits that Skånemejerier realized after the implementation are as follows: • Increased collaboration among plants as all three production plants can now see the amount and type of stock available in other locations • Reduction in error and increased time savings as the new EAM solution is integrated with other financial, production, and purchasing solutions eliminating the need to manually input and transfer information such as financial data between the various systems • Improved visibility into assets and the ability to analyze trends around equipment reliability • Reduction in maintenance resource waste and increased control over maintenance related costs © 2008 Aberdeen Group. Telephone: 617 854 5200 www.aberdeen.com Fax: 617 723 7897
    • Enterprise Asset Management Page 10 Competitive Assessment Aberdeen analyzed the aggregated metrics of surveyed companies to determine whether their performance ranked as Best-in-Class, Industry Average, or Laggard. In addition to having common performance levels, each class also shared characteristics in five key categories: (1) process (the standardization and management of processes across the enterprise); (2) organization (cross functional teams established to create corporate culture of reliability); (3) knowledge management (using data modeling capabilities to automate workflows); (4) technology (the software and capabilities that are crucial for asset management); and (5) performance management (use of asset data to manage performance). These characteristics serve as guidelines for best practices, and correlate directly with Best-in-Class performance across the key metrics. Table 3: The Competitive Framework Best-in-Class Average Laggards Definitions Standardized processes for maintenance and reliability across the √ EAM - Enterprise Asset enterprise Management 68% 51% 45% √ CMMS - Computerized Standardized measurement of Key Performance Indicators (KPI) Maintenance Management Process across the enterprise System 53% 40% 18% Standardized processes for monitoring equipment condition √ APM- Asset Performance across the enterprise Management 44% 40% 15% √ ERP- Enterprise Resource Executive ownership and sponsorship for asset management Planning strategies across the enterprise √ PFA- Plant Floor 53% 52% 36% Automation Established continuous improvement teams focused on condition Organization and reliability centered maintenance activities √ RCM- Reliability Centered 53% 50% 16% Maintenance Established cross-functional team including maintenance, productions, and engineering to create a corporate culture for reliability 35% 23% 18% Process modeling capabilities are used for automating workflows Knowledge and interoperability between systems 33% 19% 13% Percentage of manufacturers currently using technology: 61% PFA 45% PFA 23% PFA Technology 79% EAM / CMMS 56 % EAM / CMMS 48% EAM / CMMS 37% APM 31% APM 11% APM Asset management system is integrated with predictive failure analysis data Performance 28%s 17% 6% Lean principles used to manage maintenance operations 37% 25% 12% Source: Aberdeen Group, June 2008 © 2008 Aberdeen Group. Telephone: 617 854 5200 www.aberdeen.com Fax: 617 723 7897
    • Enterprise Asset Management Page 11 Process Best-in-Class manufacturers are differentiating themselves by standardizing processes across different aspects of asset management. First, these manufacturers are 50% more likely than Laggards to standardize asset maintenance and reliability processes across the enterprise. Best-in-Class manufacturers are also nearly three times as likely as Laggards to standardize the measurement of Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) as well as standardize equipment monitoring condition across the enterprise. All these are important processes for managing assets, and standardizing these processes will allow manufacturers to capture best practices and implement them across different plants to optimize asset utilization. This also allows senior executives to compare performance of different plants and to share knowledge and information from one plant to another. Organization Organizational capabilities are critical for addressing the cultural challenges discussed in Chapter One. Best-in-Class manufacturers are strategically organized to get buy-in from different stakeholders in the organization by raising awareness about the importance of asset management to the overall corporate growth plans. The Best-in-Class are establishing ownership and sponsorship from the executive level regarding their asset management strategies and programs. On a plant floor level, Best-in-Class manufacturers are establishing continuous improvement teams focused on advanced asset management capabilities such as condition and reliability centered maintenance initiatives. This step directly helps companies to change the maintenance culture to being predictive and have teams in place to continually improve processes for reliability and condition based maintenance programs. Finally, Best-in-Class manufacturers are taking a collaborative approach towards asset management by establishing cross-functional teams from production, maintenance, and engineering to create a corporate culture of reliability. This also helps organizations to bring perspectives from different functional departments to optimize production, inventory, and assets at an enterprise level. This may very well be one of the reasons why Best-in-Class manufacturers realize 16% higher Overall Equipment Effectives (OEE) as compared to Laggard manufacturers. As OEE is a metric that involves availability, quality and performance, it is absolutely necessary for all these departments to work collaboratively and establish strategies to realize higher operational performance. Knowledge and Performance Management Knowledge and performance management capabilities are both crucial for the overall asset management strategy of the organization. Best-in-Class manufacturers are not only automating workflows, but are using process modeling capabilities to effectively automate workflows and interoperate across different systems. This is an effective capability as it allows © 2008 Aberdeen Group. Telephone: 617 854 5200 www.aberdeen.com Fax: 617 723 7897
    • Enterprise Asset Management Page 12 manufacturers to capture best practices from the experienced maintenance employees and incorporate those practices to model and manage workflows. Adopting such capabilities also allows manufacturers to address the issue of an aging / retiring workforce by transferring knowledge from “We are at the early stage and few experienced employees to the overall workforce. Best-in-Class are are transiting from a traditional nearly three times as likely to use such advanced modeling capabilities to engineering and technical group automate workflows as compared to Laggards. to asset management group. Our expectation is to drive the On the performance management side, Best-in-Class companies are cultural change with regards to integrating failure analysis data in their asset management system and are the maintenance of our asset in also three-times as likely as Laggards to use Lean maintenance concepts in order to better prevent, their overall asset management strategy. As standalones, the necessity for predict rather than react.” these capabilities is not immediately apparent. However, in aggregate, there ~ Gilles Bocabarteille, Vice are important synergies that exist between the knowledge and performance President, Asset Management, management capabilities identified earlier. Process modeling capabilities very Pride International, Inc. often help facilitate using Lean in maintenance operations. Subsequently, manufacturers are able to more precisely understand both processes and the performance of assets, ultimately allowing for optimized spare parts inventory levels and asset maintenance schedules. Technology Best-in-Class companies are automating the capabilities discussed earlier by adopting technology solutions. Best-in-Class companies are nearly three- times as likely as Laggards to use Plant Floor Automation (PFA) and Asset Performance Management (APM) solutions. These solutions play a critical part in automating data collection from the assets and using analytical capabilities to understand the true value of the data collected. Best-in-Class companies are 65% more likely than Laggards to invest in an Enterprise Asset Management (EAM) solution. Aberdeen Group findings indicate that the adoption level of EAM solutions have increased since last year for manufacturers across all the three categories of performance. This truly highlights the importance of looking at asset management at an enterprise level. In addition to looking at the major technology solutions, Aberdeen Group analyzed the specific modules or technology enablers that differentiate Best- in-Class performance (Figure 4). Best-in-Class companies are adopting modules to automate three important aspects of asset management: advanced maintenance capabilities, real-time visibility, and monitoring of assets and employee training. © 2008 Aberdeen Group. Telephone: 617 854 5200 www.aberdeen.com Fax: 617 723 7897
    • Enterprise Asset Management Page 13 Figure 3: Technology Enablers Best-in-Class Others 71% Alerts and Alarm Management “We use an enterprise asset 44% management solution that 67% tracks job ticket measures. We Preventive Maintenance 49% track and trend key Operator Training 44% performances indicators and 21% review them versus plan each 44% month.” Asset Analytics 27% ~ Manager, IT Asset Dashboards 41% Large Life Science Company 35% 40% Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) 22% 0% 40% 80% Source: Aberdeen Group, June 2008 One of the top strategic action manufacturers are taking is to increase visibility into production and asset performance (Figure 2). While we observed insignificant differences in the strategic actions of the Best-in-Class compared to our general population, we do see differences in how they might be satisfying the need for visibility and other requirements. Best-in- Class companies are improving visibility by adopting asset analytics, dashboards, and alarm management modules to automate data collection, analyze and monitor asset data, and finally escalate adverse events to appropriate decision makers at the right time and in the right format to prevent equipment failure. Best-in-Class manufacturers are also moving away from the break-fix maintenance to a predictive approach by adopting preventive maintenance as well as Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) capabilities. Preventive maintenance capabilities ensure that asset maintenance is performed at regular intervals to improve the life span for assets. RCM is an advanced maintenance capability that analyzes critical failure mode of assets to determine the optimum maintenance policy to reduce the severity of asset failure. Both these approaches are important to reduce the risk due to failure of critical assets. Finally, Best-in-Class companies are addressing the aging / retiring workforce by adopting operator training modules. This ensures that the best practices already embedded in asset management systems are effectively transferred to new and inexperienced employees. This often further reduces down time and critical asset failures. Use of Mobile Solutions in Asset Management Another area that clearly differentiates Best-in-Class performance is the use of mobile solutions in the overall asset management strategy. Best-in-Class © 2008 Aberdeen Group. Telephone: 617 854 5200 www.aberdeen.com Fax: 617 723 7897
    • Enterprise Asset Management Page 14 companies are 2.5-times as likely as other manufacturers to integrate mobile devices with the asset management solution allowing manufacturers the flexibility to operate remotely. Figure 4: Empowering Employees with Mobile Solutions Best-in-Class Others Mobile devices integrated with asset 37% management systems 15% Mobile devices are used in 32% maintenance rounds 19% Mobile devices used to initiate work 26% order without going back to 20% workstations 0% 20% 40% Source: Aberdeen Group, June 2008 Traditionally, maintenance employees collected asset and equipment information on paper while on maintenance rounds for routine inspection of equipment. However, the Best-in-Class are eliminating this manual approach by equipping their employees with mobile devices to input equipment inspection data directly into mobile devices that are integrated with the asset management system. This eliminates the process of manual data entry into the computer resulting in reduction of data collection errors and time savings. Finally, the Best-in-Class are using mobile devices to initiate work orders without going to their workstations. Real Time Interoperability While Best-in-Class manufacturers are more likely to invest in asset management technology, these manufacturers are also establishing real-time interoperability among existing technology investments. This capability is very much in line with the strategic actions of creating real-time interoperability between technology solutions, discussed in Chapter One. © 2008 Aberdeen Group. Telephone: 617 854 5200 www.aberdeen.com Fax: 617 723 7897
    • Enterprise Asset Management Page 15 Figure 5: Establishing Real-time Interoperability “We use the asset management BIC Industry Average Laggards module from our ERP, tying 100% 100% financial, HR, and operations 80% together. We take data 71% 80% collected from the work orders 56% 47% in the system to determine 42% 40% 33% 33% where worker hours and maintenance costs are going and monitoring the work order 0% backlog. The data is compiled APM and PFA (Plant floor APM and CMMS/EAM CMMS/EAM and ERP into detailed monthly reports automation) for the supervisors and high- Source: Aberdeen Group, June 2008 level quarterly graphical reports for management. The data is The primary role of technology is to facilitate information sharing across the monitored to ensure that we enterprise so that employees have visibility into the manufacturing process. hit set targets.” One of the roadblocks to this facilitation is the fact that manufacturers have adopted technology applications that function independently in a siloed ~ Bradley Bellows manner. Best-in-Class manufacturers are not only integrating their City of Ottawa technology solution at the plant level by integrating Plant Floor Automation (PFA) with APM solutions and APM with CMMS / EAM solutions, but these manufacturers are getting the true value of enterprise-wide adoption by integrating the EAM solution with ERP solutions. This integration provides manufacturers with the ability to streamline maintenance operations through better planning and scheduling of production and maintenance tasks. An integrated solution offers enterprise-wide visibility of the complete asset lifecycle, right from the design phase to the final disposition. This information becomes important in making decisions about future asset purchases. Finally, integration allows manufacturers to connect their maintenance applications with higher-level business systems more easily which in turn results in increasing responsiveness and an ability to make quick and intelligent asset management decisions. Aberdeen Insights — Technology While only 19% of survey respondents have selected reducing energy management cost as a pressure (Figure 1), Aberdeen found that Best-in- Class manufacturers are more likely to face this as a pressure as compared to other manufacturers. The Best-in-Class are developing strategies at a plant level and gaining support from the top executives to reduce energy consumption costs. Best-in-Class manufacturers are integrating energy management programs with the overall asset management strategy. Best-in-Class are three-times as likely as Laggards to establish executive level accountability to manage the success of green initiatives. The Best-in-Class are also three-times as likely to collect and monitor asset data at the equipment level and utilize that data to minimize energy consumption. continued © 2008 Aberdeen Group. Telephone: 617 854 5200 www.aberdeen.com Fax: 617 723 7897
    • Enterprise Asset Management Page 16 Aberdeen Insights — Technology As the energy cost is skyrocketing, the cost of operating manufacturing assets and equipments are likely to rise. Companies need to establish these energy management strategies and adopt analytics and dashboards to collect, monitor, and analyze energy usage data to minimize energy consumption. Figure 6: Reducing Energy Consumption Costs BIC Industry Average Laggards “JSW Group is associated with 60% 53% Al Gore's ‘The Climate Project.’ We have one of the 37% 37% 31% 32% 29% greenest steel plants and many 30% 19% 23% 24% of our manufacturing processes 12% 13% 12% are inherently green. In addition, from an IT 0% perspective, we are ensuring Energy usage data is Asset data utilized to Energy management Executive level that all components, including monitored and minimize energy integrated with the accountability to the data center, are green.” collected at consumption overall asset manage the success equipment level management strategy of green initiatives ~ Madhukar Rajagopal, CIO JSW Steel Ltd Source: Aberdeen Group, June 2008 © 2008 Aberdeen Group. Telephone: 617 854 5200 www.aberdeen.com Fax: 617 723 7897
    • Enterprise Asset Management Page 17 Chapter Three: Required Actions Whether a company is trying to move its performance in EAM from Laggard Fast Facts to Industry Average, or Industry Average to Best-in-Class, the following Best in Class manufacturers actions will help spur the necessary performance improvements: are: √ Two-times more likely to Laggard Steps to Success standardize processes for • Transition from a break-fix approach for asset management to a measuring KPIs across the predictive approach by establishing continuous improvement teams enterprise with a focus on condition and reliability centered maintenance √ Two-times more likely to activities. Best-in-Class manufacturers are two-times more likely to use Lean principles to establish such teams. manage maintenance operations • Standardize processes for maintenance and reliability as well as monitoring equipment status across the enterprise. This will enable √ 1.5-times more likely to Laggards to capture best practices for asset management across integrate mobile deices with different plants and scale it across the enterprise. asset management systems • Establish support from the executive management for asset √ 30% more likely to utilize management initiatives. Best-in-Class companies are nearly 50% mobile device to initiate more likely to get executive sponsorships for asset management work order without going programs. back to workstations • Invest in analytics, dashboards, and alarm management tools to improve visibility into production and asset performance across the enterprise. The Best-in-Class are more likely than Laggards to adopt the aforementioned tools. Industry Average Steps to Success • Utilize data and process modeling capabilities to automate workflows and interoperate between technologies. The Best-in- Class are 75% more likely to invest in such capabilities than Industry Average manufacturers. • Establish cross functional teams between production, maintenance, and engineering to foster collaboration among these departments and establish a corporate culture of reliability. • Invest in EAM solutions and establish real-time interoperability between EAM and ERP solutions. The Best-in-Class are 40% more likely than Industry Average manufacturers to invest in EAM solutions and establish interoperability with ERP. Best-in-Class Steps to Success • Invest in advanced maintenance capabilities such as Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM). Currently only 40% of Best-in-Class manufacturers have adopted RCM. This is an important capability © 2008 Aberdeen Group. Telephone: 617 854 5200 www.aberdeen.com Fax: 617 723 7897
    • Enterprise Asset Management Page 18 for Best-in-Class manufacturers to retain their higher operational performance. • Empower maintenance employees with mobile devices that are integrated with asset management solutions. Adoption of mobility solutions for asset management will reduce error because of manual data entry during routine operator rounds and will enable employees to initiate work orders without going to their workstations. • Establish strategies to reduce energy consumptions costs. This includes collecting and monitoring energy usage data at the equipment level and using that data to minimize energy consumption. Best-in-Class manufacturers should also include energy management initiatives with the overall asset management strategy. Aberdeen Insights — Summary Manufacturing companies are facing increasing pressure to maximize RoA and reduce risks due to failure of critical assets. To address these pressures Best-in-Class manufacturers are taking a holistic approach by taking asset management to an enterprise level. Best-in-Class manufacturers are adopting predictive maintenance capabilities, improving visibility into production and asset performance, establishing executive sponsorship as well as cross functional teams on the plant floor, investing in EAM solutions, and are closing the loop by establishing real-time interoperability with ERP systems. All these steps are critical for Best-in-Class companies to realize 16% higher Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE), 22% higher plant throughput, and 31% lower asset downtime as compared to Laggards. © 2008 Aberdeen Group. Telephone: 617 854 5200 www.aberdeen.com Fax: 617 723 7897
    • Enterprise Asset Management Page 19 Appendix A: Research Methodology Between April and June 2008, Aberdeen examined the use, the experiences, Study Focus and the intentions of more than 160 manufacturing executives across Responding manufacturing different industry verticals regarding their asset management capabilities. executives completed an online Aberdeen supplemented this online survey effort with interviews with select survey that included questions designed to determine the survey respondents, gathering additional information on asset management following: strategies, experiences, and results. √ The pressures driving their Responding enterprises included the following: focus on enterprise asset management • Job title / function: The research sample included respondents with the following job titles: CxO or President (9%); Vice-President (5%); √ The structure and Director (9%); Manager (39%), Staff (16%), Consultant (16%), and effectiveness of existing other (5%). technology implementations • Industry: The research sample included respondents from √ Top technology enablers automotive (15%); chemicals (15%); oil and gas (14%); utilities (8%); adopted to facilitate food and beverage (8%); industrial equipment manufacturing (8%) enterprise asset management and energy (7%). √ The benefits, if any, that have • Geography: The majority of respondents (56%) were from North been derived from America. Remaining respondents were from the Asia-Pacific region technology adoption and integration (14%), Europe (18%) and Middle East, Africa (10%). The study is aimed to identify • Company size: Forty-seven percent (47%) of respondents were from emerging best practices for large enterprises (annual revenues above US $1 billion); 27% were enterprise asset management from midsize enterprises (annual revenues between $50 million and across the industry, and to $1 billion); and 26% of respondents were from small businesses provide a framework by which (annual revenues of $50 million or less). readers could assess their own capabilities • Headcount: Fifty-three percent (53%) of respondents were from large enterprises (headcount greater than 1,000 employees); 26% were from midsize enterprises (headcount between 100 and 999 employees); and 31% of respondents were from small businesses (headcount between 1 and 99 employees). Solution providers recognized as sponsors were solicited after the fact and had no substantive influence on the direction of this report. Their sponsorship has made it possible for Aberdeen Group to make these findings available to readers at no charge. © 2008 Aberdeen Group. Telephone: 617 854 5200 www.aberdeen.com Fax: 617 723 7897
    • Enterprise Asset Management Page 20 Table 4: The PACE Framework Key Overview Aberdeen applies a methodology to benchmark research that evaluates the business pressures, actions, capabilities, and enablers (PACE) that indicate corporate behavior in specific business processes. These terms are defined as follows: Pressures — external forces that impact an organization’s market position, competitiveness, or business operations (e.g., economic, political and regulatory, technology, changing customer preferences, competitive) Actions — the strategic approaches that an organization takes in response to industry pressures (e.g., align the corporate business model to leverage industry opportunities, such as product / service strategy, target markets, financial strategy, go-to-market, and sales strategy) Capabilities — the business process competencies required to execute corporate strategy (e.g., skilled people, brand, market positioning, viable products / services, ecosystem partners, financing) Enablers — the key functionality of technology solutions required to support the organization’s enabling business practices (e.g., development platform, applications, network connectivity, user interface, training and support, partner interfaces, data cleansing, and management) Source: Aberdeen Group, June 2008 Table 5: The Competitive Framework Key Overview The Aberdeen Competitive Framework defines enterprises In the following categories: as falling into one of the following three levels of practices Process — What is the scope of process and performance: standardization? What is the efficiency and Best-in-Class (20%) — Practices that are the best effectiveness of this process? currently being employed and are significantly superior to Organization — How is your company currently the Industry Average, and result in the top industry organized to manage and optimize this particular performance. process? Industry Average (50%) — Practices that represent the Knowledge — What visibility do you have into key average or norm, and result in average industry data and intelligence required to manage this process? performance. Technology — What level of automation have you Laggards (30%) — Practices that are significantly behind used to support this process? How is this automation the average of the industry, and result in below average integrated and aligned? performance. Performance — What do you measure? How frequently? What’s your actual performance? Source: Aberdeen Group, June 2008 Table 6: The Relationship Between PACE and the Competitive Framework PACE and the Competitive Framework – How They Interact Aberdeen research indicates that companies that identify the most influential pressures and take the most transformational and effective actions are most likely to achieve superior performance. The level of competitive performance that a company achieves is strongly determined by the PACE choices that they make and how well they execute those decisions. Source: Aberdeen Group, June 2008 © 2008 Aberdeen Group. Telephone: 617 854 5200 www.aberdeen.com Fax: 617 723 7897
    • Enterprise Asset Management Page 21 Appendix B: Related Aberdeen Research Related Aberdeen research that forms a companion or reference to this report include: • Risk Mitigation in Manufacturing Operations; March 2008 • Event Driven Manufacturing Intelligence: Creating Closed Loop Performance Management; May 2008 • Manufacturing Operations Management: The Next Generation of Manufacturing Systems; January 2008 • Ground Up Strategies for Asset Performance Management; September 2007 • Manufacturing IQ: Taking Manufacturing Intelligence to the Enterprise; July 2007 • Benchmarking Enterprise Asset Management; June 2007 • Collaborative Asset Maintenance Strategies, December 2006 • Driving Enterprise Performance with Asset Information, July 2006 • The Asset Management Benchmark Report : Moving Toward Zero Downtime, April 2006 Information on these and any other Aberdeen publications can be found at www.Aberdeen.com. Author: Matthew Littlefield, Research Analyst, Manufacturing, matthew.littlefield@aberdeen.com Mehul Shah, Research Analyst, Manufacturing, mehul.shah@aberdeen.com Since 1988, Aberdeen's research has been helping corporations worldwide become Best-in-Class. Having benchmarked the performance of more than 644,000 companies, Aberdeen is uniquely positioned to provide organizations with the facts that matter — the facts that enable companies to get ahead and drive results. That's why our research is relied on by more than 2.2 million readers in over 40 countries, 90% of the Fortune 1,000, and 93% of the Technology 500. As a Harte-Hanks Company, Aberdeen plays a key role of putting content in context for the global direct and targeted marketing company. Aberdeen's analytical and independent view of the "customer optimization" process of Harte- Hanks (Information – Opportunity – Insight – Engagement – Interaction) extends the client value and accentuates the strategic role Harte-Hanks brings to the market. For additional information, visit Aberdeen http://www.aberdeen.com or call (617) 723-7890, or to learn more about Harte-Hanks, call (800) 456-9748 or go to http://www.harte-hanks.com This document is the result of primary research performed by Aberdeen Group. Aberdeen Group's methodologies provide for objective fact-based research and represent the best analysis available at the time of publication. Unless otherwise noted, the entire contents of this publication are copyrighted by Aberdeen Group, Inc. and may not be reproduced, distributed, archived, or transmitted in any form or by any means without prior written consent by Aberdeen Group, Inc. 043008a © 2008 Aberdeen Group. Telephone: 617 854 5200 www.aberdeen.com Fax: 617 723 7897