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Literate Environment Analysis Presentation
Literate Environment Analysis Presentation
Literate Environment Analysis Presentation
Literate Environment Analysis Presentation
Literate Environment Analysis Presentation
Literate Environment Analysis Presentation
Literate Environment Analysis Presentation
Literate Environment Analysis Presentation
Literate Environment Analysis Presentation
Literate Environment Analysis Presentation
Literate Environment Analysis Presentation
Literate Environment Analysis Presentation
Literate Environment Analysis Presentation
Literate Environment Analysis Presentation
Literate Environment Analysis Presentation
Literate Environment Analysis Presentation
Literate Environment Analysis Presentation
Literate Environment Analysis Presentation
Literate Environment Analysis Presentation
Literate Environment Analysis Presentation
Literate Environment Analysis Presentation
Literate Environment Analysis Presentation
Literate Environment Analysis Presentation
Literate Environment Analysis Presentation
Literate Environment Analysis Presentation
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Literate Environment Analysis Presentation

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  • 1. Literate Environment Analysis Presentation Jackie Porter Walden University Dr. Martha Moore EDUC-6706G-8 The Beginning Reader, PreK-3 April 17, 2011
  • 2. <ul><li>“ Literacy is a process that begins in infancy and continues into adulthood, if not throughout life” (Tompkins, 2010, p. 111). </li></ul><ul><li>Getting to Know Literacy Learners </li></ul><ul><li>Selecting Texts </li></ul><ul><li>Literacy Lesson: Interactive Perspective </li></ul><ul><li>Literacy Lesson: Critical and Response Perspectives </li></ul>Creating a Literate Environment
  • 3. I. Getting to Know Literacy Learners <ul><li>“ The better you know your students, the better you can connect them with texts that will impact them in profound ways” (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010c). </li></ul><ul><li>Cognitive assessments (i.e. reading inventories) identify students’ independent, instructional, and frustration reading abilities (Afflerbach, 2007). </li></ul><ul><li>Once assessed, students can be given individualized instruction based on weaknesses revealed in assessments. </li></ul><ul><li>Cognitive Assessment used with selected small group: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Developmental Reading Assessment 2 (DRA2) (Beaver, 2006). </li></ul></ul>
  • 4. I. Getting to Know Literacy Learners <ul><li>Noncognitive assessments (i.e. reading interest inventories, interest inventories, etc.) support teachers and students in creating goals for reading. </li></ul><ul><li>Students who have similar interests can be grouped together to read and discuss particular text. </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers can design activities using certain topics that are of interest to students. </li></ul><ul><li>Noncognitive Assessments used with selected small group: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Interest Inventory </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reading Interest Inventory </li></ul></ul>
  • 5. I. Getting to Know Literacy Learners <ul><li>Utilizing these assessments enabled knowledge of students on different levels. </li></ul><ul><li>Enlightened on students’ interests, strengths and weaknesses. </li></ul><ul><li>Especially helpful, when not the regular classroom teacher </li></ul>
  • 6. II. Selecting Texts <ul><li>Choose theme, topic or unit to benefit and interest all students </li></ul><ul><ul><li>i.e.  Chose topic of animals for my small group instruction because all students showed some interest in animals </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Gains their interest and attention </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Informational, narrative, online, etc. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Texts available in numerous styles  i.e. printed books, audio and digital media </li></ul><ul><ul><li>All have a place in a literacy based classroom (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010a). </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Responsibility of teachers to widen students’ thinking and include wide variety of texts </li></ul>
  • 7. II. Selecting Texts <ul><li>Use continuum to choose various texts </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Narrative  fictional and nonfictional stories/read alouds </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Informational  nonfiction texts with it’s own features and format </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Semiotic  text communicates messages without/less words </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Linguistic  word oriented (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010a) </li></ul></ul>narrative informational linguistic semiotic
  • 8. II. Selecting Texts <ul><li>Choose different types of texts to make it more interesting and get students used to the variety available </li></ul><ul><li>Equally as important to promote and present informational text in the classroom </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Most difficult type of text for both students and teachers </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Educators need to present informational texts early on in school to students so they can understand how text structure works (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010d). </li></ul>
  • 9. II. Selecting Texts <ul><li>Texts chosen for selected group of students: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The True Story of the Three Little Pigs by Jon Scieszka - narrative </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What is a Mammal? by Robert Snedden - informational </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Stellaluna by Janell Cannon - narrative and online - read by Pamela Reed ( http:// www.storylineonline.net ) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Around the World on Eighty Legs: Animal Poems by Amy Gibson – book of poems but also informational text </li></ul></ul>
  • 10. II. Selecting Texts <ul><li>Continuum helps guide teachers into choosing various types of books for students. </li></ul><ul><li>Lets them see the “landscapes” of texts that are being used with students (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010a) </li></ul><ul><li>Allows teachers to view if certain texts are not being utilized enough or at all in the classroom </li></ul>
  • 11. III. Literacy Lesson: Interactive Perspective <ul><li>Interactive perspective teaches students how to read and be strategic processors and thinkers (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010e). </li></ul><ul><li>Goal is to promote students’ strategic processing and metacognition </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Metacognition  thinking about thinking (Blakey and Spence, 2011) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Studies have shown that by engaging the students in thinking strategies, independent use will develop gradually (Blakey and Spence, 2011). </li></ul></ul>
  • 12. III. Literacy Lesson: Interactive Perspective <ul><li>Strategic processing contains five pieces: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Phonics </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Phonemic awareness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fluency </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Comprehension </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Vocabulary </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Strategic processing is threaded through all five pieces (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010f). </li></ul>
  • 13. III. Literacy Lesson: Interactive Perspective <ul><li>Worked with a group of three students for literacy instruction to concentrate on word recognition and comprehension strategies </li></ul><ul><li>The text used for this lesson is What is a Mammal?. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Informational text about various types of mammals (Snedden, 1993) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Due to book’s length, only focused on five sections </li></ul></ul><ul><li>An anticipation guide was created and used as part of the comprehension strategy to activate prior knowledge. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Anticipation guide  used to activate prior knowledge before reading content-area text </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A list of statements about the topic are prepared by teacher for students to think about </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They decide if they agree or disagree with statements before reading </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>After reading selected text, students go back to guide reconsider statements. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Usually students change some of their opinions and realize they have refined their understanding of the subject through the activity (Tompkins, 2010). </li></ul></ul></ul>
  • 14. III. Literacy Lesson: Interactive Perspective <ul><li>Eight vocabulary (bolded) words from text were selected before the lesson started as a part of word recognition (Tompkins, 2010). </li></ul><ul><li>Together we read and discussed the five sections of the text were read and discussed </li></ul><ul><li>End of lesson  went back to the anticipation guide to fill the remaining part out and compare the before and after reading answers </li></ul>
  • 15. III. Literacy Lesson: Interactive Perspective <ul><li>By using the course resources and learning about interactive perspective, a literate environment was created </li></ul><ul><li>Students were thinking strategically and using comprehension strategies throughout lesson </li></ul><ul><li>Also learned more about informational texts </li></ul><ul><li>Gave me more insight on the students for future lessons and on the lesson for refinement </li></ul>
  • 16. IV. Literacy Lesson: Critical and Response Perspectives <ul><li>“ When [teachers] provide opportunities for students to think critically about texts and then respond to what they read based on their own thoughts and feelings, [they] open new and meaningful connections to ideas [the students] find in the world around them” (Walden University, 2011, para.1). </li></ul><ul><li>Including critical and response perspectives in literacy instruction, students’ interests to important issues and ideas can be promoted (Walden University, 2011). </li></ul><ul><li>May give students self-esteem, incentive, character, and civic responsibility in long run (Walden University, 2011) </li></ul>
  • 17. IV. Literacy Lesson: Critical and Response Perspectives <ul><ul><li>“ Being able to look at the text and examine it from multiple perspectives enables one to think critically about it, to be able to evaluate that text and also be able to make judgments about the validity or veracity of that text (believability)” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(Laureate Education, Inc., 2010b). </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Critical Perspective </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Teaches students how to critically examine, judge and evaluate text </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Who created the text </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What perspective might the author have </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Was the author male or female </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What was the role of race, ethnicity or social status </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>When looking at texts from different perspectives, students might interpret them in subtly different ways (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010e). </li></ul></ul>
  • 18. IV. Literacy Lesson: Critical and Response Perspectives <ul><li>Response Perspective </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Allows students opportunity to experience and respond </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reader’s lived experiences are of primary importance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Methods for responding: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Journaling </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Dramatic response </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Artistic response </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Multi-sensory experiences </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Quiet time </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>When students are able to respond to reading, it helps them better understand what was read (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010e). </li></ul></ul>
  • 19. IV. Literacy Lesson: Critical and Response Perspectives <ul><li>Worked with same group of three students for literacy instruction to concentrate on critical thinking and responding to a text. </li></ul><ul><li>The texts used for this lesson are: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The Three Little Pigs (original fairytale) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The True Story of the Three Little Pigs by Jon Scieszka </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Both are narrative texts that have same basic storyline </li></ul><ul><li>Each written from a different character’s perspective </li></ul><ul><li>The instructional practice used is similar to storyboard (Tompkins, 2010) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Main events comparison worksheet was created </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Required students to sequence events and write perspectives of each event from both stories </li></ul></ul></ul>
  • 20. IV. Literacy Lesson: Critical and Response Perspectives <ul><li>Together The Three Little Pigs was recalled and discussed, and then The True Story of the Three Little Pigs was read aloud. </li></ul><ul><li>After story, students completed comparison sheet </li></ul><ul><li>Then they responded in writing to a given question about the validity of the stories. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Whose story do you believe most, the pigs’ or the wolf’s? Explain why, using examples from the book(s).” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Students had to copy question onto their paper and write an answer to the question in at least three or four sentences. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Students were able to share their opinion and back it up with facts from the story. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>They had to express believability (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010b). </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>To close the lesson, the students shared their responses with group. </li></ul>
  • 21. IV. Literacy Lesson: Critical and Response Perspectives <ul><li>Including the critical and response perspectives in literacy instruction can prepare students to think about important issues that do and will occur in their lives. </li></ul><ul><li>When problems occur, they learn to see and hear both sides and perspectives of a situation. </li></ul><ul><li>Presenting instruction on various characters’ perspectives demonstrated to students how every person, real or fiction, has their own story </li></ul><ul><li>Will also help them be productive and contributing members of society </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Learning to speak their mind </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Includes their feelings, opinions and thoughts on various texts and subjects </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This will transform in future for the students to stand up for what and who they believe </li></ul></ul>
  • 22. IV. Literacy Lesson: Critical and Response Perspectives <ul><li>Shows students not everyone has same viewpoint or perspective </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Therefore, students need to respect others and their own personal beliefs. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Using both perspectives in the classroom demonstrates to students how things are in real life. </li></ul><ul><li>Teaches students to respond emotionally to various things and know that there are multiple sides to any story or problem </li></ul>
  • 23. Conclusion <ul><li>Establishing a Literate Environment </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Getting to Know Literacy Learners </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Cognitive and noncognitive </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Selecting Text </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Interest, variety, style, form </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Literacy Lesson: Interactive Perspective </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Strategic processors and thinkers  metacognition </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Literacy Lesson: Critical and Response Perspectives </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Examine, judge and evaluate text </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Experience and respond to reading </li></ul></ul></ul>
  • 24. References <ul><li>Afflerbach, P. (2007). Understanding and using reading assessment, K–12 . Newark, DE: International Reading Association. </li></ul><ul><li>Blakey, E. and Spence, S. (2011). Developing metacognition. Retrieved from </li></ul><ul><li>Education.com website: http://www.education.com/reference/article/Ref_Dev_Metacognition/ </li></ul><ul><li>Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010a). Analyzing and </li></ul><ul><li>selecting text [Webcast]. The Beginning Reader, PreK-3 . Baltimore, MD: Author. </li></ul><ul><li>Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010b). Critical perspective </li></ul><ul><li>[Webcast]. The Beginning Reader, PreK-3 . Baltimore, MD: Author. </li></ul><ul><li>Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010c). Getting to know your students [Webcast]. The Beginning Reader, PreK-3 . Baltimore, MD: Author. </li></ul><ul><li>Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010d). Informational text in the early years [Webcast]. The Beginning Reader, PreK-3 . Baltimore, MD: Author. </li></ul><ul><li>Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010e). Perspectives on literacy learning [Webcast]. The Beginning Reader, PreK-3 . Baltimore, MD: Author. </li></ul><ul><li>Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010f). Strategic processing </li></ul><ul><li>[Webcast]. The Beginning Reader, PreK-3 . Baltimore, MD: Author. </li></ul><ul><li>Snedden, R. (1993). What is a mammal?. San Francisco: Sierra Club Books for Children. </li></ul>
  • 25. References <ul><li>Tompkins, G. E. (2010). Literacy for the 21st century: A balanced approach (5th ed.). Boston: Allyn & Bacon. </li></ul><ul><li>Walden University. (2011). Week 6 Application. Retrieved from </li></ul><ul><li>http://sylvan.live.ecollege.com/ec/crs/default.learn?CourseID=4889516&Surv ey=1&47=7539623&ClientNodeID=984650&coursenav=1&bhcp=1 </li></ul>

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