Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
  • Like
Title goes here – this sample illustrates a two-line title ...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Now you can save presentations on your phone or tablet

Available for both IPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Title goes here – this sample illustrates a two-line title ...

  • 781 views
Published

 

Published in Business , Technology
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
781
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
11
Comments
0
Likes
1

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • Beginning in 2005 An interagency Performance Management Initiative team was created in with the goal of determining the needs and requirements for a new performance management system for the State. The initiative was one of nine HR initiatives. The team included representatives from across the State and also lead a competency design sub team that worked on the development of competencies as they relate to performance management, succession planning, workforce planning, recruiting, and other key HR models. Process steps Team members surveyed employees, managers, and HR personnel as well as interviews with agency leadership. The team used these findings, along with research into successful performance management systems, to design a new performance management system that is user-friendly, results-based, encourages employee development, and is aligned with the vision and goals of the State and its entities. Mercer Human Resources Consulting helped the team get to the final destination for the new Performance Management Plan and The Anteo Group and SAO supported the new technology.
  • Goals – what & when Competencies – How Alignment - WHY
  • Cascading approach to goals and results measures Competency-based performance management
  • The purpose of cascading goals is to link individual performance expectations to the success of the organization. For some jobs, a direct linkage will be clear, while for others, the linkage may not be as clear. These goals are cascaded throughout the enterprise and translated to become relevant to each level of the organization. The State’s goals are cascaded down to the agency’s goals, then down to the specific division’s goals, to team work goals, and finally to the individual goals.
  • Job responsibilities are automatically populated into the performance management document; these are based on the state job description. The purpose of this is to help the manager identify those areas that are most important to the employee’s success in the position. Job responsibilities can, and should, be deleted from the performance plan as needed. Identify job responsibilities that are most important for success in a specific position. Even though employees may share a common job description, their most important responsibilities may differ from each other. Responsibilities need to be translated into goals. Goals can be written based upon specific job responsibilities that are the most important to the requirements of the position and the individual. Responsibilities are not goals. In general terms, they identify activities or tasks that, if done correctly, lead to successful completion of the responsibility. When converting responsibilities to goals, the manager should identify the end result or behavior that should result, using the ABC’s of Writing Performance Goals.
  • An individual development plan (IDP) is an action plan created by the employee and the manager to identify goals, activities, projects, classes, assignments, and other activities that further contribute to the development of the employee. All employees should have a development plan even though it is not rated are the end of the review period. It is critical that the State of Georgia continues to develop and retain an excellent workforce. Individual Development Plans can focus on a couple of areas Development in current role This can apply to employees who are new in the job and need developmental activities to help them become a fully successful performer (activities to help with the learning curve for a new job) Employees who are deficient in their current role (not functioning at the level they need to be in order to be fully successful in their job) and need additional developmental activities to help improve performance and move them towards better performance Expand skill set and knowledge areas Employees who are fully successful in their current position who could benefit from some special assignments and activities to expand their skill set and move them towards exceptional performance in their current job Prepare for future roles Developmental activities and goals that will develop an employee for future career opportunities in the agency or the state. This can include training in new areas, stretch assignments, etc.
  • Cascading approach to goals and results measures Competency-based performance management

Transcript

  • 1. 2008 CSPA Conference Mastering Human Resources Performance Management
  • 2. Overview Performance Management
    • What we will cover today
      • Philosophy & Strategy
      • New Program Development Process
      • Why Do Performance Management
      • Key Components of the Plan
      • New Technology – ePerformance Manager
      • What’s Changed
      • Getting Ready for the New Plan and New Technology
      • Web Resources
      • Reviewing the Timeline
  • 3. Performance Management Philosophy and Strategy
    • Philosophy
    • Performance management is a process to help drive overall State and Agency goals to successful outcomes through effective goal setting, performance monitoring and measurement, and rewards for performance
    • Strategy
    • Measure employee performance based on accomplishment of goals and demonstration of competency proficiency that can impact State and Agency outcomes
    • Develop a consistent core Statewide performance management process, system, and tools that are “fair, simple and easy to use.
    • Hold managers and employees accountable for results delivered through active performance feedback, and development opportunities.
    • Provide managers with the skills and tools necessary to differentiate performance and allocate compensation and development rewards appropriately based on performance, budget, and other relevant factors
    • Educate both managers and employees on how to do effective performance management
  • 4.
    • Beginning in 2005
      • Created Nine Interagency HR Initiative Teams, including Performance Management
      • Goal: determine the needs and requirements for a new performance management system for the state
      • Included representatives from across the State and also led a competency design sub team that worked on the development of competencies as they relate to performance management, succession planning, workforce planning, recruiting, and other key HR functions
    • Process steps
      • Team members surveyed employees, managers, and HR personnel as well as interviews with agency leadership
      • The team used these findings, along with research into successful performance management systems, to design a new performance management system that is user-friendly, results-based, encourages employee development, and is aligned with the vision and goals of the State and its entities
      • Mercer Human Resources Consulting helped the team get to the final destination for the new Performance Management Plan and The Anteo Group and SAO supported the new technology
    Performance Management New Program Development
  • 5. Performance Management New Components of the Plan Former Performance Plan Current Performance Plan Focused on job responsibilities and job description Focuses on goals and competencies Goals based on job responsibilities Goals aligned with agency strategic objectives Statewide responsibilities Statewide core & leadership competencies Stand alone software
    • Software networked and integrated with current products
    • Traceable and auditable
    Paper forms and filing required Web-based and “paperless” Inconsistent process enterprise-wide Common, integrated process 3-point rating scale 5-point rating scale [differentiation] Employee–no access to performance plan Employee access to performance plan Employee not always involved in development of plan Employee part of the performance planning Employee Self-Evaluation
  • 6. Performance Management Keys to Successful Implementation
    • Top leadership support – Governor’s office
    • Executive and leadership level support & accountability
    • Stakeholder involvement
      • Education for HR directors and staff
      • Process and system design
      • Design sessions to link business process and system
    • Effective project planning and project management
    • Nine Phase 1 Agencies
      • Top leadership sponsorship
      • Cross section of agency size
      • Different business functions
      • Different job families
      • Varying levels of technological resources
  • 7. Performance Management Performance Management Model
  • 8. Performance Management Behavioral Competencies
  • 9. Performance Management Example – Customer Service Competency
    • Understands that all State employees have external and/or internal customers that they provide services and information to; honors all of the State’s commitments to customers by providing helpful, courteous, accessible, responsive, and knowledgeable service.
    Unsatisfactory Performer Successful Performer Exceptional Performer
    • Helpful: Fails to provide assistance and information to customers or begrudgingly provides minimal service; fails to identify or solve customer service issues; does not incorporate learning from past mistakes.
    • Helpful: Willingly provides assistance and useful information to meet customer needs; takes appropriate actions to provide accurate information to customers; assumes ownership of customer issues and takes appropriate steps to correct problems.
    • Helpful: Anticipates customer needs and goes “the extra mile” to provide service; takes ownership of customer issues, actively seeks ways to improve customer service; makes useful improvement suggestions to the appropriate manager or leader.
    • Courteous: Fails to greet customers promptly and be polite in interactions; is not attentive to the customer or considerate of his/her needs; fails to leave a positive impression with customers; inappropriately reacts to situations rather than being empathic to the needs of the customer.
    • Courteous: Greets customers promptly and respectfully face-to-face or over the phone; listens attentively to verify understanding of customers needs; quickly establishes and maintains positive relationships with customers; takes an interest in customers and understands their needs; shows respect by remaining patient, calm and polite in all situations.
    • Courteous: Maintains a professional and respectful demeanor at all times when serving customers; is attentive to customers needs, even during busy periods; Continually improves relationships with customers by focusing individualized attention; empathizes with a variety of customers and helps them feel understood; acts respectfully and diplomatically to defuse even the most difficult situations with ease.
    • Accessible: Is difficult to contact in person or over the phone; takes an unreasonably long time in responding to customer requests and issues; fails to address reducing unreasonable customer wait times; fails to make information about services or the agency available to the customer when it is in their power to do so.
    • Accessible: Is easy for the customer to contact in person or over the phone; responds promptly and courteously to customer requests and issues; ensures that customer wait times are reasonable; makes helpful information about services or their agency available to the customer.
    • Accessible: Makes self fully available to the customer in person and over the phone by being flexible with time and schedule in order to provide services and information; finds ways to reduce customer wait times; identifies ways to improve the accessibility of information and services for the customer.
  • 10. Performance Management Example – Talent Management – Leadership Competency
    • Understands that all State employees have external and/or internal customers that they provide services and information to; honors all of the State’s commitments to customers by providing helpful, courteous, accessible, responsive, and knowledgeable service.
    Unsatisfactory Performer Successful Performer Exceptional Performer
    • Establishes departmental goals but does not establish or communicate individual accountabilities toward reaching those goals
    • Establishes departmental and individual goals; Clearly communicates departmental and individual goals and accountabilities
    • Establishes departmental and individual goals; Directs individuals to focus on the most vital departmental goals to maximize personal success within the department
    • Does not consistently provide employees with the resources they need to accomplish their goals
    • Provides adequate resources for employees to accomplish their goals up front and upon request of employees; removes barriers as needed to help accomplish team goals
    • Monitors employee progress and proactively makes adjustments in resource allocations; proactively removes barriers to help accomplish team goals
    • Does not monitor the “right” performance results on a regular basis and is slow to confront or address under-performers
    • Monitors the “right” performance measures; Gives frequent and candid performance feedback on how employees are doing their jobs .
    • Monitors the “right” performance measures; Gives frequent and candid performance feedback; demonstrates courage by taking resolute action against weak performers
  • 11. STATE MISSION, VISION & GOALS State Goals Departmental Goals Individual Goals State Performance Business Outcomes Departmental Achievement Individual Achievement Agency Achievement CONTINUAL PERFORMANCE Agency Goals PLANNING RESULTS Performance Management Goals - Based EXECUTION Business Outcomes
  • 12. Performance Management Goals - Based
    • Cascading goals link individual performance expectations to organizational goals and objectives
      • Individual Success is linked to Organizational Success
    • For some jobs, a direct linkage will be clear, while for others, the linkage may not be as clear
    • Goals are cascaded throughout the enterprise and translated to become relevant to each level of the organization
      • State’s goals are cascaded down to the agency’s goals, then down to the specific division’s goals, to team work goals, and finally to the individual goals
  • 13. Performance Management Job Responsibilities
    • Job responsibilities are based upon the state job description
    • These job responsibilities can help a manager identify those areas that are most important to the specific employee in the specific position
    • Managers can use what is required for these job responsibilities and translate them into measurable performance expectations or goals.
    • Managers can also link job responsibilities to competencies
  • 14. Performance Management Individual Development Plan (IDP)
    • An action plan created by the employee and the manager to identify goals and activities that contribute employee development
    • It is important that employees have development plans as it is critical that the state continues to develop and retain an excellent workforce
    • IDP can focus on several areas:
      • Development in current role
      • Expand skill set and knowledge areas
      • Prepare for future roles
  • 15. Performance Management Supporting Tools
    • e Performance Management System
    • The performance management process is supported by the PeopleSoft (PS) e Performance Management System
    • Web-based self-service performance evaluation application for managers, employees, and human resources (HR) administrators
    • Used for planning, collaborating, communication, assessment and monitoring evaluations
  • 16. Complete Employee Self-Evaluation Coaching and Feedback Throughout the Performance Period Performance Management e-Performance Business Flow Initiate Evaluation Process – Performance Document Creation Establish Evaluation Criteria – Planning Phase and Agreement Revise Complete Evaluation Criteria (Planning Phase) Manager Approval Required Complete Manager’s Evaluation of Employee’s Performance Consolidate Feedback into Manager’s Evaluation Obtain Manager’s Manager Approval Obtain HR’s Approval Conduct Review with Employee Acknowledge and Finalize Review HR Admin. by Agency Manager and Employee Manager and Employee Manager Manager and Employee Manager’s Manager HR Admin Manager and Employee
  • 17. Performance Management Lessons Learned from Phase I
    • Timely, sufficient communications for multiple audiences
      • Phase 2 – expand upon Phase 1 communications
    • Agency Readiness Calls were valuable
      • Phase 2 – will start calls earlier (October rather than February)
    • Human Resources System Training
      • Phase 1 – User Acceptance Testing and HR Admin Guide
      • Phase 2 – HR Training and updated HR Admin Guide
    • Manager training – process training was good
      • Phase 1 – no hands on system training
      • Phase 2 – hands on system training
    • SPA Talent Management Help Desk to support ePerformance
      • Created a help desk
      • Preparing for Phase 2 rollout and support
    • Low usage of MSS and ESS by employees
      • Encourage up front learning
    • The agency readiness checklists were good
    • HR and managers are very happy with the new 5-point scale
  • 18. Performance Management Preparing for Phase 2 Implementation
    • Letters to Agency Heads and HR Directors
    • Phone calls and visits to agencies
    • Change Readiness Survey and assessment
    • Gathering HR contact information
    • Phase 1 Lessons Learned Sessions:
      • Internal with SPA and Project team
      • HR Lessons Learned Forum with Phase 1 agencies
    • Review and revisions of training and other resource materials
    • October Kick-Off for Phase 2 Agencies
  • 19. Performance Management Phase 2 Implementation Dates Date Activity October 2008 Change readiness calls and prep with HR community March 2009 Training for Human Resources May – July 2009 Training for Managers June – July 2009 Training for Employees July 2009 ePerformance Management Implementation
  • 20. Performance Management Begin Change Management Efforts
    • What you should expect:
    • Various avenues for communication
      • Agency readiness calls
      • Agency head communications
      • Readiness checklists for preparing the system
      • Communications to HR, managers, and employees
    • Communication toolkits developed, for example
      • Sample communication letters to send to employees explaining the new process
      • Reference cards for managers and employees (tips and tricks)
  • 21. Performance Management Agency Readiness Calls
    • What you should expect:
    • Goals
      • Clearly identify what is needed to transition to the new performance management plan and technology
      • To help determine additional tools support needed for ease of transition
      • Listen and provide support as needed
      • Address system and technology concerns
      • Address and assist with PeopleSoft data concerns
    • What you can do to get ready now
      • Address PeopleSoft “Reports to”
      • Ensure employees and managers have email addresses registered with TeamGeorgia
      • Direct managers and employees to the MSS and ESS navigation UPKS
      • Ensure that there are enough HR administrators in your agency to manage process
  • 22. Performance Management Human Resources Training
    • What to expect
      • Role
        • First point of contact for agency leadership and employees
        • Coordinate and/or facilitate training to for agency managers and employees
        • Continue in customer service role for technology or plan trouble shooting (Tier I helpdesk support)
      • Extensive training and toolkits provided
      • Extensive training on the new technology
      • Early roll-out of ePerformance Manager
      • Hands-on system training
  • 23. Performance Management SPA Support Example – Helpdesk Support
    • How It Works:
    • Our goal is to ensure a successful transition to the enhanced Performance Management Process and ePerformance Manager System. The HR Administrative Guide (please see links on bottom right hand side of this page) provides detailed “how to” steps. If you need additional assistance, we have created a help desk for HR Administrators to call:
    • For questions related to Performance Management or the ePerformance Manager System, please call the State Accounting Office helpline at 404.657.3956 or 888.896.7771. Press option 2, then press 2.
    • If you would like to e-mail us your question(s), please contact us at [email_address] .
    • The Help Desk hours of operation will be 8:00 am to 5:00 pm Monday - Friday
    • HR ADMINISTRATOR'S HELP DESK
  • 24. Performance Management Manager Training
    • What to expect
      • On-line training tools
      • Agency specific training
      • Hands-on system training
      • Webinars for additional training and resources
      • Managers notebooks – available through web links
      • Link to MSS navigation:
        • http://route88upk.state.ga.us/toc.html
  • 25. Performance Management Employee Training
    • What to expect
      • On-line training
      • Training toolkits
      • Hands-on system training
      • Web information / webcast
        • http:// www.spa.ga.gov/employees/ePerformResources.asp
      • Link to ESS navigation:
        • http://route88upk.state.ga.us/toc.html
  • 26. Performance Management Typical Process Timeline Ongoing coaching and feedback throughout the year
    • Mid-year Review Meeting to discuss progress.
    • Manager completes previous year’s performance evaluations.
    Note: This timeline assumes the State moves to a common review date and uses its fiscal year to determine the timing of the performance management cycle. Under this calendar, managers have discretion to hold meetings with their employees anytime between June 1 and August 31
    • Manager & employee have one-on-one Performance Meeting(s) to conduct Performance Eval.
    • Discuss :
    • Year-end results
    • Performance rating;
        • Pay increases (if applicable)
    • HR and Sr. Leader reviews ratings, pay decisions, and Calibrations
    PREVIOUS YEAR July October
    • Performance Planning: Manager and employee collaborate to develop and review goals and competencies for coming year
    August - September CURRENT YEAR July July - June (entire year) January
  • 27. Performance Management Frequently Asked Questions and Q&A
    • Is the PeopleSoft software required to utilize ePerformance Manager? Your agency must have the statewide PeopleSoft supported by the State Accounting Office.
    • Will the approval process require handwritten signatures? No. The ePerformance system allows for all approving parties to approve each phase of the process electronically.
    • Who does the manager or employee call regarding questions with the ePerformance process or system? The HR administrator within your agency is your point of contact with questions related to the ePerformance process and system.
    • If the HR Administrator has a question regarding the ePerformance process, who does s/he call? The HR Administrator should call or e-mail the Talent Management Help Desk.
  • 28. Performance Management Frequently Asked Questions and Q&A
    • What is a competency?
      • Competencies are attributes, knowledge, skills, abilities that contribute to successful performance.
      • Behavioral Competency: Employee behaviors, knowledge, skills, abilities, and other characteristics that contribute to individual success in the organization. (e.g., teamwork and cooperation, communication, etc.)
      • Technical Competency: Job Specific knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary for successful performance on the job. (e.g., knowledge of accounting principles, knowledge of human resource law and practice
    • Will I be evaluated on competencies?
      • Yes. As part of the performance management program all employees will be evaluated on Core behavioral competencies. All managers and supervisors will be evaluated on the Leadership competencies.
  • 29. Performance Management Talent Management Team
    • Buz Mayo, Executive Director
      • [email_address] ; 404-651-8749
    • Ronnie Witcher , Program Director
      • [email_address] ; 404-657-2379
    • Janet Hecht , Ph.D., HR Projects Coordinator
      • [email_address] ; 404-463-3534
    • Al Brown, PHR, HR Consultant
      • [email_address] ; 404-657-2848