Pilot – 2001-2002 Valuing Work @ Wellesley College ...

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Pilot – 2001-2002 Valuing Work @ Wellesley College ...

  1. 1. Pilot – 2001-2002 Valuing Work @ Wellesley College Performance Management Guide Introduction Wellesley College is committed to the practice of meaningful, timely and productive performance management for all of its employees. Thank you for supporting that commitment! This Performance Management Guide and the Performance Management Document are the tools of performance management at Wellesley College. They have been thoughtfully developed and reviewed by managers, employees and senior leadership alike, and form the basis of our system. The orientation to this process as well as the ongoing performance management training to be provided by the College will combine to increase the effectiveness of our individual and collective efforts. NOTE: Please review this Performance Management Guide thoroughly before beginning any performance management activities or documentation. The examples, instructions and definitions will help clarify all sections of this Performance Management Document. Purpose of Performance Management at Wellesley The performance management system at Wellesley College is designed to provide alignment between the College’s mission, constituent needs and performance expectations. The program will: • Foster ongoing two-way communication between employees and managers • Support the development of clear, consistent and measurable goals linked directly to Wellesley’s core values and competencies • Help to articulate and support training needs and career development • Establish criteria for making reward and recognition decisions. Performance Management: Where it Fits Performance management is one component of the larger Valuing Work @ Wellesley program. With input from across the College, other systems and tools have been developed to complement performance management. These are: • A mission and values-based reward strategy for the College • A seven-level job classification system based on required skills and competencies for Wellesley administrative staff • Role documentation based on the classification model to describe the role • Broad, flexible salary bands that are competitive with our labor markets • Salary administration guidelines to help managers and employees apply the new tools and processes consistently.
  2. 2. The Performance Management Cycle & Schedule The performance management process at Wellesley College is conducted on an annual cycle. In order to encourage managers and employees to plan, discuss and assess performance thoughtfully and thoroughly, three options have been provided to managers for performance management scheduling. A manager may choose any of the following options (with the approval of the appropriate Senior Staff member), and notify Human Resources in advance of the option she/he has chosen. Option One: Performance management documents are completed and submitted annually for all staff in a given department, during the quarter in which the employee was hired at Wellesley. This allows for staggering the performance management process throughout the fiscal year. Option Two: Performance management documents are completed and submitted annually for all staff in a given department during a quarter chosen by the manager in conjunction with the Senior Staff member. This allows managers to choose performance management timing that fits a department’s peak workload periods. Option Three: Performance management documents are completed and submitted annually for all staff in a given department during the fourth quarter of the fiscal year (April – June period). This is the schedule followed historically at Wellesley. NOTE: Should a manager not choose any option described, Option Three (completion of performance management documents during the fourth fiscal quarter) will be the default option assigned to that department. Regardless of the timing option chosen, all salary increase recommendations will still occur during the fourth fiscal quarter and will become effective on July 1 each year. Documentation Requirements for Performance Management The Performance Management Document will be provided on-line to staff in a simple template that can be accessed by both manager and employee. The Performance Management Document must be completed and signed once during each 12-month period. Timing of this 12-month period is chosen by the Manager, in conjunction with the Senior Staff member, as described above. Performance Management Documents need to be submitted to Human Resources for inclusion in the employee’s personnel file. The Performance Management Process Stage I: Goal Setting and Performance Planning: As the annual performance management cycle begins, manager and employee plan for what will be accomplished during the performance period. This stage includes an assessment of the employee vis-à-vis the competencies critical to the performance of her/his role as outlined in her/his role document, as well as an articulation of specific goals and results to be accomplished. These individual goals 2
  3. 3. and areas to work on should serve as a point of reference for ongoing discussions throughout the year. Stage II: Interim Goal Review/Update: In order to encourage managers and employees to talk about performance and progress on a regular basis, a “mid-year” review has been built into the performance management process. While this review/update can actually take place anytime during the performance period, it ensures that goals and performance are reviewed more often than annually. This discussion(s) can be initiated by either the manager or employee and should be documented by a quick note, especially if changes are made in goals, results expected, etc. Stage III: Performance Review and Assessment: Summarizing the employee’s progress and growth during the year vis-à-vis the competencies outlined for her/his role as well as reviewing goal achievement, brings closure to the performance period and provides a basis for the Performance Planning stage for the following year. Both the manager and the employee should update the Performance Assessment and Review section of the performance management form, noting any improvements, increased or emerging strengths or weaknesses with respect to the competencies required by the role and the goals outlined in Stage I of the performance management process. The manager prepares the final draft after discussion between the manager and employee. Multiple performance ratings may be assigned at this stage. Stage III may provide the foundation for Stage I of the following review cycle. Some managers and employees may prefer to hold this discussion simultaneously while others may choose to separate the assessment and planning stages. Tips for Using the Guide and Tools • Read the guidelines carefully and review the tools referred to before using any of the techniques or processes described. • New employees should attend the orientation to the Valuing Work program. If any employee needs guidance on the process, please contact your Human Resources Representative to arrange an overview. • Discuss the process and tools with your manager and your peers to ensure your understanding. • Attend the ongoing training opportunities in performance management provided by the College. This is where you will acquire and begin to practice the skills for effective performance management: goal setting, performance assessment, coaching and counseling, etc. Tools to Use in the Performance Management Process Note: The Performance Management Document, Goal/Objective Setting Guidelines, and the Classification Model are available on the Human Resources Website: http://www.wellesley.edu/HR/ or through the Network Neighborhood, Ntm, HumRes. 3
  4. 4. A. Divisional Goals and Operational Plans Goals and operational plans include any work that has been undertaken with respect to goals, objectives, and process for the department or division, which is critical to review with managers and employees alike. Translating these macro plans into terms that are meaningful in individual performance management provides a strong sense of connection and contribution for employees and increases the likelihood of overall success. B. Classification Model Key compensable factors, derived from our reward strategy, are described at each of the seven levels and by specific dimensions and can be useful for career development as well as performance discussions. C. Role Document A role documentation format has been completed for each distinct administrative role at Wellesley. In addition to describing the skills and competencies required for the role, the document describes general performance factors. D. Performance Management Document A format for recording performance management information for an individual; includes goal setting and performance planning, expected results, competency assessment, ongoing manager- employee updates, and performance review and assessment. E. Prior Goals for Employee The expectation of performance management at Wellesley is that the process will be ongoing, interactive and cyclical for the manager and employee. Should an employee change managers, the last performance management cycle’s materials may prove helpful in assessing results. F. Goal/Objective Setting Guidelines In conjunction with group training provided for managers by the College, guidelines for developing reasonable, specific goals will assist employees and managers alike in performance planning and articulation of expected results. STAGE I: GOAL SETTING & PERFORMANCE PLANNING Before meeting to begin the performance management process, employee and manager alike need to do some homework. The manager will share with the employee the departmental goals for the year. Both the manager and the employee should review the role document. Identifying individual goals and areas to work on in the year ahead and preparing a Performance Competency Summary highlighting the specific competency areas critical to the performance of this role will help prepare both parties for a meaningful initial discussion. 4
  5. 5. A. IDENTIFICATION OF GOALS & OBJECTIVES Using the Goal/Objective Setting Guidelines, and Divisional Goals and Operational Plans (if any are available), the manager should identify one to three major goals and areas to work on in the year ahead. These goals should be discussed and refined at the initial performance planning meeting. • Using the Goal/Objective Setting Guidelines: An overview tool for developing goals has been provided to you in your tool kit. This outline is brief and requires supplemental training and practice in order to develop a degree of comfort with goal setting. It is critical to concentrate on a few major goals (1-3) for the performance period that support the departmental goals. List these 1-3 major individual goals in the spaces provided. • Outlining Specific Activities to Achieve Goals: If there are projects, work teams, training, etc. planned to support the achievement of a goal, list them in this section. The format can be a bullet point or two or a narrative. • Describing Expected Results: For each goal, describe specifically what is expected as a result during the performance period. This may include something measured quantitatively or may be expressed as a qualitative result. If there are concrete deliverables expected, note them as well. This section is critical to effective Performance Assessment, so be as detailed as possible. B. PERFORMANCE COMPETENCY SUMMARY The Valuing Work @ Wellesley classification program is based on a set of seven factors, or areas of competency, that are seen as being important (in varying degrees) to all types of work at the College. These competencies are Service to Constituents; Expertise; Accountability/Responsibility; Collaboration; Communication; Innovation & Problem Solving, Critical Thinking; and Development of Self and Others. Each role has specific competency areas critical to the performance of the role. Both the manager and the employee should complete an assessment of the employee’s current strengths and challenges with respect to each of these competency areas. The manager and the employee should meet to discuss the assessment. The manager prepares the final draft. For new employees, the manager should highlight the specific competency areas critical to the successful performance of the role. Sources of Information: A role document has been prepared and reviewed for each distinct role at Wellesley College. Its format aligns with our Classification Model, in that certain competencies (skills) have been described for each role. The Role Document and the description of these competencies are key information sources in completing the Performance Competency section of the Performance Management Document. What to Do at this Stage: For each competency listed in this section, briefly describe (1-3 sentences will be sufficient) how the employee demonstrates strength (or proficiency), what weaknesses she/he is experiencing, and identify areas she/he could develop. 5
  6. 6. STAGE II: INTERIM GOAL REVIEW/UPDATE During the performance period, managers and employees are urged to discuss progress against goals and general performance of the employee. This discussion(s) can be initiated by manager or employee and should be documented with a quick note in the section below, especially if changes are made in goals, expected results, etc. Ideally, manager and employee will have at least one of these mini-discussions during the performance period. The performance management process does not mandate a specific format for this discussion, or for its documentation. A few sentences or bullet points describing what was discussed and any resulting goal changes will suffice. The discussion can take place at any time between the Goal Setting Stage and the Performance Evaluation, but will be most effective if conducted sometime around mid-cycle. STAGE III: PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT AND REVIEW At the end of the performance period, manager and employee should each review and update the Performance Assessment and Review section, noting the degree to which goals were achieved during the performance cycle as well as any improvements, changes in strengths and/or weaknesses for the employee with respect to the competencies described. This section simply provides an opportunity to describe growth during the performance period. During the Goal Setting and Performance Planning Stage, strengths and weaknesses were articulated – at this juncture, the manager and employee need to summarize the current state of these. Similar terminology to that used in Stage I can and should be employed here. Since performance management is an ongoing process, Stage III provides the starting point for Stage I discussions for the next annual performance evaluation cycle. Some managers and employees may choose to combine stages I and III after the completion of the first performance management cycle. The manager should prepare a final draft after the discussion between manager and employee. PERFORMANCE RATINGS Based on the performance evaluation completed above, assign one of the descriptive ratings to each of the competency areas listed. Choose one of the following performance ratings for each area. Employee and manager should each complete the ratings sections and meet to discuss them. A performance rating should be assigned for each competency area and goal assigned. These ratings stand alone and will not be averaged into a final or overall rating. E = Exceeds Expected Results: Achieved the results described in the Goal Setting/Performance Planning stage and further enhances them through initiative, creativity, and proactive and self- directed action. M = Meets Expected Results: Achieved the results described in the Goal Setting/Performance planning stage for a competency or goal. S = Fell Short of Expected Results: Did not fully achieve the results described in the Goal Setting/Performance Planning stage for a competency or goal. 6
  7. 7. SUMMARY Use this as an opportunity to summarize overall performance of the role throughout the performance period. Be specific and cite examples. SIGNATURES/ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS • What the Signatures Indicate/Do Not Indicate: As noted in the Performance Management Document, an employee’s signature indicates their input to the document and that a meeting occurred with the manager to discuss it. Signature does not necessarily imply agreement with the document. • Employee Comments Section: This section is optional and may be used by the employee to contribute thoughts and opinions about the performance management process or her/his assessment specifically. • Submission Procedures: A copy of the Performance Management Document must be submitted to Human Resources according to the schedule chosen by the manager in advance. 7
  8. 8. Example: Administrative Assistant STAGE I: GOAL SETTING AND PERFORMANCE PLANNING A. GOAL SETTING Major Goal for Performance Period Coordinating the movement of department office area from Building A to Building B • Be primary interface for XYZ Department • Responsible for all physical equipment to be moved • Coordinate installation of all computer needs Specific Activities Planned to Achieve this Goal • Develop detailed project plan for move • Identify any potential budget requirements Results/Outcomes Expected (Qualitative or Quantitative) Move is accomplished by target date Minimal disruption of departmental services All hardware and software is installed by target date B. PERFORMANCE COMPETENCY SUMMARY Competency: Service to Constituents: Service to Constituents: ability to build relationship with all constituents; responsiveness to constituent needs; ability to multi-task through interruptions. Performance Expectation: Understands Wellesley very well and knows what she/he can do for those she/he serves; ensures that all departmental needs are met; guarantees all department procedures are complied with. Takes service seriously. 8
  9. 9. Areas to Develop: Needs to strengthen relationships with other departments in order to communicate the needs of the department more effectively. STAGE II: INTERIM GOAL REVIEW/UPDATE Date of Conversation: April 2000 Subject/Goal Discussed: Discussed with employee her performance as the primary interface on the move of Department XYZ and agreed that her hard work and good follow-up was keeping the team on track. However, employee needs to become more comfortable sharing information on problems or delays that have arisen during the move. I agreed to a brief follow-up weekly throughout the move. STAGE III: PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT AND REVIEW A. PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT Major Goal for Performance Period • Coordination of movement of department office area from Building A to Building • Be primary interface for XYZ Department • Responsible for all physical equipment to be moved • Coordinate installation of all computer needs Specific Activities Planned to Achieve this Goal • Develop detailed project plan for move • Identify any potential budget requirements Degree to which Expected Results Were Achieved • Participated as project leader for move of XYZ Department. Performance Rating: M 9
  10. 10. • Planned, analyzed and anticipated physical space needs and design through proactive communication with faculty, staff and Physical Plant Administration. Performance Rating: E • Department moved and experienced some downtime as a result of inadequate contingency planning. Performance Rating: S B. PERFORMANCE COMPETENCY ASSESSMENT Competency: Service to Constituents: ability to build relationship with all constituents; responsiveness to constituent needs; ability to multi-task through interruptions. Performance Expectation: Understands Wellesley very well and knows what she/he can do for those she/he serves; ensures that all departmental needs are met; guarantees all department procedures are complied with. Takes service seriously. Degree to which Expected Results were Achieved: Employee continues to excel in constituent knowledge and service orientation. Has increased her understanding of the complexities involved in delivering a high level of service in the midst of a major disruption. Her communication with critical resources has improved. Her timely response to changes in plans facilitated a smooth transition. Employee still needs to inform manager of potential problems in a timely manner. 10

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