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PAY-FOR-PERFORMANCE PROGRAM

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  • Copyright ©2007 by The Segal Group, Inc., parent of The Segal Company and its Sibson Consulting Division. All Rights Reserved
  • Transcript

    • 1. PAY-FOR-PERFORMANCE PROGRAM Pay-for-Performance Training for Supervisors April 2008 Copyright ©2008 by The Segal Group, Inc., parent of The Segal Company and its Sibson Consulting Division. All Rights Reserved
    • 2.  Welcome and Overview  Pay-for-Performance Strategy  Performance Management Process  Linking Compensation to Performance  Closing
    • 3. Our goal for today is to provide you with an understanding of the…
      • Pay-for-Performance Strategy
      • New Performance Management Model
      • Compensation Philosophy
      • Recommended Approaches for Linking Pay to Performance
    • 4. Why are we here today?
      • Trinity leadership desires:
      • To recognize and encourage excellence by rewarding contributions in work performance which exceed established standards and expectations
      • To more closely align performance expectations with the priorities and goals of the institution
      • Administrative Staff desire:
      • A more rigorous approach to Performance Management as a means to better manage their own performance and careers
      • More meaningful supervisor-employee conversations about performance and development
      • Rewards that align with demonstrated performance levels
    • 5. An Advisory Committee was formed to guide the Pay-for-Performance initiative
      • PAY-FOR-PERFORMANCE ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP
      Facilities Foreman Tom Downes Network Administrator Luca Pizzoferrato Associate Director, Financial Aid Cary LeGeyt Associate Registrar Terry Hosig Associate Academic Dean Dave Robbins Technical Services Librarian Tom Zaharevich Director, IT John Langeland VP Alumni Relations & Communications Kathi Boelhouwer VP Planning and Administration Paula Russo Position Name
    • 6. The Pay-for-Performance initiative was completed in five phases over the last six months Project Timeline 5. Implementation and Training 4. Pay-for-Performance Linkage 3. Performance Management Apr Mar Feb Jan Dec Nov Oct 2. Strategy and Pay Guidelines 1. Discovery Phase
    • 7. Let’s take the next five minutes to reflect on our own experiences with performance conversations
      • Share your most memorable experience related to a performance review or feedback exchange
    • 8.  Welcome and Overview  Pay-for-Performance Strategy  Performance Management Process  Linking Compensation to Performance  Closing
    • 9. Simply stated… … Pay-for-Performance is: planning, coaching, and evaluating performance and aligning rewards with performance outcomes
    • 10. The Pay-for-Performance Strategy is composed of two major components: Performance Management and Compensation PAY-FOR-PERFORMANCE Performance Management Compensation
    • 11. We will use the Pay-for-Performance Strategy to link performance evaluations to pay decisions PAY-FOR-PERFORMANCE STRATEGY FOR TRINITY ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF
      • Individual salaries based on the salary range for the job and the demonstrated skills, expertise, and performance of the individual with opportunity for greater pay increases for higher levels of performance
      • Grounded in a strong, effective and reliable performance management system
      Link to Performance
      • Principles of performance management will be consistent throughout the College with flexibility to address the needs of different departments
      • Includes all administrative and positions under same program and policies, with appropriate tailoring of salary ranges to reflect market realities
      Program Model
      • Levels primarily based on market to ensure Trinity’s ability to attract a diverse workforce of high-caliber administrative staff
      • Consider relative contribution of internal role on the achievement of College and department goals
      Internal / External Valuation
      • Clear linkage between performance expectations and College and department goals
      Institutional Alignment
    • 12. We will use the Pay-for-Performance Strategy to link performance evaluations to pay decisions continued PAY-FOR-PERFORMANCE STRATEGY FOR TRINITY ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF
      • Comparison institutions reflect a combination of competitor, peer, and aspiration institutions
      • Variations of markets for specific job families or departments may be necessary
      Comparison Markets
      • Transparency of compensation philosophy / pay guidelines to ensure understanding of pay and its relation to performance
      Communication
      • Leadership sets broad strategy for the Pay-for-Performance program and ensures program supports Trinity’s mission
      • HR designs and administers the program, and serves as guide/advisor to supervisors and Division Heads
      • Managers/supervisors recommend pay actions, subject to Division Head approval
      Management
      • Primarily base salary, with the potential for alternative enhancements
      • Lump-sum payments for employees over the maximum of the pay range
      Pay Components
    • 13.  Welcome and Overview  Pay-for-Performance Strategy  Performance Management Process  Linking Compensation to Performance  Closing
    • 14. The Performance Management Process for Trinity Administrative Staff has been enhanced to…
      • Serve as the basis for differentiated decision making, including promotion, development opportunities, recognition, and rewards
      • Provide requisite levels of consistency in performance evaluations throughout the institution
      • Assist supervisors in making performance evaluations as objective as possible
      • Ensure transparency of expectations, standards, and goals for staff members
      • Provide all employees with additional opportunities for growth and/or recognition
    • 15. Research confirms that effective performance management can increase an institution’s overall performance Based on a recent Performance Management study, Higher Education seems to have a lot of room for improvement: 35 2. The effectiveness of our performance management program is average 70 5. Performance Management is not a contributor towards helping the institution achieve its strategic goals 63 6. There is no differentiation between performance ratings and corresponding pay actions 40 7. There is a strong tie between performance ratings and promotions 25 4. Our leadership’s own goals are aligned with the institutions (Perceptions drop to virtually no alignment at the middle-management and non-management levels) 60 3. Our leaders do not view performance management as a critical business process 50% 1. The effectiveness of our performance management program is below average Results (% Agree) Study Question
    • 16. Ongoing dialogue between supervisors and employees is the “backbone” of effective Performance Management Realizing Your Potential 5 Conversation Evaluating Performance 4 Conversation Coaching for Improved Performance 3 Conversation Establishing the Relationship 1 Conversation Setting Expectations 2 Conversation
    • 17. The Performance Management cycle includes three phases that will (re)occur on an annual basis
      • I. Purpose: To align institutional plans to individual performance and development plans
      • July through August
      • Supervisors and employees meet to review the College goals and develop an Annual Performance Plan
      I. Performance Planning/Goal Setting
      • III. Purpose: To assess annual performance through collection, review, and calibration of performance data in preparation for pay decisions
      • May through June
      • Supervisors and employees complete a formal Year-End Evaluation (Self Assessment and Supervisor Evaluation)
      • Supervisors make pay decisions based on performance evaluations
      • Supervisors within large departments conduct Department Review sessions to ensure consistency of standards and delivery of performance and development messages
      III. End of Year Formal Evaluation
      • II. Purpose: To exchange information that can be used to improve performance and enhance development
      • August through Next May
      • Supervisors provide ongoing feedback related to day-to-day activities to improve performance
      • Supervisors and employees complete a formal Mid-Year Evaluation (Self Assessment and Supervisor Evaluation) to discuss performance to-date and (re)direct efforts for the remainder of the year
      II. Ongoing Review and Feedback
    • 18. Supervisors and employees have key roles in the Performance Management process
      • Supervisors
      • Clarify responsibilities, define annual goals in relation to department and College goals, identify competencies
      • Plan skill development and promote career growth
      • Provide constructive feedback
      • Track and monitor performance throughout the year to support the final evaluation
      • Spend the necessary time to write the evaluation(s) and prepare for meeting(s) with employees
      • Employees
      • Understand what is expected of you in terms of your job responsibilities, annual goals, and competencies
      • Participate in setting annual goals
      • Be open and honest about career goals and professional interests
      • Ask for suggestions and assistance to improve performance
      • Inform your supervisor about your progress and/or difficulties that may interfere with meeting your objectives
      • Complete your Self Assessment
    • 19. The purpose of Phase 1 is to align institutional and individual performance plans I. Performance Planning/Goal Setting III. End of Year Formal Evaluation II. Ongoing Review and Feedback
    • 20. Specific activities, tools, and resources related to Phase 1 are as follows…
      • Supervisors and employees meet to set expectations for the year using Conversation #2 (Setting Expectations) and develop an Annual Performance Plan
      • For new hires and recently promoted individuals, supervisors and employees meet and develop a New Hire/New Role Plan and Evaluation
      I. Performance Planning/Goal Setting Setting Expectation 2 Conversation
    • 21. The Annual Performance Plans will include clear and mutually agreed-to expectations across three areas “ What specific competencies (i.e., knowledge, skills, behaviors) will help me accomplish my job responsibilities and achieve my goals for this year? “ What do we need to accomplish this year in order to support the College’s goals and my department’s objectives?” “ What are the most critical tasks and activities I am responsible for in my day-to-day job to support departmental objectives?” Annual Goals “ What is Done” Competencies “ How it is done” Focus Content Area INDIVIDUAL EXPECTATIONS Job Responsibilities “ What is Done” I. Performance Planning/Goal Setting Successfully transition budget records from old to new tracking system by March 30, 2009 Assist department head in administration of department procedures and programs Attention to Detail: The ability to accurately account for data related to the job Examples
    • 22. Job responsibilities should be derived from the job description I. Performance Planning/Goal Setting
    • 23. Annual Goals should reflect College and Division/Department needs Institution College mission, strategy and goals Division/Department Division/Department goals, plans and objectives in support of Institution objectives
      • Staff Member
      • Annual goals linked to division/department goals:
        • Clearly articulate “what” to achieve (job responsibilities and goals)
        • Clearly articulate how success will be measured (competencies)
      Open and Clear Communication of Institutional Strategic Plan and its Impact on Division/ Department and Employee Employee, Division/ Department and College-wide Plans Designed to Support Institutional Mission and Strategy I. Performance Planning/Goal Setting
    • 24. For example, annual goals for an Accounts Payable Specialist may be derived as follows… I. Performance Planning/Goal Setting Goal: Ensure 100% accuracy and complete transparency of College financials Goal: Ensure all financial procedures are up to date and provide the accurate and current financial data for leadership of Trinity to review Institution Division/Department Employee Job Responsibilities: Maintain accurate financials records Annual Goals: Review and update accounts payable procedures by May 30, 2009 Measure of Success: Procedures are accurate and available for use on June 1, 2009
    • 25. In setting Annual Goals, supervisors and employees should follow these guidelines
      • Effective goal setting includes creating goals that are:
        • S pecific
        • M easurable
        • A chievable
        • R esults-oriented
        • T ime-bound
      • Supervisors should develop goals with employees to provide clear direction and clarify expectations to guide their activities throughout the year. Consider the following:
        • What are Trinity’s goals for the performance year? My department’s goals?
        • How can individual goals support the department’s goals? What am I expected to accomplish and by when?
        • How will I accomplish those goals and what resources do I need? How will I know if I have successfully accomplished each goal?
      I. Performance Planning/Goal Setting
    • 26. Let’s review some of the helpful tips for avoiding common pitfalls when setting goals Tips I. Performance Planning/Goal Setting
      • When goal statements are wordy, they obscure what the performance expectations really are
      • Wordy goals are confusing and may lead to disagreements as to expectations and whether the goal has been achieved
      Pitfall: Overly wordy goals
      • A goal should establish and describe intended results
      • Activities and tasks are a means to an end – valuable only if they get the desired results. Activities should never be the main focus in goal setting
      Pitfall: A focus on activities rather than results
      • Be clear about the qualities or measures of the expected results
      • Without this clarity, you and your supervisor may think you agree on goals only to later realize that you disagree on whether or not the goal has been achieved
      Pitfall: Unclear expected results or measures
      • Be sure to clarify who is accountable for achieving the goal
      • This can be more complex for team members, or when work is highly interrelated; indicate if accountability is shared
      Pitfall: Unclear accountability
      • Since goal setting is intended to focus your attention on the most important needs, limit the number of your annual goals to 3 – 5
      Pitfall: Too many goals
    • 27. Competencies describe how work should be accomplished
      • Competencies are defined as the knowledge, skills, and abilities that should be demonstrated when a job is performed
      • A competency model was developed for all administrative staff at Trinity, consisting of
        • 7 College-wide competencies
        • Sample behavior indicators
      • While demonstration of each of these competencies will vary depending on the job, these are generally expected of all members of Trinity’s community
      I. Performance Planning/Goal Setting
    • 28. Let’s walk through an example using “Service Orientation”
      • Definition: The ability to provide timely and high quality support to others both within and outside of the department
      • Sample Behavior Indicators:
      • Demonstrates commitment to providing timely and high quality support to those both internal and external to one’s own department
      • Keeps the end-user/recipient in mind as work is conducted
      • Demonstrates a pleasant demeanor when working with others
      • Considers others’ feelings and the ramifications of one’s own actions and decisions
      I. Performance Planning/Goal Setting
    • 29. Conversation #2 will guide discussions related to developing the Annual Performance Plan Clarify job responsibilities based on the job description and associated measures of success (What) Discuss the core competencies and identify the most appropriate behavior indicators that demonstrate competence (How) Define annual goals related to department and College goals and associated measures of success (What) 1 2 3 WHAT IS DISCUSSED IN AN EFFECTIVE CONVERSATION #2? Review for understanding 4 I. Performance Planning/Goal Setting Setting Expectations
    • 30.
      • Outcome: Develop working knowledge and skills required to set performance expectations
      Conversation #2 Exercise: Practice setting expectations with a focus on goal setting
      • Sample Job: Office Assistant
      The Situation
      • Read the scenario
      • Work together to determine the annual goals
      • Use the template to capture the goals
      The Approach
      • Break into groups of four or five
      Set Up Setting Expectations I. Performance Planning/Goal Setting 30 minutes TIME
    • 31. Let’s discuss what you’ve learned and some potential “watchouts” related to Phase 1
      • What was the most important thing you learned from the goal setting exercise?
      • How can you and your employee prepare for the goal setting conversation?
      • How should disagreements about job responsibilities or goals be handled?
      • How should you document the Annual Performance Plan if your employee works for others as well?
      • What tips for Phase 1 should you take away based on our discussion?
      I. Performance Planning/Goal Setting
    • 32. The purpose of Phase 2 is to provide feedback to guide performance and development I. Performance Planning/Goal Setting III. End of Year Formal Evaluation II. Ongoing Review and Feedback
    • 33. Specific activities, tools, and resources related to Phase 2 are as follows…
      • Supervisors and employees meet and conduct Conversation #3 (Coaching for Improved Performance) during day-to-day activities
      • Supervisors and employees meet and conduct Conversation #4 (Evaluating Performance) and a Mid-Year Evaluation to discuss the performance to-date and (re)-direct efforts for the remainder of the year
        • Self Assessment
        • Supervisor Evaluation
      Coaching for Improved Performance 3 II. Ongoing Review and Feedback Evaluating Performance 4 Conversation Conversation
    • 34. Providing regular, on-going feedback has been shown to improve performance
      • A study of higher education institutions and corporate organizations showed that managers in top performing organizations coach and give regular feedback more often than managers who work in lower performing organizations
      • This suggests that coaching and feedback really does matter – to both the employee and to the overall organization
      II. Ongoing Review and Feedback So providing regular and helpful feedback to employees will help them perform better AND it will help Trinity better meet its goals!
    • 35. Conversation #3 Exercise: Practice Sharing Observations
      • Outcome: Develop working knowledge and skills required to share relevant observations that support an evaluation
      • Take a look at Karen’s scarf
      The Approach
      • Break into groups of four or five
      Set Up Coaching 5 minutes TIME The Situation
      • The SCARF exercise
    • 36. Candid and supportive supervisor/employee dialogue is the key to effective performance management
      • Forms and ratings provide the framework, but the real action happens when a supervisor and employee talk about expectations, performance and consequences:
      • Employees often report getting only infrequent performance feedback
      • Many supervisors and employees do not have the skills to do this effectively
      • Premature assessment gets in the way of information
      Expectations Observations Assessments Consequences FEEDBACK FRAMEWORK © II. Ongoing Review and Feedback
    • 37. Expectations set the stage for delivering clear feedback
      • Mutual and clear understanding of expectations is the foundation for effective feedback
      • May be explicit or implicit
      • Changes over time are normal, and need to be communicated
      Expectations Desired behaviors and results Observations Assessments Consequences FEEDBACK FRAMEWORK © II. Ongoing Review and Feedback
    • 38. Observations provide meaningful information that the supervisors and employees can use
      • Are exactly what was seen, heard, etc.
      • Are in the past and are completed actions
      • Are NOT assessments
      Expectations Observations Neutral facts or occurrences (behaviors and results) Assessments Consequences FEEDBACK FRAMEWORK © II. Ongoing Review and Feedback
    • 39. Assessments are the evaluations of the employees’ performance
      • Are interpretations based on observations and facts
      • Must be “owned” by the giver
      • Negative assessments often cause resistance
      • Often imply a sense of urgency for action
      Expectations Observations Assessments Personal interpretations or evaluations of a set of observations Consequences FEEDBACK FRAMEWORK © II. Ongoing Review and Feedback
    • 40. Consequences clarify what can be expected based on the assessment
      • Should be consistent with annual performance assessment
      • Are “desired” and “undesired” depending upon assessment
      • Explicitly predefined or not
      • Affect your pay and working relations with others
      Expectations Observations Assessments Consequences Known or possible effects of continued behavior FEEDBACK FRAMEWORK © II. Ongoing Review and Feedback
    • 41. Let’s review some tips for avoiding common pitfalls when giving feedback
      • 1. Don’t wait for the right time.
      • 2. Soften how you deliver hard messages without losing accuracy and honesty.
      • 3. Don’t deliver important feedback mixed with your emotions.
      • 4. Don’t assume the message was received because it was given.
      • 5. Don’t develop a strong (i.e., rigid) assessment before gathering the facts and the viewpoint of the receiver.
      • 6. Respect the staff member’s privacy.
      • 7. Be specific.
      • 8. Demonstrate your support.
      II. Ongoing Review and Feedback Tips
    • 42. Let’s review some tips for avoiding common pitfalls when giving feedback continued
      • Helpful Tips Dealing with Emotional Responses to Feedback
      • In certain feedback scenarios, some people experience get upset as a result of the information. Often, we resist giving important information out of fear of “sharing” that experience. Some tips for dealing with this type of situation include:
      • 1. Let people experience their emotions
      • 2. Offer a postponement of the conversation
      • 3. Dive into the facts and solicit the receiver’s perspective and other facts
      II. Ongoing Review and Feedback
    • 43. The purpose of Phase 3 is to evaluate annual performance and develop a salary increase recommendation I. Performance Planning/Goal Setting III. End of Year Formal Evaluation II. Ongoing Review and Feedback
    • 44. Specific activities, tools, and resources related to Phase 3 are as follows…
      • Employee conducts an End-of-Year Self Assessment
      • Supervisor conducts End-of-Year Evaluation of the employee
      • Supervisor and employee meet and conduct Conversation #4 (Evaluating Performance) to review the employee’s Self Assessment and Supervisor Evaluation
      • Supervisors in large departments jointly conduct Department Review sessions to ensure consistency of standards and delivery of messages
      III. End of Year Formal Evaluation Evaluating Performance 4 Conversation
    • 45. The Annual Performance Evaluation is conducted more rigorously within top performing organizations
      • The study mentioned earlier showed that managers in top performing organizations conduct annual performance evaluations better than managers who work in lower performing organizations
        • Managers are more likely to conduct evaluations thoroughly and on time
        • Managers are more likely to differentiate pay decisions based on performance outcomes
      • This suggests that annual performance evaluations really do matter – to both the employee and to the overall organization
      III. End of Year Formal Evaluation It critical that you take the time to conduct a thorough evaluation and differentiate pay based on performance outcomes!
    • 46. Consider the following process in conducting your Self Assessment
      • 1. Think about your performance for the whole year
      • 2. Evaluate your performance against the measures of success in the three dimensions—Primary Job Responsibilities, Annual Goals, and Competencies that are defined as part of the Annual Performance Plan
      • 3. Rate your performance in the Self Assessment portion of the End-of-Year Evaluation using the 4-point scale and criteria in the Performance Ratings Definitions
      • 4. Compare your ratings with the Mid-Year Evaluation, and adjust your ratings, if needed
      • 5. Summarize your Self Assessment in the Employee Comments box
      • 6. Provide an Overall Assessment of your performance over the year
      III. End of Year Formal Evaluation
    • 47. Review the Self Assessment with your supervisor
      • 1. After completing the Self Assessment portion of the End-of-Year Evaluation, schedule time with your supervisor to meet and discuss your progress for the year
      • 2. Send the End-of-Year Self Assessment to your supervisor prior to your meeting
      • 3. Your supervisor will have completed the Supervisor Evaluation of your performance during the year prior to your meeting
      • 4. Together you will discuss your results, finalize the performance ratings, complete and both sign the End-of-Year Evaluation
      • 5. You and your supervisor will begin planning for next year
      • 6. Final increase recommendations will be made by the supervisor to the department head and through Human Resources to the division head for approval
      III. End of Year Formal Evaluation
    • 48. You may want to consider holding Review meetings in your department
      • What is a Department Review meeting?
        • A meeting during which supervisors in the same group/department share their perspectives about employee performance to calibrate evaluations
      • What are the benefits of conducting a Department Review meeting?
        • Helps establish consistency of reviews and feedback across the group/department
        • Helps to ensure credibility and avoid “tough rater/easy rater” concerns
        • Enables supervisors to get peer assistance in the annual review
      • Which departments should consider conducting Department Review meetings?
        • More than 8–10 employees, many of whom perform a similar type of role
        • Supervisors have first-hand experience with employees in the group/department that don’t report to them
      III. End of Year Formal Evaluation A sample agenda for a Department Review meeting is included in your materials.
    • 49. Conversation #3 and #4 Exercise: Practice Evaluating Performance
      • Outcome: Develop working knowledge and skills required to evaluate performance using the Feedback Framework©
      • Read the scenario
      • Develop and deliver an assessment using the Feedback Framework©
      The Approach
      • Break into groups of four or five
      Set Up Coaching 25 minutes TIME The Situation
      • Sample Job: Office Assistant
      FEEDBACK FRAMEWORK © Expectations Observations Assessments Consequences
    • 50. Let’s review what we learned from the exercise and review additional tips for exchanging feedback
      • Preparing for the Conversation
      • Conducting the Conversation
      II. Ongoing Review and Feedback
      • Take the appropriate time to gather specific information
        • Schedule conversations with those from whom you want to seek feedback (if the employee worked with them)
        • Make sure feedback is focused on specific, fact-based information
      • Review the information gathered and profile key strengths and development needs
      • Develop and script key messages. Use the feedback framework as a template
              • Formally schedule a time to have the feedback discussion and provide adequate time for dialogue
              • Schedule the discussion in an environment that is conducive to meaningful dialogue and exchange
      • Remember the purpose of the meeting: Feedback is not about “good or bad”—it’s about helping people understand and improve their performance
      • Ensure the dialogue is two-way (both supervisor and employee engage in the conversation)
      • Listen first to understand, then to respond
      • Focus discussions on work behaviors and results—not on the individual as a person
      • Solicit feedback on the quality of the discussion and what you both should do to further improve feedback discussions going forward
      Tips for Supervisors Giving Feedback
    • 51. Let’s review what we learned from the exercise and review additional tips for exchanging feedback continued
      • Receiving Feedback
      • Remember that feedback is hard, but it is a good thing
      • Remember that feedback received is always about past behavior—not current or future behavior. Also, receiving feedback offers the possibility of learning something valuable that can serve as a basis for future improvements
      • Following these steps can improve your ability to receive feedback:
        • Listen carefully
        • Try not to let defenses build or overreact
        • Paraphrase what you think you heard
        • Ask questions for clarification and request examples of any areas that are unclear or in which disagreement exists
        • Evaluate the accuracy and potential value of what you have heard
        • Do not resist feedback
        • Take time to think about how to incorporate feedback with your performance
      II. Ongoing Review and Feedback Tips for Employees
    • 52. Begin planning for the next year
      • The last step in the Reviewing Results phase begins the Setting Expectations phase for the coming year
      • Shortly after you’ve discussed performance for the current performance year, begin to plan and discuss your Annual Performance Plan for the next performance year, considering:
        • Changes in current job responsibilities or projects
        • Changes in staffing (new person in position) and working environment
        • Changes in institutional goals and departmental needs
      • Use a new Annual Performance Form to start to document all relevant expectations regarding your performance for the next year
      III. End of Year Formal Evaluation
    • 53. Consider the following questions before conducting the End-of-Year Evaluations
      • What if my employee disagrees with the ratings?
      • What if my employee performs work for more than one supervisor or department and gets different ratings for the similar job content?
      • What salary decisions should be made based on the End-of-Year Evaluation?
      III. End of Year Formal Evaluation
    • 54.  Welcome and Overview  Pay-for-Performance Strategy  Performance Management Process  Linking Compensation to Performance  Closing
    • 55. Trinity’s Compensation Philosophy has been defined as follows…
      • Our Compensation Philosophy is to provide a comprehensive compensation program which will support and advance the institutional mission through its ability to attract and retain a diverse workforce of high-caliber, community-oriented administrative staff who are dedicated to supporting the College’s mission and educational goals. The objectives we strive to achieve in support of this philosophy are:
        • To provide fair and equitable pay, within the financial resources of the College
        • To recognize the multiple markets within which Trinity must compete for talented staff members
        • To recognize individual contributions to the institution and reward accordingly
        • To be transparent, clear, administratively streamlined, and understandable by the community
    • 56.  Welcome and Overview  Pay-for-Performance Strategy  Performance Management Process  Linking Compensation to Performance  Closing
    • 57. The Pay-for-Performance Handbook includes the tools and resources you will need
      • Pay-for-Performance Strategy
      • Performance Management Model and Calendar
      • Performance Management Tools and Tips for Supervisors
      • 5 Conversations Approach
      • 5 Conversations Worksheets
    • 58. There are a few immediate next steps that you will need to take
      • 1. Complete End-of-Year Evaluation documentation on your employees based on any expectations that were set at the beginning of this performance year (by May 30). Use the new form and associated ratings with the understanding that not all of it will be complete for the first year
      • 2. Make salary recommendations to your Department Head, as applicable, based on performance evaluation results
      • 3. Determine whether your department will conduct a Department Review meeting to calibrate ratings
      • 4. Department Head will submit evaluations and salary recommendations to HR who will summarize and provide results to the Division Head in order to ascertain that the 4% pool has been adhered to and final increase recommendations match documentation
      • 5. Once final increase recommendations have been approved, conduct Performance Evaluation meetings with your employees and communicate annual increase
    • 59. What did you learn today?
      • Which activities and/or conversations will be the most difficult for you to have with your employee? Why?
      • Is there anything else we can help you with regarding the Pay-for-Performance initiative?

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