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    landm.doc landm.doc Presentation Transcript

    • CRITERIA FOR THE EVALUATION OF 8. LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT An evaluation of : the governance of the school the quality of leadership of the school, particularly by the headteacher, senior team and leaders with other responsibilities the effectiveness of management the strategic use of resources progress against key issues for action identified at the last Ofsted inspection any particular aids or barriers to raising achievement, either within the school or externally KEY SOURCES OF EVIDENCE  Lesson observation  Exit interviews  Teachers and support staff opinions  Best Value questionnaire  Parental opinions  Trends in results over time  Governing Body self-review materials  Incidents of bullying, racism and other oppressive behaviour  Pupil opinions  Records of evaluation of teaching and learning  The school improvement plan and post-Ofsted action plan  Performance Management programme  LEA Management Profile  Financial monitoring information  Curriculum plans Hertfordshire Framework for School Self-Evaluation Second Edition Leadership and Management 1
    • The school evaluates the governance of the school KEY SOURCES OF EVIDENCE: Governing body self review materials (see separate section). Exemplification Current position How do you know? 8.1 The Governing Body helps shape the vision and direction of the school 8.2 The Governing Body ensures that the school fulfils its statutory duties, including promoting inclusive policies in relation to special educational needs, race equality, disability and sex 8.3 The Governing Body ensures that diversity in the make-up of the school community is recognised in policies and practices 8.4 The Governing Body has a good understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the school 8.5 The Governing Body challenges and supports the senior management team Hertfordshire Framework for School Self-Evaluation Second Edition Leadership and Management 2
    • HOW GOOD IS THE GOVERNANCE OF THE SCHOOL? ALL SCHOOLS Very good (2) Creativity and dynamism in reflecting The governing body makes a major contribution to the leadership of the school, including its sixth form, and its upon performance, promoting change, successes. It is fully involved in strategic planning and formulating policies, and supports staff in implementing and capitalising on links with the local them. Governors keep in close touch with the school’s work across all stages, and this cements the partnership community suggest excellent (1) between the governing body and the school. The pattern of the governing body’s work meshes well with the governance. school’s development cycle, so that both are very influential. Governors are well aware of the school’s strengths and weaknesses and deal with them openly and frankly, contributing fully to development planning. Performance management procedures are very effective and are monitored closely by the governing body. Good (3) The governing body influences the work of the school and its policies through challenge and support. It has a good grasp of the school’s strengths and weaknesses and has a significant, strategic influence in leading the school’s development, with a clear focus on raising standards and improving the quality of provision. The governing body is prepared to take difficult decisions where necessary. It is well organised and it improves its own performance through appropriate development activities or training. Satisfactory (4) The governing body ensures that the school meets its statutory responsibilities, and has clear aims and policies. Its performance management policy operates effectively. Corporately, it sets an overall direction for the school and formulates policies that reflect the individual character of the school. It reviews performance data to monitor the whole school’s work and its recommendations for action are followed up. All governors understand their role and any specific responsibilities. There is a businesslike relationship between governors and senior staff in leading the school. Continued …. Hertfordshire Framework for School Self-Evaluation Second Edition Leadership and Management 3
    • HOW GOOD IS THE GOVERNANCE OF THE SCHOOL? (continued ….) ALL SCHOOLS Unsatisfactory (5) The school fails to meet one or more statutory responsibilities and lacks some of the policies that are required. The governing body relies too heavily on the headteacher. Although they are supportive, governors play a slight part in leading the school and do little to hold the school to account. Their work lacks focus and influence. They have insufficient knowledge of one or more of the stages. There is little corporate agreement about the school’s strengths and weaknesses. The governing body has a limited grasp of the performance of the school and only modest effect on its development. Poor (6) High vacancies, poor attendance, Important statutory responsibilities are not met. The governing body is remote from the school. Relationships hostile relationships and almost total between members of the governing body or between it and the senior staff are at best indifferent and may be reliance on the headteacher are hostile or acrimonious. Governors’ business is badly organised and their conduct presents a barrier to school indications of very poor (7) improvement. Governors are largely unaware of the strengths and weaknesses of the school and, in particular, of governance. the effectiveness or otherwise of its senior managers. They have a limited influence on the work of the school. The governing body presents no challenge. Standards and quality are not assured and it fails to set a clear direction or priorities for the school’s work. GOVERNANCE 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 KS  Excellent Very poor KS  KS  Hertfordshire Framework for School Self-Evaluation Second Edition Leadership and Management 4
    • What are the strongest features of the governance? What aspects of governance need improvement, and what action is needed? Aspects Action needed Hertfordshire Framework for School Self-Evaluation Second Edition Leadership and Management 5
    • The quality of leadership of the school, particularly by the headteacher, senior team and leaders with other responsibilities KEY SOURCES OF EVIDENCE: Teacher/support staff opinions; lesson observation; parental opinions; pupil opinions; trends in results over time; incidents of racism, bullying and other oppressive behaviour; analysis of school improvement plan. Exemplification Current position How do you know? 8.6 There is clarity of vision, a sense of purpose and high aspirations with a relentless focus on pupil achievement 8.7 Leaders inspire, motivate and influence staff and pupils towards a common goal of effective learning and high achievement 8.8 Leaders provide good role models for other staff and pupils 8.9 The leadership of the school creates and sustains effective teams at all levels 8.10 There is knowledgeable and innovative leadership of the curriculum, assessment and pedagogy 8.11 Strategic planning and evaluation reflect and promote the school’s ambitions and goals 8.12 Leaders are committed to running an equitable and inclusive school in which each individual matters Hertfordshire Framework for School Self-Evaluation Second Edition Leadership and Management 6
    • HOW GOOD IS THE LEADERSHIP OF THE SCHOOL? ALL SCHOOLS Very good (2) Leadership that is inspirational, or Leadership is dedicated to ensuring the highest possible standards and achievement in all areas of the school’s that has resulted in a much improved work. It is reflective, self-critical and innovative and articulates a clear vision of the school in the future, so that school or one with outstanding all staff know what they are working towards. It results in clear strategic thinking and planning for improvement. features, and which is highly Leadership development is supported and encouraged through the school. Evaluation is embedded in the school’s influential beyond the school, is likely practice, and is open, frank and accurate. The school is ambitious and keen to learn from best practice elsewhere. to be judged excellent (1). Most teaching is very effective, but leaders take steps to improve that which is not. The school provides successfully for pupils who do not respond well to school or have difficulty in learning. The school has a deservedly high reputation. Good (3) Leadership is principled, well established and dynamic at different levels in the school. There is a drive for improvement and a strong sense of direction. Staff share a common purpose and make an effective contribution to the school’s goals and values. Relationships are cordial and characterised by mutual respect. The school reviews its performance and evaluates systematically the effectiveness of teaching, providing feedback and support, and managing performance with commitment and integrity. The standards it achieves compare well with those of similar schools. Satisfactory (4) Leadership is firm, competent and committed and there are clear lines of responsibility. Staff reflect the school’s aims and policies in their work; they understand the school’s goals and their role in achieving them. The school monitors its performance and tackles weaknesses. Even in areas where the school is successful, the leadership is not complacent, but aims to improve further. There are examples of effective teamwork among staff, within and across stages. The leadership team is respected and has the capacity to effect change. The school’s performance is generally as good as that of schools in similar circumstances. Continued …… Hertfordshire Framework for School Self-Evaluation Second Edition Leadership and Management 7
    • HOW GOOD IS THE LEADERSHIP OF THE SCHOOL? (continued ….) ALL SCHOOLS Unsatisfactory (5) Leadership at the top has little effect. It lacks confidence or drive. It pays insufficient attention to teaching, learning and standards in one or more subjects or stages. It may be complacent, insecure or insular. Its style may be autocratic and insensitive, or so participative that there is a lack of decisiveness when it is needed. It does not face up to some challenges for the school and is anxious about external evaluation. Leadership is also unsatisfactory if the leadership team has been in post for some time in a school where performance lags behind that of similar schools. Poor (6) Very poor leadership (7) is indicated Poor leadership is muddled, besieged or incompetent. The school lacks a sense of direction. Senior staff are where the cohesion of the school is at preoccupied with daily tasks and incidents and find it difficult to prioritise the most important issues and focus risk or the school’s results are well their efforts accordingly. Teamwork is weak or little in evidence. Staff do their own thing. Those with below those of similar schools. leadership skills or potential in middle management positions get little encouragement or support to develop their ideas or talents. Morale is low and there is frequent staff absence. The leaders do not demonstrate much capacity to improve the school. The school may be coasting, with adequate results only because of a favourable intake of pupils or the commitment of individual staff, but, in comparison with similar schools, its results are consistently below average. LEADERSHIP 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 KS  Excellent Very poor KS  KS  Hertfordshire Framework for School Self-Evaluation Second Edition Leadership and Management 8
    • What are the key features of leadership in the school? What aspects of leadership need improvement, and what action is needed? Aspects Action needed Hertfordshire Framework for School Self-Evaluation Second Edition Leadership and Management 9
    • The school evaluates the effectiveness of management KEY SOURCES OF EVIDENCE: Teacher/support staff opinions; lesson observation; trends in results; analysis of school improvement plan; records of evaluation of teaching and learning; programme for performance management. Exemplification Current position How do you know? 8.13 School self-evaluation is rigorous and the findings are used effectively to secure further improvement 8.14 There is rigorous monitoring, evaluation and development of teaching and learning 8.15 The school monitors performance measures, data and management information (including information on the performance of different groups of pupils), reviews patterns and takes appropriate action 8.16 The management of pupils with special educational needs meets the requirements of the Code of Practice 8.17 Staff performance management, including support staff, is effective in bringing about improvement and consistent with the school’s priorities 8.18 Improvement planning is effective and based on evaluation evidence which gives a clear and accurate identification of priorities for action Continued …… Hertfordshire Framework for School Self-Evaluation Second Edition Leadership and Management 10
    • The school evaluates the effectiveness of management (continued) KEY SOURCES OF EVIDENCE: Teacher/support staff opinions; exit interviews; lesson observation. Exemplification Current position How do you know? 8.19 The recruitment, retention, deployment and workload of all staff are well managed 8.20 The professional development programme extends the knowledge, understanding and skills of all staff and governors 8.21 There is effective induction of staff new to the school, in particular newly qualified teachers, teachers new to their post, and supply teachers 8.22 All staff are valued, feel well-motivated, professionally supported and challenged 8.23 The school takes measures to ensure the well being of all staff 8.24 Supply staff are given effective support and guidance. Their work is managed by a senior member of staff Hertfordshire Framework for School Self-Evaluation Second Edition Leadership and Management 11
    • The school evaluates the strategic use of its resources KEY SOURCES OF EVIDENCE: Teacher/support staff opinions; lesson observation; analysis of Best Value questionnaire; school improvement plan; LEA Management Profile; financial monitoring information; curriculum plans. Exemplification Current position How do you know? 8.25 Financial resources including specific grants are used effectively to achieve targets and priorities 8.26 A 3 year financial plan provides a strategic framework for the school’s future development 8.27 Significant variances in the school’s Management Information Profile are identified and reviewed in light of the school’s targets and priorities 8.28 There is effective use made of new technologies, including ICT. Access technology is used to provide opportunity for disabled pupils 8.29 Best Value principles of comparison, challenge, consultation and competition are applied in the school’s management, procurement and use of services and resources Hertfordshire Framework for School Self-Evaluation Second Edition Leadership and Management 12
    • The school evaluates its progress against the key issues for action identified at the last Ofsted inspection KEY SOURCES OF EVIDENCE: Post-Ofsted action plan. Exemplification Current position How do you know? The school has made good progress against each key issue: 8.30 Key issue 1 8.31 Key Issue 3 8.32 Key Issue 4 8.33 Key Issue 5 8.34 The school evaluates any particular aids or barriers to raising achievement, either within the school or externally Exemplification Current position How do you know? Hertfordshire Framework for School Self-Evaluation Second Edition Leadership and Management 13
    • HOW GOOD IS THE MANAGEMENT OF THE SCHOOL? ALL SCHOOLS Very good (2) Management that provides a model for Managers are committed to enabling the school to fulfil its vision and strategic objectives. It places high priority the development of others is likely to on appointing staff, developing their skills and deploying them to best effect. Management procedures and be judged excellent (1). interventions are unbureaucratic. The systems are sufficiently flexible to cope with initiatives or the unexpected. Management is confident and well informed. Managers are observant and perceptive, anticipate potential problems and take pre-emptive action. Comprehensive and analytical assessment procedures are organised precisely to give the school a very clear insight into pupils’ progress within and across stages, particularly in the core subjects, and for the achievements of different groups. The school welcomes visitors, student teachers and external views on its work. It has much to show and is inventive in using resources to reward performance and improve facilities. Management reflects a school with ambition. Good (3) The school is organised efficiently and managed reflectively, informed by good management practice elsewhere. Essential functions are covered well and procedures are not unduly bureaucratic. All staff are clear about their roles, responsibilities and personal objectives, and have ready access to guidance, support and relevant training. There is effective delegation of responsibilities. Target-setting and the monitoring of achievement are well established for individual pupils and policies for behaviour, planning and assessment are reflected consistently across the work of the whole school. Processes and procedures are kept under review, and initiative is encouraged. Management is supportive, with a strong focus on raising standards. Satisfactory (4) The school day runs smoothly. Procedures are clear and they are generally followed. There is an up-to-date management plan that outlines the school’s priorities for development and takes sufficient account of every stage. These are based on analysis of performance. Improvements are being implemented and monitored effectively. The headteacher has identified staff leaders, and performance management and appraisal are properly established. There are considered approaches to professional development. The school is supportive of new and supply teachers. Finances are managed efficiently and effectively and the deployment of resources discussed and agreed with senior management and governors. The school provides satisfactory value for money. Continued …… Hertfordshire Framework for School Self-Evaluation Second Edition Leadership and Management 14
    • HOW GOOD IS THE MANAGEMENT OF THE SCHOOL? (continued ….) ALL SCHOOLS Unsatisfactory (5) Management is disorganised, quirky or inexperienced, with the result that the school works inefficiently. Alternatively, it may be so regimented that it inhibits the work of staff and the enthusiasm of pupils. Staff may be unsure of their responsibilities. Policies tend not to be applied systematically across the work of the school. Good intentions may not always be followed through. Performance management shows little sign of being linked to improvement. Staff development may be based on responding to a menu of opportunities rather than an assessment of need. Lack of systematic approaches inhibits effective education and there is a danger of standards slipping. Poor (6) Management in crisis is very poor (7). The school is disordered. It does not run smoothly and is frequently overtaken by events, even crises. Managers are defensive, staff are unclear about policies and responsibilities, and time is not planned or used well. The school manages assessment procedures ineptly and records of pupils’ progress are very uneven. Budget management is careless or unnecessarily cautious, leading to excessive surpluses or overspends. There is high staff turnover and probably a falling roll. It is no place for a trainee teacher. MANAGEMENT 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 KS  Excellent Very poor KS  KS  Hertfordshire Framework for School Self-Evaluation Second Edition Leadership and Management 15
    • Which aspects of managing the performance of the school work best and why? Aspects Why? In what ways does the management of performance need improvement, and what action is needed? Ways Action needed Hertfordshire Framework for School Self-Evaluation Second Edition Leadership and Management 16
    • Which are the strongest features of the school’s management of resources, and why? Features Why? What aspects of resource management need improvement, and what action is needed? Aspects Action needed Hertfordshire Framework for School Self-Evaluation Second Edition Leadership and Management 17
    • RELATED DOCUMENTS Bureaucracy Cutting Toolkit. DfES, BCT 6/2003. Good Practice in Cutting Bureaucracy. DfES. 1999. Good Practice in Cutting Bureaucracy/2. DfES/0234/2003. Best Value in Schools. DfES/0900/2002. Best Value Guidance for Schools, HCC, 2000. Roles of Governing Bodies and Head Teachers. DfEE/0168/2000. Action Planning for School Improvement. OFSTED, 2001. Releasing Potential, Raising Attainment: Managing Data in Secondary Schools. DfES/0722/2002. Information Management Supporting Success - Making it a Reality. DfES/0311/2001. Management Information for Schools. HCC (annual). Performance Management in Schools. DfEE/0051/2000. Performance Management for Teachers. HMI 502, OFSTED, 2002. Safer School Partnerships: Guidance DfES/0485/2003. Improving Behaviour and Attendance: Guidance on Exclusion from Schools and Pupil Referral Units. DfES/0087/2002. Improving Pupil Behaviour - guidance on preventing and responding to bullying, HCC, 2003. Continued …. Hertfordshire Framework for School Self-Evaluation Second Edition Leadership and Management 18
    • RELATED DOCUMENTS (continued ….) Inclusion SEN Code of Practice. DfES/581/2001. SEN Toolkit. DfES/558/2001. Inclusive Schooling - Children with Special Needs. DfES/0774/2001. Access to Education for Children and Young People with Medical Needs. DfES/0773/2001 and /0025/2002. Accessible Schools. DfES/0020/2002. Supporting the Target Setting Process (Revised 2001) DfES/0065/2001. Index for Inclusion (Revised) CSIE 2002. Promoting Race Equality in Schools, HCC, 2002. Removing the Barriers: Raising Achievement Levels for Minority Ethnic Pupils. DfES/0001/2202. Including all Children in the Literacy Hour and Daily Maths Lesson. DfES/0465/2002. Achievement of Black Caribbean Pupils: Three Successful Primary Schools. HMI 447, 2002. Achievement of Black Caribbean Pupils: Three Successful Secondary Schools. HMI 448, 2002. Learning for All, CRE, 2002. School Policies Equal Opportunities Pupil Discipline Attendance Sample policies at www.dfes.gov.uk/a-z Hertfordshire Framework for School Self-Evaluation Second Edition Leadership and Management 19