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Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
 

Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006

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    Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006 Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006 Document Transcript

    • Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006 Prepared by the Office of Institutional Research
    • Preface In the 2005­2006 academic year, MiraCosta College began a process of systematic data collection to quantify the successes and improvements of the institution. Central to this process is this document, the Key Performance Indicators (KPI). KPI measurements are tied directly to the College’s Mission and Core Values, and our hope is that over time they will create both a quantitative and qualitative picture of MiraCosta College. The initial set of Indicators contained within this document were developed by the Research and Planning Office, then reviewed, discussed and approved by the Planning and Budgeting Council. Once a draft document was available, input was gathered from the college community on areas in need of revision and improvement. Information contained within this document was gathered from our local student database, class schedules, college catalogs and other sources. It should be noted that each section of the College Mission and Core Values is numbered solely for the purposes of organization. It is not an indicator of priority or importance to the District. ii  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
    • Table of Contents Preface........................................................................................................ii Table of Contents....................................................................................iii Part I ........................................................................................................... 1 MiraCosta College Mission .................................................................... 1 College Mission 1: Transfer Education ............................................................................2 1.1 Annual Number of Transfers ............................................................................................... 2 1.2 Reverse Transfers................................................................................................................... 3 1.3 California State University Grade Point Average and Continuation Rate...................... 4 1.4 Transfer Readiness ................................................................................................................ 5 1.5 Underrepresented Students .................................................................................................. 5 1.6 Grants, Initiatives and Programs Developed...................................................................... 6 1.7 Number of Signed UC Transfer Guarantees ...................................................................... 7 1.8 Persistence Rates of Transfer Students ............................................................................... 8 College Mission 2: Vocational Education ......................................................................10 2.1 Vocational Degrees.............................................................................................................. 10 2.2 Vocational Certificates ........................................................................................................ 10 2.3 Retention Rates .................................................................................................................... 11 2.4 Persistence Rates.................................................................................................................. 11 2.5 Semester­to­Semester and Fall­to­Fall Persistence Rates (MCC) ................................... 12 2.6 Vocational Enrollment Statistics........................................................................................ 13 2.6a Vocational Retraining........................................................................................................ 13 College Mission 3: General Education ...........................................................................14 3.1 Program Offerings, Significant Changes and Enrollment Patterns ............................... 14 3.2 Retention Rates .................................................................................................................... 14 3.3 Persistence Rates (ARCC) ................................................................................................... 14 3.4 Semester­to­Semester and Fall­to­Fall Persistence Rates ................................................ 14 3.5 Student Progress Rate.......................................................................................................... 16 3.6 Number of Instructional Associate Degrees (Excludes Vocational)............................... 16 3.7 FTES Generated ................................................................................................................... 17 Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  iii
    • College Mission 4: Basic Skills Education .....................................................................18 4.1 Successful Course Completion........................................................................................... 18 4.2 ESL Improvement Rate ....................................................................................................... 18 4.3 Basic Skills Improvement Rate .......................................................................................... 18 College Mission 5: Community Education ....................................................................19 5. A Community Services and Business Development ......................................................... 19 5. A.1 Program Offerings and Growth.................................................................................................................................. 19 5. A.2 Student Enrollment........................................................................................................................................................ 21 5. A.3 Number of First­time MCC Students........................................................................................................................ 21 5. A.4 Student Satisfaction Rates ........................................................................................................................................... 21 5. B ­ Continuing Education (Tuition­free Noncredit)........................................................... 22 5. B.1 Course Offerings and Significant Changes ............................................................................................................. 22 5. B.2 Program Enrollments ..................................................................................................................................................... 22 5. B.3 Noncredit Student Progress ......................................................................................................................................... 23 5. B.4 Retention Rates................................................................................................................................................................ 25 College Mission 6: Support Services ..............................................................................26 6.1 Program Offerings and Significant Changes.................................................................... 26 6.2 Student Participation Rates ................................................................................................ 26 6.3 Student Satisfaction Rates .................................................................................................. 27 6.4 Working Capacity ................................................................................................................ 28 Part II ........................................................................................................29 MiraCosta College Core Values............................................................29 Core Value 1: Primary Purpose of Teaching and Learning..........................................30 1.1 Educational Master Plan ..................................................................................................... 30 1.2 Program Review................................................................................................................... 30 1.3 Resource Allocation............................................................................................................. 31 Core Value 2: Collegiality & Shared Governance.........................................................32 2.1 Board Policies and Procedures ........................................................................................... 32 2.2 Academic Senate, Classified Senate and Student Senate Governance.......................... 32 2.3 Committee Structures.......................................................................................................... 32 2.4 Resource Allocation............................................................................................................. 33 Core Value 3: Technology Leadership............................................................................34 3.1 Technology Master Plan...................................................................................................... 34 3.2 Resource Allocation............................................................................................................. 34 iv  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
    • 3.3 Course Offerings and Innovations .................................................................................... 34 Core Value 4: Positive Working/Learning Environment..............................................35 4.1 Campus Climate Surveys.................................................................................................... 35 4.2 Student Services Program Review ..................................................................................... 35 Core Value 5: Highest Quality Through Effectiveness, Efficiency and Accountability ...............................................................................................................36 5.1 Finance and Attendance Audits ......................................................................................... 36 5.2 College and Program Accreditations ................................................................................. 36 5.3 State and Federal Accountability Reports......................................................................... 36 5.4 Efficiency Assessments of Facilities and Utilities............................................................ 36 5.5 Campus Climate Surveys.................................................................................................... 36 Core Value 6: Decision Making Based on Research Data and Evidence ...................38 6.1 Strategic Planning................................................................................................................ 38 6.2 Program Review................................................................................................................... 39 6.3 Research and Data Collection............................................................................................. 39 Core Value 7: Career Preparation and Economic Development..................................40 7.1 Vocational Programs............................................................................................................ 40 7.2 Career Services ..................................................................................................................... 41 7.3 Small Business Development Center ................................................................................ 42 7.4 Community Services/Business Development................................................................... 42 Core Value 8: A Climate Which Promotes Diversity ....................................................43 8.1 Curriculum and Programs................................................................................................... 43 8.2 Student Organizations and International Programs ........................................................ 47 8.3 Hiring Processes and Outcomes......................................................................................... 48 Core Value 9: Service to Our Community......................................................................50 9.1 Community Links ................................................................................................................ 50 9.2 Service Learning................................................................................................................... 50 9.3 Community Services............................................................................................................ 50 9.4 Noncredit Program............................................................................................................... 51 9.5 College Events...................................................................................................................... 51 9.6 Community Events .............................................................................................................. 53 9.7 Use of College Facilities and Programs ............................................................................. 56 Core Value 10: Beautiful Welcoming Campuses...........................................................57 10.1 Facilities Master Plan......................................................................................................... 57 10.2 Campus Climate Surveys .................................................................................................. 57 Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  v
    • Core Value 11: Innovation and Ability to Change........................................................59 11.1 Resource Allocations for Innovations, Enhancements, New Initiatives and Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) ................................................................................................................. 59 11.1a Outcomes of the New Initiatives, Innovations and Enhancement Requests ............ 59 11.1b Number of Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) Requests that Emanated as an Innovation, New Initiative or Enhancement .......................................................................... 63 11.2 New Program Development ............................................................................................. 63 11.3 Partnerships, Grants and Contracts ................................................................................. 63 Acknowledgments ............................................................................................................64 vi  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
    • Part I MiraCosta College Mission MiraCosta College, one of California’s comprehensive, public two­ year community colleges, has served the coastal area of North San Diego County for 70 years. In recognizing individuals and domestic and international communities are diverse and changing, the college is committed to offering a variety of programs and services in the following areas: 1. Transfer Education 2. Vocational Education 3. General Education 4. Basic Skills Education 5. Community Education 6. Support Services Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  1
    • College Mission 1: Transfer Education 1.1 Annual Number of Transfers MiraCosta College prides itself on providing a pathway to the four­year institutions for its students. Data for Table 1 uses the 2000­2001 academic year as a baseline, and measures the increase in the number of transfers each year compared to that baseline. Figures are based on data provided by the California Post Secondary Education Commission (CPEC). Table 1: MiraCosta College Transfer Rates Baseline 2001­2002 2002­2003 2003­2004 2004­2005 Year 2000­2001 University of California 107 ­ 6.5% + 24.3% + 40.2% + 15.9% California State University 333 + 10.5% + 20.1% + 2.1% + 28.8% Listed below are the numbers of transfer students who have transferred to the California State University and University of California Systems by campus: Table 2: MiraCosta College Transfers to the University of California 2000­2005 Approx. Distance 2000­2001 2001­2002 2002­2003 2003­2004 2004­2005 University of California, Berkeley 427 mi 6 3 5 6 5 University of California, Davis 446 mi 5 2 5 9 3 University of California, Irvine 45 mi 2 7 4 4 3 University of California, Los Angeles 89 mi 7 9 7 13 12 University of California, Riverside 54 mi 8 5 14 5 2 University of California, San Diego 22 mi 61 66 80 92 72 University of California, Santa Barbara 169 mi 9 2 10 9 22 University of California, Santa Cruz 375 mi 9 6 8 12 5 Totals 107 100 133 150 124 Table 3: MiraCosta College Transfers to the California State University 2000­2005 Approx. 2000­ 2001­ 2002­ 2003­ 2004­ Four­Year Institution Distance 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 California Maritime Academy 436 mi N/A N/A 1 2 0 California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo 241 mi 2 4 2 2 6 California State Polytechnic University, Pomona 66 mi 3 4 4 4 5 California State University, Bakersfield 181 mi 1 3 1 1 0 California State University, Channel Islands 121 mi N/A N/A 0 0 1 California State University, Chico 517 mi 5 8 4 1 4 California State University, Dominguez Hills 72 mi 1 2 0 0 2 California State University, East Bay 409 mi 1 0 4 2 0 California State University, Fresno 286 mi 0 1 2 1 2 California State University, Fullerton 58 mi 8 10 13 5 19 2  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
    • Approx. 2000­ 2001­ 2002­ 2003­ 2004­ Four­Year Institution Distance 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 California State University, Long Beach 62 mi 15 11 18 15 13 California State University, Los Angeles 78 mi 1 2 3 3 6 California State University, Monterey Bay 350 mi 3 2 1 3 3 California State University, Northridge 101 mi 8 5 13 5 4 California State University, Sacramento 437 mi 2 2 4 3 0 California State University, San Bernardino 68 mi 1 0 1 3 3 California State University, San Marcos 9 mi 187 234 245 209 285 California State University, Stanislaus 360 mi 0 1 2 1 0 Humboldt State University 649 mi 3 5 8 3 5 San Diego State University 32 mi 71 63 56 51 47 San Francisco State University 427 mi 16 9 13 23 17 San José State University 386 mi 2 2 2 0 4 Sonoma State University 466 mi 3 0 3 3 3 Totals 333 368 400 340 429 The number of MiraCosta College transfers provided by the CSU and UC systems do not tell the full story. The numbers do not list students who may have completed other units at other community colleges and are therefore listed with that institution. Students also transfer to private and out­of­state institutions in numbers that have yet to be quantified. MiraCosta College recently gained access to the National Student Clearinghouse database, allowing for some additional tracking measures to be put into place. We will continue to work with the transfer center to appropriately identify and track MiraCosta College students through their educational experience. 1.2 Reverse Transfers Reverse transfer students are those students who enroll at a four­year institution, but at some point in their progress, decide to enroll at MiraCosta prior to completing their Bachelor’s degree. Currently, the available student data does not allow us to exclusively track those students who come to us from a four­year school without their Bachelor’s degree. We can determine whether or not they have attended college elsewhere, but cannot determine which students came from a four­year institution and which came from another community college. It is still valuable to know the percentage of our student population who enroll at MiraCosta each semester after attending other institutions. Students in this category are identified each term as “New Transfer Students” (NTR) on their college application. To separate out those students taking courses for personal enrichment as opposed to degree­seeking and certificate­seeking students, only those NTR students with the following goals were selected: o 2­Year Vocational Degree – No Transfer o AA Degree and Transfer to a Four­Year Institution o AA Degree – No Transfer o Transfer to a Four­Year Institution without an AA degree o Vocational Certificate – No Transfer Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  3
    • Table 4: Percentage of Degree­Seeking Students from Other Institutions 2002­2006 Fall 2002 Fall 2003 Fall 2004 Fall 2005 Total New Transfer Students 1982 1635 1649 1717 Total Degree­Seeking New Transfers 1196 994 987 966 Percentage of Degree­Seeking New Transfers (of Total Enrollment) 11% 10% 10% 9% In any given term, approximately 10% of MiraCosta College’s credit student populations are degree­seeking students who have already attended other colleges, community colleges or universities. 1.3 California State University Grade Point Average and Continuation Rate Student success is not measured solely by the number of students who transfer to a given institution. It is not enough to transfer students, if they are not prepared for the rigors of the new institution once they arrive. The California State University system (CSU) provides data on MiraCosta College transfers after one year of attendance anywhere in the CSU system. The University of California does not currently provide this information about transfer students, but efforts are underway to secure this information in future editions of this document. Figure 1: Grade Point Averages of MiraCosta College Students at the CSU 4 3.5 3.13 3.01 3.06 3.02 3.08 3 2.88 2.92 2.93 2.93 2.94 2.5 MiraCosta College 2 System­wide Total 1.5 1 0.5 0 Fall 2000 Fall 2001 Fall 2002 Fall 2003 Fall 2004 MiraCosta College students have grade point averages that are consistently above the statewide average. 4  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
    • A college’s continuation rate captures the number of students who enroll for a fall term and then enroll for a subsequent fall term. Like the grade point averages, MiraCosta remains consistently higher than the statewide average. Figure 2: Continuation Rates of MiraCosta College Students at the CSU 100% 86% 86% 89% 89% 88% 90% 80% 85% 85% 85% 85% 85% 70% 60% MiraCosta College 50% Systemwide Total 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Fall 2000 Fall 2001 Fall 2002 Fall 2003 Fall 2004 1.4 Transfer Readiness The term “transfer ready” refers to the number of students who have completed 60 UC/CSU transferable units with a GPA of 2.0 or higher. This calculation will be done annually with the new Accountability Report for the Community Colleges (ARCC­ formerly “Partnership for Excellence”). The first of these reports will be available in January 2007. 1.5 Underrepresented Students Within the mission of increasing transfers is the goal of providing transfer opportunities for underrepresented students. The tables below illustrate the number of underrepresented students who transferred to the CSU and UC over the last five years. Table 5: Transfer Rates of MiraCosta College Underrepresented Students to CSU1 Mexican­ African­American American Indian Total American/Latino # % # % # % # % 2000­2001 8 2.40% 2 0.60% 62 18.60% 72 21.60% 2001­2002 11 3.00% 2 0.50% 46 12.50% 59 16.00% 2002­2003 10 2.50% 4 1.00% 62 15.50% 76 19.30%  1  Ethnicity terminology from CSU. Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  5
    • Mexican­ African­American American Indian Total American/Latino 2003­2004 13 3.80% 0 0.00% 60 17.60% 73 21.40% 2004­2005 15 3.50% 8 1.90% 68 15.90% 91 21.30% Table 6: Transfer Rates of MiraCosta College Underrepresented Students to UC2 African­American American Indian Chicano/Latino Total # % # % # % # % 2000­2001 2 1.90% 0 0.00% 14 13.10% 16 15.00% 2001­2002 1 1.00% 2 2.20% 7 7.00% 10 10.20% 2002­2003 4 3.00% 1 1.10% 23 17.30% 28 21.40% 2003­2004 5 3.30% 1 0.70% 14 9.30% 20 13.30% 2004­2005 3 2.40% 3 2.40% 16 13.00% 22 17.80% In all cases, the proportion of underrepresented transfer students is significantly below those of the general credit student population. This is an area that needs additional focus in the upcoming years. 1.6 Grants, Initiatives and Programs Developed Two transfer­related grants were approved via the college funding process during 2005­2006: University Bridge Serves and Strengthening the Pipeline to the Doctorate. University Bridge Services – Increasing Diversity of Transfer Students As the title indicates, the first grant addresses the issue of the lack of diversity within the transfer student population. In 2005­2006, the following grant activities were conducted: o Classroom visitations: offered services to all ESL and MATH 820, 100, and 101. Other classroom visitations including Child Development and English. o Create bilingual transfer material (two documents). o Began designing bilingual web page. o Circulated over 1500 of each new bilingual transfer document to current MCC students and high school outreach. o Four tours: UCR, CSUSM, SDSU, UCSD. o Two presentations for EOPS: Biotech and Nursing. o Club outreach: MECHA, Puente, BSU, Care. o Created new university links with CSUSM: As a result of our cooperative efforts with CSUSM, the Bridge Building Partnership between CSUSM and a number of local community colleges has re­emerged. One of the expected outcomes of this partnership is developing and carrying out a one­day conference titled: Opening the Doors of Higher Education to be hosted by CSUSM in Spring 2006. Freddy Ramirez, will serve as a planning committee member for this conference that will focus on improving transfer opportunities for underrepresented students from MiraCosta and other local community colleges.  2  Ethnicity terminology from UC. 6  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
    • o Created new services for students interested in transferring to UCSD ­ Eva Jimenez at UCSD created list serve of students who visited UCSD on tour and will contact them monthly with updates and opportunities. In addition to the activities for 2005­2006, there are additional goals and activities planned for 2006­2007. The ultimate outcome of this grant will be evident in the increased numbers of underrepresented students transferring to four­year institutions in upcoming years. Strengthening the Pipeline to the Doctorate – Community College to Graduate School The second grant focused on increasing the number of community college students who would continue on to graduate school after completing their Bachelor’s degree. Specific goals of the program were: o Strengthening the link between community college, university, and research university systems. o Creating a graduate school belief system in the educational pipeline. o Developing transition programs between the systems. o Producing practicing scholars. Some of the activities included: § Workshops on the general requirements for getting into graduate school. § Creating outreach material on: Myths vs. Reality of Graduate School Admissions. § Guest speakers: Professionals and graduate school admission staff/professors to present material on their fields. § Faculty/student­mentor information sessions initiated by the individual students with vouchers to the cafeteria to host the faculty member of their choice. § Creating worksheets for students to use as a guideline for the graduate school process. § Update and expand graduate school web site. Several workshops were held at both the San Elijo and Oceanside campuses, and attendance averaged 75 people at each event. This is an area of interest amongst our students and the Transfer Center hopes that funding for the program will continue. 1.7 Number of Signed UC Transfer Guarantees Another measurement of our transfer successes is the number of students who sign transfer guarantees. MiraCosta College has guaranteed and preferred admission programs to several UC schools provided students complete certain criteria. Our guaranteed admission programs include: o UCSD TAG ­ Transfer Admission Guarantee o UCSD UniversityLink Program (students become eligible to apply to UniversityLink Medical Science Program) o UCD TAA – Transfer Admission Agreement o UCR TAG – Transfer Admission Guarantee o UCSB TAA – Transfer Admission Agreement o UCSC GATE – Guaranteed Admission for Transfer Entry Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  7 
    • We also have two additional preferred admission programs: o UCI PAIF – Preferred Admission Into the Field o UCLA TAP – Transfer Alliance Program (UCLA College only, except for Communications) Figure 3: Number of Signed UC Transfer Agreements3 2000 ­ 2001 through 2005 ­ 2006 160 148 140 131 120 116 100 80 74 64 60 40 40 20 0 2000­2001 2001­2002 2002­2003 2003­2004 2004­2005 2005­2006 1.8 Persistence Rates of Transfer Students Another measurement of the future successes of our transfer students is the percentage of students who persist from one semester to the next. Listed below are the percentages of first­ time, full­time students who have an educational goal of transferring to a four­year institution. Persistence is defined two ways in the table: those students who enroll in Fall and return to the Spring semester, and those students who enroll in a subsequent Fall semester. Table 7: Persistence Rates of First­Time, Full­Time Students Who Intend to Transfer Educational Goal Fall 2002 Fall 2003 Fall 2004 Fall 2005 Transfer to four­yr. Total 113 138 162 186 without AA Persist to 89 79% 117 85% 136 84% 160 86% Spring Persist to 62 55% 84 61% 104 64% NA NA  Next Fall 3  Includes all transfer guarantees and UCLA TAP preferred admission program. 8  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
    • Educational Goal Fall 2002 Fall 2003 Fall 2004 Fall 2005 AA degree and Total 406 461 457 496 Transfer to four­yr. Persist to 350 86% 387 84% 376 82% 419 84% Spring Persist to 271 67% 292 63% 298 65% NA NA Next Fall Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  9
    • College Mission 2: Vocational Education 2.1 Vocational Degrees Vocational Education is another critical element in the mission of MiraCosta College. Students completing vocational degrees learn skills and techniques that apply directly to their chosen field of employment. Figure 4: Number of Vocational Degrees Awarded 2002­2006 70 63 60 55 49 50 50 48 40 30 20 10 0 2001-2002 2002-2003 2003-2004 2004-2005 2005-2006 2.2 Vocational Certificates MiraCosta College offers two types of certificates: Certificate of Competence and Certificate of Achievement. Requiring a minimum of 18 units of instruction, Certificates of Competence are designed to prepare students for immediate entry into the workforce. Units earned through these certificates can also be used by students interested in earning an Associates degree. Certificates of Achievement are short­term programs of study (less than 18 units) for students interested in learning the basics of a given field of employment. Completion of these certificates prepares students for entry­level employment. In most cases, the units earned in these programs can be applied to the Certificates of Competence. 10  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
    • Figure 5: Certificates Awarded 2001­2006 400 350 334 300 287 287 261 250 235 234 Certificates of Competence 200 188 Certificate of Achievement 155 146 150 100 92 50 0 2001­2002 2002­2003 2003­2004 2004­2005 2005­2006 2.3 Retention Rates MiraCosta College defines retention as the number of students receiving an A, B or C grade over the total number of grades received (excluding IP ­ In Progress, I – Incomplete and RD ­ Record Delayed grade). Students enrolled in vocational classes had the following retention rates for the last four years: Table 8: Retention Rates of Students in Vocational Courses 2002­2005 Fall 2002 Fall 2003 Fall 2004 Fall 2005 68% 66% 70% 69% 2.4 Persistence Rates This item was included in the original ARCC (AB1417) document, but was removed from the latest draft. The Chancellor’s Office will be calculating persistence, but only as it relates to the college as a whole, not to specific areas such as vocational or basic skills education. Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  11
    • 2.5 Semester­to­Semester and Fall­to­Fall Persistence Rates (MCC) At the time of PBC’s original approval of the KPIs, it was decided that MiraCosta would measure persistence of its vocational students in a different manner than that proposed by the ARCC. We defined vocational students as the number of first­time, full­time students who indicated a vocational and/or career­related educational goal. Persistence was defined as the number of these students who enrolled in any course for the subsequent Spring and Fall semesters. Table 9: Persistence Rates of Vocational Students 2002 ­ 2005 Educational Goal Fall 2002 Fall 2003 Fall 2004 Fall 2005 Vocational Degree ­ No Transfer Total 25 29 10 11 Persist to Spring 21 84% 21 72% 10 100% 10 91% Persist to Next Fall 14 56% 12 41% 7 70% NA NA Vocational Certificate ­ No Transfer Total 24 37 23 26 Persist to Spring 17 71% 31 84% 20 87% 23 88% Persist to Next Fall 11 46% 23 62% 12 52% NA NA Maintain Certificate/License Total 3 3 3 8 Persist to Spring 3 100% 3 100% 3 100% 5 63% Persist to Next Fall 1 33% 2 67% 3 100% NA NA Prepare for New Career/Job Skill Total 10 13 6 12 Persist to Spring 8 80% 10 77% 4 67% 9 75% Persist to Next Fall 4 40% 6 46% 3 50% NA NA Discover / Formulate Career Total 11 10 12 2 Persist to Spring 7 64% 8 80% 9 75% 0% Persist to Next Fall 6 55% 8 80% 7 58% NA NA Total Total 73 92 54 59 Persist to Spring 56 77% 73 79% 46 85% 47 80% 12  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
    • Educational Goal Fall 2002 Fall 2003 Fall 2004 Fall 2005 Persist to Next Fall 36 49% 51 55% 32 59% NA NA 2.6 Vocational Enrollment Statistics Listed below are the enrollment statistics for vocational classes: Table 10: Vocational Enrollment Statistics Number of Students Number of FTES (Unduplicated) Enrollments Fall 2002 4,126 6,132 696.07 Fall 2003 3,968 5,883 630.15 Fall 2004 3,804 5,739 681.23 Fall 2005 3,935 5,826 663.57 2.6a Vocational Retraining This measurement illustrates the number of students we served though our vocational programs in a given year who had already completed a Bachelor’s degree. We were interested in learning how many students were coming to MiraCosta College for the purposes of changing careers. To illustrate this point, we examined the number of students enrolling at MiraCosta College with a Bachelor’s degree or higher against their listed major. Table 11: Students Enrolling with a Vocational Major after Bachelor’s Degree 2002­2006 Fall 2002 Fall 2003 Fall 2004 Fall 2005 BA Holders 1066 1002 940 1083 Total Percentage of BA Degree Holders 10% 10% 10% 10% BA Degree Holders reporting a Vocational Major 255 316 300 335 Percentage of BA Degree Holders reporting a Vocational Major 24% 32% 32% 31% Over the last four terms, approximately 30% of our Bachelor’s degree holding students have enrolled at MiraCosta College and have chosen a vocational major. Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  13
    • College Mission 3: General Education Note: General Education has different definitions depending on the context. For the purposes of this document, we refer to “General Education” as the general academic programs of the college. Areas that exclude vocational or basic skill areas will be specifically noted. 3.1 Program Offerings, Significant Changes and Enrollment Patterns o Top 10 most popular majors in Fall 2005: § Business Administration § General Studies § Nursing Licensed Vocational § University Studies § Psychology § Biological Sciences § Accounting § Child Development § Music § Real Estate 3.2 Retention Rates MiraCosta College defines retention as the number of students receiving an A, B or C grade over the total number of grades received (excluding IP ­ In Progress, I – Incomplete and RD ­ Record Delayed grade). Students enrolled in non­vocational/non­basic skill classes had the following retention rates for the last four years: Table 12: Retention Rates Fall 2002 Fall 2003 Fall 2004 Fall 2005 65% 65% 66% 65% 3.3 Persistence Rates (ARCC) This item will come directly from the ARCC report published in January, and will deal with the college as a whole, rather than specific areas of study. ARCC defines persistence as: Percentage of cohort of first­time students with minimum of six units earned in a fall term who return and enroll in the subsequent fall term anywhere in the system. 3.4 Semester­to­Semester and Fall­to­Fall Persistence Rates As was done in the Vocational Education section, we provided additional persistence information based on students’ educational goals. The figures below represent first­time, full­ time students. 14  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
    • Table 13: Semester­to­Semester and Fall­to­Fall Persistence Rates Educational Goal Fall 2002 Fall 2003 Fall 2004 Fall 2005 AA degree, no transfer Total 36 31 37 40 Persist to Spring 29 81% 23 74% 24 65% 26 65% Persist to Next Fall 22 61% 12 39% 18 49% NA NA Advance in current job Total 4 1 2 1 Persist to Spring 2 50% 1 100% 1 50% 1 100% Persist to Next Fall 1 25% 0% 1 50% NA NA Complete credits for HS/GED Total 1 1 1 Persist to Spring NA 0% 1 100% 1 100% Persist to Next Fall NA 0% 1 100% NA NA Educational Development Total 7 2 3 10 10 Persist to Spring 7 100% 1 50% 3 100% 7 7 Persist to Next Fall 4 57% 0% 2 67% NA NA Undecided on Goal Total 38 48 58 66 Persist to Spring 29 76% 32 67% 49 84% 56 85% Persist to Next Fall 21 55% 22 46% 27 47% NA NA Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  15
    • 3.5 Student Progress Rate This is another measurement that will be calculated using the ARCC framework. The Chancellor’s Office defines student progress as: Percentage of cohort of first­time students with minimum of 12 units earned who attempt a degree/certificate/transfer threshold course within six years of entry who are shown to have achieved ANY of the following outcomes or value­added measures of progress within six years of entry: o Earned any AA/AS or Certificate (18 or more units) o Actual transfer to a four­year institution (student shown to have enrolled at any four­year institution of higher education after enrolling at a CCC) o Achieved “Transfer Directed” (student successfully completed both transfer­level Math AND English courses) o Achieved “Transfer Prepared” (student successfully completed 56 UC/CSU transferable units with a GPA >=2.0 in those transferable courses) o Earned at least 30 units while in the CCC system (value­added threshold of units earned as defined in wage studies as having a positive affect on future earnings) 3.6 Number of Instructional Associate Degrees (Excludes Vocational) Many students each year complete an Associate’s degree in what’s called an instructional major. The focus of these degrees is less about the direct preparation for employment as it is a field of interest. Figure 6: Instructional Associate Degrees 450 424 400 400 348 348 350 323 307 300 250 200 150 100 50 0 01­02 02­03 03­04 03­04 04­05 05­06 16  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
    • 3.7 FTES Generated The monitoring of Full­Time Equivalent Students (FTES) is a crucial component of any community college. MiraCosta is unique because it is one of the community colleges that do not receive the majority of its funding based on FTES. These figures are still important because it is a good measure of the college’s overall productivity in a given year. A concerted effort to increase the number of FTES was undertaken during the last few years. Activities included the conversion of many open­lab classes to distance education (online) courses, new and innovative marketing strategies combined with a thorough examination of our attendance and record keeping practices. These efforts combined with increases in enrollments have resulted in FTES growth in a time when many other colleges have seen their figures decline. Figure 7: Factored FTES 2000­2006 7800 7734.85 7729.63 7600 7509.8 7446.5 7400 7319.33 7200 7000 6928.46 6800 6600 6400 2000­2001 2001­2002 2000­2001 2003­2004 2004­2005 2005­2006 Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  17
    • College Mission 4: Basic Skills Education 4.1 Successful Course Completion This item’s description comes from the ARCC report, but the definition is the same as MiraCosta’s definition of successful retention. Data from the Chancellor’s Office indicates that MiraCosta’s basic skills retention rate is above the statewide average. Table 14: Successful Course Completion Fall 2002 Fall 2003 Fall 2004 Fall 2005 Statewide Average 49% 49% 49% 48% MiraCosta College 58% 60% 58% 57% The retention rates of our basic skills students are the lowest of our three reference groups (vocational, general education and basic skills courses.) This is an area that will warrant additional study in the upcoming years. 4.2 ESL Improvement Rate This item will be provided in the ARCC report. The ARCC defines the ESL Improvement Rate as: Percent of students who successfully completed at least one credit ESL course in a term who successfully completed a higher level ESL course or a college level course within two years of taking the first ESL course (a three­year cohort examination). Only students starting at two or more levels below college level/transfer level will be counted. At this point in time the ARCC will not be including noncredit ESL courses in their calculations. We are working on finalizing a similar measurement of our own to include the noncredit ESL program. 4.3 Basic Skills Improvement Rate This item will also be provided in the ARCC report. The ARCC defines the Basic Skills Improvement Rate as: Percent of students who successfully completed at least one credit or noncredit basic skills course in a term who successfully completed a higher level basic skills course in the same discipline (reading, writing, math, respectively) or a college level course within two years of taking the first basic skills course (a three­year cohort examination). Only students starting at two or more levels below college level/transfer level will be counted. 18  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
    • College Mission 5: Community Education 5. A Community Services and Business Development 5. A.1 Program Offerings and Growth The Community Services and Business Development department of MiraCosta College consists of two areas: Community Services and Business Development. Community Services offers fee­ based, not­for­credit courses, workshops, and other activities that members of the community can participate in for personal and professional development. Business Development provides training for businesses and other organizations in a contract education mode which may be offered as not­for­credit, noncredit, or credit. The new offerings in the Community Services area in 2005­2006 were: o Summer 2005 § Accessories: Tools for Expanding and Enhancing Your Wardrobe § Become a California State Notary Public § Fabulous Locations to Invest In § Learn 2 Step: Stepping Dance Lessons § Windows and Walls o Fall 2005 § Basics of Screenwriting § Becoming a Voice­Over Performer § How to Write a Song § Retirement Planning Today o Spring 2006 § Better Business Writing § Cartooning: The Basic Skills § Earrings, Earrings, Earrings § Healthful Herbs for a Healthier Sex Life § Illustrating Children’s Books § Introduction to Acting and Audition Preparation § Life Drawing § Local Marine Mammals § Makeover Challenge for the Home § Online SAT/ACT Prep Classes § Painting en Plein Air § Screenwriting for Fun and Maybe Profit § Silk Painting § S.M.A.R.T. Consumer Workshop § Swing Dance Levels 1 and 2 § Using Dreams to Transform Your Life § Wine 101 Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  19
    • The most significant changes within Community Services have been made to the Business and Career courses between 2004­2005 and 2005­2006. Course offerings have expanded and additional online certificate programs have been added: Table 15: Online Career Training and Certificate Programs through Community Education Healthcare Programs Administrative Dental Assistant Coding Reimbursement and Pharmacy Technician Documentation for Physicians Administrative Medical Specialist HIPAA Compliance (4 user licenses) Revenue Management for Healthcare (Medical Billing and Coding) Providers Advanced Coding for the Physician’s ICD­10 Medical Coding: Preparation Veterinary Assistant Office and Instruction Advanced Hospital Coding and CCS Medical Transcription Prep Business Programs Administrative Professional with Lean Mastery Records Management MOS Bookkeeping the Easy Way Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) Six Sigma Greenbelt Certified Bookkeeper Project Management Travel Agent Training Internet, Design and Technical Programs AutoCAD 2005 Help Desk Specialist Webmaster Digital Arts Certificate Multimedia Design Certificate Graphic Design Web Database Developer Networking and CompTIA Certification Training Programs A+ Certification Linux+/LPI Level One Certification Security+ Certification Cisco CCNA Certification Network+/Server+ Certification Microsoft Certification Training Programs Microsoft Certified Database Microsoft Certified System Microsoft Certified System Administrator (MCDBA) Administrator 2003 (MCSA) Administrator Microsoft Certified System Engineer 2003 (MCSE) Construction Technology Home Inspection Certificate HVAC Technician Certificate Video Game Design and Development Programs 3ds max Video Game Design and Development Advanced Video Game Design and Development 20  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
    • 5. A.2 Student Enrollment As a revenue­based program, the Community Services offerings serve the changing needs and desires of the community. The enrollments reflected in the chart below are unduplicated; for example, a single student enrolling in four activities would be counted four times, once for each enrollment. The decline in excursion enrollments is the intentional result of fewer offerings in this area. Although excursions serve the interests of some members of the community, they are very labor intensive with a low profit margin. Table 16: Community Education Enrollments 2000­2006 2000­2001 2001­2002 2002­2003 2003­2004 2004­2005 2005­2006 Excursion Enrollments 283 522 512 541 478 274 Class Enrollments (Art, Business, Language, etc.) 4574 4590 5314 4597 3961 3952 Events Enrollments (College for Kids, Driver’s Ed, etc.) 2322 2635 2646 2154 2663 2962 Contract Education (Employees Served) 1295 1640 1110 1224 1493 1644 5. A.3 Number of First­time MCC Students Limited demographic information is collected about students who enroll in the Community Services program, so additional discussion will be necessary on the best method of capturing this information. An informal survey of the end of activity evaluation forms for Spring 2006 indicated that approximately 49% of the students were first­time enrollees at MiraCosta. 5. A.4 Student Satisfaction Rates Satisfaction surveys are distributed to every student who enrolls in a Community Education course. Data from these surveys will be transferred into an electronic format for analysis in future years. Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  21
    • 5. B ­ Continuing Education (Tuition­free Noncredit) 5. B.1 Course Offerings and Significant Changes The Continuing Education program offers at least some tuition­free, noncredit courses in all nine of the authorized areas of noncredit instruction: Elementary (usually called Adult Basic Education) and Secondary (adult high school and GED preparation) Basic Skills, English as a Second Language, Immigrant Education (citizenship), Consumer Education, Health and Safety, Parenting, courses for adults with substantial disabilities, courses for older adults, and Short­ Term Vocational Education. The most significant changes have been in finding ways to meet the ongoing demand for English as a Second Language by adding Saturday classes and offering additional opportunities for structured courses in the Community Learning Lab. Other changes include offering the Cisco Networking program in an open­entry format similar to some of the credit courses in Computer Information Systems and the addition of a Netlab, an enhancement approved through PBC for 2006­2007, which will allow students to access the hands­on portions of the curriculum from a remote location. 5. B.2 Program Enrollments When the College was required in 2003 to reduce offerings because of budget cuts, noncredit met the requirement by reducing the number of instructional hours in many of the courses offered in the categories other than adult high school, English as a Second Language, and Short­Term Vocational. We have never returned to the pre­cut hours in some of the courses. Other factors which have impacted enrollment in the past two years are immigration issues and the foreign deployment of Camp Pendleton Marines. Nevertheless, the noncredit programs and classes continue to provide the community with a broad range of educational opportunities with high standards. Table 17: Headcount and FTES of the Noncredit Program 2002­2005 2002­2003 2003­2004 2004­2005 2005­2006 Unduplicated Headcount 6987 6576 6249 6318 FTES 1152.19 1048.75 1079.65 1051.42 The FTES within the noncredit program show overall increases in the classes for seniors and the adult high school diploma program. 22  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
    • Figure 8: FTES Generated by Noncredit Program 2002­2005 600.0 500.0 400.0 300.0 200.0 100.0 0.0 Adult High English as Adult Basic Consumer Health and Parenting Special Courses for Vocational School a Second Education Education Safety Skills Education Seniors Education Diploma Language 2002­2003 224.9 49.7 502.2 20.5 98.7 33.2 78.5 115.3 29.3 2003­2004 230.8 43.8 463.4 18.4 86.6 28.5 60.4 96.0 20.8 2004­2005 217.4 56.13 489.45 16.96 22.46 23.86 65.68 171.37 16.33 2005­2006 214.6 47.85 465.3 17.61 30.09 24.81 58.12 177.82 15.21 5. B.3 Noncredit Student Progress Student progress is measured in the English as a Second Language program by the way in which students move through the seven levels of instruction. Faculty assess students’ learning outcomes in listening, speaking, reading and writing skills at the end of each of the nine­week terms in order to determine each student’s readiness to progress to the next level. Students can complete four, nine­week courses over the course of the Fall and Spring semesters. Progress is measured in each course: Table 18: ESL Progress ­ Term I Promotion Rate Morning 46% Evening 42% Program Average 44% Table 19: ESL Progress ­ Term II Promotion Rate Morning 50% Evening 59% Program Average 55% Table 20: ESL Progress ­ Term III Promotion Rate Morning 47% Evening 60% Program Average 54% Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  23
    • Table 21: ESL Progress ­ Term IV Promotion Rate Morning 63% Evening 56% Program Average 60% The primary method of determining the progress of students in the Adult High School Diploma Program is the number of diplomas awarded each year. Although that is the primary method of measuring progress, each student who has earning the diploma as a goal meets with a counselor or advisor each nine­week term prior to enrolling in the subsequent term. His/her progress toward the goal is assessed by reviewing the requirements completed and those remaining and completing or updating the Educational Plan both in the student’s personal file and that retained in the Community Education Office. Many students enroll in the program with goals other than completing a high school diploma, upgrading skills in English and mathematics prior to enrollment in college credit courses or in order to advance in the workplace, earning credits to transfer to their home high school to meet diploma requirements, for example. Figure 9: Number of Adult High School Diplomas 2000­2006 140 131 129 120 104 100 100 96 95 80 60 40 20 0 2000­2001 2001­2002 2002­2003 2003­2004 2004­2005 2005­2006 No method for defining progress in the other categories of noncredit has been devised as those courses are most often taken for personal or professional enrichment. Research needs to be conducted to assess the progress of ESL and adult high school students who transition into credit courses and programs. 24  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
    • 5. B.4 Retention Rates Retention rates are computed for English as a Second Language and adult high school students using formulas different from those used for credit. The formula used for determining retention in ESL is the number of students who completed a nine­week term with acceptable hours of attendance (no more than five classes missed during the term) divided by the number of students who registered for the class. For example, if 37 students registered for a class and 28 successfully completed, the retention rate would be 76%. The program retention rate for 2005­2006 was 78%. Table 22: ESL Retention ­ Term I Retention/Persistence Morning 79% Evening 78% Program Average 79% Table 23: ESL Retention ­ Term II Retention/Persistence Morning 79% Evening 78% Program Average 79% Table 24: ESL Retention ­ Term III Retention/Persistence Morning 78% Evening 74% Program Average 76% Table 25: ESL Retention ­ Term IV Retention/Persistence Morning 81% Evening 75% Program Average 78% The formula for calculating retention rates for adult high school students is similar to that used for credit students as grades are awarded in the program. The major difference is that a grade of D counts as a successful completion of a course. Since high school credit is granted for a course completed with that grade by the local high schools, MiraCosta accepts that standard, as well. Table 26: Average Retention Rates of ADHSP 2002­2006 Fall 2002 Fall 2003 Fall 2004 Fall 2005 69% 56% 66% 62% Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  25
    • College Mission 6: Support Services 6.1 Program Offerings and Significant Changes MiraCosta College offers a wide variety of support services for its students: o Admissions and Records o Library o Bookstore (Oceanside) o Service Learning o Bookstore (San Elijo) o Scholarships o Campus Life/Activities o School Relations & o Campus Police Diversity Outreach o Career Center o Sports o Child Development Center (CDC) o Student Accounts Office o Counseling o Study Abroad o Disabled Student Program o Testing and Services (DSPS) o Transcripts o Extended Opportunity Program o Tutoring and Academic and Services (EOPS) Support o Financial Aid o University Transfer Center o Health Services o Veterans Services o Honors Scholar Program o Wellness Center o International Students o Writing Center o Language Resource Center There were no significant changes in services during the 2005­2006 academic year. 6.2 Student Participation Rates Student support services are a key component to any student experience. Listed below are the participation rates of some of the student services for the last four years. Table 27: Student Services Participation Rates 2002­2003 2003­2004 2004­2005 2005­2006 Annual Unduplicated Credit 17,498 16,426 15,997 16,712 Enrollment Extended Opportunities Programs and % 3% 4% 5% 5% Services (EOPS) # 562 614 735 767 % 3% 3% 4% % Disables Student Programs and Services Not yet # 518 544 560 available % 37% 42% 48% 48% Financial Aid # 6525 6942 7681 8000 26  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
    • 6.3 Student Satisfaction Rates Overall, students are satisfied with the services that MiraCosta College offers. During the Spring 2006 semester, students were surveyed on their opinions regarding their satisfaction with various aspects of MiraCosta College. A total of 1046 valid credit surveys were collected, spanning the San Elijo and Oceanside campuses. A noncredit version of the survey was distributed at the Community Learning Center, generating 233 responses To rate satisfaction, students were first asked the number of times they had used a particular service. They were then asked to rate each service on a Likert Scale that ranged from “Very Satisfied” to “Very Dissatisfied.” Students also had the option of indicating “Don’t Know.” The satisfaction rates below come from students who indicated that they had used a particular service at least one time. Table 28: Credit Student Services Satisfaction Rates – Spring 2006 n (number of Satisfied Dissatisfied Don't Know responses) Admissions and Records 923 91% 5% 4% Counseling 761 82% 14% 4% Transfer Center 420 82% 5% 13% Career Center 261 72% 7% 21% Writing Center 267 87% 4% 10% Tutoring Center 333 84% 5% 11% Math Learning Center 324 89% 4% 7% Open Computer Lab 684 93% 2% 5% Financial Aid 369 76% 12% 12% EOPS 122 82% 5% 13% DSPS 83 71% 8% 20% Student Health Center 251 83% 5% 12% College Bookstore 973 85% 12% 4% Cafeteria 823 85% 12% 3% Library Services 840 93% 2% 5% Table 29: Noncredit Student Services Satisfaction Rates – Spring 2006 n (number of responses) Satisfied Dissatisfied Don't Know Counseling 116 94% 3% 3% Writing Center 31 94% 6% 0% Tutoring Center 43 91% 9% 0% Open Computer Lab 136 96% 1% 4% DSPS 25 92% 8% 0% College Bookstore 141 86% 11% 4% Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  27
    • 6.4 Working Capacity This measurement accounts for the amount of service (i.e., appointments) available to students, and the number of appointments utilized in a given year. Since not all student services work on an appointment basis, additional discussion will be necessary in the future versions of this document. 28  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
    • Part II MiraCosta College Core Values 1. Primary Purpose of Teaching and Learning 2. Collegiality and Shared Governance 3. Technology Leadership 4. Positive Working/Learning Environment 5. Highest Quality Through Effectiveness, Efficiency and Accountability 6. Decision­making Based on Research, Data and Evidence 7. Career Preparation and Economic Development 8. A Climate the Promotes Diversity 9. Service to Our Community 10. Beautiful Welcoming Campuses 11. Innovation and Ability to Change Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  29
    • Core Value 1: Primary Purpose of Teaching and Learning As an institution of higher education, our principle focus centers on our students and the quality of education they receive. These measurements are designed to measure our ongoing commitment to quality instruction and services provided by MiraCosta College. 1.1 Educational Master Plan At the conclusion of the Spring 2006 semester, the Academic Master Plan Committee completed the master plan’s latest rewrite. It involved individuals from all areas of the institution (faculty, administrators and classified staff) coming together and charting the course for MiraCosta College for the next three years. The plan described the evolution of MiraCosta College, as well as a snapshot of the institution as it stands today. The largest portion of the document provides detail in the form of goals and action plans that show the direction of the institution in the future. The final draft was presented to the Board of Trustees in May 2006. The master plan can be viewed in its entirety at the following URL: http://www.miracosta.edu/OfficeOfThePresident/PIO/Publications/Academic%20Master%20 Plan.pdf 1.2 Program Review The educational needs of our students are in constant transition. The demographics of the service area, the local economy and the job market all play a role in what programs we offer. In order to ensure that we are meeting the needs of the community, all instructional programs go through a regular review and evaluation process. Programs are reviewed on a six­year cycle with several reports due in the interim. Its intent is to examine each academic program and determine what is necessary to allow it to function more efficiently. The Office of Institutional Research provides a summary of data that includes enrollment, FTES, cost per FTE, success/retention as well as grade distributions. Departments use this data to create a complete picture of the functioning of the program, and at that time decide whether expansion or consolidation of a given program is warranted. Table 30: Noncredit Student Services Satisfaction Rates – Spring 2006 Student Services 3­Year Review Career Studies Services, CIS, International Languages, Retention Services, Social Science 6­Year Review *Short­term Vocational Art, Drama, DSPS, HAAT, Mathematics *Older Adults The outcomes of the program review process not only assist the departments themselves, but also the formulation of the master plans and the accreditation process. 30  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
    • 1.3 Resource Allocation When making decisions related to the budget and the implementation of new programs, the 50% law is central to the discussion. As the title indicates, no more than 50% of funding can be used on “non­instructional” items. This law was written in the 1950’s, when there were a limited number of support services offered outside of the classroom. As the capabilities of the institution expand and we serve the needs of our students in new and innovative ways, we increasingly find that our funding needs are falling on the non­qualifying side of the law. MiraCosta College continues to monitor all spending to ensure that we remain within the law’s guidelines, but realize that changes in the law are necessary to meet the needs of our students. We have begun working with the Chancellor’s Office and the Governor to propose changes that would expand the definition of what can be considered as “instructional items.” Figure 10: MiraCosta College Application of the 50% Law 2000­2007 55.00% 54.23% 54.17% 54.00% 53.60% 53.00% 52.66% 52.00% 50.88% 51.08% 51.00% 50.00% 50.00% 50.00% 49.00% 48.00% 47.00% FY 00 FY 01 FY 02 FY 03 FY 04 FY 05 FY 06 (Projected) FY 07 Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  31
    • Core Value 2: Collegiality & Shared Governance 2.1 Board Policies and Procedures Within the policies and procedures of the Board of Trustees, there are items that address the issue of collegiality and shared governance. In December 2002, the Board adopted a Policy Governance Manual still in effect today. And in addition to this manual, there are several areas of Board Policy that deal with the roles of the senates in collegial governance. o Board Policy I.C.1: Academic Senate Role in Collegial Governance o Board Policy I.C.2: Classified Staff Role in Collegial Governance o Board Policy I.C.3: Student Participation in Collegial Governance This issue has been the subject of campus­wide discussion during the 2005­2006 academic year, and will likely result in revision of policies in future years. 2.2 Academic Senate, Classified Senate and Student Senate Governance Shared governance is a strongly held belief at MiraCosta College. This is evidenced by the variety of representation not only on the District Standing Committees, but within the senates themselves. Each governance group strives to ensure that there is representation by members of all three campuses. All senate members, regardless of their part­time or full­time status are encouraged to participate in the governance process. The Academic Senate approved a document titled “Collegiality, the Academic Senate and Its Code of Ethics” in April 2002. This document is a product of the Academic Senate Council on Ethics and Professional Standards, and is still used and referenced today. 2.3 Committee Structures The Academic Senate has 20 standing committees and two ad hoc committees in which 131 different senate members participate.4 Given the limited compensation for part­time faculty, committees are largely made up of full­time faculty and administrators. The Classified Senate also has eight standing committees in which at least 20 different senate members participate.5 Committees have a pre­determined structure to allow adequate representation in the process. Students, faculty, staff and administrators are all encouraged to participate and have a voice in the decision­making process.  4  Source: 2005­2006 list of committee membership on the Academic Senate web site.  5  Source: 2005­2006 list of committee membership on the Classified Senate web site. 32  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
    • 2.4 Resource Allocation Designated members of the Classified and Academic Senates receive release time in order to participate in the governance process. The Classified Senate is granted 50% release time for the president, eight hours per month for the vice president, and senators are granted four hours per month. Within the Academic Senate, the president has historically been granted 50% release time, but was funded for 80% release time based on a new initiative funded for 2005­2006. This funding will continue for 2006­2007, at which time the decision will be made about whether or not to request permanent funding from the Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) Committee. The president has an additional 40% of release time to be granted to other senate members at his/her discretion. Neither the Vice President nor the senators are granted additional release time as it is seen as a part of their contractual obligation. In 2005­2006 the entirety of the discretionary release time was given to the vice president for the purposes of chairing the Academic Master Plan Committee.  Table 31 Members of Senates Departments Academic Senate Classified Senate Senator­ Network Specialist Academic Information Services Behavioral Science Council Member Biological Science Council Member Business Council Member/Representative Senator­ Instructional Division Secretary Business Administrative Services Business Administrative Services Vice President­ Campus Police Dispatcher Business Administrative Services Treasurer­ Accounting Specialist Computer and Information Science Representative Counseling Representative Senator­ Systems Administrator Senator­ Media Services Aide Senator­ Administrative Secretary Instructional Services President­ Administrative Secretary Senator­ Tutoring Services Specialist Senator­ IT Specialist Letters Council Member Library Representative Mathematics President Physical Science Council Member, Associate Faculty Member President’s Office Council Member Social Science Vice President/Representative, Council Member/Representative, Associate Faculty Member Theatre, Dance and Communication Arts Council Member, Representative Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  33
    • Core Value 3: Technology Leadership 3.1 Technology Master Plan The Technology Master Plan is a comprehensive document that addresses the present and future needs of the institution. Planning through 2007, the goals of the master plan included expanding the functionality and usability of our ERP, increasing training for faculty, staff and students on the variety of technology at their disposal, and the creation of a web portal that will streamline business processes for all areas of the campus community. The Technology Master Plan was approved by the Board of Trustees in June 2006. 3.2 Resource Allocation As a rule, technology has a very short lifespan. Both hardware and software need to be replaced on a frequent basis, requiring long­range planning for each item purchased. It is not enough to account for the cost of the item itself without considering the future costs of replacing that item over time. The Strategic Planning for Information Technology Committee (SPIT) was among the first groups on campus to adopt a “Total Cost of Ownership” method of purchasing new technology for the campus. Items approved for purchase are automatically put on a replacement cycle and budgeted accordingly. 3.3 Course Offerings and Innovations All faculty, staff and students have multiple opportunities during the academic year to take courses that help maintain and improve their technological skills. Courses are offered during flex week and at select times during the year. Help is available on an as­needed basis from our campus technology specialists and in online formats via the College Help Desk. The full listing of training resources can be found on MiraCosta’s website: http://www.miracosta.edu/Instruction/AIS/training/ 34  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
    • Core Value 4: Positive Working/Learning Environment 4.1 Campus Climate Surveys During the Spring 2006 semester, surveys were distributed to credit and noncredit students, asking their opinions on their satisfaction with the campus environment, and whether or not they felt that MiraCosta provided a positive learning environment. Amongst the findings: o 95% of credit students felt that MiraCosta College offers a student­friendly environment o 94% of noncredit students felt that MiraCosta College offers a student­friendly environment o 97% of credit students would recommend MiraCosta College to a friend or family member. The results from the student surveys were encouraging, and we hope to continue this process in upcoming years to monitor the needs of our students. In 2008 we hope to implement an employee survey for the same purpose. 4.2 Student Services Program Review  Like MiraCosta’s instructional programs, services to students also undergo an annual  program review process.  The specifics of this review are currently being revised.  Completed program review documents are available through the Vice President of  Student Services Offices. Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  35
    • Core Value 5: Highest Quality Through Effectiveness, Efficiency and Accountability 5.1 Finance and Attendance Audits MiraCosta College undergoes several audits each year to verify that its operational and business practices are within the guidelines of state and local regulations. The audits cover the financial aspects of the institution, the accounting of FTES, business practices for attendance accounting and record keeping, and an audit of the Foundation. The final audit for 2005­2006 will not be completed until the end of the 2006 calendar year. 5.2 College and Program Accreditations MiraCosta College completed its last accreditation visit in 2004, will complete a mid­term report in March 2007. 5.3 State and Federal Accountability Reports The newest accountability report is the “Accountability Report for the Community Colleges” (ARCC). This report examines cohorts of students over six­year timeframes and measures success, retention, persistence and progress through various programs. 5.4 Efficiency Assessments of Facilities and Utilities All buildings constructed for MiraCosta College are done so with utilities conservation in mind. No official usage assessment existed in 2005­2006, but steps are being taken in 2006­2007 to quantify usage and the savings derived. 5.5 Campus Climate Surveys Efficiency is extremely important in the eyes of our students, as the ease or difficulty to enroll in classes can make a difference as to whether or not a student chooses to enroll in future semesters. In the Spring 2006 student survey, students were asked to rate the ease of certain processes on a Likert scale that ranged from “Very Easy” to “Very Difficult.” Students who indicated “N/A” for these ratings were not included in the final calculations: 36  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
    • Table 32: Credit Students’ Perception of MiraCosta College Processes – Spring 2006 n Easy Difficult Ease of Using the Paper Application 648 92% 8% Ease of Using the Online Application 774 93% 7% Ease of Registration at Admissions and Records 753 92% 8% Ease of registering using SURF 930 93% 7% Ease of adding/dropping at Admissions and Records 749 94% 6% Ease of adding/dropping using SURF 786 94% 6% Ease of making an appointment in the Counseling Center 745 91% 9% Ease of making an appointment in the Transfer Center 368 91% 9% Ease of applying for Financial Aid 405 65% 35% Ease of buying books in the bookstore 992 91% 9% Ease of getting tutoring 390 92% 8% Students are for the most part satisfied with the processes involved with becoming a student, with the exception of Financial Aid. This may be due to the complexity of the federal application process. The noncredit student population had similar ratings: Table 33: Noncredit Students’ Perception of MiraCosta College Processes – Spring 2006 n Easy Difficult Ease of enrolling in classes 222 93% 7% Ease of making an appointment in the Counseling Center 148 91% 9% Ease of buying books in the bookstore 180 92% 8% Ease of getting tutoring 86 94% 6% Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  37
    • Core Value 6: Decision Making Based on Research Data and Evidence 6.1 Strategic Planning The Strategic Planning process involved several significant changes in 2005­2006. The planning calendars of the Technology, Facilities and Academic Master Plans were coordinated with the budgeting cycle. This allowed decisions about future budgets to be made only after the master planning process was completed. Secondly, Strategic Planning Online (SPOL) was implemented. This online process facilitated the planning of projects within individual departments and the connection with other departments to see that the project was completed with the necessary input. Thirdly, there was the implementation of the Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) Process. This process involved requests for permanent funding, taking into account immediate and long range costs and the indirect costs associated with that funding. The TCO process worked closely with the New Initiatives, Innovations and Enhancement requests already in use at the college. Categorization was based on the length of funding required and any supporting evidence available. Because the TCO process was approved in 2005­2006, newly funded projects will not be included until the completion of the 2006­2007 Key Performance Indicators Report. The items funded for 2005­2006 were: o Enhancements § Staff Development Budget, $57,000 § Instructional Associate for Surgical Technology, $17,000 § Electronic Student Portfolio System Development, $10,000 § Chariot Advisor compensation increased from 40 to 72 hours/month, $36,553 § Memory Upgrade – Music Recording Studios, $2,418 § Three computer workstations at SAN University Transfer Center, $5,940 § Campus Police parking machine laptop, $1,724 § Development of a Phlebotomy/IV certification, $3,000 § Increase switchboard/receptionist hours, $18,586 § Outcomes Assessment Committee: Facilitator/travel funds, Train the Trainer, $30,000 § Memory upgrade for SAN Room 309, $8,700 § Media Services large venue projector, $7,000 § Six Language Lab computers, $6,750 § Reconfiguration of Administration Building Lobby, $10,000 § Students’ Printing Management solution, $50,000 § BTEC Manufacturing Instructional Associate, $60,000 § Program Assistant, $18,000 § Increase Academic Senate President release time, $8,800 § Biology Instructional Associate from 10 months to 12 months, $12,500 § Student Services part­time Campus Aide – 16 hours, $12,800 38  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
    • o Initiatives § Explore, Customize, Implement Strategic Planning Online, $25,000 § Retention Services Learning Communities, $22,000 § Massage therapy curriculum development and equipment, $16,150 § Admissions and Records Evaluator, $70,000 § Building of a Fund Development Office (operating budget), $25,800 § Annual surveys of students/staff/faculty, $15,000 § Part­time temporary annual Fund Director, $30,075 § University Bridge services to increase Transfer Student Diversity, $6,420 § Cyber Tutoring (student hourly tutors), $10,880 o Innovations § Basic skills revision/development of summer college, $13,067 § Media Arts, $3,560 § Credit card keyboards, $2,000 § Operation Terrorism/Homeland Security, $6,400 § Increase Online Offerings (Four at $4K each), $16,000 § Spanish for Health Care Providers course, $700 § E­car shelter at SAN, $2,907 § Service Learning video, $800 § Strengthening District pipeline, community college to graduate school, $5,000 § Portable lighting studio, $7,800 6.2 Program Review Each time a program goes through a review process, enrollment and financial data is provided to support assertions made in the review narrative. Data elements include: retention data, costs, FTES, FTEF, cost per FTE, and enrollment information. 6.3 Research and Data Collection Every department program and project involves data of one kind or another. In 2005­2006, the new Office of Institutional Research (formerly Research and Planning) began a systematic data collection process to begin to quantify our successes as an institution. In Spring 2006 we conducted the first large­scale survey of students district­wide. We also began an extensive review of existing data sources to determine if improvements were necessary to increase the quality of the output data. The information contained in the survey responses and in our existing database supports all of the master plans, program review, and many other qualitative and quantitative studies district­ wide. In the future we hope to introduce a data warehouse so that individual users can collects data in a self­service mode and increase the volume of information available for long­range planning. Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  39 
    • Core Value 7: Career Preparation and Economic Development 7.1 Vocational Programs MiraCosta College offers many vocational programs that allow students to complete a program of study that prepares them for employment immediately upon completion of the degree/certificate. The programs offered in 2005­2006 were: o Accounting o Administration of Justice o Automotive Technology o Biotechnology o Business Administration o Business Office Technology o Career Studies o Child Development o Communication Studies o Computer & Information Science o Cosmetology o Design Drafting Technology o Horticulture o Hospitality o Internet and Multimedia Technology o Internship Studies o Medical Assistant o Music o Nursing o Occupational Therapy o Physical Therapy o Real Estate o Restaurant Management o Surgical Technology o Tourism o Work Experience 40  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
    • 7.2 Career Services The Career Services department provides work experience and career opportunities to MiraCosta College students, assisting students in every facet of the job­seeking process. Table 34: Activity of Career Services 2005­2006 SARS­GRID # of Individual Appointments 1472 # of Workshops Delivered 114 Total # of Students at Workshops 335 Classroom Presentations Total Presentations 60 Total Students 1243 Enrollments Co­op total 145 Internship total 31 MonsterTrak New Registrants 601 New Job Postings 5028 New Internship Postings 116 Placements New Placements on Campus 214 New Placements off Campus 48 Other Community Members Served 54 Total Events 47 Total Students at Events 156 CFFJAC & Tech Prep CFFJAC Served 2553 Tech Prep Students Receiving Credit 244 Tech Prep Students Served 1013 High Schools in Consortium 13 *Number of Articulation Agreements *39 MCC Faculty Related Meetings 18 *Including Pending Renewal Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  41
    • 7.3 Small Business Development Center The Small Business Development Center (SBDC) supports the needs of the Small Business owners in the community. They reported the following figures for 2005­2006: o Clients: 976 o Jobs Created: 160 o Jobs Retained: 14 o Increase in Revenue: $1.3 million o Loans: $3.7 million o Equity Investment: $1.2 million 7.4 Community Services/Business Development Through the concerted efforts of the Director of Community Services and Business Development and a contracted sales person, the number of businesses served through contract education increased by 27% in 2005­2006. 42  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
    • Core Value 8: A Climate Which Promotes Diversity 8.1 Curriculum and Programs MiraCosta College strives to meet the cultural needs and interests of its students by offering a broad spectrum of courses and programs Table 35: MiraCosta College Programs of Study Programs of Study Astronomy Geography Philosophy Auto Technology Geology Phlebotomy Biology German Physical Education Biotechnology Gerontology Physical Science Business Accounting Health Physical Therapy Business Administration History Physics Business Office Technology Horticulture Political Science Career and Life Planning Hospitality Psychology Chemistry Humanities Reading Child Development Internet and Multimedia Technology Real Estate Chinese Italian Recreation Cisco Computer Networking Japanese Restaurant Communication Studies Kinesiology Sociology Computer & Information Science Library Science Spanish Cosmetology Linguistics Special Education Counseling Literature Surgical Technology Dance Mathematics Tourism Drafting Medical Assistant Work Experience English Music English as a Second Language Nursing Film Oceanography French Pharmacology Table 36: MiraCosta College Certificates of Competence Certificates of Competence Discipline Certificates Offered Accounting Accounting (ACCT) Bookkeeping Administration of Justice (ADM) Law Enforcement Architecture (ARCH) Architectural Technology Automotive Technology Automotive Technology (Day Only) (AUTO) Automotive Technology (Evening Only) Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  43
    • Certificates of Competence Discipline Certificates Offered Bioprocessing Technician Biotechnology (BTEC) Biotechnology Research and Development Technology Entrepreneurship Business Administration Management (BUS) Marketing Retail Management Business Office Office Manager Technology (BOT) Secretary/Administrative Assistant Child Development Associate Teacher Child Development Early Intervention and Inclusion Child Development Child Development Entrepreneurship (CHLD) Child Development Master Teacher Child Development Site Supervisor Child Development Teacher Computer & Information Computer Applications Science (CIS) Computer Network Administration Cosmetology (COSM) Cosmetology Design Drafting Computer­Aided Design and Drafting Technology (DRAF) Computer­Aided Drafting Mechanical Drafting Dramatic Arts (DRAM) Design and Technology Agri­Business Management Floriculture Horticulture (HORT) Landscape Architecture Landscape Management Nursery/Horticulture Crop Production Hospitality (HOSP) Hospitality Management Internet and Multimedia Digital Publishing Technology (IMT) Internet and Multimedia Technology Web Management Medical Assistant (MA) Medical Office Professional Digital Audio Production Music (MUS) Recording Arts/Record Production Sound Reinforcement Nursing (NURS) Licensed Vocational Nursing Real Estate (REAL) Real Estate 44  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
    • Certificates of Competence Discipline Certificates Offered Real Estate Entrepreneurship Restaurant Management (REST) Restaurant Management Surgical Technology (SURG) Surgical Technology Tourism (TOUR) Travel and Tourism Management Table 37: MiraCosta College Certificates of Achievement Certificates of Achievement Discipline Certificates Offered Billing, Cost and Accounting Assistant Accounting (ACCT) Income Tax Preparer Art (ART) Digital Photography Automotive Alignment, Brakes, and Suspension Automotive Technology Automotive Electronics (AUTO) Automotive Quick Service Assistant Basic Engine Performance Biotechnology (BTEC) Biotechnology Laboratory Assistant Business Administration Business Fundamentals (BUS) Retail Assistant Data Entry General Office Business Office Technology Medical Transcription (BOT) Office Assistant Virtual Assistant Child Development (CHLD) Child Development Assistant Teacher Communication Studies (COMM) Organizational Communication Advanced Routing and Switching Computer Internetworking Fundamentals E­Commerce Computer & Information Science (CIS) Microsoft Certified Office User (Proficient Level) Microsoft Certified Office User (Expert Level) UNIX Administration Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  45
    • Certificates of Achievement Discipline Certificates Offered Dance (DNCE) Pilates Certification Design Drafting Technology Applied Design (DRAF) Drafting Fundamentals Arboriculture Floral Design Assistant Irrigation Technology Horticulture (HORT) Landscape Assistant Nursery Assistant Wine Technology Front Office Operations Hospitality (HOSP) Rooms Division Management Arts and Technology Multimedia Production Internet and Multimedia Print Publishing Technology (IMT) Video and Animation Visual Communication Web Design Kinesiology (KINE) Personal Fitness Trainer Medical Assistant (MA) Medical Insurance and Coding Specialist Digital Audio Guitar MUSIC (MUS) Music Technology Performance Technician Certified Nursing Assistant Health Care Fundamentals Nursing (NURS) Home Health Aide Physical Therapy Aide Phlebotomy (PHLB) Phlebotomy Technician Psychology/Sociology Research Fundamentals (PSYC/SOC) Volunteer Services Property Management Real Estate Appraisal Real Estate (REAL) Real Estate Assistant Real Estate Finance Real Estate Sales Restaurant Management Catering Operations (REST) Dining Room Operations Food Service Operations 46  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
    • Certificates of Achievement Discipline Certificates Offered Spanish (SPAN) Career Spanish Tourism (TOUR) Travel Reservations 8.2 Student Organizations and International Programs In addition to the programs offered each year, MiraCosta College hosts many programs, clubs and activities outside the classroom. The Institute for International Perspectives hosted the following events in 2005­2006: o Study Abroad Expo o International Club o Multicultural Expo Olympics Party o Fashion Show o Ice Cream Party o Multicultural Expo ­ Photo o Tax Workshop Contest o Japanese Spring Festival o New Student Orientation o Graduation Party o Frisbee Party o Campus Visit Day o Writing Workshop Series The Student Activities Office involved more than 45 clubs during the 2005­2006 academic year and over 200 events: Allied Health/Peer Feminist Majority Latter Day Saints Assoc Educators Club Leadership Alliance (LDSSA) Animal Protection & Fencing Club, MCC Mac Users Group, MCC Rescue League Friends of EOPS MEChA Anime Club Future Educators Club Natural Science Club Anthropology Club Gay Student Alliance Parents On Campus (POC) Art Club Hospitality / Tourism Phi Theta Kappa Backstage Players Club Pre­Dental Club of MCC Ballet Folklorico International Club Producers Club of Barrio Arte Club Inter­Varsity Christian MiraCosta College Black Student Union Fellowship Progressive Club Club Biomed Intl. Soc. For Puente Diversity Club Club Catholic Pharmaceutical Engineers Roots and Shoots Criminal Justice Club Islander Club Soccer Club Dance Club Italian Club of MiraCosta Tennis Club Dance Club (SAN) Japanese Club The 19th Hole (Golf Club) Democrats, MCC Latina Leadership Veterans Club Engineering Club Network Voices to Action World Peace SGI Club Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  47
    • 8.3 Hiring Processes and Outcomes Following the recommendations of the 2004 Accreditation Review, efforts have been underway to increase the diversity of our faculty and staff. During 2005­2006, the Equal Opportunity Advisory Committee was reconvened and met several times over the year. The goals of the committee were to: o Increase faculty/staff diversity o Expand community outreach to underrepresented groups o Offer educational opportunities for the campus community regarding the issue of diversity o Improve the retention of faculty and staff once hired at MiraCosta College This year, trained Equal Employment Opportunity representatives were a part of each hiring committee on campus. Thirteen new faculty members were hired for 2005­2006, and of those 13, 26% (three faculty members) were diverse. Table 38: Demographic Distribution of the MiraCosta College District – Fall 2005 American Indian/Alaskan Asian/Pacific Native Islander Black Hispanic Other White Totals # 1,313 25,373 11,571 77,105 10,935 240,637 366,934 District Population % 0.40% 6.90% 3.20% 21.00% 3.00% 65.60% 100% # 77 949 450 2,014 787 5,716 9,993 Credit Students % 0.80% 9.50% 4.50% 20.20% 7.90% 57.20% 100% # 3 2 2 7 Board of Trustees % 0.00% 0.00% 42.90% 28.60% 0.00% 28.60% 100% # 2 11 13 Administration % 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 15.40% 0.00% 84.60% 100% # 1 2 9 12 Classified Management % 8.30% 0.00% 0.00% 16.70% 0.00% 75.00% 100% # 4 20 11 40 2 149 226 Classified Staff % 1.80% 8.80% 4.90% 17.70% 0.90% 65.90% 100% Non­ # 1 3 5 2 19 30 Classroom Faculty % 0.00% 3.30% 10.00% 16.70% 6.70% 63.30% 100% # 1 3 4 Other Non­ Academic % 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 25.00% 0.00% 75.00% 100% Full­time Credit # 3 7 3 17 0 77 107 Classroom Faculty % 2.80% 6.50% 2.80% 15.90% 0.00% 72.00% 100% 48  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
    • American Indian/Alaskan Asian/Pacific Native Islander Black Hispanic Other White Totals Full­time Noncredit # 4 4 Classroom Faculty % 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 100.00% 100% Part­time Credit # 3 23 11 32 7 273 349 Classroom Faculty % 0.90% 6.60% 3.20% 9.20% 2.00% 78.20% 100% Part­time HSDP # 20 20 Classroom Faculty % 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 100.00% 100% Part­time Noncredit # 3 9 60 72 Classroom Faculty % 0.00% 4.20% 0.00% 12.50% 0.00% 83.30% 100% Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  49
    • Core Value 9: Service to Our Community 9.1 Community Links MiraCosta College works closely with the community we serve in an effort to meet its ever­ changing needs. Several times each year, the Board of Trustees hosts “Community Links” meetings. Community members come to campus to review past activities and create action plans for the future. 2005­2006 Community Links Meetings: o October 2005 – Foundation Board o December 2005 – University Partners o March 2006 – K­12 Partners o May 2006 – Business and Community Partners 9.2 Service Learning MiraCosta College students play a significant role in the service to our community. Our Service Learning Program offers students the opportunity to earn course­relevant experience and college credit for community service activities. Table 39: Service Learning Program Hours 2002­2006 Number of Participants Number of Hours Completed 2002­2003 850 8539 2003­2004 1005 11166 2004­2005 1100 12004 2005­2006 1050 11000 9.3 Community Services The programs offered by Community Services reflect the needs and interests of their clients. Approximately 200 different fee­based classes are offered in a given year. Subjects range from personal enrichment to excursions to job­related training. Employers interested in improving the skills of their employees can bring MiraCosta College classes to their worksite through the Contract Education program. Table 40: Community Services 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Excursion Enrollments 283 522 514 541 478 Class Enrollments (Art, Business, Language, etc.) 4574 4590 5314 4597 3961 Events Enrollments (College for Kids, Driver’s Ed, 2322 2635 2646 3154 2663 etc.) Contract Education (Employees Served) 1295 1640 1110 1224 1493 50  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
    • 9.4 Noncredit Program The Noncredit program offers free courses in English as a Second Language, Vocational Education, Personal Enrichment, courses for seniors and an Adult High School Diploma Program. Through this program, many partnerships with the community have been formed that benefit students, outside agencies and MiraCosta College: o Carlsbad High School o Oceanside High School o Carlsbad Library Adult Literacy o Oceanside Library Adult Literacy Program Program o Carlsbad Senior Center o Oceanside Senior Center o Carlsbad Unified School District o Oceanside Unified School District o Catholic Charities o Partners for Healthy Neighborhoods o Cisco Systems Networking Academy o San Diego Council on Literacy o El Camino High School o San Diego County Health and Human o La Costa Canyon High School Services Agency (Adoptions) o La Posada de Guadalupe o San Dieguito Adult School o North County Coastal Career Center o San Dieguito Union High School District o Ocean Shores High School o Vista Adult School 9.5 College Events As a community college, all events on campus are open to our students and to the community. The Associated Student Government is active on all three of our campuses, offering a variety of programs and activities: Table 41: 2005­2006 Events at the San Elijo Campus Activities “Fulbright Scholar Presentation on Pakistani Education” "Holiday Angels" “Cinco de Mayo Celebration” “Graduate School Night” “Japanese Festival” New Beginnings Fundraising Event for Delgado Community College in New Orleans” Table 42: 2005­2006 Events at the Oceanside Campus Activities "Gill Specialization in High Performance Fish" Lecture Hurricane Relief Masquerade "Kisses and Hugs" for a $ Hypnotist "Think Pink!: Rockin' for a Cure" Benefit Concert ID Photo Shoot InterVarsity Christian Fellowship ­ Outreach to the 1st Annual MCC Fencing Club Tournament Community Alpha Project Donations Int'l Women's Fashion Show Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  51
    • Activities Arming Campus Police Forum Japanese Club Food Sale Back­2­School/Stay in School Japanese Spring Festival Bake Sale Kacey Jones Memorial Event Barrio Arte Fundraising Katrina Relief Presentation Becoming and Being a Nurse Practioner Latina Leadership Network Ceviche Sale Benefit for Schools in Africa Latina Leadership Network Food Sale Big Theater Anime Movie Latino­a Graduation Celebration Candidate's Forum Learn the Propositions Car Wash Fundraiser Maric College of Nursing Career Expo Martin Luther King Breakfast Career Expo Club Display MeChA Food Sale Casino Night MiraCosta Magic Mardi Gras Changing Karma MiraCosta Magic Mardi Gras Pancake Breakfast Christmas Sale Miz Liberty Cinco De Mayo ­ Sell buttons Movie Night Cinco De Mayo Car Show Native American Performance Cinco De Mayo Celebration Pan Dulce Sale Cinco De Mayo Dance Parents on Campus Nacho/Hotdog Sale Cinco De Mayo Information Booth Party Hour Cinco De Mayo Performance Peace Scholarship Fundraiser College Hour Posada Comedy Show Presentation by Dr. Barbara Tedlock Devotional/Pizza Party Puente Club Food Sale Dia De Los Muertos ­ Pan Dulce Sale Relay for Life Dodgeball Promotion Rhythms Fest Easter Basket Fundraiser Sound De Venus Exercise Your Write College Hour Speaker: Andy Froehle Factory Farming Booth Speaker: Victoria Buresch Family Picnic Spirited Away ­ Food Sale Finals Week Freebies Spring Fest Food Drive (7) The Constitution and Patriot Act Free Coffee!! Title of Activity G Day "Saint Patrick's Day" Tostada Sale Ghandi, MLK, Ikeda Training Concert Ghandi, MLK, Ikeda Tuskegee Airmen Git'n Yeehaw'd Valentine Bake Sale Gospel Doctrines Veteran's Day Recognition Gospel Jubilee Video Show of Encouragement 52  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
    • Activities Halloween Fundraiser Voter Registration/Education Halloween/Dia de los Muertos Voting Awareness Health Awareness: Great American Smokeout Weekly Anime Showings Health/Safety Fair Welcome Back College Hour HIV/AIDS Awareness Why Business is Important in Oceanside Hurricane Relief College Hour 9.6 Community Events MiraCosta College welcomes members of the community to a broad spectrum of events on all three district campuses. Art, dance, film festivals, lectures, music, and theatre are all a part of the offerings made to the community each year. Table 43: 2005­2006 Events on the San Elijo Campus San Elijo Campus Activities Dance “Buddhist and Tibetan Folk Dance performed by Tibetan Monks” “Lion Dance Chinese New Year Celebration” Dance Studio Hour (Fall and Spring) International Film Series "Maria Full of Grace" ­ Colombia/USA "Spirited Away" ­ Japan "Downfall" ­ Germany "The Chorus" ­ France "The House of Flying Daggers" ­ China "The Sea Inside" ­ Spain "Twilight Samurai" ­ Japan "Caterina in the Big City" ­ Italy "Schultze Gets the Blues" ­ Germany "A Very Long Engagement" ­ France Lectures and Presentations “Congressional 50th District Debate” “Kids at College with Paul Ecke Elementary School” "The Flora of San Diego County and the Plant Atlas Project" ­ Dr. Jon P. Redman “Changing the Way you See Your Life” “Constitutional Rights and Liberties: Patriot Act” “Love Shouldn’t Hurt: Discussion on Domestic Abuse” “Stories of Survivors: Breast Cancer Awareness” “Transfer Night Information for High School Students and Parents” Al Young ­ California's new Poet Laureate LIFE ­ Learning Is For Everyone Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  53
    • San Elijo Campus Activities Silent Film Fest featuring "Mantrap" ­ Lecture by Philip Carli Table 44: 2005­2006 Events on the Oceanside Campus Oceanside Campus Activities Art Exhibitions Faculty Art Exhibit "Passages" ­ Metal Point Drawings, Photographs and Images ­ Dean Bienvenido Ramos and Matt Micajah Truitt Ernest Silva ­ Paintings "F is For Fish" ­ Ceramic Sculpture and Mixed Media by Hank Strause and Anthony Richards "Sincerely" ­ Paintings by Leslie Nemour "Dreams and Visions" ­ All media student art show Theatre Productions "Brighton Beach Memoirs" "Fuente Ovejuna" "Assassins" "As You Like It" Dance "Shapes and Reflections ­ 2005" "Day of Dance ­ 2006" "Dance Break ­ 2006" Cinco de Mayo ­ Aztec Dancers Dance Showcase ­ "Step into Ireland" Music Performances Faculty and Staff Concert "Songs Without Words" ­ Mira Costa Chamber Chorale, Camerata Singers and the North Coast Concert Chorale "Music of the Masters" ­ North Coast Symphony Orchestra Songwriters' Concert "Holiday Sparkler"­ North Coast Symphony Orchestra "Christmas by Candlelight" ­ MiraCosta Chamber Chorale and Camerata Singers MiraCosta College Guitar Orchestra Concert People's Choice Concert ­ Student Performances Concert Music of African American Composers ­ MiraCosta College Orchestra "Solo Time" ­ MiraCosta College Orchestra and members from the local community "Bring It On!" ­ North Coast Concert Chorale and the MiraCosta College Chamber Chorale International Film Series "Maria Full of Grace" ­ Colombia/USA "Spirited Away" ­ Japan "Downfall" ­ Germany "The Chorus" ­ France "The House of Flying Daggers" ­ China "The Sea Inside" ­ Spain 54  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
    • Oceanside Campus Activities "Twilight Samurai" ­ Japan "Caterina in the Big City" ­ Italy "Schultze Gets the Blues" ­ Germany "A Very Long Engagement" ­ France Lectures and Presentations "Border Art and Culture" ­ Marcos Ramirez "Erre" Silent Film Fest featuring "Submarine" ­ Lecture by Philip Carli LIFE ­ Learning Is For Everyone Community events are not limited to our three campuses. MiraCosta College performances and activities also take place out in the community. Table 45: 2005­2006 Events Held in the Community Music Performances MiraCosta College Guitar Ensemble "Gaudette" ­ North Coast Concert Chorale and the MiraCosta College Chamber Chorale Choral Concert ­ San Elijo Chorale "Old and New" ­ North Coast Chorale and Chamber Chorale Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  55
    • 9.7 Use of College Facilities and Programs As a community college, MiraCosta opens up its doors to allow members of the community to use its resources. District libraries track the amount of usage generated by non­MiraCosta Students: Table 46: Library Usage by Non­MiraCosta College Students – 2005­2006 Library Patron Hours FLS Student Hours Total Hours June 2005 7.4 13.4 20.8 July 2005 21.6 10.3 31.9 August 2005 114.4 5.6 120 September 2005 109.7 42 151.7 October 2005 10.3 0.6 10.9 November 2005 5.6 0 5.6 December 2005 2.9 0 2.9 January 2006 52.9 44.1 97 February 2006 149.5 131.7 281.2 March 2006 148.2 136.6 284.8 April 2006 21.6 29.4 51 May 2006 0 0 0 Total 644.1 413.7 1057.8 Community members/students may also expand their educations by auditing courses. This process is available to students who have successfully completed a given course the maximum number of times allowable, and are interested in attending the course to improve their skill or knowledge in that area. Pending the approval of the faculty member, those intending to audit a course may pay a nominal charge to participate in course activities without earning college credit. Table 47: MiraCosta College Class Audits 2003­2006 2003­2004 2004­2005 2005­2006 Summer 9 20 21 Fall 60 118 83 Spring 80 123 86 Total 149 261 190 56  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
    • Core Value 10: Beautiful Welcoming Campuses 10.1 Facilities Master Plan The Facilities Master Plan involves the future building projects for MiraCosta College. The 2006 plan laid out the guidelines for future improvements on all three college campuses. While space on our campuses is limited, one of the goals of the plan was to increase the amount of classroom space while still meeting the guidelines mandated by the Chancellor’s Office. Future improvements include: · Adding classroom buildings on all three campuses · Creating an aquatics complex on the Oceanside Campus · Expand parking at the Community Learning Center · New gateway signage to improve the visibility of the San Elijo Campus A complete copy of the Plan can be viewed at the following URL: http://www.miracosta.edu/Administrative/Downloads/Facilities%20Master%20Plan.pdf 10.2 Campus Climate Surveys A section of the 2006 student survey was devoted to opinions on campus grounds and facilities. Data indicates that students are for the most part, satisfied with MiraCosta’s facilities: Table 48: Satisfaction with Facilities – 2006 Credit and Noncredit Student Surveys Oceanside San Elijo Community Learning Center Agree Disagree Don't Know Agree Disagree Don't Know Agree Disagree Don't Know The buildings are accessible to students 96% 3% 1% 98% 1% 1% 98% 1% 1% I feel that MiraCosta College provides a safe and secure environment 95% 4% 1% 97% 2% 1% 96% 2% 2% The classroom buildings are clean and well­ maintained 97% 3% 1% 98% 2% 0% 99% 1% 1% Restroom and locker room facilities are clean and well maintained 84% 12% 5% 91% 5% 5% 88% 7% 5% Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  57
    • Oceanside San Elijo Community Learning Center Agree Disagree Don't Know Agree Disagree Don't Know Agree Disagree Don't Know The grounds support a welcoming environment 96% 3% 1% 98% 2% 0% 98% 1% 1% Classroom facilities adequately support student learning programs and services 94% 2% 4% 96% 2% 2% 96% 2% 2% Campus walkways are well lit 84% 7% 9% 82% 8% 10% 91% 1% 8% Parking facilities are well lit 78% 12% 10% 80% 11% 9% 80% 5% 15% Parking facilities are adequately maintained. 90% 8% 3% 95% 4% 1% 85% 6% 10% Students were asked to rate their level of agreement with the statements above based on the campus at which the survey was administered. This was in an effort to address the needs of any specific campus. Areas of concern on both campuses are the cleanliness of the restrooms, as well as lighting on campus walkways and in the parking facilities. 58  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
    • Core Value 11: Innovation and Ability to Change 11.1 Resource Allocations for Innovations, Enhancements, New Initiatives and Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) MiraCosta College’s commitment to innovation and change is evidenced by the amounts budgeted annually for new funding requests. The amounts of funding allocated are based on the needs of prior years. 2005­2006 was the first year for implementation for the TCO process, and funding was based on an estimated number of submissions. Table 49: Allocations for Funding Requests Funding Type Amount Allocated Enhancements $250,000 Facilities­related Enhancements $350,000 New Initiatives $200,000 Innovations $ 50,000 Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) $1,700,000 (including indirect costs) The Planning and Budgeting Council (PBC) in conjunction with the TCO subcommittee worked to verify that as many projects as possible were funded given the constraints of the amounts of available funding, the 50% law and existing processes already in place. 11.1a Outcomes of the New Initiatives, Innovations and Enhancement Requests The most rewarding part of the funding process is learning about the amazing things that the money helped to facilitate. Listed below are the outcomes of the projects funded for 2005­2006: Table 50: Outcomes of New Initiatives Funded FY 2005­2006 Approved New Initiative Outcome Funds Collaborated with Indian River Community Explore, Customize, Implement Strategic Planning College (FL) to develop SPOL at MiraCosta $25,000 Online (SPOL) College. System was implemented and first utilized in Spring 2006. Learning communities were expanded in traditionally difficult courses (English, math, sciences). It involved 14 unique courses in Learning Communities $22,000 Fall and 29 unique courses in Spring. Retention rates of participants were higher than students who did not participate in the program. The final curriculum will go to APA on Oct. 20, and the program will begin in the Massage Therapy Curriculum & Equipment $16,150 Fall 2007. Students who complete the certificate will be qualified to work in local spas, salons and doctors offices. Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  59
    • Approved New Initiative Outcome Funds Position hired in 2005­2006 to implement the Degree Audit system. The bulk of the set­up was completed in its first year, testing is Evaluator $70,000 currently in progress with evaluators, and expected to be released to the counselors in Spring 2007. Initiated “Transforming Lives Through Education” newsletter. Organized and staffed legislative visits in Washington DC seeking federal appropriation for Nursing Building of a Fund Development Office (Op Budget) $25,800 program. Provided funding for routine operational expenses. Initiation of an active Fund Development Office resulted in revenue increase from approximately $350,000 to $700,000. In Spring 2006 more than 2000 surveys were conducted within the credit and noncredit Annual Surveys of Students, Staff, Faculty $15,000 programs. Faculty/staff survey slated for implementation in 2008. Created marketing materials for the President’s Circle Program including invitations, brochure, web pages, welcome package, and other accessory items, thereby giving the philanthropic organization a unified look. Hosted two President’s Circle Part­time Temporary Annual Fund Director $30,075 events and increased membership from 30 – 40, adding $12,000 in new funds. Organized a faculty/staff committee to raise funds for the arts during the 2006­2007 year. Put together direct mail program to increase payroll deduction for the arts campaign. Some of the activities funded through this request: UC/CSU campus tours, bilingual University Bridge Services to Increase Transfer transfer materials, classroom visits and $6,420 Student Diversity outreach efforts. A detailed explanation can be found in College Mission section 1.6 of this document. The Cyber Tutoring initiative hired and trained a dedicated staff of 1 coordinator and 7 tutors that have built the WEB foundation for on­line tutoring to be implemented in Cyber Tutoring (student hourly tutors) $10,880 subsequent years. Eight student, tutor, and faculty focus groups provided feedback on the tools for use in on­line environments and developed strategies to roll out Phase I of on­line tutoring in Fall 2006 60  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
    • Table 51: Outcomes of Innovations Funded FY 2005­2006 Approved Innovation Outcome Funds The Basic Skills subcommittee of the Letters Department completed a year­long study on best practices in developmental education. Their report was presented to Basic Skills Revision/Dev of Summer the Letters Department and recommendations approved. $13,067 Many of these recommendations are now funded by the College statewide Basic Skills initiative. Since these state funds are one­time funds, the subcommittee will prepare a funding request for next year. Media Arts $3,560 Data Not Available Project completed. New keyboards reduced 30­40 Credit Card Keyboards $2,000 keystrokes for each credit card transaction and improved overall accuracy. Curriculum developed to explore issues related to Terrorism and homeland Security from various Operation Terrorism/Homeland Security $6,400 perspectives. First course offered in Fall 2006. Exploration is underway to achieve POST certification for this course. Increase Online Offerings (4x$4K ea) $16,000 Project re­evaluated and withdrawn. Course presented to AP&P Preview in Spring 2006. Formal Spanish for Health Care Providers Course $700 approval is expected in Fall 2006 and course offerings are expected in Fall 2007. Shelter built to house a campus police e­car at the San Elijo E­car Shelter at SAN $2,907 campus. Project was completed in Spring 2006. The introduction to service learning video was completed in June 2006. A professional videographer was hired to work with a team of students to create a short production Video $800 that could be used for promotional purposes. The video highlights MiraCosta students working at various community organizations and inspires others to get involved. This project provided information, guidance and mentoring on the process of attending graduate school. Workshops Strengthening District Pipeline: were well attended and additional funding will be sought $5,000 Community College to Graduate School in upcoming years. More detailed information on this project can be found in College Mission section 1.6 of this document. Portable Lighting Studio $7,800 Project completed Table 52: Outcomes of Enhancements Funded FY 2005­2006 Enhancement Approved Outcome Funds The increase in hours replaces hours lost to past budget cuts. Being very lab­intensive, Instructional Associate from 10month to 12 month $12,500 the Biology program relies heavily on the Instructional Associate. Project completed Part­time Program Assistant – 16 hrs $18,000 This is an ongoing project as the contract with Xerox is for five years. Enhancement Students Printing Management Solution $50,000 covered the first year of funding, and permanent funding will be sought in subsequent years. The Biotechnology Instructional Associate is a critical support position funded initially as BTEC Manufacturing Instructional Associate $60,000 an enhancement. This is a highly specialized technical support position charged with Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  61
    • Enhancement Approved Outcome Funds making media preps and keeping the equipment operational. Permanent funding will be sought through a TCO as a part of the Biomanufacturing program. Project completed Increase Academic Senate President Release Time $8,800 Project completed Reconfiguration of Admin Bldg Lobby $10,000 Project completed Development of a Phlebotomy/IV Certification $3,000 Hours increased to meet the needs of the Increase Switchboard/Receptionist Hours $18,586 institution. Funding used to travel to Facilitator/Travel Funds, train the trainer $30,000 Outcomes/Assessment Conferences and to host faculty training activities. Memory Upgrade – for SAN 309 $8,700 Project completed Project completed Large Venue Projector $7,000 Six Language Lab Computers $6,750 Project completed Project completed Parking Machine Laptop $1,724 The Surgical Technology Instructional Associate was hired in 2005­2006, providing Instructional Assoc for Surgical Technology $17,000 support to the new program. Permanent funding has been approved for subsequent years. Ongoing project. Product review is currently underway, but no suitable product Electronic Student Portfolio System Dev $10,000 has been selected. Chariot Advisor Compensation increase from 40 to 72 Project completed $36,553 hours/month Project completed Memory Upgrade – Recording Studios $2,418 Three Computer Workstations @ SAN UTC $5,940 Project completed A variety of campus­wide activities such as convocations, Community Education orientation, retreats, travel for classified Staff Development Budget $57,000 staff, mediation training, legal training for supervisors, and support for PDP were funded. Each project would have its own outcome and indicators for success. 62  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
    • 11.1b Number of Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) Requests that Emanated as an Innovation, New Initiative or Enhancement As a new process, TCO accounts for the true cost of funding a project. It accounts for the cost to fund the project itself, the indirect costs of the project, and any long range cost for maintaining the project in the future. With limited amounts of funds available, the Planning and Budgeting Council (PBC) must make the decision as to which projects are funded in a given year. Projects previously funded as Innovations, New Initiatives and Enhancements have the benefit of being able to provide data that supports permanent funding. As this is a new process, the first group of TCO requests was funded for 2006­2007. A listing of those who were previously funded as Innovations, New Initiatives and Enhancements will be included in the 2006­2007 edition of this document. 11.2 New Program Development In 2005­2006 there were two new instructional programs implemented. Accounting became a stand­alone discipline within the Business Department. A Surgical Technology Program also began within the Health Occupations Department. 11.3 Partnerships, Grants and Contracts Many of the exciting programs and services offered by MiraCosta College are funded through grants and partnerships from outside sources: Table 53: State and Local Grants FY 06 STATE AND LOCAL GRANTS Award Amt VTEA Regional Consortium 7,300.00 VTEA­Tech Prep 67,148.00 VTEA­Tech Prep Local Network 200,000.00 *¢ DOL­Biotech Workforce 774,999.68 * California Campus Compact 6,530.00 Small Business Administration 111,252.00 Small Business Administration 99,433.00 Workforce Investment JPA 55,000.00 CTE LVN to RN 499,390.00 * TANF Child Development Careers 57,911.00 Grossmont CCD­Professional Academy 36,352.00 Biogen Idec Faculty Assistance 60,000.00 Child Development­West Ed 2,500.00 Child Development­YCCD 17,000.00 SDCCD Tech Prep 3,350.00 San Diego Workforce­Life Science Training 197,200.00 * Cisco Regional Training Academy 7,500.00 ¢  * Awards that span two fiscal years. Amounts reflect total award amount. Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  63
    • Acknowledgments The Office of Institutional Research would like to thank the members of the campus community who contributed to this document and work tirelessly to make MiraCosta College the best community college in California. 64  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006