Key Performance Indicators
          2005­2006




Prepared by the Office of Institutional Research
Preface

In the 2005­2006 academic year, MiraCosta College began a process of systematic data collection
to quantify the s...
Table of Contents

Preface...................................................................................................
College Mission 4: Basic Skills Education .....................................................................18
      4....
3.3 Course Offerings and Innovations .................................................................................... ...
Core Value 11: Innovation and Ability to Change........................................................59
      11.1 Resou...
Part I
                       MiraCosta College Mission


MiraCosta College, one of California’s comprehensive, public two...
College Mission 1: Transfer Education

1.1 Annual Number of Transfers

MiraCosta College prides itself on providing a path...
Approx.    2000­   2001­   2002­   2003­   2004­
Four­Year Institution                                    Distance   2001 ...
Table 4: Percentage of Degree­Seeking Students from Other Institutions 2002­2006
                                         ...
A college’s continuation rate captures the number of students who enroll for a fall term and then
enroll for a subsequent ...
Mexican­
                 African­American     American Indian                                      Total
                ...
o   Created new services for students interested in transferring to UCSD ­ Eva Jimenez at
        UCSD created list serve ...
We also have two additional preferred admission programs:

        o     UCI PAIF – Preferred Admission Into the Field
   ...
Educational
    Goal                         Fall 2002               Fall 2003               Fall 2004               Fall ...
College Mission 2: Vocational Education


2.1 Vocational Degrees

Vocational Education is another critical element in the ...
Figure 5: Certificates Awarded 2001­2006
  400




  350
         334



  300                                            ...
2.5 Semester­to­Semester and Fall­to­Fall Persistence Rates (MCC)

At the time of PBC’s original approval of the KPIs, it ...
Educational
    Goal                           Fall 2002           Fall 2003             Fall 2004            Fall 2005
  ...
College Mission 3: General Education

Note: General Education has different definitions depending on the context. For the ...
Table 13: Semester­to­Semester and Fall­to­Fall Persistence Rates
Educational
   Goal                       Fall 2002     ...
3.5 Student Progress Rate

This is another measurement that will be calculated using the ARCC framework. The
Chancellor’s ...
3.7 FTES Generated

The monitoring of Full­Time Equivalent Students (FTES) is a crucial component of any
community college...
College Mission 4: Basic Skills Education

4.1 Successful Course Completion

This item’s description comes from the ARCC r...
College Mission 5: Community Education



5. A Community Services and Business Development

5. A.1 Program Offerings and G...
The most significant changes within Community Services have been made to the Business and
Career courses between 2004­2005...
5. A.2 Student Enrollment

As a revenue­based program, the Community Services offerings serve the changing needs and
desir...
5. B ­ Continuing Education (Tuition­free Noncredit)

5. B.1 Course Offerings and Significant Changes

The Continuing Educ...
Figure 8: FTES Generated by Noncredit Program 2002­2005
      600.0



      500.0



      400.0



      300.0



      ...
Table 21: ESL Progress ­ Term IV
                                                                  Promotion Rate
        ...
5. B.4 Retention Rates

Retention rates are computed for English as a Second Language and adult high school students
using...
College Mission 6: Support Services


6.1 Program Offerings and Significant Changes

MiraCosta College offers a wide varie...
6.3 Student Satisfaction Rates

Overall, students are satisfied with the services that MiraCosta College offers. During th...
6.4 Working Capacity

This measurement accounts for the amount of service (i.e., appointments) available to students,
and ...
Part II
                 MiraCosta College Core Values




   1. Primary Purpose of Teaching and Learning
   2. Collegiali...
Core Value 1: Primary Purpose of Teaching and Learning

As an institution of higher education, our principle focus centers...
1.3 Resource Allocation

When making decisions related to the budget and the implementation of new programs, the 50%
law i...
Core Value 2: Collegiality & Shared Governance


2.1 Board Policies and Procedures

Within the policies and procedures of ...
2.4 Resource Allocation

Designated members of the Classified and Academic Senates receive release time in order to
partic...
Core Value 3: Technology Leadership

3.1 Technology Master Plan

The Technology Master Plan is a comprehensive document th...
Core Value 4: Positive Working/Learning Environment


4.1 Campus Climate Surveys

During the Spring 2006 semester, surveys...
Core Value 5: Highest Quality Through Effectiveness, Efficiency and
Accountability


5.1 Finance and Attendance Audits

Mi...
Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
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Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006

  1. 1. Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006 Prepared by the Office of Institutional Research
  2. 2. Preface In the 2005­2006 academic year, MiraCosta College began a process of systematic data collection to quantify the successes and improvements of the institution. Central to this process is this document, the Key Performance Indicators (KPI). KPI measurements are tied directly to the College’s Mission and Core Values, and our hope is that over time they will create both a quantitative and qualitative picture of MiraCosta College. The initial set of Indicators contained within this document were developed by the Research and Planning Office, then reviewed, discussed and approved by the Planning and Budgeting Council. Once a draft document was available, input was gathered from the college community on areas in need of revision and improvement. Information contained within this document was gathered from our local student database, class schedules, college catalogs and other sources. It should be noted that each section of the College Mission and Core Values is numbered solely for the purposes of organization. It is not an indicator of priority or importance to the District. ii  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
  3. 3. Table of Contents Preface........................................................................................................ii Table of Contents....................................................................................iii Part I ........................................................................................................... 1 MiraCosta College Mission .................................................................... 1 College Mission 1: Transfer Education ............................................................................2 1.1 Annual Number of Transfers ............................................................................................... 2 1.2 Reverse Transfers................................................................................................................... 3 1.3 California State University Grade Point Average and Continuation Rate...................... 4 1.4 Transfer Readiness ................................................................................................................ 5 1.5 Underrepresented Students .................................................................................................. 5 1.6 Grants, Initiatives and Programs Developed...................................................................... 6 1.7 Number of Signed UC Transfer Guarantees ...................................................................... 7 1.8 Persistence Rates of Transfer Students ............................................................................... 8 College Mission 2: Vocational Education ......................................................................10 2.1 Vocational Degrees.............................................................................................................. 10 2.2 Vocational Certificates ........................................................................................................ 10 2.3 Retention Rates .................................................................................................................... 11 2.4 Persistence Rates.................................................................................................................. 11 2.5 Semester­to­Semester and Fall­to­Fall Persistence Rates (MCC) ................................... 12 2.6 Vocational Enrollment Statistics........................................................................................ 13 2.6a Vocational Retraining........................................................................................................ 13 College Mission 3: General Education ...........................................................................14 3.1 Program Offerings, Significant Changes and Enrollment Patterns ............................... 14 3.2 Retention Rates .................................................................................................................... 14 3.3 Persistence Rates (ARCC) ................................................................................................... 14 3.4 Semester­to­Semester and Fall­to­Fall Persistence Rates ................................................ 14 3.5 Student Progress Rate.......................................................................................................... 16 3.6 Number of Instructional Associate Degrees (Excludes Vocational)............................... 16 3.7 FTES Generated ................................................................................................................... 17 Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  iii
  4. 4. College Mission 4: Basic Skills Education .....................................................................18 4.1 Successful Course Completion........................................................................................... 18 4.2 ESL Improvement Rate ....................................................................................................... 18 4.3 Basic Skills Improvement Rate .......................................................................................... 18 College Mission 5: Community Education ....................................................................19 5. A Community Services and Business Development ......................................................... 19 5. A.1 Program Offerings and Growth.................................................................................................................................. 19 5. A.2 Student Enrollment........................................................................................................................................................ 21 5. A.3 Number of First­time MCC Students........................................................................................................................ 21 5. A.4 Student Satisfaction Rates ........................................................................................................................................... 21 5. B ­ Continuing Education (Tuition­free Noncredit)........................................................... 22 5. B.1 Course Offerings and Significant Changes ............................................................................................................. 22 5. B.2 Program Enrollments ..................................................................................................................................................... 22 5. B.3 Noncredit Student Progress ......................................................................................................................................... 23 5. B.4 Retention Rates................................................................................................................................................................ 25 College Mission 6: Support Services ..............................................................................26 6.1 Program Offerings and Significant Changes.................................................................... 26 6.2 Student Participation Rates ................................................................................................ 26 6.3 Student Satisfaction Rates .................................................................................................. 27 6.4 Working Capacity ................................................................................................................ 28 Part II ........................................................................................................29 MiraCosta College Core Values............................................................29 Core Value 1: Primary Purpose of Teaching and Learning..........................................30 1.1 Educational Master Plan ..................................................................................................... 30 1.2 Program Review................................................................................................................... 30 1.3 Resource Allocation............................................................................................................. 31 Core Value 2: Collegiality & Shared Governance.........................................................32 2.1 Board Policies and Procedures ........................................................................................... 32 2.2 Academic Senate, Classified Senate and Student Senate Governance.......................... 32 2.3 Committee Structures.......................................................................................................... 32 2.4 Resource Allocation............................................................................................................. 33 Core Value 3: Technology Leadership............................................................................34 3.1 Technology Master Plan...................................................................................................... 34 3.2 Resource Allocation............................................................................................................. 34 iv  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
  5. 5. 3.3 Course Offerings and Innovations .................................................................................... 34 Core Value 4: Positive Working/Learning Environment..............................................35 4.1 Campus Climate Surveys.................................................................................................... 35 4.2 Student Services Program Review ..................................................................................... 35 Core Value 5: Highest Quality Through Effectiveness, Efficiency and Accountability ...............................................................................................................36 5.1 Finance and Attendance Audits ......................................................................................... 36 5.2 College and Program Accreditations ................................................................................. 36 5.3 State and Federal Accountability Reports......................................................................... 36 5.4 Efficiency Assessments of Facilities and Utilities............................................................ 36 5.5 Campus Climate Surveys.................................................................................................... 36 Core Value 6: Decision Making Based on Research Data and Evidence ...................38 6.1 Strategic Planning................................................................................................................ 38 6.2 Program Review................................................................................................................... 39 6.3 Research and Data Collection............................................................................................. 39 Core Value 7: Career Preparation and Economic Development..................................40 7.1 Vocational Programs............................................................................................................ 40 7.2 Career Services ..................................................................................................................... 41 7.3 Small Business Development Center ................................................................................ 42 7.4 Community Services/Business Development................................................................... 42 Core Value 8: A Climate Which Promotes Diversity ....................................................43 8.1 Curriculum and Programs................................................................................................... 43 8.2 Student Organizations and International Programs ........................................................ 47 8.3 Hiring Processes and Outcomes......................................................................................... 48 Core Value 9: Service to Our Community......................................................................50 9.1 Community Links ................................................................................................................ 50 9.2 Service Learning................................................................................................................... 50 9.3 Community Services............................................................................................................ 50 9.4 Noncredit Program............................................................................................................... 51 9.5 College Events...................................................................................................................... 51 9.6 Community Events .............................................................................................................. 53 9.7 Use of College Facilities and Programs ............................................................................. 56 Core Value 10: Beautiful Welcoming Campuses...........................................................57 10.1 Facilities Master Plan......................................................................................................... 57 10.2 Campus Climate Surveys .................................................................................................. 57 Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  v
  6. 6. Core Value 11: Innovation and Ability to Change........................................................59 11.1 Resource Allocations for Innovations, Enhancements, New Initiatives and Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) ................................................................................................................. 59 11.1a Outcomes of the New Initiatives, Innovations and Enhancement Requests ............ 59 11.1b Number of Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) Requests that Emanated as an Innovation, New Initiative or Enhancement .......................................................................... 63 11.2 New Program Development ............................................................................................. 63 11.3 Partnerships, Grants and Contracts ................................................................................. 63 Acknowledgments ............................................................................................................64 vi  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
  7. 7. Part I MiraCosta College Mission MiraCosta College, one of California’s comprehensive, public two­ year community colleges, has served the coastal area of North San Diego County for 70 years. In recognizing individuals and domestic and international communities are diverse and changing, the college is committed to offering a variety of programs and services in the following areas: 1. Transfer Education 2. Vocational Education 3. General Education 4. Basic Skills Education 5. Community Education 6. Support Services Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  1
  8. 8. College Mission 1: Transfer Education 1.1 Annual Number of Transfers MiraCosta College prides itself on providing a pathway to the four­year institutions for its students. Data for Table 1 uses the 2000­2001 academic year as a baseline, and measures the increase in the number of transfers each year compared to that baseline. Figures are based on data provided by the California Post Secondary Education Commission (CPEC). Table 1: MiraCosta College Transfer Rates Baseline 2001­2002 2002­2003 2003­2004 2004­2005 Year 2000­2001 University of California 107 ­ 6.5% + 24.3% + 40.2% + 15.9% California State University 333 + 10.5% + 20.1% + 2.1% + 28.8% Listed below are the numbers of transfer students who have transferred to the California State University and University of California Systems by campus: Table 2: MiraCosta College Transfers to the University of California 2000­2005 Approx. Distance 2000­2001 2001­2002 2002­2003 2003­2004 2004­2005 University of California, Berkeley 427 mi 6 3 5 6 5 University of California, Davis 446 mi 5 2 5 9 3 University of California, Irvine 45 mi 2 7 4 4 3 University of California, Los Angeles 89 mi 7 9 7 13 12 University of California, Riverside 54 mi 8 5 14 5 2 University of California, San Diego 22 mi 61 66 80 92 72 University of California, Santa Barbara 169 mi 9 2 10 9 22 University of California, Santa Cruz 375 mi 9 6 8 12 5 Totals 107 100 133 150 124 Table 3: MiraCosta College Transfers to the California State University 2000­2005 Approx. 2000­ 2001­ 2002­ 2003­ 2004­ Four­Year Institution Distance 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 California Maritime Academy 436 mi N/A N/A 1 2 0 California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo 241 mi 2 4 2 2 6 California State Polytechnic University, Pomona 66 mi 3 4 4 4 5 California State University, Bakersfield 181 mi 1 3 1 1 0 California State University, Channel Islands 121 mi N/A N/A 0 0 1 California State University, Chico 517 mi 5 8 4 1 4 California State University, Dominguez Hills 72 mi 1 2 0 0 2 California State University, East Bay 409 mi 1 0 4 2 0 California State University, Fresno 286 mi 0 1 2 1 2 California State University, Fullerton 58 mi 8 10 13 5 19 2  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
  9. 9. Approx. 2000­ 2001­ 2002­ 2003­ 2004­ Four­Year Institution Distance 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 California State University, Long Beach 62 mi 15 11 18 15 13 California State University, Los Angeles 78 mi 1 2 3 3 6 California State University, Monterey Bay 350 mi 3 2 1 3 3 California State University, Northridge 101 mi 8 5 13 5 4 California State University, Sacramento 437 mi 2 2 4 3 0 California State University, San Bernardino 68 mi 1 0 1 3 3 California State University, San Marcos 9 mi 187 234 245 209 285 California State University, Stanislaus 360 mi 0 1 2 1 0 Humboldt State University 649 mi 3 5 8 3 5 San Diego State University 32 mi 71 63 56 51 47 San Francisco State University 427 mi 16 9 13 23 17 San José State University 386 mi 2 2 2 0 4 Sonoma State University 466 mi 3 0 3 3 3 Totals 333 368 400 340 429 The number of MiraCosta College transfers provided by the CSU and UC systems do not tell the full story. The numbers do not list students who may have completed other units at other community colleges and are therefore listed with that institution. Students also transfer to private and out­of­state institutions in numbers that have yet to be quantified. MiraCosta College recently gained access to the National Student Clearinghouse database, allowing for some additional tracking measures to be put into place. We will continue to work with the transfer center to appropriately identify and track MiraCosta College students through their educational experience. 1.2 Reverse Transfers Reverse transfer students are those students who enroll at a four­year institution, but at some point in their progress, decide to enroll at MiraCosta prior to completing their Bachelor’s degree. Currently, the available student data does not allow us to exclusively track those students who come to us from a four­year school without their Bachelor’s degree. We can determine whether or not they have attended college elsewhere, but cannot determine which students came from a four­year institution and which came from another community college. It is still valuable to know the percentage of our student population who enroll at MiraCosta each semester after attending other institutions. Students in this category are identified each term as “New Transfer Students” (NTR) on their college application. To separate out those students taking courses for personal enrichment as opposed to degree­seeking and certificate­seeking students, only those NTR students with the following goals were selected: o 2­Year Vocational Degree – No Transfer o AA Degree and Transfer to a Four­Year Institution o AA Degree – No Transfer o Transfer to a Four­Year Institution without an AA degree o Vocational Certificate – No Transfer Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  3
  10. 10. Table 4: Percentage of Degree­Seeking Students from Other Institutions 2002­2006 Fall 2002 Fall 2003 Fall 2004 Fall 2005 Total New Transfer Students 1982 1635 1649 1717 Total Degree­Seeking New Transfers 1196 994 987 966 Percentage of Degree­Seeking New Transfers (of Total Enrollment) 11% 10% 10% 9% In any given term, approximately 10% of MiraCosta College’s credit student populations are degree­seeking students who have already attended other colleges, community colleges or universities. 1.3 California State University Grade Point Average and Continuation Rate Student success is not measured solely by the number of students who transfer to a given institution. It is not enough to transfer students, if they are not prepared for the rigors of the new institution once they arrive. The California State University system (CSU) provides data on MiraCosta College transfers after one year of attendance anywhere in the CSU system. The University of California does not currently provide this information about transfer students, but efforts are underway to secure this information in future editions of this document. Figure 1: Grade Point Averages of MiraCosta College Students at the CSU 4 3.5 3.13 3.01 3.06 3.02 3.08 3 2.88 2.92 2.93 2.93 2.94 2.5 MiraCosta College 2 System­wide Total 1.5 1 0.5 0 Fall 2000 Fall 2001 Fall 2002 Fall 2003 Fall 2004 MiraCosta College students have grade point averages that are consistently above the statewide average. 4  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
  11. 11. A college’s continuation rate captures the number of students who enroll for a fall term and then enroll for a subsequent fall term. Like the grade point averages, MiraCosta remains consistently higher than the statewide average. Figure 2: Continuation Rates of MiraCosta College Students at the CSU 100% 86% 86% 89% 89% 88% 90% 80% 85% 85% 85% 85% 85% 70% 60% MiraCosta College 50% Systemwide Total 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Fall 2000 Fall 2001 Fall 2002 Fall 2003 Fall 2004 1.4 Transfer Readiness The term “transfer ready” refers to the number of students who have completed 60 UC/CSU transferable units with a GPA of 2.0 or higher. This calculation will be done annually with the new Accountability Report for the Community Colleges (ARCC­ formerly “Partnership for Excellence”). The first of these reports will be available in January 2007. 1.5 Underrepresented Students Within the mission of increasing transfers is the goal of providing transfer opportunities for underrepresented students. The tables below illustrate the number of underrepresented students who transferred to the CSU and UC over the last five years. Table 5: Transfer Rates of MiraCosta College Underrepresented Students to CSU1 Mexican­ African­American American Indian Total American/Latino # % # % # % # % 2000­2001 8 2.40% 2 0.60% 62 18.60% 72 21.60% 2001­2002 11 3.00% 2 0.50% 46 12.50% 59 16.00% 2002­2003 10 2.50% 4 1.00% 62 15.50% 76 19.30%  1  Ethnicity terminology from CSU. Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  5
  12. 12. Mexican­ African­American American Indian Total American/Latino 2003­2004 13 3.80% 0 0.00% 60 17.60% 73 21.40% 2004­2005 15 3.50% 8 1.90% 68 15.90% 91 21.30% Table 6: Transfer Rates of MiraCosta College Underrepresented Students to UC2 African­American American Indian Chicano/Latino Total # % # % # % # % 2000­2001 2 1.90% 0 0.00% 14 13.10% 16 15.00% 2001­2002 1 1.00% 2 2.20% 7 7.00% 10 10.20% 2002­2003 4 3.00% 1 1.10% 23 17.30% 28 21.40% 2003­2004 5 3.30% 1 0.70% 14 9.30% 20 13.30% 2004­2005 3 2.40% 3 2.40% 16 13.00% 22 17.80% In all cases, the proportion of underrepresented transfer students is significantly below those of the general credit student population. This is an area that needs additional focus in the upcoming years. 1.6 Grants, Initiatives and Programs Developed Two transfer­related grants were approved via the college funding process during 2005­2006: University Bridge Serves and Strengthening the Pipeline to the Doctorate. University Bridge Services – Increasing Diversity of Transfer Students As the title indicates, the first grant addresses the issue of the lack of diversity within the transfer student population. In 2005­2006, the following grant activities were conducted: o Classroom visitations: offered services to all ESL and MATH 820, 100, and 101. Other classroom visitations including Child Development and English. o Create bilingual transfer material (two documents). o Began designing bilingual web page. o Circulated over 1500 of each new bilingual transfer document to current MCC students and high school outreach. o Four tours: UCR, CSUSM, SDSU, UCSD. o Two presentations for EOPS: Biotech and Nursing. o Club outreach: MECHA, Puente, BSU, Care. o Created new university links with CSUSM: As a result of our cooperative efforts with CSUSM, the Bridge Building Partnership between CSUSM and a number of local community colleges has re­emerged. One of the expected outcomes of this partnership is developing and carrying out a one­day conference titled: Opening the Doors of Higher Education to be hosted by CSUSM in Spring 2006. Freddy Ramirez, will serve as a planning committee member for this conference that will focus on improving transfer opportunities for underrepresented students from MiraCosta and other local community colleges.  2  Ethnicity terminology from UC. 6  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
  13. 13. o Created new services for students interested in transferring to UCSD ­ Eva Jimenez at UCSD created list serve of students who visited UCSD on tour and will contact them monthly with updates and opportunities. In addition to the activities for 2005­2006, there are additional goals and activities planned for 2006­2007. The ultimate outcome of this grant will be evident in the increased numbers of underrepresented students transferring to four­year institutions in upcoming years. Strengthening the Pipeline to the Doctorate – Community College to Graduate School The second grant focused on increasing the number of community college students who would continue on to graduate school after completing their Bachelor’s degree. Specific goals of the program were: o Strengthening the link between community college, university, and research university systems. o Creating a graduate school belief system in the educational pipeline. o Developing transition programs between the systems. o Producing practicing scholars. Some of the activities included: § Workshops on the general requirements for getting into graduate school. § Creating outreach material on: Myths vs. Reality of Graduate School Admissions. § Guest speakers: Professionals and graduate school admission staff/professors to present material on their fields. § Faculty/student­mentor information sessions initiated by the individual students with vouchers to the cafeteria to host the faculty member of their choice. § Creating worksheets for students to use as a guideline for the graduate school process. § Update and expand graduate school web site. Several workshops were held at both the San Elijo and Oceanside campuses, and attendance averaged 75 people at each event. This is an area of interest amongst our students and the Transfer Center hopes that funding for the program will continue. 1.7 Number of Signed UC Transfer Guarantees Another measurement of our transfer successes is the number of students who sign transfer guarantees. MiraCosta College has guaranteed and preferred admission programs to several UC schools provided students complete certain criteria. Our guaranteed admission programs include: o UCSD TAG ­ Transfer Admission Guarantee o UCSD UniversityLink Program (students become eligible to apply to UniversityLink Medical Science Program) o UCD TAA – Transfer Admission Agreement o UCR TAG – Transfer Admission Guarantee o UCSB TAA – Transfer Admission Agreement o UCSC GATE – Guaranteed Admission for Transfer Entry Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  7 
  14. 14. We also have two additional preferred admission programs: o UCI PAIF – Preferred Admission Into the Field o UCLA TAP – Transfer Alliance Program (UCLA College only, except for Communications) Figure 3: Number of Signed UC Transfer Agreements3 2000 ­ 2001 through 2005 ­ 2006 160 148 140 131 120 116 100 80 74 64 60 40 40 20 0 2000­2001 2001­2002 2002­2003 2003­2004 2004­2005 2005­2006 1.8 Persistence Rates of Transfer Students Another measurement of the future successes of our transfer students is the percentage of students who persist from one semester to the next. Listed below are the percentages of first­ time, full­time students who have an educational goal of transferring to a four­year institution. Persistence is defined two ways in the table: those students who enroll in Fall and return to the Spring semester, and those students who enroll in a subsequent Fall semester. Table 7: Persistence Rates of First­Time, Full­Time Students Who Intend to Transfer Educational Goal Fall 2002 Fall 2003 Fall 2004 Fall 2005 Transfer to four­yr. Total 113 138 162 186 without AA Persist to 89 79% 117 85% 136 84% 160 86% Spring Persist to 62 55% 84 61% 104 64% NA NA  Next Fall 3  Includes all transfer guarantees and UCLA TAP preferred admission program. 8  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
  15. 15. Educational Goal Fall 2002 Fall 2003 Fall 2004 Fall 2005 AA degree and Total 406 461 457 496 Transfer to four­yr. Persist to 350 86% 387 84% 376 82% 419 84% Spring Persist to 271 67% 292 63% 298 65% NA NA Next Fall Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  9
  16. 16. College Mission 2: Vocational Education 2.1 Vocational Degrees Vocational Education is another critical element in the mission of MiraCosta College. Students completing vocational degrees learn skills and techniques that apply directly to their chosen field of employment. Figure 4: Number of Vocational Degrees Awarded 2002­2006 70 63 60 55 49 50 50 48 40 30 20 10 0 2001-2002 2002-2003 2003-2004 2004-2005 2005-2006 2.2 Vocational Certificates MiraCosta College offers two types of certificates: Certificate of Competence and Certificate of Achievement. Requiring a minimum of 18 units of instruction, Certificates of Competence are designed to prepare students for immediate entry into the workforce. Units earned through these certificates can also be used by students interested in earning an Associates degree. Certificates of Achievement are short­term programs of study (less than 18 units) for students interested in learning the basics of a given field of employment. Completion of these certificates prepares students for entry­level employment. In most cases, the units earned in these programs can be applied to the Certificates of Competence. 10  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
  17. 17. Figure 5: Certificates Awarded 2001­2006 400 350 334 300 287 287 261 250 235 234 Certificates of Competence 200 188 Certificate of Achievement 155 146 150 100 92 50 0 2001­2002 2002­2003 2003­2004 2004­2005 2005­2006 2.3 Retention Rates MiraCosta College defines retention as the number of students receiving an A, B or C grade over the total number of grades received (excluding IP ­ In Progress, I – Incomplete and RD ­ Record Delayed grade). Students enrolled in vocational classes had the following retention rates for the last four years: Table 8: Retention Rates of Students in Vocational Courses 2002­2005 Fall 2002 Fall 2003 Fall 2004 Fall 2005 68% 66% 70% 69% 2.4 Persistence Rates This item was included in the original ARCC (AB1417) document, but was removed from the latest draft. The Chancellor’s Office will be calculating persistence, but only as it relates to the college as a whole, not to specific areas such as vocational or basic skills education. Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  11
  18. 18. 2.5 Semester­to­Semester and Fall­to­Fall Persistence Rates (MCC) At the time of PBC’s original approval of the KPIs, it was decided that MiraCosta would measure persistence of its vocational students in a different manner than that proposed by the ARCC. We defined vocational students as the number of first­time, full­time students who indicated a vocational and/or career­related educational goal. Persistence was defined as the number of these students who enrolled in any course for the subsequent Spring and Fall semesters. Table 9: Persistence Rates of Vocational Students 2002 ­ 2005 Educational Goal Fall 2002 Fall 2003 Fall 2004 Fall 2005 Vocational Degree ­ No Transfer Total 25 29 10 11 Persist to Spring 21 84% 21 72% 10 100% 10 91% Persist to Next Fall 14 56% 12 41% 7 70% NA NA Vocational Certificate ­ No Transfer Total 24 37 23 26 Persist to Spring 17 71% 31 84% 20 87% 23 88% Persist to Next Fall 11 46% 23 62% 12 52% NA NA Maintain Certificate/License Total 3 3 3 8 Persist to Spring 3 100% 3 100% 3 100% 5 63% Persist to Next Fall 1 33% 2 67% 3 100% NA NA Prepare for New Career/Job Skill Total 10 13 6 12 Persist to Spring 8 80% 10 77% 4 67% 9 75% Persist to Next Fall 4 40% 6 46% 3 50% NA NA Discover / Formulate Career Total 11 10 12 2 Persist to Spring 7 64% 8 80% 9 75% 0% Persist to Next Fall 6 55% 8 80% 7 58% NA NA Total Total 73 92 54 59 Persist to Spring 56 77% 73 79% 46 85% 47 80% 12  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
  19. 19. Educational Goal Fall 2002 Fall 2003 Fall 2004 Fall 2005 Persist to Next Fall 36 49% 51 55% 32 59% NA NA 2.6 Vocational Enrollment Statistics Listed below are the enrollment statistics for vocational classes: Table 10: Vocational Enrollment Statistics Number of Students Number of FTES (Unduplicated) Enrollments Fall 2002 4,126 6,132 696.07 Fall 2003 3,968 5,883 630.15 Fall 2004 3,804 5,739 681.23 Fall 2005 3,935 5,826 663.57 2.6a Vocational Retraining This measurement illustrates the number of students we served though our vocational programs in a given year who had already completed a Bachelor’s degree. We were interested in learning how many students were coming to MiraCosta College for the purposes of changing careers. To illustrate this point, we examined the number of students enrolling at MiraCosta College with a Bachelor’s degree or higher against their listed major. Table 11: Students Enrolling with a Vocational Major after Bachelor’s Degree 2002­2006 Fall 2002 Fall 2003 Fall 2004 Fall 2005 BA Holders 1066 1002 940 1083 Total Percentage of BA Degree Holders 10% 10% 10% 10% BA Degree Holders reporting a Vocational Major 255 316 300 335 Percentage of BA Degree Holders reporting a Vocational Major 24% 32% 32% 31% Over the last four terms, approximately 30% of our Bachelor’s degree holding students have enrolled at MiraCosta College and have chosen a vocational major. Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  13
  20. 20. College Mission 3: General Education Note: General Education has different definitions depending on the context. For the purposes of this document, we refer to “General Education” as the general academic programs of the college. Areas that exclude vocational or basic skill areas will be specifically noted. 3.1 Program Offerings, Significant Changes and Enrollment Patterns o Top 10 most popular majors in Fall 2005: § Business Administration § General Studies § Nursing Licensed Vocational § University Studies § Psychology § Biological Sciences § Accounting § Child Development § Music § Real Estate 3.2 Retention Rates MiraCosta College defines retention as the number of students receiving an A, B or C grade over the total number of grades received (excluding IP ­ In Progress, I – Incomplete and RD ­ Record Delayed grade). Students enrolled in non­vocational/non­basic skill classes had the following retention rates for the last four years: Table 12: Retention Rates Fall 2002 Fall 2003 Fall 2004 Fall 2005 65% 65% 66% 65% 3.3 Persistence Rates (ARCC) This item will come directly from the ARCC report published in January, and will deal with the college as a whole, rather than specific areas of study. ARCC defines persistence as: Percentage of cohort of first­time students with minimum of six units earned in a fall term who return and enroll in the subsequent fall term anywhere in the system. 3.4 Semester­to­Semester and Fall­to­Fall Persistence Rates As was done in the Vocational Education section, we provided additional persistence information based on students’ educational goals. The figures below represent first­time, full­ time students. 14  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
  21. 21. Table 13: Semester­to­Semester and Fall­to­Fall Persistence Rates Educational Goal Fall 2002 Fall 2003 Fall 2004 Fall 2005 AA degree, no transfer Total 36 31 37 40 Persist to Spring 29 81% 23 74% 24 65% 26 65% Persist to Next Fall 22 61% 12 39% 18 49% NA NA Advance in current job Total 4 1 2 1 Persist to Spring 2 50% 1 100% 1 50% 1 100% Persist to Next Fall 1 25% 0% 1 50% NA NA Complete credits for HS/GED Total 1 1 1 Persist to Spring NA 0% 1 100% 1 100% Persist to Next Fall NA 0% 1 100% NA NA Educational Development Total 7 2 3 10 10 Persist to Spring 7 100% 1 50% 3 100% 7 7 Persist to Next Fall 4 57% 0% 2 67% NA NA Undecided on Goal Total 38 48 58 66 Persist to Spring 29 76% 32 67% 49 84% 56 85% Persist to Next Fall 21 55% 22 46% 27 47% NA NA Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  15
  22. 22. 3.5 Student Progress Rate This is another measurement that will be calculated using the ARCC framework. The Chancellor’s Office defines student progress as: Percentage of cohort of first­time students with minimum of 12 units earned who attempt a degree/certificate/transfer threshold course within six years of entry who are shown to have achieved ANY of the following outcomes or value­added measures of progress within six years of entry: o Earned any AA/AS or Certificate (18 or more units) o Actual transfer to a four­year institution (student shown to have enrolled at any four­year institution of higher education after enrolling at a CCC) o Achieved “Transfer Directed” (student successfully completed both transfer­level Math AND English courses) o Achieved “Transfer Prepared” (student successfully completed 56 UC/CSU transferable units with a GPA >=2.0 in those transferable courses) o Earned at least 30 units while in the CCC system (value­added threshold of units earned as defined in wage studies as having a positive affect on future earnings) 3.6 Number of Instructional Associate Degrees (Excludes Vocational) Many students each year complete an Associate’s degree in what’s called an instructional major. The focus of these degrees is less about the direct preparation for employment as it is a field of interest. Figure 6: Instructional Associate Degrees 450 424 400 400 348 348 350 323 307 300 250 200 150 100 50 0 01­02 02­03 03­04 03­04 04­05 05­06 16  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
  23. 23. 3.7 FTES Generated The monitoring of Full­Time Equivalent Students (FTES) is a crucial component of any community college. MiraCosta is unique because it is one of the community colleges that do not receive the majority of its funding based on FTES. These figures are still important because it is a good measure of the college’s overall productivity in a given year. A concerted effort to increase the number of FTES was undertaken during the last few years. Activities included the conversion of many open­lab classes to distance education (online) courses, new and innovative marketing strategies combined with a thorough examination of our attendance and record keeping practices. These efforts combined with increases in enrollments have resulted in FTES growth in a time when many other colleges have seen their figures decline. Figure 7: Factored FTES 2000­2006 7800 7734.85 7729.63 7600 7509.8 7446.5 7400 7319.33 7200 7000 6928.46 6800 6600 6400 2000­2001 2001­2002 2000­2001 2003­2004 2004­2005 2005­2006 Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  17
  24. 24. College Mission 4: Basic Skills Education 4.1 Successful Course Completion This item’s description comes from the ARCC report, but the definition is the same as MiraCosta’s definition of successful retention. Data from the Chancellor’s Office indicates that MiraCosta’s basic skills retention rate is above the statewide average. Table 14: Successful Course Completion Fall 2002 Fall 2003 Fall 2004 Fall 2005 Statewide Average 49% 49% 49% 48% MiraCosta College 58% 60% 58% 57% The retention rates of our basic skills students are the lowest of our three reference groups (vocational, general education and basic skills courses.) This is an area that will warrant additional study in the upcoming years. 4.2 ESL Improvement Rate This item will be provided in the ARCC report. The ARCC defines the ESL Improvement Rate as: Percent of students who successfully completed at least one credit ESL course in a term who successfully completed a higher level ESL course or a college level course within two years of taking the first ESL course (a three­year cohort examination). Only students starting at two or more levels below college level/transfer level will be counted. At this point in time the ARCC will not be including noncredit ESL courses in their calculations. We are working on finalizing a similar measurement of our own to include the noncredit ESL program. 4.3 Basic Skills Improvement Rate This item will also be provided in the ARCC report. The ARCC defines the Basic Skills Improvement Rate as: Percent of students who successfully completed at least one credit or noncredit basic skills course in a term who successfully completed a higher level basic skills course in the same discipline (reading, writing, math, respectively) or a college level course within two years of taking the first basic skills course (a three­year cohort examination). Only students starting at two or more levels below college level/transfer level will be counted. 18  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
  25. 25. College Mission 5: Community Education 5. A Community Services and Business Development 5. A.1 Program Offerings and Growth The Community Services and Business Development department of MiraCosta College consists of two areas: Community Services and Business Development. Community Services offers fee­ based, not­for­credit courses, workshops, and other activities that members of the community can participate in for personal and professional development. Business Development provides training for businesses and other organizations in a contract education mode which may be offered as not­for­credit, noncredit, or credit. The new offerings in the Community Services area in 2005­2006 were: o Summer 2005 § Accessories: Tools for Expanding and Enhancing Your Wardrobe § Become a California State Notary Public § Fabulous Locations to Invest In § Learn 2 Step: Stepping Dance Lessons § Windows and Walls o Fall 2005 § Basics of Screenwriting § Becoming a Voice­Over Performer § How to Write a Song § Retirement Planning Today o Spring 2006 § Better Business Writing § Cartooning: The Basic Skills § Earrings, Earrings, Earrings § Healthful Herbs for a Healthier Sex Life § Illustrating Children’s Books § Introduction to Acting and Audition Preparation § Life Drawing § Local Marine Mammals § Makeover Challenge for the Home § Online SAT/ACT Prep Classes § Painting en Plein Air § Screenwriting for Fun and Maybe Profit § Silk Painting § S.M.A.R.T. Consumer Workshop § Swing Dance Levels 1 and 2 § Using Dreams to Transform Your Life § Wine 101 Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  19
  26. 26. The most significant changes within Community Services have been made to the Business and Career courses between 2004­2005 and 2005­2006. Course offerings have expanded and additional online certificate programs have been added: Table 15: Online Career Training and Certificate Programs through Community Education Healthcare Programs Administrative Dental Assistant Coding Reimbursement and Pharmacy Technician Documentation for Physicians Administrative Medical Specialist HIPAA Compliance (4 user licenses) Revenue Management for Healthcare (Medical Billing and Coding) Providers Advanced Coding for the Physician’s ICD­10 Medical Coding: Preparation Veterinary Assistant Office and Instruction Advanced Hospital Coding and CCS Medical Transcription Prep Business Programs Administrative Professional with Lean Mastery Records Management MOS Bookkeeping the Easy Way Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) Six Sigma Greenbelt Certified Bookkeeper Project Management Travel Agent Training Internet, Design and Technical Programs AutoCAD 2005 Help Desk Specialist Webmaster Digital Arts Certificate Multimedia Design Certificate Graphic Design Web Database Developer Networking and CompTIA Certification Training Programs A+ Certification Linux+/LPI Level One Certification Security+ Certification Cisco CCNA Certification Network+/Server+ Certification Microsoft Certification Training Programs Microsoft Certified Database Microsoft Certified System Microsoft Certified System Administrator (MCDBA) Administrator 2003 (MCSA) Administrator Microsoft Certified System Engineer 2003 (MCSE) Construction Technology Home Inspection Certificate HVAC Technician Certificate Video Game Design and Development Programs 3ds max Video Game Design and Development Advanced Video Game Design and Development 20  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
  27. 27. 5. A.2 Student Enrollment As a revenue­based program, the Community Services offerings serve the changing needs and desires of the community. The enrollments reflected in the chart below are unduplicated; for example, a single student enrolling in four activities would be counted four times, once for each enrollment. The decline in excursion enrollments is the intentional result of fewer offerings in this area. Although excursions serve the interests of some members of the community, they are very labor intensive with a low profit margin. Table 16: Community Education Enrollments 2000­2006 2000­2001 2001­2002 2002­2003 2003­2004 2004­2005 2005­2006 Excursion Enrollments 283 522 512 541 478 274 Class Enrollments (Art, Business, Language, etc.) 4574 4590 5314 4597 3961 3952 Events Enrollments (College for Kids, Driver’s Ed, etc.) 2322 2635 2646 2154 2663 2962 Contract Education (Employees Served) 1295 1640 1110 1224 1493 1644 5. A.3 Number of First­time MCC Students Limited demographic information is collected about students who enroll in the Community Services program, so additional discussion will be necessary on the best method of capturing this information. An informal survey of the end of activity evaluation forms for Spring 2006 indicated that approximately 49% of the students were first­time enrollees at MiraCosta. 5. A.4 Student Satisfaction Rates Satisfaction surveys are distributed to every student who enrolls in a Community Education course. Data from these surveys will be transferred into an electronic format for analysis in future years. Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  21
  28. 28. 5. B ­ Continuing Education (Tuition­free Noncredit) 5. B.1 Course Offerings and Significant Changes The Continuing Education program offers at least some tuition­free, noncredit courses in all nine of the authorized areas of noncredit instruction: Elementary (usually called Adult Basic Education) and Secondary (adult high school and GED preparation) Basic Skills, English as a Second Language, Immigrant Education (citizenship), Consumer Education, Health and Safety, Parenting, courses for adults with substantial disabilities, courses for older adults, and Short­ Term Vocational Education. The most significant changes have been in finding ways to meet the ongoing demand for English as a Second Language by adding Saturday classes and offering additional opportunities for structured courses in the Community Learning Lab. Other changes include offering the Cisco Networking program in an open­entry format similar to some of the credit courses in Computer Information Systems and the addition of a Netlab, an enhancement approved through PBC for 2006­2007, which will allow students to access the hands­on portions of the curriculum from a remote location. 5. B.2 Program Enrollments When the College was required in 2003 to reduce offerings because of budget cuts, noncredit met the requirement by reducing the number of instructional hours in many of the courses offered in the categories other than adult high school, English as a Second Language, and Short­Term Vocational. We have never returned to the pre­cut hours in some of the courses. Other factors which have impacted enrollment in the past two years are immigration issues and the foreign deployment of Camp Pendleton Marines. Nevertheless, the noncredit programs and classes continue to provide the community with a broad range of educational opportunities with high standards. Table 17: Headcount and FTES of the Noncredit Program 2002­2005 2002­2003 2003­2004 2004­2005 2005­2006 Unduplicated Headcount 6987 6576 6249 6318 FTES 1152.19 1048.75 1079.65 1051.42 The FTES within the noncredit program show overall increases in the classes for seniors and the adult high school diploma program. 22  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
  29. 29. Figure 8: FTES Generated by Noncredit Program 2002­2005 600.0 500.0 400.0 300.0 200.0 100.0 0.0 Adult High English as Adult Basic Consumer Health and Parenting Special Courses for Vocational School a Second Education Education Safety Skills Education Seniors Education Diploma Language 2002­2003 224.9 49.7 502.2 20.5 98.7 33.2 78.5 115.3 29.3 2003­2004 230.8 43.8 463.4 18.4 86.6 28.5 60.4 96.0 20.8 2004­2005 217.4 56.13 489.45 16.96 22.46 23.86 65.68 171.37 16.33 2005­2006 214.6 47.85 465.3 17.61 30.09 24.81 58.12 177.82 15.21 5. B.3 Noncredit Student Progress Student progress is measured in the English as a Second Language program by the way in which students move through the seven levels of instruction. Faculty assess students’ learning outcomes in listening, speaking, reading and writing skills at the end of each of the nine­week terms in order to determine each student’s readiness to progress to the next level. Students can complete four, nine­week courses over the course of the Fall and Spring semesters. Progress is measured in each course: Table 18: ESL Progress ­ Term I Promotion Rate Morning 46% Evening 42% Program Average 44% Table 19: ESL Progress ­ Term II Promotion Rate Morning 50% Evening 59% Program Average 55% Table 20: ESL Progress ­ Term III Promotion Rate Morning 47% Evening 60% Program Average 54% Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  23
  30. 30. Table 21: ESL Progress ­ Term IV Promotion Rate Morning 63% Evening 56% Program Average 60% The primary method of determining the progress of students in the Adult High School Diploma Program is the number of diplomas awarded each year. Although that is the primary method of measuring progress, each student who has earning the diploma as a goal meets with a counselor or advisor each nine­week term prior to enrolling in the subsequent term. His/her progress toward the goal is assessed by reviewing the requirements completed and those remaining and completing or updating the Educational Plan both in the student’s personal file and that retained in the Community Education Office. Many students enroll in the program with goals other than completing a high school diploma, upgrading skills in English and mathematics prior to enrollment in college credit courses or in order to advance in the workplace, earning credits to transfer to their home high school to meet diploma requirements, for example. Figure 9: Number of Adult High School Diplomas 2000­2006 140 131 129 120 104 100 100 96 95 80 60 40 20 0 2000­2001 2001­2002 2002­2003 2003­2004 2004­2005 2005­2006 No method for defining progress in the other categories of noncredit has been devised as those courses are most often taken for personal or professional enrichment. Research needs to be conducted to assess the progress of ESL and adult high school students who transition into credit courses and programs. 24  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
  31. 31. 5. B.4 Retention Rates Retention rates are computed for English as a Second Language and adult high school students using formulas different from those used for credit. The formula used for determining retention in ESL is the number of students who completed a nine­week term with acceptable hours of attendance (no more than five classes missed during the term) divided by the number of students who registered for the class. For example, if 37 students registered for a class and 28 successfully completed, the retention rate would be 76%. The program retention rate for 2005­2006 was 78%. Table 22: ESL Retention ­ Term I Retention/Persistence Morning 79% Evening 78% Program Average 79% Table 23: ESL Retention ­ Term II Retention/Persistence Morning 79% Evening 78% Program Average 79% Table 24: ESL Retention ­ Term III Retention/Persistence Morning 78% Evening 74% Program Average 76% Table 25: ESL Retention ­ Term IV Retention/Persistence Morning 81% Evening 75% Program Average 78% The formula for calculating retention rates for adult high school students is similar to that used for credit students as grades are awarded in the program. The major difference is that a grade of D counts as a successful completion of a course. Since high school credit is granted for a course completed with that grade by the local high schools, MiraCosta accepts that standard, as well. Table 26: Average Retention Rates of ADHSP 2002­2006 Fall 2002 Fall 2003 Fall 2004 Fall 2005 69% 56% 66% 62% Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  25
  32. 32. College Mission 6: Support Services 6.1 Program Offerings and Significant Changes MiraCosta College offers a wide variety of support services for its students: o Admissions and Records o Library o Bookstore (Oceanside) o Service Learning o Bookstore (San Elijo) o Scholarships o Campus Life/Activities o School Relations & o Campus Police Diversity Outreach o Career Center o Sports o Child Development Center (CDC) o Student Accounts Office o Counseling o Study Abroad o Disabled Student Program o Testing and Services (DSPS) o Transcripts o Extended Opportunity Program o Tutoring and Academic and Services (EOPS) Support o Financial Aid o University Transfer Center o Health Services o Veterans Services o Honors Scholar Program o Wellness Center o International Students o Writing Center o Language Resource Center There were no significant changes in services during the 2005­2006 academic year. 6.2 Student Participation Rates Student support services are a key component to any student experience. Listed below are the participation rates of some of the student services for the last four years. Table 27: Student Services Participation Rates 2002­2003 2003­2004 2004­2005 2005­2006 Annual Unduplicated Credit 17,498 16,426 15,997 16,712 Enrollment Extended Opportunities Programs and % 3% 4% 5% 5% Services (EOPS) # 562 614 735 767 % 3% 3% 4% % Disables Student Programs and Services Not yet # 518 544 560 available % 37% 42% 48% 48% Financial Aid # 6525 6942 7681 8000 26  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
  33. 33. 6.3 Student Satisfaction Rates Overall, students are satisfied with the services that MiraCosta College offers. During the Spring 2006 semester, students were surveyed on their opinions regarding their satisfaction with various aspects of MiraCosta College. A total of 1046 valid credit surveys were collected, spanning the San Elijo and Oceanside campuses. A noncredit version of the survey was distributed at the Community Learning Center, generating 233 responses To rate satisfaction, students were first asked the number of times they had used a particular service. They were then asked to rate each service on a Likert Scale that ranged from “Very Satisfied” to “Very Dissatisfied.” Students also had the option of indicating “Don’t Know.” The satisfaction rates below come from students who indicated that they had used a particular service at least one time. Table 28: Credit Student Services Satisfaction Rates – Spring 2006 n (number of Satisfied Dissatisfied Don't Know responses) Admissions and Records 923 91% 5% 4% Counseling 761 82% 14% 4% Transfer Center 420 82% 5% 13% Career Center 261 72% 7% 21% Writing Center 267 87% 4% 10% Tutoring Center 333 84% 5% 11% Math Learning Center 324 89% 4% 7% Open Computer Lab 684 93% 2% 5% Financial Aid 369 76% 12% 12% EOPS 122 82% 5% 13% DSPS 83 71% 8% 20% Student Health Center 251 83% 5% 12% College Bookstore 973 85% 12% 4% Cafeteria 823 85% 12% 3% Library Services 840 93% 2% 5% Table 29: Noncredit Student Services Satisfaction Rates – Spring 2006 n (number of responses) Satisfied Dissatisfied Don't Know Counseling 116 94% 3% 3% Writing Center 31 94% 6% 0% Tutoring Center 43 91% 9% 0% Open Computer Lab 136 96% 1% 4% DSPS 25 92% 8% 0% College Bookstore 141 86% 11% 4% Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  27
  34. 34. 6.4 Working Capacity This measurement accounts for the amount of service (i.e., appointments) available to students, and the number of appointments utilized in a given year. Since not all student services work on an appointment basis, additional discussion will be necessary in the future versions of this document. 28  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
  35. 35. Part II MiraCosta College Core Values 1. Primary Purpose of Teaching and Learning 2. Collegiality and Shared Governance 3. Technology Leadership 4. Positive Working/Learning Environment 5. Highest Quality Through Effectiveness, Efficiency and Accountability 6. Decision­making Based on Research, Data and Evidence 7. Career Preparation and Economic Development 8. A Climate the Promotes Diversity 9. Service to Our Community 10. Beautiful Welcoming Campuses 11. Innovation and Ability to Change Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  29
  36. 36. Core Value 1: Primary Purpose of Teaching and Learning As an institution of higher education, our principle focus centers on our students and the quality of education they receive. These measurements are designed to measure our ongoing commitment to quality instruction and services provided by MiraCosta College. 1.1 Educational Master Plan At the conclusion of the Spring 2006 semester, the Academic Master Plan Committee completed the master plan’s latest rewrite. It involved individuals from all areas of the institution (faculty, administrators and classified staff) coming together and charting the course for MiraCosta College for the next three years. The plan described the evolution of MiraCosta College, as well as a snapshot of the institution as it stands today. The largest portion of the document provides detail in the form of goals and action plans that show the direction of the institution in the future. The final draft was presented to the Board of Trustees in May 2006. The master plan can be viewed in its entirety at the following URL: http://www.miracosta.edu/OfficeOfThePresident/PIO/Publications/Academic%20Master%20 Plan.pdf 1.2 Program Review The educational needs of our students are in constant transition. The demographics of the service area, the local economy and the job market all play a role in what programs we offer. In order to ensure that we are meeting the needs of the community, all instructional programs go through a regular review and evaluation process. Programs are reviewed on a six­year cycle with several reports due in the interim. Its intent is to examine each academic program and determine what is necessary to allow it to function more efficiently. The Office of Institutional Research provides a summary of data that includes enrollment, FTES, cost per FTE, success/retention as well as grade distributions. Departments use this data to create a complete picture of the functioning of the program, and at that time decide whether expansion or consolidation of a given program is warranted. Table 30: Noncredit Student Services Satisfaction Rates – Spring 2006 Student Services 3­Year Review Career Studies Services, CIS, International Languages, Retention Services, Social Science 6­Year Review *Short­term Vocational Art, Drama, DSPS, HAAT, Mathematics *Older Adults The outcomes of the program review process not only assist the departments themselves, but also the formulation of the master plans and the accreditation process. 30  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
  37. 37. 1.3 Resource Allocation When making decisions related to the budget and the implementation of new programs, the 50% law is central to the discussion. As the title indicates, no more than 50% of funding can be used on “non­instructional” items. This law was written in the 1950’s, when there were a limited number of support services offered outside of the classroom. As the capabilities of the institution expand and we serve the needs of our students in new and innovative ways, we increasingly find that our funding needs are falling on the non­qualifying side of the law. MiraCosta College continues to monitor all spending to ensure that we remain within the law’s guidelines, but realize that changes in the law are necessary to meet the needs of our students. We have begun working with the Chancellor’s Office and the Governor to propose changes that would expand the definition of what can be considered as “instructional items.” Figure 10: MiraCosta College Application of the 50% Law 2000­2007 55.00% 54.23% 54.17% 54.00% 53.60% 53.00% 52.66% 52.00% 50.88% 51.08% 51.00% 50.00% 50.00% 50.00% 49.00% 48.00% 47.00% FY 00 FY 01 FY 02 FY 03 FY 04 FY 05 FY 06 (Projected) FY 07 Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  31
  38. 38. Core Value 2: Collegiality & Shared Governance 2.1 Board Policies and Procedures Within the policies and procedures of the Board of Trustees, there are items that address the issue of collegiality and shared governance. In December 2002, the Board adopted a Policy Governance Manual still in effect today. And in addition to this manual, there are several areas of Board Policy that deal with the roles of the senates in collegial governance. o Board Policy I.C.1: Academic Senate Role in Collegial Governance o Board Policy I.C.2: Classified Staff Role in Collegial Governance o Board Policy I.C.3: Student Participation in Collegial Governance This issue has been the subject of campus­wide discussion during the 2005­2006 academic year, and will likely result in revision of policies in future years. 2.2 Academic Senate, Classified Senate and Student Senate Governance Shared governance is a strongly held belief at MiraCosta College. This is evidenced by the variety of representation not only on the District Standing Committees, but within the senates themselves. Each governance group strives to ensure that there is representation by members of all three campuses. All senate members, regardless of their part­time or full­time status are encouraged to participate in the governance process. The Academic Senate approved a document titled “Collegiality, the Academic Senate and Its Code of Ethics” in April 2002. This document is a product of the Academic Senate Council on Ethics and Professional Standards, and is still used and referenced today. 2.3 Committee Structures The Academic Senate has 20 standing committees and two ad hoc committees in which 131 different senate members participate.4 Given the limited compensation for part­time faculty, committees are largely made up of full­time faculty and administrators. The Classified Senate also has eight standing committees in which at least 20 different senate members participate.5 Committees have a pre­determined structure to allow adequate representation in the process. Students, faculty, staff and administrators are all encouraged to participate and have a voice in the decision­making process.  4  Source: 2005­2006 list of committee membership on the Academic Senate web site.  5  Source: 2005­2006 list of committee membership on the Classified Senate web site. 32  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
  39. 39. 2.4 Resource Allocation Designated members of the Classified and Academic Senates receive release time in order to participate in the governance process. The Classified Senate is granted 50% release time for the president, eight hours per month for the vice president, and senators are granted four hours per month. Within the Academic Senate, the president has historically been granted 50% release time, but was funded for 80% release time based on a new initiative funded for 2005­2006. This funding will continue for 2006­2007, at which time the decision will be made about whether or not to request permanent funding from the Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) Committee. The president has an additional 40% of release time to be granted to other senate members at his/her discretion. Neither the Vice President nor the senators are granted additional release time as it is seen as a part of their contractual obligation. In 2005­2006 the entirety of the discretionary release time was given to the vice president for the purposes of chairing the Academic Master Plan Committee.  Table 31 Members of Senates Departments Academic Senate Classified Senate Senator­ Network Specialist Academic Information Services Behavioral Science Council Member Biological Science Council Member Business Council Member/Representative Senator­ Instructional Division Secretary Business Administrative Services Business Administrative Services Vice President­ Campus Police Dispatcher Business Administrative Services Treasurer­ Accounting Specialist Computer and Information Science Representative Counseling Representative Senator­ Systems Administrator Senator­ Media Services Aide Senator­ Administrative Secretary Instructional Services President­ Administrative Secretary Senator­ Tutoring Services Specialist Senator­ IT Specialist Letters Council Member Library Representative Mathematics President Physical Science Council Member, Associate Faculty Member President’s Office Council Member Social Science Vice President/Representative, Council Member/Representative, Associate Faculty Member Theatre, Dance and Communication Arts Council Member, Representative Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  33
  40. 40. Core Value 3: Technology Leadership 3.1 Technology Master Plan The Technology Master Plan is a comprehensive document that addresses the present and future needs of the institution. Planning through 2007, the goals of the master plan included expanding the functionality and usability of our ERP, increasing training for faculty, staff and students on the variety of technology at their disposal, and the creation of a web portal that will streamline business processes for all areas of the campus community. The Technology Master Plan was approved by the Board of Trustees in June 2006. 3.2 Resource Allocation As a rule, technology has a very short lifespan. Both hardware and software need to be replaced on a frequent basis, requiring long­range planning for each item purchased. It is not enough to account for the cost of the item itself without considering the future costs of replacing that item over time. The Strategic Planning for Information Technology Committee (SPIT) was among the first groups on campus to adopt a “Total Cost of Ownership” method of purchasing new technology for the campus. Items approved for purchase are automatically put on a replacement cycle and budgeted accordingly. 3.3 Course Offerings and Innovations All faculty, staff and students have multiple opportunities during the academic year to take courses that help maintain and improve their technological skills. Courses are offered during flex week and at select times during the year. Help is available on an as­needed basis from our campus technology specialists and in online formats via the College Help Desk. The full listing of training resources can be found on MiraCosta’s website: http://www.miracosta.edu/Instruction/AIS/training/ 34  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006
  41. 41. Core Value 4: Positive Working/Learning Environment 4.1 Campus Climate Surveys During the Spring 2006 semester, surveys were distributed to credit and noncredit students, asking their opinions on their satisfaction with the campus environment, and whether or not they felt that MiraCosta provided a positive learning environment. Amongst the findings: o 95% of credit students felt that MiraCosta College offers a student­friendly environment o 94% of noncredit students felt that MiraCosta College offers a student­friendly environment o 97% of credit students would recommend MiraCosta College to a friend or family member. The results from the student surveys were encouraging, and we hope to continue this process in upcoming years to monitor the needs of our students. In 2008 we hope to implement an employee survey for the same purpose. 4.2 Student Services Program Review  Like MiraCosta’s instructional programs, services to students also undergo an annual  program review process.  The specifics of this review are currently being revised.  Completed program review documents are available through the Vice President of  Student Services Offices. Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006  35
  42. 42. Core Value 5: Highest Quality Through Effectiveness, Efficiency and Accountability 5.1 Finance and Attendance Audits MiraCosta College undergoes several audits each year to verify that its operational and business practices are within the guidelines of state and local regulations. The audits cover the financial aspects of the institution, the accounting of FTES, business practices for attendance accounting and record keeping, and an audit of the Foundation. The final audit for 2005­2006 will not be completed until the end of the 2006 calendar year. 5.2 College and Program Accreditations MiraCosta College completed its last accreditation visit in 2004, will complete a mid­term report in March 2007. 5.3 State and Federal Accountability Reports The newest accountability report is the “Accountability Report for the Community Colleges” (ARCC). This report examines cohorts of students over six­year timeframes and measures success, retention, persistence and progress through various programs. 5.4 Efficiency Assessments of Facilities and Utilities All buildings constructed for MiraCosta College are done so with utilities conservation in mind. No official usage assessment existed in 2005­2006, but steps are being taken in 2006­2007 to quantify usage and the savings derived. 5.5 Campus Climate Surveys Efficiency is extremely important in the eyes of our students, as the ease or difficulty to enroll in classes can make a difference as to whether or not a student chooses to enroll in future semesters. In the Spring 2006 student survey, students were asked to rate the ease of certain processes on a Likert scale that ranged from “Very Easy” to “Very Difficult.” Students who indicated “N/A” for these ratings were not included in the final calculations: 36  Key Performance Indicators 2005­2006

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