Exploring Career Development Options at CSU

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  • Why was this workshop scheduled by Organisational Development? The 2003 Climate Survey indicated that CSU needed to provide staff with information regarding career planning & development, staff promotion & rewards & recognition. As such, the question regarding promotion in the survey was very broad (the promotion process within CSU is effective, the promotion process within CSU is fair)– promotion at CSU is applicable to academic staff only. Areas that rated poorly from the whole CSU community that responded (918 staff) were: I am given opportunities to develop the skills that I need to do my job 48% The rewards & recognition I receive from this job are fair 38% The promotion process within CSU is easily understood 31% The promotion process within CSU is effective 18% The promotion process within CSU is fair. 19% I have (or have had) good opportunities for career development at CSU. 32% 85. Enough time & effort is spent on career planning. 14% In 2004 a range of policies and guidelines were developed to improve access to continuous professional development and career development at the University. This is one workshop that will be provided for general staff. Others planned for 2005 include: Information sessions for general & academic staff outlining the new schemes (see handout) Updating your resume & preparing a job application for CSU positions (June 2005) Preparing for interview for CSU positions (June 2005) Staff selection techniques for CSU interview committees (July 2005) Definition of a career vs a job Job – Way to earn a livelihood. Short term, task orientated. People tend to undertake tasks delegated to them. (means to an end) Career – People seek a longer term commitment to a profession or employer. They may undertake higher education, extensive training or seek experiential opportunities. Individuals may derive fun or enjoyment out of the work experience. (a journey) Career development at CSU is defined as the development of skills, knowledge and experience to prepare staff for a future position at a similar or higher level than their current position (definition developed by Jenny Bell).
  • Job – Way to earn a livelihood. Short term, task orientated. People tend to undertake tasks delegated to them. Means to an end. Career – People seek a longer term commitment to a profession or employer. They may undertake higher education, extensive training or seek experiential opportunities. Individuals may derive fun or enjoyment out of the work experience. The path is a journey. Career Development Many authors now discuss the protean form of career, with careers readily taking on varied shapes, forms, or meanings. & exhibiting considerable variety or diversity. Career moves now involve horizontal growth, where individuals expand their range of competencies and ways of connecting to work & other people, as opposed to the more traditional vertical growth of success. Hall & colleagues (1996, p.35) state that ‘in the protean form of growth, the goal is learning, psychological success, and expansion of the identify. In the more traditional form, the goal was advancement, success & esteem in the eyes of others, & power).’ Hall D.T (ed.) 1996. The career is dead – long live the career: a relational approach to careers. Jossey- Bass, San Francisco, GA.
  • Career Management Read out the metaphor about the changing focus on careers from Patton, Wendy 2001, Career education: what we know, what we need to know, Australian Journal of Career Development, vol 10., no. 3., Spring 2001, p.13 Proffered by Knowdell 1996: ‘ The 1950s career can be described as a ride on a train along steady and stable tracks to a predictable destination. By the 1970s, as the nature of the world of work began to change, the metaphor of a journey on a bus was more appropriate in that buses respond to changing traffic conditions, may change routes along the way or even change destinations. However, the bus schedule was still largely determined by the bus company. Ind considering careers and work in this century, writers suggest that the most appropriate vehicle for the journey is the all terrain vehicle. The most significant difference brought about with this change of vehicle for the 21 st century is that the individual will be in the driving seat.’
  • Career Development Support Refer to the CSU Guidelines on Support for the Professional Development of CSU Staff Career planning at CSU: Planning – Professional Devt. may include a short internal/external course, attendance at a conference, self-paced computer web/-based learning, a TAFE or university course, coaching, seeking advice from a person with expertise in a certain area, mentoring, secondment, job rotation, resources for self-directed learning, professional reading, a short-term or long-term project (no longer than one year), committee membership, performance of higher duties (for a limited period) & staff exchange. Documenting: Goals & objectives as part of the performance management scheme. Discussing: With managers, mentors and buddies and seeking guidance. Evaluation and Review: Clarification or goals and objectives, evaluation or progress and review of goals and objectives.
  • The Linear Career Concept A traditional view of career success with success being defined according to how high one rises in a hierarchy. This may be a progression that people are looking for when they start with an organisation. This may require ‘organisation hopping’ if people don’t succeed. May also involve achieving more control over the work environment e.g. apprentice ….. Leading hand ….. Tradesperson …. Self employed Can you think of anyone within CSU who has followed this pattern? Latest research indicates that this pattern is less likely to occur within business due to: large numbers of baby boomers in the workforce creating more competitive conditions Increases in downsizing which have destroyed faith in security of long term employment Flattening of organisational structures has decreased the number of management positions, whilst the number of candidates has increased. Careers now tend to be a series of projects not necessarily upward steps within an organisation. Examples/case study to support this concept?
  • The Expert Career Concept Another traditional way of describing career success. These people tend to prefer not to move up in a linear fashion as this moves them further and further away from their technical field. This may include CSU staff from DIT, possibly finance & library staff. Can you think of others?
  • The Spiral Career Concept Movements have a definite pattern with each new position using previously acquired skills or knowledge and opening up more opportunities to develop entirely new knowledge and skills. Hence, the career involves a spiralling outward from a central core of competencies. This may include some people working in the non-government sector who have very clear goals on wanting challenge & variety in their work or have a strong need to serve others.
  • The Transitory Career Concept The person moves from one occupation to another that is very different from work previously undertaken. These people believe that they ‘don’t really have a career’ and operate outside of the traditionally defined frameworks. Employees who change jobs and employers on a regular basis are now becoming the norm. ‘ A survey of 1100 workers by the recruitment agency Talent 2 discovered that 65% of employees were no longer working in the industry where they had started their career. About 70% had changed career paths between one and four times and 42% had changed jobs up to five times.’ Sydney Morning Herald Weekend Edition, My Career, January 8-9, 2005, p.1.
  • Previous assumptions of career development involved the linear upward progression (movement from a position of reasonably low status, low salary and responsibility to a higher position). Women may be more likely to look for positions which give them flexibility, including flexitime schemes or career breaks to bear and raise children or care for family members. Some researchers argue that women find their identity within their relationship with others and this plays a considerable role in any career decisions women make. Women may experience conflict between work and family roles and tend to put personal job satisfaction first before career aspirations, reward and power. Close this section with quantification of CSU structure.
  • Note: Most positions (188.14) are at Level 4 with the number of positions decreasing from this level onwards. General Staff Classification Descriptors at Level 5 require a higher level of education &/or experience e.g. completion of a degree & entry as a graduate; completion of an associate diploma with a range of experience & at least 2 years subsequent relevant work experience or completion of a certificate or a post-trades certificate and extensive subsequent relevant experience.
  • Experts on career decision-making note that the average person now changes careers 4 to 7 times over a lifetime. The author of an article on the Austn. Institute of Training & Development website states that ‘current research suggests that we will experience up to 8 career changes in a lifetime’. (Burgess, I Maintaining your career …. All 8 of them! http://www.aitd.com.au) Hence, staff development needs to include a range of offerings including: Networking Mentoring Generic skills (e.g. project management, coping with change, problem solving). There is a promotions scheme for academic staff at CSU but not for general staff. Professional development at CSU is the process of developing knowledge, skills and experience to enable staff to perform their current positions effectively or to prepare for a position to which they may aspire. Professional development activities include but are not limited to: internal or external workshops and short courses - e.g. Leadership and Management Development Program (Human Resources); Certificate I in Information Technology (Division of Information Technology); Tertiary Teaching Colloquium and Foundations of University Learning and Teaching course (Human Resources, Faculty of Education and the Centre for Enhancing Learning and Teaching); (b) forums for specialist staff - e.g. trainers and course co-ordinators; (c) internal or external seminars and conferences - e.g. Admin Focus Conference (Human Resources) and Tech Trade Conference (Human Resources); (d) self-paced computer-based/web-based learning - e.g. Knowledgebank: Microsoft Applications (Division of Information Technology web site); (e) TAFE or University courses - e.g. Associate Student Program (for individual subjects), undergraduate courses and postgraduate courses at CSU; (f) coaching; (g) project work; (h) membership of a working party or committee; (i) secondment to positions inside or outside the University; (j) staff exchange between partner organisations; and (k) higher duties for a limited period. Give out handout ‘Summary of Professional Development at CSU’
  • Activity In pairs or small groups. Facilitator notes on whiteboard/flipchart and documents the common themes. After this discussion participants watch the last 5-6 mins of Career planning , Take away training, Ash Quarry (held in Dolores Dawson’s office).
  • Career Development does not necessarily imply movement to the top of a profession. It is more about achieving a sense of purpose and direction and maximising professional and occupational changes to achieve control over your work life. Some people feel that career success is more about self-actualisation, skill growth and self-satisfaction compared with climbing a fixed ladder of jobs. Balancing work, health and family responsibilities (young/aged dependants) is also an important factor. In the new environment the individual is responsible for their development, not the organisation. CSU is able to provide support to assist you reach your career development goals.
  • Facilitator to outline stages The University has clear expectations of your performance and provides the following to assist staff to manage career development: Induction and Development Sessions provided by HR, DIT, Library, DFS. Sessions provided by the employee’s supervisor/workplace (systems, organisational culture & expectations). CSU Online Induction including EEO & EH&S etc. (compliance issues). CSU procedures manual – ‘Starter Kit’. On the job coaching – supervisor or colleagues. Introduction to a mentor. Probation and Appointment CSU Information Session & Welcome Lunch & the Vice Chancellor Welcome Sessions. Completion of Online Induction (Welcome to CSU). Feedback from supervisor. Mentor relationship. Informal and formal (e.g. forums) networking. Performance Management Participation and reflection as a result of professional development opportunities (e.g. attendance at workshops, seminars, conferences, forums, secondments, professional experience program). Self assessment – personal reflection, Myers Briggs Type Indicator. Feedback from supervisor, internal and external colleagues. Informal and formal (e.g. forums) networking. Mentor relationship. Professional Development Professional development activities include but are not limited to: (a) internal or external workshops and short courses - e.g. Leadership and Management Development Program (Human Resources); Certificate I in Information Technology (Division of Information Technology); Tertiary Teaching Colloquium and Foundations of University Learning and Teaching course (Human Resources, Faculty of Education and the Centre for Enhancing Learning and Teaching); (b) forums for specialist staff - e.g. trainers and course co-ordinators; (c) internal or external seminars and conferences - e.g. Admin Focus Conference (Human Resources) and Tech Trade Conference (Human Resources); (d) self-paced computer-based/web-based learning - e.g. Knowledgebank: Microsoft Applications (Division of Information Technology web site); (e) TAFE or University courses - e.g. Associate Student Program (for individual subjects), undergraduate courses and postgraduate courses at CSU; (f) coaching; (g) project work; (h) membership of a working party or committee; (i) secondment to positions inside or outside the University; (j) staff exchange between partner organisations; and (k) higher duties for a limited period. New Initiatives at CSU offer financial and/or support to undertake professional development opportunities: Academic staff – Special Studies Program, Graduate Certificate in University Teaching and Learning, Scholarship in Teaching Fund, Academic Staff Promotion Policy, Performance Based Funding for Teaching or Research Productive Staff, University Awards for Teaching Excellence, Awards for Research Excellence. General Staff – Professional Experience Scheme, Study Time Scheme, Post Graduate Study Support Scheme, Vice Chancellor’s Award for Excellence Building generic skills e.g. problem solving, project management, change management, team leadership. Informal and formal (e.g. forums) networking.
  • We’ll cover these more in detail, but an overview: Recognise the need for career planning Career planning is a process that span’s an individual’s life. In making your decision to come to CSU you probably chose a position that matched your skills & abilities. As time has passed you may have felt the need to: Reassess your skills, qualifications & considered other areas within the University that may interest you. This may have been self-directed or could have occurred through discussions with your work colleagues, a mentor or during performance management reviews. Maybe your position duties have changed & you have developed more skills or qualifications & skills in another area. After going through the process of self assessment & career exploration individuals start to map out career goals & develop an action plan. At CSU this is undertaken during performance management reviews. When your goals are aligned with those of the University or the Division, School or Faculty your supervisor has a role to support and assist you to develop the skills, knowledge or behaviours to achieve these goals. This is likely to include access to career development resources.
  • Recognising the need for career planning Use of analogy of Alice and the Cheshire cat to explain that there is first a sense that a change of direction might be in need and career planning is a systematic way of planning. In this phase you may be undecided about your career future. You may be unsettled at work, experiencing burnout or your circumstances may have changed and you desire a change. You may be seeking a promotion or development opportunities. You may want to downsize your job but stay stimulated whilst developing. You may be apprehensive about changing jobs or career paths. You understand that career planning may assist in meeting your future needs and want to assume responsibility for the decision and have an informed choice about your direction in life (sometimes the organisation may take control and try to channel your skills in other areas). You are evaluating the potential obstacles in your way. Ask participants: ‘What kind of obstacles might be present in your life.’ This may include attitudes and expectations of significant others in your life, income considerations, difficulty in accepting change. Ask participants: ‘That kind of opportunities might be present in your life’. Commitment to career planning involves dedication, purpose, involvement and persistence.
  • Self Assessment Give out handout – (Aligningneeds.pdf) Ask participants if they have definitions of values, ethics, attributes, or skills (or facilitator to provide these). Sometimes people are not always aware of their abilities or interests. Testing is often helpful in these instances and should include structured thinking about oneself in terms of skills, life interests and values. Useful for gaining a better understanding of your direction in life in terms of your career, goals and relationships. Motivations may change throughout the lifespan. Consider personal factors related to your career. These may include dual career relationships, caring responsibilities, financial challenges & geographic ties. Some of these factors may be helpful, others limiting. Often after self assessment it is helpful to ask for feedback from others who know you well. This may include colleagues or supervisors. At the end of this evaluation you will be in more of a position to know what you need or want and what you can offer an employer. Ask participants if anyone has undertaken a personality or vocational interest inventory. Some people may mention DiSC or MBTI.
  • Work Aspect Preference Scale , developed by Robert Pryor Phd, Congruence Pty. Ltd., Rehabilitation and Occupational Psychologists. Dolores Dawson has experience in administering and evaluating the results from this tool. It measures the qualities of work which people consider important. These are listed across 13 work aspects of independence, co-workers, self development, creativity, money, life style, prestige, altruism, security, management, detachment, physical activity & surroundings. Career Anchors, developed by Edgar Schein, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who has studies O.D. This is an inventory similar to the Work Aspect Preference Scale & is best used by people with some occupational and life experience to understand what their true basis values, motives & needs are. A career anchor is something in life that is of most value to you. It is an element of a person’s self concept that he or she will not give up, even in the face of choices. It can be a combination of perceived areas of competence, motives and values that you would not give up. Once we are aware of these we can make more informed career decisions about career changes that are in accordance with our real needs. The process consists of completion of a career orientations inventory & scoring sheet upon which you match your needs to a major career anchor. Schein lists technical/functional competence, general managerial competence, autonomy/independence, security/stability, entrepreneurial creativity, service/dedication to a cause, pure challenge & lifestyle. Schein’s longitudinal research asked respondents to identify key choices & events, to speculate why they had made those particular choices and how they felt about change. Some comments arose from people that had tried jobs that did not feel right to them & Schein use the anchor analogy – i.e. being pulled back to a job that fitted them better. MBTI is based around the work of Carl Jung (psychologist) & measures 16 types of human personality. This tool suggests that career choices can be made if you have information about your preferences in obtaining information, making decisions and developing attitudes about life events. You will also be able to use the results of your MBTI test to understand your preferred learning styles and evaluate the fit between your personality and your work. The model of personality type is based on 4 preferences: Where, primarily, do you direct your energy? If you prefer to direct your energy to deal with people, things, situations, or "the outer world", then your preference is for Extraversion. This is denoted by the letter "E". If you prefer to direct your energy to deal with ideas, information, explanations or beliefs, or "the inner world", then your preference is for Introversion. This is denoted by the letter "I". How do you prefer to process information? If you prefer to deal with facts, what you know, to have clarity, or to describe what you see, then your preference is for Sensing. This is denoted by the letter "S". If you prefer to deal with ideas, look into the unknown, to generate new possibilities or to anticipate what isn't obvious, then your preference is for Intuition. This is denoted by the letter "N". How do you prefer to make decisions? If you prefer to decide on the basis of objective logic, using an analytic and detached approach, then your preference is for Thinking. This is denoted by the letter "T". If you prefer to decide using values and/or personal beliefs, on the basis of what you believe is important or what you or others care about, then your preference is for Feeling. This is denoted by the letter "F". How do you prefer to organise your life? If you prefer your life to be planned, stable and organised then your preference is for Judging (not to be confused with 'Judgemental', which is quite different). This is denoted by the letter "J". If you prefer to go with the flow, to maintain flexibility and respond to things as they arise, then your preference is for Perception. This is denoted by the letter "P". When you put these four letters together, you get your Myers Briggs type code, and there are sixteen combinations. For example, INTJ indicates that you prefer Introversion, iNtuition, Thinking and Judging (remember, this indicates preferences only - an INTJ also uses Extraversion, Sensing, Feeling and Perception). Note from CSU library re Vocational Preference Inventory (VPI): professional manual by J. Holland. “This item is held in our closed access collection as it is a restricted item (P-level). We are unable to supply the item to you at this stage for the following reasons:   Unless designated otherwise, P-level tests (such as the one you have requested) are available for use only by:   1.    Members of the Australian Psychological Society or a psychological association of comparable standing; 2.    Students enrolled in approved courses of study at honours or post-graduate level who may be supplied with tests for research purposes under the supervision of a lecturer whose qualifications are in accordance with required standards. The supervisor should supply a letter of authorisation.   If you can demonstrate that you fulfil either of the above requirements we can make arrangements for the item to be photocopied and sent to you.” More information about the VPI is available from: Lock RD 2005, Taking charge of your career direction: career planning guide, book 1, 5 th edn., Thomson, Australia, pp. 85-118.
  • Career Explorer Requires free registration to the Motivational Appraisal of Personal Potential (MAPP) test. Aptitude tests such as the MAPP pinpoint your motivations and their corresponding talents. A full MAPP Assessment reveals the real you: your natural motivations, your interests, and your talents for work. The test takes about 20 minutes and involves answering 71 questions. Career Key The test takes about 10 minutes and broadly measures skills, abilities, values, interests and personality. Scores are given using the following categories: realistic, investigative, artistic, social, enterprising and conventional (the 6 Holland personality/environment types). Individuals will be a combination of the 6 types with some types having dominance. A matching list of work groups of careers are provided. OZJAC – The Australian Courses and Careers Database provides information on: Courses: where they are offered, what subjects you can study, how to get in, who to contact, what jobs they lead to. Providers: where the universities, TAFE institutions and private providers are, what courses they offer, what services are available, who to contact. Jobs: what duties are involved, what training is required, whether there are personal requirements, what the working conditions are like, what other jobs are in the same industry, where to find out more. General Information: what's new in education and training, where to get financial assistance, who to contact for wage and employment conditions, how course fees work, and lots more.
  • OZJAC – The Australian Courses and Careers Database provides information on: Courses: where they are offered, what subjects you can study, how to get in, who to contact, what jobs they lead to. Providers: where the universities, TAFE institutions and private providers are, what courses they offer, what services are available, who to contact. Jobs: what duties are involved, what training is required, whether there are personal requirements, what the working conditions are like, what other jobs are in the same industry, where to find out more. General Information: what's new in education and training, where to get financial assistance, who to contact for wage and employment conditions, how course fees work, and lots more.
  • Explain the benefits of have good self knowledge of skills, abilities, interests
  • Career Exploration After you have explored your needs, goals and possible career options you can consider where you can best look for career opportunities. Be ready to seize opportunities inside or outside the University. Make sure you are prepared & ready (e.g. resume up to date). Activity Work in groups or small pairs to discuss career options that are available at Charles Sturt University. One person will report back to the whole group. Participants may discuss: Study time Study support Seeking position within another work area Secondment The professional experience program VC’s award for excellence. Undertaking higher level duties. Facilitator to expand upon these options. Watch, learn and talk to others Talk to people in the jobs that you are interested in or might be promoted to. Find out how their career developed and what tips they can offer. Try to learn from their successes and failures. Watch/talk to other people that work in positions where you would like employment and gather information. If you have a mentor talk to him/her about career possibilities. Network Keep up to date with the latest trends and professional development opportunities in the career(s) of your choice. You may find yourself going back to the self assessment stage during this process to determine if your new career step is the best option. You will need to consider: The level of risk involved in undertaking the career decision (don’t underestimate the level of risk that your are willing to assume). The likelihood of you being successful in undertaking the career path/change (do you really possess the necessary aptitudes? Will you have opportunities to implement this career path/change?) How fulfilling the potential change is likely to be. (See if you can get some work experience in the area to determined if it is really what you want). Research Undertake information research to find out as much as you can about various options you have identified. Look at labour forecasts in your chosen area(s), Job Guide 2004 (available from CSU library). Contact the Universities Admissions Centre, TAFE, CSU Schools, Faculties and Divisions to find out what course of study you make need to undertake to meet career options. Check the CSU Recruitment website regularly and become informed about position classification standards, duty statements and selection criteria for positions that interest you. Undertake a SWOT analysis to determine the value of undertaking other positions or assessing whether there will be benefits remaining in your current position.
  • Steps to achieve your career goal(s) Ask participants: Why do you need to develop realistic goals? (So you know where you are heading. Goals give direction, purpose and meaning). Set goals beyond your grasp but within your reach. Set short-range goals (e.g. fortnightly, monthly) so you will achieve some sense of accomplishment and allow you to focus your energies. Share your goals with only those people who can help you achieve them or those people who have some role to play in your career development plan (some people may actively discourage you from achieving your goal(s)). Goals should be flexible so you can modify your approach. Do you need to undertake more professional development to achieve your career goal? Have some options been raised by you or your supervisor during a performance management review? Do you need to become more informed about the structure and function of sections of the University? Think of the specific areas that would be beneficial to develop: Technical Skills: Basic skills of job knowledge of how to do what you have to do. E.g. Producing a financial report, cataloguing, using the BEIMS system to produce a report, knowledge of specific legislation. Managerial Skills: How to effectively motivate, direct, delegate, supervise, plan, organise, control, administer, monitor and reward your work and that of others. This includes self management as well as responsibility for other staff. Strategic Skills: Skills is leadership and vision. Knowing where the team is going and how to get there. Interpersonal skills: How to form and maintain positive relationships with others and how to influence them appropriately. Realisation that it takes time to achieve these goals.
  • Give participants Handout – Career Development Options Action Plan (CDOActionPlanDraftJan05.doc) Mission Statement Developing this will help to crystallise your vision of who you are & where you want to go in your career in the next 3-5 years. Write it down or put it up on the wall where you can see it every day. To reinforce your mission you can also tell someone else about it. e.g. "My personal career mission is to gain experience in the human resources field toward whilst undertaking a degree with a major in Human Resource Management."
  • Updating your career portfolio Facilitator to outline the career portfolio document developed by Andrea Lawless. Enrol in a study program Check to see if you are eligible for study leave, financial benefits or other schemes at the University. Set goals in your professional development plan If appropriate, discuss career goals with your supervisor and document these in your professional development plan. The plan considers goals that you would like to achieve in the next year in relation to developing or enhancing skills and knowledge for your current position or preparation for future positions. For general staff this may include attendance and feedback to work colleagues following a conference, short internal/external course, secondment etc. (see Uni Policy document for more info.) The timeframe is documented, along with the resources and support needed. The professional development plan for Academic staff outlines academic activities of professional development activities, targets and progress, resources and support needed. You may consider support available through the Special Studies Program to engage in research, scholarship of teaching, maintain and improve professional and vocational knowledge, gain senior management experience or work in your field. Develop/extend networks Network with others when you are in a job. Don’t wait until you are considering changing jobs. Networking exchanges ideas for the express purpose of sharing mutually beneficial information. Networks can be useful so that when opportunities arise and the people in your network hear of an opportunity they are more likely to contact you. Another useful strategy is to get into other people’s networks and make those individuals part of your own network. Can you think of networks of people who know you well (e.g. personal - friends, family members or close colleagues) or people that you know with whom you would like to network (social or professional - these may be internal or external to CSU and can include co-workers, former co-workers, bosses, academic advisors and professors)? Undertake additional tasks This will indicate that you are eager to take on more responsibility. This may include taking the initiative with project work, undertaking committee work (e.g. Admin Focus, Techtrade). You will demonstrate your potential to your current supervisor and your value with regards to skills and versatility. The Assocn. For Tertiary Management Inc. (ATEM) The Association for Tertiary Education Management Inc (ATEM Inc) is a professional body in Australasia for tertiary education administrators and managers. Individual membership for Australians is $121. Corporate membership is $935. ATEM has an extensive education and training program (e.g. Managing Change Strategically, Dealing with Difficult Customer Situations, Faculty Managers Forum, Contract Issues for Non-Lawyers, Placing Risk Management into the University Context). The site also contains a listing of advertised job vacancies within Australian universities. ATEM's Professional Development Framework (PDF) allows members to develop an individual career development plan which suits their needs and the needs of their institutions. The PDF may culminate in the award of Fellow , a high level ATEM award recognising a member's commitment to both their profession and to the quality of their professional performance. The PDF is supported by Study Scholarships to assist with gaining formal qualifications and Staff Exchange Programs to allow members to gain a broader perspective with which to enhance their work.
  • Reflect upon your Action Plan Ask yourself: What steps have you been able to effectively undertake? What steps have been difficult to undertake? What could you do differently to reach your goal(s)? Do you need to modify your Action Plan due to changing priorities, interests, skills and personal circumstances? Are there different opportunities available within the University? Self development as an ongoing, lifelong process Keep current of trends and issues both within and outside your field and the University. Continually market yourself Promote your skills and knowledge within the University and outside at social, business and community circles. Promote your abilities in ‘Billboard’, your Faculty/Division newsletter or at staff meetings. Undertake responsibility on a committee. This aspect often separates those people able to break through barriers in their career development from those who plateau prematurely.
  • Support Consider your support networks in the career development process. Are they work colleagues, your supervisor, colleagues at other organisations, professional contacts, a mentor, your family and friends? Seek out those people that can support you to achieve your goals. Remain positive ‘ If you think you can or you can’t, you’re right’. – Henry Ford. Keep your inner voice positive and calm throughout the career development process. Use positive affirmations. Top sports athletes use this strategy. e.g. ‘I have confidence that I will develop this skills by the end of the year to move to the next stage of my career development’. You can print them on cards & place them around the house or in the car to read on a regular basis. You can say them aloud or to yourself during private moments. Reward yourself for accomplishments Review your progress on a regular basis and reward yourself for your accomplishments. Visualise yourself in the position that you want. Make it positive. What will you be doing, how will you do it, how will people be interacting with you? Use all your senses – what will you smell, taste, hear and feel as well as see? Practise it a few times a week for 5 minutes or more. During your journey: Be committed to your existing position. Have patience (you might need to remind others of this as well). Sometimes it takes time to achieve your goals. Activity Handout Janet Dibb-Smith’s tips (Dibb-SmithTips.pdf) to all participants and ask people to reflect upon the tips. Janet was a staff member at CSU for many years and is now Director Research of the Research Branch of Adelaide Research and Innovation at the University of Adelaide.

Transcript

  • 1. Exploring Career Development at Charles Sturt University Organisational Development Charles Sturt University Revised January 2007
  • 2.
    • Workshop Objectives
    • After participation in this workshop you should be able
    • to:
    • Identify career development theories
    • Gain awareness of options, pathways and access to career development support at the University
    • Integrate career objectives into performance management plans
    • Plan and set goals to work towards career options
    • Implement and review a career development action plan
  • 3. Career Development at CSU
    • Career Development sits within the Continuing Professional
    • Development Framework developed by Organisational
    • Development.
    • The CPD Framework seeks to align human resource systems (e.g.
    • Recruitment & Selection, Induction and Development, Performance
    • Management) so staff can increase their understanding and
    • knowledge, and/or improve their skills and abilities to maintain or
    • enhance professional performance.
    • Strategies will include staff development programs, leadership and
    • management programs, career development, coaching and
    • mentoring.
  • 4.
    • Career Development at CSU
    • consists of the following components:
    • Career planning
    • Career development
    • Career management
  • 5. Career definitions at the University
    • Career Planning
    • The career planning process at Charles Sturt University
    • involves the staff member undertaking self-assessment,
    • identifying and exploring career options, setting goals,
    • planning action steps to achieve those goals, and taking
    • action in accordance with the career plan.
    • (from résumés & Résumé Writing Services, viewed 28
    • April 2005, < http://www.eresumes.com/eglossary.html >)
  • 6. Career definitions at the University
    • Career Development
    • Career development at CSU is a process
    • where staff initiate action to develop the skills,
    • knowledge and experience to prepare for a
    • future position at a similar or different level with
    • CSU or another organisation.
    • (adapted from Sofo, F. 1999, Human resource
    • development: perspectives, roles and practice choices.
    • Business & Professional Publishing, Warriewood, NSW,
    • p. 65)
  • 7. Career definitions at the University
    • Career Management
    • Career management is concerned with aligning
    • the staff member’s career needs with the
    • University’s workforce needs and providing
    • supervisor and system support through schemes
    • such as performance management,
    professional development, rewards and recognition and academic staff promotion. (adapted from the University of Wollongong Career Development Policy, viewed 28 April 2005, < http://staff.uow.edu.au/cdu/policyprocedure/CDPpolicy.html >)
  • 8. Career definitions at the University
    • Career Development Support
    • Career development support refers to the
    • support and resources provided by the
    • University to enhance the work-related
    knowledge, skills and abilities of staff to increase their potential to contribute to the goals of the University. These activities are outlined in the ‘Support for the Professional Development of CSU Staff (Guidelines)’. http://www.csu.edu.au/adminman/hum/humanresources.htm
  • 9. Career choices and direction
    • Four career concepts feature in the ways
    • people view the ideal career.
    • The Linear Career Concept
    • Starting at the bottom and
    • working upwards to successively
    • higher positions with more responsibility, authority and salary.
    • Motives underlying this concept involve achievement, power or influence.
    • Challenges underlying this concept include fierce competition for senior positions because of the number of baby boomers currently in the workforce.
  • 10. Career choices and direction
    • The Expert Career Concept
    • Finding work which fits one’s ‘calling’ and
    • becoming more skilled and competent in this
    • field.
    • Success is defined by the level of technical expertise and not the level of salary, number of work benefits, or the level of authority.
    • People tend to stay in this field until they retire. Eg. Doctor, engineer, financial analyst, lawyer, accountant.
    • Motives underlying this concept are technical competence, expertise and security.
    • Challenges involve the need to keep up to date with the fast pace of technological change and corporate and restructuring programs which may pose a threat to job security.
  • 11. Career choices and direction
    • The Spiral Career Concept
    • Involves a number of related lateral moves
    • between functional areas. This may occur
    • every 5 to 10 years.
    • Combination of a broadening of experience and a continuous challenge of new tasks with slower or no upward movement on a career ladder.
    • Key motives are creativity, personal growth and increasing capability and an interest in developing other people.
    • A key challenge is to find organisations who will support the development of knowledge and skills over time (this is now becoming more common).
  • 12. Career choices and direction
    • The Transitory Career Concept
    • Involves a lot of movement with a ‘consistent
    • pattern of inconsistency’.
    • Careers consist of a smorgasbord of experiences and
    • jobs or the type of work are changed on the average of
    • every 2 to 4 years.
    • Modest or no emphasis on upward movement.
    • Key motives are variety, uniqueness, independence and
    • interpersonal contacts.
    • Key challenges may be finding organisations that support
    • individual renewal, growth and change.
  • 13. The chaos theory and career planning
    • Careers can be a combination of control and chance.
    • There is now a trend from the linear career system to a multidirectional career system.
    • A high percentage of people report that an unplanned event has had considerable influence upon career decisions.
    • A woman’s career development may ensue in a completely different manner than a man’s.
  • 14.  
  • 15. Implications for professional development
    • The University needs to take into account
    • diverse approaches to career development
    • to achieve a fit between the personal
    • definitions of success held by staff and the
    • organisational goals.
  • 16.
    • Personal Reflection
    • What have been the
    • critical decision points
    • that have influenced
    • your career so far?
  • 17.
    • Within the University’s context, career development is
    • defined as a process where staff initiate action to develop
    • the skills, knowledge and experience to prepare for a future
    • position at a similar or different level with the University or
    • another organisation.
    • The University encourages you to continuously develop
    • your career, either in your current position or elsewhere
    • within the University.
    Career Development at CSU
  • 18.
    • The University supports your career
    • development during the following stages of
    • University life:
    • Induction and Development
    • Probation and Appointment
    • Performance Management
    • Professional Development
  • 19. Career Planning Steps Mentoring Coaching Performance management Performance management Recognise the need for career planning Self assessment Career exploration Set career goals and develop the action plan Implement the action plan Career management and review of the action plan Adapted from: Shahnasarian M, 1994, Decision time: a guide to career enhancement, Psychological Assessment Resources, USA, p.3.
  • 20. Recognise the need for career planning ‘ That depends on where you want to get to,’ answered the cat. ‘ Would you please tell me which way I ought to go from here?’ asked Alice. Source: Jones JE & Gladstone JF1995, The Red King’s dream or Lewis Carroll in Wonderland, Jonathon Cape, London.
  • 21. Self Assessment
    • Honestly appraise your values, ethics, attributes, skills and goals.
    • Think about your preferences, interests and your existing capabilities. What motivates and energises you?
    • Identify competencies (skills, knowledge and behaviour) for success in positions that interest you. Look closely at the selection criteria in job descriptions. What are your strengths and weaknesses?
    • If considering an external position assess the goals, values and working conditions of the organisation. How well do they fit with your own personal objectives?
    • You can learn more about yourself and your career interests by completing one or more personality and vocational interest inventories.
  • 22. Self Assessment
    • Some of the most widely used career planning tools are based on the psychological type theory of John Holland and Carl Jung.
    • Inventories or tests generally measure interest or lifestyle, not ability.
    • An inventory will ask your opinion about certain activities. Responses are then grouped into occupational domains with scores. This is compared to the total population to give information about preferences in the occupational groups that the inventory measures.
    • Two types of inventories:
    • - Those that are self-administered, self scored, and self-
    • interpreted.
    • - Those given by a test administrator, scored by a
    • machine and tested by a counsellor or professional.
  • 23. Self Assessment
    • Examples:
    • Work Aspect Preference Scale
    • Career Anchors
    • Myers Briggs Type Indicator (assistance is available from Organisational Development or Tieger PD & Barron-Tieger B 2001, Do what you are: discover the perfect career for you through the secrets of personality type, Scribe Publications, Victoria).
    • Vocational Preference Inventory (VPI) – Developed by John Holland, this inventory is among the most widely used instruments in career counselling and has an extensive base of empirical support. (Restricted access at the CSU library). Based upon the 6 personality/environment types RAISEC - Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social, Enterprising and Conventional. More information about the VPI is available from, Lock RD 2005, Taking charge of your career direction: career planning guide, book 1, 5 th edn., Thomson, Australia, pp. 85-118.
  • 24. Self Assessment
    • Useful web sites and computer programs:
    • 16 Personality Types
    • www.16types.com
    • Information about the MBTI.
    • Career Explorer
    • http://www.careerexplorer.net/aptitude.asp
    • Provides a free sample career aptitude test.
    • The Career Key
    • http://www.careerkey.org/
    • Free service to help with career choices and career
    • planning. Based upon the 6 personality/environment types.
    • developed by Dr. John Holland ( RAISEC - Realistic,
    • Investigative, Artistic, Social, Enterprising and Conventional).
  • 25. Self Assessment
    • Useful web sites and computer programs:
    • OZJAC database
    • Provides information on career planning with course links to different
    • jobs, industries and Training (available at Riverina Regional Library, Wagga
    • Wagga and Young TAFE Campus library). See also The Job Guide
    • ( http://jobguide.dest.gov.au ) published by the Department of Education,
    • Science & Training that lists around 1,500 occupations and specialisations.
    • Self-Directed Search
    • http://www.self-directed-search.com
    • The SDS takes 15 minutes and costs US$9.95 which will provide
    • you with a personalised interpretative report with a list of
    • possible career options and suggestions to assist with education
    • and career planning. It was developed by Dr. John Holland and
    • is based upon the 6 different RAISEC types.
  • 26. Career Services
    • Career Counsellors can provide a confidential
    • service to assist with career choices. See your
    • local telephone book or The Australian Association
    • of Career Counsellors(http://www.aacc.org.au) for
    • a database listing of professional career
    • counsellors in your region.
    • Employee Assistance Program offers short-term
    • professional face to face or telephone (24 hours)
    • counselling in relation to adjusting to change, career
    • changes and making career choices. Call 1300 366 789
    • for an appointment.
  • 27. Career Exploration
    • Look for opportunities
    • - within the University
    • - external to the University
    • Watch, learn and talk to others
    • Network
    • Research
  • 28. Setting career goals
    • Consider what steps you need to take to achieve
    • your career goal. What skills, knowledge or
    • behaviour do you need to develop?
    • Technical skills
    • Management skills
    • Strategic skills
    • Interpersonal skills
    • These can form part of your annual professional
    • development plan.
  • 29. Developing the Action Plan
    • When you have a good understanding of your skills, abilities and needs
    • you can prepare an action plan.
    • Document:
    • Your mission statement
    • Your career objective(s) in 1 year & in 5 years
    • Your current related education, skills & strengths
    • Your current needs or values
    • List & prioritise your short term actions in small, achievable
    • steps. Put a deadline on them & review achievement on a
    • regular basis.
    • List, prioritise and review long term goals.
    • Review you career action plan at least every 6 months.
  • 30. Implementing the Action Plan
    • Career development tools:
    • Develop or update your career portfolio
    • Enrol in a study program
    • Set goals in your professional development plan during the performance management review
    • Develop/extend networks
    • Undertake additional tasks
    • The Association for Tertiary Management Inc. (ATEM) http://www.atem.edu.au or other professional associations.
  • 31. Career Management and Review of the Career Action Plan
    • Continually market yourself
    • Reflect upon your Career Action Plan
    • Think of self-development as an ongoing,
    • lifelong process
  • 32. Sustaining motivation
    • Remain positive
    • Reward yourself for accomplishments
    • Who can give you the support you need?
  • 33. SOURCES
    • Ball B 1991, Manage your own career: a self-help guide to career
    • choice and change. Wrightworks, North Brighton, Victoria.
    • Bisdee B 1997, Steer your own career. Penguin Books, Ringwood,
    • Victoria.
    • Bolles RN 1972, What color is your parachute? A practical manual for
    • job hunters and career changers. Ten Speed Press, Berkeley,
    • California.
    • Brosseau KR & Driver MJ 1998, CareerView concepts: roadmaps for
    • career success. Decision Dynamics Group, viewed 7 January 2005,
    • <http://decdynamics.com/cvConcepts.html>
    • eResumes & Resume Writing Services, viewed 28
    • April 2005, <http://www.eresumes.com/eglossary.html>
    • Eggert M 2003, Perfect career: all you need to get it right the first time.
    • Random House, Sydney.
  • 34. SOURCES Fisher CD & Schoenfeldt LF, Shaw JB 2003, Human resource Management. 5th edn., Houghton Mifflin Co., New York. Knowdell R 1996, Perspectives shaping career planning in the future. In R. Feller & G. Walz (Eds.), Career transitions in turbulent times: exploring work, learning and careers. ERIC, Greensboro, N.C. pp. 183-192. Lock RD 2005, Taking charge of your career direction: career planning guide, book 1. 5th edn., Thomson, Australia. Mathis RL & Jackson JH 2003, Human resource management. 10th edn., South Western College, Minnesota. Mavin S 2001, Women’s career in theory and practice: time for change?, Women in Management Review, vol. 16, no. 4, pp. 183-193. Pantry S & Griffiths P, 2003, Your essential guide to career success. 2nd. edn., Facet, London.
  • 35. SOURCES
    • Shahnasarian M1994, Decision time: a guide to career enhancement.
    • Psychological Assessment Resources, USA.
    • Sims K 2000, Your career and you: self assessment for students and
    • Graduates. The Graduate Careers Council of Australia, Parkville,
    • Victoria.
    • Sofo, F. 1999, Human resource development: perspectives, roles
    • and practice choices. Business & Professional Publishing, Warriewood,
    • NSW.
    • Tieger PD & Barron-Tieger B 2001, D o what you are: discover the
    • perfect career for you through secrets of personality type. 3 rd edn.,
    • Scribe publications, Carlton Nth, Victoria.
    • University of Wollongong Career Development Policy, viewed 28 April
    • 2005, <http://staff.uow.edu.au/cdu/policyprocedure/CDPpolicy.html>