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East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and ...
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  • 1. East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and Technical Center EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE EVALUATION HANDBOOK October, 2003
  • 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS 2
  • 3. TABLE OF CONTENTS Section I. AN INTRODUCTION Page Introduction………………………………………………..……….………….. 5 II. GUIDE TO EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE EVALUATION Overview……………………………………………………………………..….. 7 The Purpose of Performance Evaluation……………………..…………. 7 Philosophy………………………………………………………………………. 7 Evaluator-Evaluatee Relationships……………………………………….. 8 Supervisor and Employee Rights………………………………………….. 8 Assignments and Job Descriptions……………………………………….. 8 Coaching Through Informal Evaluation & Feedback………….……… 9 Formal Evaluation (Appraisal)……………………………………………... 9 Definition of Terms……………………………………………………………. 10 The Ten Commandments For Ethical Performance Appraisal……… 11 Pitfalls to Avoid When Observing Others……………………………….. 12 Improving Employee Performance……………………………………….. 12 Guidelines for Describing Performance Problems……………………. 17 Staff Evaluation Calendar…………………………………………………… 22 III. CERTIFICATED STAFF Certificated Employee Diagnostic and Objectives Setting Process. 24 Employee Evaluation Objectives Form…………………………………… 25 Guidelines for the Evaluation Conference of Instructors…………… 27 Observations Model…………………………………………………………… 28 Classroom Observation Form ……………………………………………… 31 Certificated Staff Evaluation Quality Indicators……………………… 32 Definition of Ratings Certificated Evaluation Forms…………………. 39 Instructor Performance Evaluation Report…………………………….. 40 IV. CLASSIFIED EMPLOYEES Classified Employee Performance Evaluation System………………. 43 Classified Employee Diagnostic and Objectives Setting Process…. 44 Employee Evaluation Objectives Form…………………………………… 45 Classified Staff Evaluation Quality Indicators………………………… 47 Definition of Ratings Classified Staff Evaluation Forms…………….. 53 Classified Performance Evaluation Report……………………………… 54 V. LEADERSHIP EMPLOYEES Leadership Employee Performance Evaluation System……………… 57 Leadership Employee Performance Evaluation Report……………… 58 3
  • 4. I. INTRODUCTION 4
  • 5. INTRODUCTION This Employee Performance Evaluation Handbook is intended to serve as a guide for all East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and Technical Center staff involved in the performance evaluation process. The information contained in this handbook is written for evaluators and evaluatees with general guidelines on the overall evaluation process. There are separate chapters for specific information on evaluating certificated, classified, and leadership employees. Supervisors shall evaluate all regular employees in a timely manner using the appropriate ROP forms. The supervisor shall explain the reason for the performance evaluation to the employee, the standards used in the evaluation process, and the basis for the evaluation given, and shall offer assistance in areas of needed improvement. The Personnel Director shall provide guidance and assistance to evaluators in the performance evaluation process. Please read this handbook carefully and keep it handy for future reference. One of your first responsibilities as an evaluator is to be familiar with its contents. Please discuss your understanding of this process with your supervisor or the Personnel Director if you have any questions or need further assistance. Changes in Policy Since ROP practices may change, we expressly reserve the right to change any of our policies and procedures, including those covered here, at any time. Normally we will notify you of these changes by posting them on our web site at www.esgvrop.org or by other appropriate means. Changes will be effective on dates determined by ROP and will immediately supersede previous policy(ies). No supervisor or administrator, other than the Superintendent, has any authority to alter the foregoing. If you are uncertain about any policy or procedure, please check with your supervisor and/or the Personnel Director. 5
  • 6. II. GUIDE TO PERFORMANCE EVALUATION 6
  • 7. OVERVIEW Employees are more likely to perform their job effectively when they clearly understand their assignments, know what level of performance is considered to be acceptable, and receive continuous feedback. Evaluation of an employee’s performance is not just a once-a-year activity done by a supervisor to an employee; it is an ongoing process that involves information from co-workers, clients, the supervisor, and the employee themselves. The employee is just as responsible for his or her successful performance as the supervisor. A formal performance appraisal is an important opportunity to summarize informal evaluations of the employee’s performance over a longer period of time. ROP policy currently requires that an employee receive at least one formal performance appraisal every 12 months. The ROP requires a mid- and end-of-probation appraisal for classified employees who are in the initial probation period. THE PURPOSE OF PERFORMANCE EVALUATION ♦ The purpose of the performance evaluation process is to clarify expectations, communicate current job performance, and provide direction for job performance improvement so that the employee may provide a greater contribution to the overall objectives of the ROP. Formal evaluations, when properly understood and conducted, are a positive force in helping each person achieve personal and job-related goals and objectives. An effective evaluation system requires observation and documentation of job performance and accomplishes the following: ♦ Clarify and communicate overall objectives of the ROP ♦ Acknowledge areas of strength ♦ Identify performance areas where assistance is needed ♦ Provide guidance toward job performance improvement ♦ Identify and reinforce positive performance and growth PHILOSOPHY The ROP philosophy of appraisal recognizes the following principles: ♦ An evaluation system is part of the overall management system. ♦ Evaluation is a cooperative endeavor between evaluator and evaluatee. ♦ Open communication between evaluator and evaluatee is an essential condition for successful maintenance of the system. ♦ The focus of the system is not on “proving” but on “improving.” ♦ Effective evaluation is a continuous and flexible process that must be sensitive to the need for modification. ♦ The primary product of effective evaluation is improved performance, which is facilitated by specific recommendations. ♦ These recommendations grow out of the interaction between evaluator and evaluatee. 7
  • 8. EVALUATOR-EVALUATEE RELATIONSHIPS Each staff member is to be evaluated by the immediate supervisor and, occasionally, by both the immediate supervisor and the administrator at the next level. For example, an instructor prepares a draft of an instructional aide’s evaluation, which is then reviewed by the instructional supervisor. The final evaluation is shared with the employee in an evaluation conference with the instructor, the instructional supervisor, and the employee present. Evaluators are responsible for establishing and maintaining a positive and professional environment that encourages staff members to achieve the greatest possible personal and professional growth to successfully carry out their responsibilities. Each evaluator should attempt to alleviate any conditions that limit successful performance, as well as provide specific suggestions that will enable each employee to perform efficiently. SUPERVISOR AND EMPLOYEE RIGHTS Supervisors have final authority on acceptable performance indicators and have the right to hold employees accountable for meeting these standards. Supervisors also have the right to formally evaluate employees on a periodic basis or whenever they feel a formal evaluation would be beneficial, and have a responsibility to provide informal feedback on a frequent basis in order to achieve the level of performance required to manage a successful classroom, program, service, or department. Employees have the right to be informed of performance expectations and to be evaluated in as objective a manner as possible. Employees also have the right to periodic performance feedback and to at least on formal evaluation each year. ASSIGNMENTS AND JOB DESCRIPTIONS The first step to successful performance is ensuring that the employee is clear about his or her assignment, the employee’s role within the ROP, and the duties and responsibilities of that position. Each position in a department has its own unique set of duties and responsibilities. For example, not every teaching assignment has identical requirements, nor do all administrative assistants perform exactly the same combination of tasks, though much of what they do is similar. Each supervisor should develop a department (or functional) job description specific to each position within that department or unit. This description, which may range from a simple list of tasks to a detailed narrative of several paragraphs, should supplement the generic job description provided in position announcements and should be updated as often as necessary. 8
  • 9. COACHING THROUGH INFORMAL EVALUATION AND FEEDBACK COACHING is a term used to describe an ongoing evaluation and feedback process that tells employees, “How am I doing?” and “Where do I go from here?” Coaching is the day-to-day effort to review tasks, answer questions, discuss progress (or lack of it) toward meeting standards, develop skills, and provide positive guidance. Supervisors are not the only people who can provide coaching to an employee, coworkers, other supervisors, and even students or clients can often be in a good position to give helpful feedback about an employee’s performance. Such coaching opportunities can be part of a planned peer coaching, mentoring, or client feedback process or can occur spontaneously as a result of the employee’s request for input. The employee can also be his or her own coach by obtaining feedback from other sources. Reviewing one’s own work products or appropriate evaluative data can provide the employee with an opportunity for self-evaluation and improvement. It is highly recommended that supervisors keep track of important information for evaluation by creating a “memory file” or log. This may be a simple file folder that includes notes and documents (such as letters of appreciation, documentation of assistance provided, or warning notices) on exceptional (positive or negative) performance or behavior by the employee. By keeping a memory file on each employee, a supervisor can track an employee’s performance progress, as well as document what coaching has been provided. This memory file must be kept confidential and should preferably be kept in a locked drawer or cabinet. Employees may also choose to set up their own memory files to ensure that all key aspect of their performance are recorded. FORMAL EVALUATION (APPRAISAL) If assignments and standards have been clear and if coaching through informal evaluation and feedback has been ongoing, a formal performance appraisal should be merely a summary of what has already occurred. It should include no surprises for the employee or the supervisor, because both should already know how successful the employee has been in meeting performance standards. 9
  • 10. DEFINITION OF TERMS Appraisal: The process of making considered judgments concerning the accomplishments and competencies of an employee based on a broad knowledge of the area of performance involved and the specific characteristics of the situation of the individual being evaluated (synonymous with evaluation) Assessment: The act of determining the degree or amount of; a determination resulting from the evaluation process Assessment Criteria: Demonstrable levels of performance upon which a judgment or decision may be based. Certificated Employee: Staff who require a credential in order to carry out the assigned duties or responsibilities. Classes of Employees: Those groupings of employees whose roles and responsibilities are similar as defined in job classification descriptions. Classified Employee: Staff whose positions do not require credentials issued by the Commission on Teacher Credentialing Evaluation: The process of making considered judgments concerning the accomplishments and competencies of an employee based on a broad knowledge of the area of performance involved and the specific characteristics of the situation of the individual being evaluated (synonymous with appraisal) Evaluatee: One who is evaluated Evaluator: One who evaluates Goal: A broad statement of intent or direction for a given organizational unit, instructional area, or individual Immediate Supervisor: The individual who has direct responsibility for directing the employee in daily tasks and who is responsible for completing the performance appraisal Objective: A desired accomplishment or achievement that can be verified within a given time and under specifiable conditions which, if attained, advances the program, unit, or individual toward a corresponding goal 10
  • 11. Standard: An acknowledged measure of comparison, established by authority or mutual acceptance, for quantitative or qualitative value; a criterion Standard of Performance: An authoritative or mutually established level of accomplishment Uniform Evaluation System: A system of evaluation that applies the same guidelines in a consistent manner to all members of each type or class of employee THE TEN COMMANDMENTS FOR ETHICAL PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL 1. Do not judge the worth of another human being because his or her values differ from your own. 2. Let the employee know what performance is expected to obtain a successful performance appraisal. 3. Keep appraisal information confidential. 4. Base your appraisal on representative information related to the specific job. 5. Appraise on the basis of relevant information. 6. Make the appraisal as honest and objective as possible. 7. Keep written and oral appraisals consistent. 8. Present appraisals as your opinion. 9. Make sure the employee receives a copy of the appraisal. 10. Inform the employee that he or she may write a written response if he or she disagrees with the appraisal. 11
  • 12. PITFALLS TO AVOID WHEN OBSERVING OTHERS In any area of human relations, and especially when we have the responsibility for observing and evaluating others, we should be aware of the following pitfalls: ♦ Snap judgments, or the tendency to form first impressions of others, are common mistakes. We should strive to be objective and obtain further information before we praise, condemn, or draw conclusions. ♦ Projection is the tendency to attribute to others some of our own motives and/or faults. If we tend to be perfectionists, procrastinating, suspicious, pessimistic, or skeptical, etc., we need to be careful not to project our own traits on to the other person. ♦ Prejudice is any preconceived judgment caused by our own or a colleague/friend’s past experiences or teachings, often based on insufficient knowledge. People, situations, and issues should be evaluated on the basis of their merits, with an open mind. ♦ Predisposition is the tendency to draw conclusions before the facts are presented, i.e., to hear what we want to hear, to see what we want to see. In decision-making, we frequently put the cart before the horse-we make up our minds, and then look for evidence to support our position. ♦ Preoccupation, being so busy with other thoughts that we pay no attention to what is going on or what is being said, is easy on a busy job. Active listening and attention to the feelings of others are invaluable tools in human relationships. ♦ Lack of appreciation for other people’s dreams and ideas It is important to remember that other people have their own dreams and ideas. Failure to recognize this creates a barrier to mutual understanding and open communication and makes it difficult, if not impossible, to understand one another. We cannot lead, manage, or counsel others effectively in the absence of this understanding. IMPROVING EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE Once you have determined that an employee is deficient in one or more areas of job performance, you must identify what needs to be done to correct the employee’s deficiencies and provide specific suggestions/offers of assistance for improvement. The “Suggestions/Directives” component is typically included in a disciplinary document, but it may also be attached to the performance appraisal. 12
  • 13. Legally sufficient documentation requires an evaluator to provide the following: Directions on the proper conduct or level of performance in the future, and Suggestions or recommendations to assist employees in meeting these requirements Directions Directions must be clear and unequivocal, including a specific timeline and the consequences if the employee fails to comply. In other words, the employee must know what must be done to correct the deficient performance, by what date this must occur, and what will happen if it is not corrected. ALL DIRECTIONS therefore must: be clear, factually specific, and unequivocal; include effective timelines; and include consequences for non-compliance. Examples “Effective immediately, you are directed to remove all debris from the classroom floor. Failure to comply with this requirement will result in the issuance of a letter of reprimand.” “Effective immediately, you are hereby required to model correct spelling for students in the classroom and in all written communication. Failure to comply with this requirement will result in a further disciplinary action by the ROP, including the issuance of a letter of reprimand.” Clear and Unequivocal Directions A common mistake made by evaluators is drafting directive language that is vague or equivocal. Documentation must be clear and unambiguous as to the: DIRECTIVE given to the employee to correct the deficient conduct, as well as the DESCRIPTION of the conduct you are directing the employee to follow. Bad Language Examples “Perhaps you should be friendlier to other employees.” “I suggest that you be more careful with personnel files.” Good Language Examples “I expect you to refrain from using derogatory language, such as ‘stupid’ and ‘dumb’ towards your co-workers. “You must be more careful in performing your job and refrain from filing records in the wrong personnel files.” 13
  • 14. Drafting Clear Directives The directive given to an employee to correct unsatisfactory conduct or performance must be CLEAR AND UNEQUIVOCAL. The test for determining a clear and unequivocal directive is that it must not leave room for the employee’s own interpretation. A statement that implicitly gives an employee the option of not obeying is not a clear and unequivocal directive. Typically, evaluators couch directive language in vague, innocuous terms to avoid offending employees. The problem is that this “tactful” approach conveys mixed signals that make the direction subject to MISINTERPRETATION. This is a common defense in disciplinary cases. Concern that straightforward direction may negatively affect the working relationship between an evaluator and employee is unfounded, provided the direction is honest, constructive, and free from personal bias. Bad Language Examples “It would be better if you didn’t leave your students alone in the classroom.” “In the future, I would appreciate it if you turned in your goals and objectives on time.” Good Language Examples “You are directed to be present with your students in the classroom.” “In the future, I expect you to turn in your goals and objectives on time.” Drafting Clear Descriptions of Directed Conduct The description of the conduct you are directing the employee to follow must be UNABMBIGUOUS, EASY TO UNDERSTAND, AND COMPLETE. This is important to ensure that the employee reasonably understands what is expected in order to correct the deficient performance. If the direction is vague or incomplete, employees may argue that they did not understand and therefore should not be held accountable for non-compliance. This is a common defense in disciplinary cases. Frequently, drafting clear directive language is not difficult because the conduct to be corrected is easy to identify. Abstract conduct and general performance areas, such as instructional techniques, classroom management, employee attitude and cooperation, job efficiency, and adequate skill levels, however, are more difficult to describe. The general rule is that the same techniques, used in describing the facts evidencing the employee’s deficient performance should be used by the evaluator in identifying the conduct or performance standards expected of the employee. The language should pinpoint and describe the expected conduct in complete and explicit terms, using details and examples or samples of the employee’s work to add specific factual foundation. Examples • “Effective immediately, you are directed to prepare lesson plans with more detail. You are to specify the subject matter, the instructional methodology and materials used to present the lesson, the objectives, and time period for completion. I have attached a sample lesson plan that contains the format I expect you to follow.” 14
  • 15. • “Effective immediately, you are to refrain from using anger and sarcasm as a method of criticizing negative behavior. For example, you are to avoid yelling at your students as you did when you raised your voice during my classroom observation on September 15, 2003, and asked your student John Sanders, ‘What are you..deaf?’” • “Effective immediately, you are expected to work with your co-workers in a cooperative manner. Specifically, you are to accept your share of the work without using derogatory statements toward other employees such as ‘you do it sucker,’ and you are to complete the work within the required timelines. You are to demonstrate a sensitive and positive attitude toward the needs of others by offering to assist in completing department tasks as assigned by your immediate supervisor.” Timelines and consequences Directions must always contain the effective timelines and the consequences if the employee fails to comply. The employee must know not only what should be done to correct the deficient performance, but also by what date this must occur (i.e. timelines) and what will happen if the behavior is not corrected (i.e. consequences). Including Timelines Examples “Effective May 1, 2003, you are to report to my office each morning prior to commencing your assigned responsibilities. This direction will continue in effect until otherwise notified in writing.” “Effective October 15, 2003, through January 15, 2004, you are directed to submit your lesson plans to me each Friday for review and comment. “Effective immediately, you are directed to place all custodial materials in their allocated space before leaving for home.” Including Consequences Including the consequences for failing to follow the directions of an evaluator is an important element in PROGRESSIVE DISCIPLINE. It is easier to justify harsher discipline when the employee previously knew the consequences for failing to follow directions. As a general rule, the “consequence” statement should clearly indicate the specific disciplinary action to be imposed, rather than describing the action in general permissive terms. Bad Language Examples “Failure to follow my directive may result in further disciplinary action.” “Continued non-compliance with this directive may result in a recommendation of additional disciplinary action.” 15
  • 16. Good Language Examples “Failure to comply with this directive will result in the issuance of a warning letter.” “Failure to comply with this requirement will result in a recommendation of suspension without pay for up to 10 days.” “Failure to follow my instructions will result in disciplinary action, including the issuance of a letter of reprimand.” “Continued non-compliance with this directive will result in further disciplinary action, including a recommendation of dismissal.” Suggestions For Improvement Including suggestions for improvement is important since it is required in most certificated and classified policies. Education code requires an administrator who gives a certificated employee an unsatisfactory evaluation to do the following: 1. Recommend specific ways an employee may improve; and 2. Endeavor to assist the employee. If unsatisfactory evaluations do not include suggestions for improvement and offers of assistance, employees could argue that they were not given adequate supervision or guidance and therefore were not afforded a reasonable opportunity to correct any deficiencies. Suggestions for improvement may be very simple, such as the following: Recommending that the employee read books or attends employee staff development or professional growth workshops related to the area of performance deficiency. Suggesting that the employee review the applicable section(s) of the ROP Employee Handbook or Board Policies and Administrative Regulation(s) that was/were violated Offering to meet with the employee to review proper procedures and required documents Recommending that the employee call the immediate supervisor whenever questions arise concerning proper procedures or techniques Offering to make available other employees to model or demonstrate proper performance (peer coaching) Suggesting that the employee take certain academic courses or applicable ROP or adult education courses to improve the unsatisfactory performance Offering to make available equipment or materials to assist the employee in correcting any deficiencies Including specific steps the employee could follow in improving the performance problem 16
  • 17. GUIDELINES FOR DESCRIBING PERFORMANCE PROBLEMS Once you have determined that an employee is deficient in one or more areas of performance, you must describe and document the facts evidencing an employee’s deficient performance. To do this, the evaluator must be careful to: Clearly pinpoint the specific conduct deemed deficient. Describe the specific conduct in complete and explicit terms, avoiding unnecessary technical language. Avoid factual errors. Pinpointing Specific Conduct It is important to pinpoint each performance deficiency. Evaluators frequently combine more than one substandard activity into a single general description. This approach is not recommended because it is more difficult to isolate and track patterns of deficient performance and to provide clear directions for improvement. The better approach is to separately describe and document distinct performance deficiencies. Bad Language Examples An evaluator, having concerns about a clerical employee’s excessive errors, misfiling of documents, and failure to record telephone messages, COMBINES THESE DEFICIENCIES INTO A BROAD GENERAL DESCRIPTION: “Your inadequate clerical skills, as reflected in you failure to document telephone messages, excessive typing errors, and misfiling of documents, are unacceptable. Your unsatisfactory performance has caused this office unnecessary delay in the completion of required tasks, and has resulted in complaints from students and parents whose telephone messages were not returned.” An evaluator, having concerns about an instructor’s incomplete lesson plans, inappropriate use of classroom materials, insufficient homework assignments, inadequate assessment of student work, and poor student control, COMBINES THESE DEFICIENCIES INTO A BROAD GENERAL DESCRIPTION: “Your poor instructional technique, as evidenced by your incomplete lesson plans, inappropriate use of classroom materials, insufficient homework assignment, inadequate assessment of student work, and poor student control, has negatively affected student progress and motivation to learn.” 17
  • 18. Good Language Examples An evaluator, having concerns about a clerical employee’s excessive typing errors, misfiling of documents, and failure to record telephone messages, SEPERATELY DESCRIBES AND DOCUMENTS EACH PERFORMANCE DEFICIENCY: Typing Errors “On January 14, 2003, you made 18 separate typing errors in the attached two-page letter to Mary Smith, Principal, East High School. The errors included misspellings and inaccurate punctuation. These mistakes were identified by Ms. Smith, who shared the letter with the ROP Board President.” Misfiling Documents “On January 11, 2003, you placed the classroom observation reports for Nancy Green, Business Technology instructor at the Del Norte Facility, in the wrong file. As a result, I was unable to locate these documents when I needed them for an evaluation conference with Ms. Green. This caused me to violate the timeline listed in the Performance Evaluation Policy.” Unrecorded Telephone Messages “On January 10, 13, and 14, 2003, you failed to record telephone calls received from Susan Jones, a parent at East High School. Ms. Jones wanted to talk to me concerning her child’s illness. As a result, I did not return Ms. Jones’ call until January 16, which caused her to be angry.” An evaluator, having concerns about an instructor’s incomplete lesson plans, inappropriate use of classroom materials, insufficient homework assignments, inadequate assessment of student work, and poor student control, SEPERATELY DESCRIBES AND DOCUMENTS EACH PERFORMANCE DEFICIENCY: Incomplete Lesson Plans “Your lesson plans that I reviewed on January 5, 2003, were incomplete. They did not provide enough information to enable a substitute to continue with your planned curriculum. For example, there were several periods that were unplanned or you did not identify the skill or learning level of a specific activity.” Describing Conduct in Complete and Explicit Terms It is important to describe deficient conduct in complete and explicit terms. A common mistake made by evaluators is using general statements or conclusions without including the underlying supporting facts. This problem can be corrected by the following: Including specific factual details, such as dates, names, titles, places, events, witnesses and admission by employees Supplementing general statements or conclusions with specific examples Supplementing general statements or conclusions with visual evidence of the employee’s work 18
  • 19. The Importance of Detail Detail in employee performance documentation is important because it does the following: Reinforces the credibility of the evaluator in accurately reporting the employee’s conduct Reduces the evaluator’s reliance on recalling specific facts of an employee’s past performance deficiencies Assists the ROP in sustaining its burden of proof in disciplinary cases Including Specific Factual Detail Legally sufficient documentation must be: Complete and clear: The document must be factually specific and not based solely on general statements and conclusions without specific factual foundation. Self-contained: The document should contain all relevant information necessary to be fully understood by a third person unfamiliar with the employee’s unsatisfactory conduct. ASSUMPTIONS OF PRIOR KNOWLEDGE SHOULD BE AVOIDED. Explicit in identifying the problem: A third party reviewing the document should not have to deduce the problem from the facts. The test for determining whether a factual statement is sufficiently complete and explicit is the following: Would another person unfamiliar with the employee’s unsatisfactory performance understand what the employee did that created the problem based on reading the factual statement, without having to refer to any other information source? Bad Language Examples “ You are frequently late to staff meetings.” “You went to the gate at 7:30 a.m. on January 15, 2003, and waited 10 minutes before returning to the maintenance yard.” (Problem not identified) “On December 12, 2002, you drove the ROP Van to the Sunflower Facility at 1:30 p.m. and you picked up books and delivered them to East High School.” (Problem not identified) Good Language Examples “You are frequently late to staff meetings. Between September 15 and November 1, 2003, you were late to staff meetings on September 18 (10 minutes); September 29 (5 minutes); October 11 (15 minutes); and October 26 (10 minutes).” “On January 15, 2003, I directed you to go to the Sunflower Facility, at 7:30 a.m. to unlock the building for the building contractor. Instead of waiting until the contractor arrived, you left after 10 minutes and returned to the maintenance yard without opening the building.” “On December 12, 2003, you drove the ROP van to the Sunflower Site at 1:30 p.m. without checking the delivery schedule. As a result, you picked up books and delivered them to East High School instead of picking up computer equipment that you were scheduled to deliver to the Del Norte site.” 19
  • 20. Including Specific Examples to Supplement General Statements or Conclusions An easy way to correct general statements or conclusions, besides adding more factual detail, is to include specific examples of the general conduct described in the documentation. The examples help in providing the proper factual foundation. Bad Language Examples “You are a poor spelling model for students.” “The classrooms you were assigned to clean on April 6, 2003, were dirty.” Good Language Examples “You are a poor spelling model for students. For example, on May 6, 2003, a classroom bulletin board display had the following spelling errors: ‘callendar’ and ‘ priveledge.’ Further, on May 7, 2003, a classroom display sign was inaccurately spelled ‘Guess my wieght.’” “The classrooms you were assigned to clean on October 12, 2003, were dirty. For example, there were gum wrappers and cookies on the floor in Room 25, as well as chalk and pen marks on the floor in Room 26.” Attaching Visual Evidence of the Employee’s Work to Supplement General Statements or Conclusions Another easy way to correct general statements or conclusions is to attach visual evidence of the employee’s deficient conduct. This may include photographs and copies of the employee’s work. Examples “The classrooms you were assigned to clean on October 12, 2003 were dirty. Attached are photographs of the debris on the floor in Rooms 25 and 26 taken by me on October 12 at 3:45 p.m.” “The attached lesson plans you turned in on October 12, 2003, are not in compliance with my October 6, 2003, directive. These lesson plans are too brief and general for a substitute to follow and fail to make allowances for individual student differences.” In using visual evidence of an employee’s work, it is important to record on the document the date the information was received and, in the case of photographs, the location and time as well as the person who took the picture. This procedure helps to facilitate the admissibility of the photographs into evidence at a discipline hearing. Recording Accurate Facts Stating facts correctly is important. Inaccurately recording objective facts because of carelessness can negatively affect an evaluator’s credibility as a witness. An inference may be drawn that if objective facts cannot be accurately described, then subjective observations are nor trustworthy. 20
  • 21. The most common recorded errors involve the following: Incorrect dates Incorrect names of employees, parents, students or witnesses Incorrect titles Incorrect designation of work stations and equipment Incorrect description of documents Incorrect reference to Education Code sections, board policies, and administrative regulations 21
  • 22. East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and h i l STAFF EVALUATION CALENDAR DATES PROCEDURES Prior to Goal-setting Conference Staff are given the Evaluation Handbook when they are employed. At the beginning of the school year the administrator gives staff the employee evaluation objectives form. Evaluators familiarize themselves with the Performance Evaluation Handbook, job requirements, and program needs and begin to identify objectives and strategies. September to October 15 Staff submits employee evaluation objectives form to supervisor. Supervisor reviews objectives and discusses revisions if necessary. Supervisor retains the original and provides copy to employee. It is not necessary to send copy to Personnel at this time. October 15 to December 15 Evaluator begins data gathering and observation of progress towards objectives. (This includes documented class observation notes.) December 15 to end of Fall Semester Evaluation conferences for all staff must take place. The evaluator provides clear, direct and honest communication to improve staff performance. Evaluatees are given constructive feedback from which they can effect positive change and improve mutual trust and respect. If serious performance issues exist, the evaluatee will have a follow-up conference within 45 days. December 15 to April 15 Evaluator continues data gathering and observation of progress towards objectives. April 15 to end of Spring Semester Follow-up evaluation conferences for all staff must take place. Forward original performance evaluation and objectives form to Personnel after completion of evaluation process. Both supervisor and employee retain copies. Evaluation conference may be scheduled at anytime 22
  • 23. III. CERTIFICATED STAFF 23
  • 24. CERTIFICATED EMPLOYEE DIAGNOSTIC AND OBJECTIVES SETTING PROCESS An important part of the employee evaluation process takes place at the beginning of the evaluation period. The evaluator (supervisor) schedules a meeting with the employee to jointly develop the objectives, i.e. what the employee expects to achieve during the year and how this will be accomplished. The “Employee Evaluation Objectives Form” should be used for this process. The employee should consider professional growth activities to improve or enhance performance even if he/she is meeting acceptable standards on the job. These professional growth activities should be realistic. If the timelines need to be changed at a later date, this may be done by mutual agreement. It is important to indicate on the form how attainment of the objective will be measured. (See the attached example.) If the evaluator believes the employee’s performance is below standard, the evaluator should discuss these concerns with the employee as they occur. If there are still areas needing improvement at the time of the objectives-setting conference, the evaluator should discuss these in the meeting. The evaluator should come to the meeting prepared to discuss performance concerns and to suggest objectives for improving the employee’s performance. In the meeting, the evaluator should ask the employee for input and, whenever possible, include the employee’s suggestions for corrective objectives; activities, methods and processes for achievement of objectives; timelines for completion; and how they will know that the objectives have been met. If the employee denies the existence of a performance deficit, the evaluator should give specific examples of problem areas to help the employee understand that improvement is necessary. The employee will try harder if there is “buy-in” on the improvement plan. The key to employee success in obtaining objectives is to ensure that the objectives are discussed and agreed upon. The evaluator and evaluatee should discuss the significance and priority of each objective. Some may be major areas of concern and others minor. This is important when it comes to the final examination. Possible constraints that may impede accomplishment of an objective should be discussed and noted in the first conference and throughout the year as they arise. At the end of the evaluation period (usually one year), the supervisor will complete the reverse side of the “Employee Evaluation Objectives Form” to comment on the employee’s attainment of objectives and differentiate between corrective objectives and developmental objectives. The supervisor (evaluator) will also note any obstacles or restrictions that may have kept the employee from reaching objectives, specific areas for improvement (if any), overall appraisal of job performance, and commendations. Attach the employee evaluation objectives form to the Instructor Performance Evaluation Report before it is forwarded to the Personnel Director. 24
  • 25. EAST SAN GABRIEL VALLEY REGIONAL OCCUPATIONAL PROGRAM AND TECHNICAL CENTER EMPLOYEE EVALUATION OBJECTIVES Employee: Position: Date: Work Location: OBJECTIVES Objectives Strategies: Expected Date Evidence of Achievement: Progress Activities, Methods, and Processes of Completion: Reviewed: (What do you expect to achieve?) (How do you expect to do it?) (When will it be (How will you know that you met your (Comment Section completed?) objective?) for Supervisor) 25
  • 26. EAST SAN GABRIEL VALLEY REGIONAL OCCUPATIONAL PROGRAM AND TECHNICAL CENTER APPRAISAL COMMENTS/SUGGESTIONS/SUMMARY: (To be completed by Supervisor at the end of the evaluation period) Comment on attainment of objectives and differentiate between corrective objectives and developmental objectives. Note valid obstacles or restrictions, which may have kept the employee from reaching objectives, specific areas for improvement (if any), overall appraisal of job performance, and commendations. SUMMARY: COMPLETION OF OBJECTIVES: □ SATISFACTORY □ UNSATISFACTORY Reviewed by Designated Supervisor: Date: Note: Signature of evaluatee indicates the above comments and recommendations were discussed with the evaluator. If the evaluatee disagrees with the comments and/or recommendation, he/she may submit a written statement within 5 working days from receipt to the next level administrator, which will be attached to this form. Evaluatee’s Signature: Date: Reviewed by Personnel Director: Date: Original: Personnel; Supervisor: Copy; Employee: Copy 26
  • 27. RECOMMENDED GUIDELINES FOR THE EVALUATION CONFERENCE OF INSTRUCTORS The performance appraisal interview is an integral part of the process of evaluation. It can involve such diverse functions as the evaluation of instructional techniques, warning, praising, motivating, recommending future courses of action, and the granting or withholding of accolades or remediation plans and disciplinary action. Formal instructor evaluation can run the gamut from anecdotal narrative to precise measurement. Instructors may be evaluated for any of these purposes: ♦ To improve performance ♦ To acknowledge outstanding performance ♦ To supply information for modifying assignments ♦ To protect either the individual or the organization in legal matters ♦ To provide the basis for planning for individual growth and development Most educators consider the improvement of instruction to be the most important purpose for evaluation. The others listed above, however, should also be considered in the evaluation process. The most effective evaluation plan is one that improves learning conditions for students, promotes professional development, and contributes to higher staff morale. Steps in the evaluation process include the following: ♦ A goal setting conference ♦ Observation and information collection ♦ Post-observation conferences and continuous communication ♦ Decision making ♦ Assessment of the evaluation process Problems are encountered in instructor evaluation where there is an emphasis on fault-finding rather than coaching for improvement; when prejudice, bias, and poor judgment are used in collecting and analyzing information; and when communication is not open and honest. Criticism has a negative effect on people; it tends to build defensiveness. Mutual goal-setting for the future and coaching, on the other hand, improve performance. The most effective motivation occurs when feedback is given frequently to instructors rather than yearly. 27
  • 28. OBSERVATIONS MODEL What follows is an overview of a classic observations model, excerpted and adapted from Supervision of Instruction, Carl Glickman, Allyn and Bacon, 1990. Introduction The tasks of supervision that can bring about improved instruction are direct assistance to instructors, staff development, curriculum development, group development, action research, and peer coaching. Each of these assists in improving instruction, as follows: Direct assistance: The administrator provides one-on-one feedback to instructors to improve instruction. Staff development: The administrator provides learning opportunities to instructors in areas of need in order to improve instruction. Curriculum development: The administrator provides for changes in teaching content and instructional materials to improve instruction. Group development: The administrator provides for instructional problem-solving meetings among instructors to improve instruction. Action research: The administrator provides instructors with ways to evaluate their own teaching to improve instruction. Peer coaching: The administrator provides for instructors to participate in peer coaching to improve instruction by emulating effective instructional techniques of others. Each of these tasks is directly related to improved instruction. An administrator needs to take responsibility for these tasks if a class is to become increasingly effective. Guidelines to effective observations The structure of observations can be simplified into five sequential steps: 1. Notification of observation 2. Classroom observation 3. Analysis and interpretation. 4. Provide constructive feedback 5. Critique of previous four steps. 28
  • 29. Step 1: Notification of observation Prior to the actual observation, the administrator conveys to the instructor (1) the reason and purpose for the observation, (2) the focus of the observation, (3) the method and form of observation to be used, (4) the time of observation, and (5) the time for constructive feedback to take place. These determinations are made before the actual observation, so that both administrator and instructor are clear about what will transpire. The purpose of the observation should provide the criteria for making the remaining decisions on focus, method, and time of observation. You may choose to combine your notification of observation during the initial meeting on goals and objectives. Step 2: Observation In the next step, observation, you may employ one or several observation strategies to evaluate those items agreed upon in your pre-conference. Methods include quantitative observations, which are ways of measuring particular behaviors and events, or qualitative or descriptive observations, where the observer records events as they occur and then interprets these events. Quantitative techniques include categorical frequencies (a count of how many times certain events or behaviors occur), physical indicator instruments (yes/no checklist of the physical classroom), performance indicators (yes/no or frequency checklist of student or teacher behaviors), and visual diagramming of teacher interactions with student. Qualitative techniques include detached open-ended narratives, where the observer simply records events; participant observation, where the supervisor becomes a participant in the classroom and talks with teacher and students; and focused questionnaire, where the observer brings in a list of questions/topics relevant to the focus of the observation to use in recording events. The observer should keep in mind the difference between descriptions of events and interpretations. Interpretation should follow description. Step 3: Analysis and Interpretation The next step includes analysis and interpretation of the observation. The administrator leaves the classroom with his or her observations and finds a quiet place to review and study the information he/she has gathered. The task of analysis may include counting frequencies, looking for recurring patterns, isolating a major occurrence, or distinguishing performance indicators that were present and those that were not. Regardless of the instrument (questionnaire or open-ended form) used, the administrator must make sense of a large amount of information. Then the administrator can make interpretations based on the analysis of the observation descriptors. 29
  • 30. The administrator must consider the individual instructor’s level of experience, skills, and commitment in deciding which approach to use when providing constructive feedback. Approaches include any combination of the following: informational: The administrator presents his or her observations and interpretations, asking for input, setting a goal, and providing the instructor with alternative actions from which to choose. collaborative: The administrator shares his/her observational data, allowing the instructor to present his or her own interpretations and negotiating a mutual contract for future improvement. non-directive: The administrator explains his or her observations and encourages the instructor to analyze, interpret, and make his or her own plan. Step 4: Providing Constructive Feedback Once observation form(s), analysis, and interpretation are completed, and an interpersonal approach for feedback is selected, the administrator is ready to meet with the instructor to discuss the analysis of the observation and, finally, to produce a plan for instructional improvement. The first order of business is to share the observation with the instructor, i.e. to reflect back to the instructor what was seen. Then the administrator can follow the chosen approach: the informational or collaborative directive or non-directive. The responsibility for developing a future plan may reside with the administrator, be equally shared, or belong to the instructor. The conference ends with a plan for further improvement Step 5: Critique The critique of the previous four steps is a time for reviewing whether the format and procedures used during the formal observation process were satisfactory and whether revisions might be needed before repeating the sequence. The critique might be held after constructive feedback is given or in a separate conference after a few days. It need not be a formal session but can be instead a brief discussion, consisting of questions such as the following: What was valuable in what we have been doing? What was of little value? What changes could be suggested? The critique has both symbolic and functional value. It indicates that the administrator is involved in an improvement effort in the same way as the instructor being evaluated. Furthermore, the feedback from the instructor gives the administrator a chance to determine what practices to continue, revise, or change when working with the instructor in the future. The five steps are now complete, and a tangible plan of future action is in the hands of the instructor. The administrator is prepared to review the plan before the next observation and reestablish focus and method of observation. 30
  • 31. East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and Technical CLASSROOM OBSERVATION FORM Instructor: Observer: Class: Date of Evaluation: Start Time: End Time: Lesson Type: Lecture Demonstration Discussion Small Group Supervised Study Multi-media Resource speaker Role Play Other: The purpose of this observation is to create a consciousness of the vital points that affect the success of an instructor and lesson presentation. Ratings are of value only if they are made with complete frankness. Rating Scale: 1 – Outstanding; 2 – Strong; 3 – Satisfactory; 4 – Needs Improvement; 5 – Unsatisfactory; N/A - Not Applicable Observation Area Rating Comments Physical characteristics 1. Walls and floors are clear of graffiti 1 2 3 4 5 N/A 2. Student work is displayed and less than four weeks old 1 2 3 4 5 N/A 3. Teacher materials/directions are posted and less than four weeks old 1 2 3 4 5 N/A 4. Floors are clear of litter 1 2 3 4 5 N/A 5. Student resource materials are files in storage area 1 2 3 4 5 N/A 6. Teacher resource materials are filed in storage area 1 2 3 4 5 N/A 7. “In” and “Out” boxes for student papers are clearly marked 1 2 3 4 5 N/A 8. There are safety signs posted 1 2 3 4 5 N/A 9. Tools and equipment are used safely and stored correctly 1 2 3 4 5 N/A Introduction, Motivation, Anticipatory Set 1. Did the teacher gain the interest of the class in the first minute? 12345 N/A 2. How well did the teacher prepare the class for the lesson information? 12345 N/A 3. Did the teacher find out what the students knew about the lesson? 12345 N/A Presentation Objectives 1. Were terms and technical words explained? 1 2 3 4 5 N/A 2. How well was the lesson held to the topic? 1 2 3 4 5 N/A 3. Were practical examples used to clarify points in this lesson? 1 2 3 4 5 N/A 4. Did teacher refrain from “talking to the board?” 1 2 3 4 5 N/A 5. Did the teacher look at all students? 1 2 3 4 5 N/A 6. Were the visual aids and media used effectively? 1 2 3 4 5 N/A 7. Were good questioning techniques used? 1 2 3 4 5 N/A 8. Was there frequent check-up for understanding taking place? 1 2 3 4 5 N/A 9. Is diversity respected in the classroom? 1 2 3 4 5 N/A Activity, Application, Guided Practice 1. Were handouts and information sheets clear? 1 2 3 4 5 N/A 2. Was discussion consistent with the topic? 1 2 3 4 5 N/A 3. Did the teacher maintain the interest of the class? 1 2 3 4 5 N/A 4. Were students engaged in the lesson? 1 2 3 4 5 N/A Testing, Evaluation, Summary, Closure 1. How well was the lesson summarized and student understanding checked? 12345 N/A 2. Quality of testing, assessment, evaluation? 12345 N/A Teacher as a Presenter 1. Voice Quality 1 2 3 4 5 N/A 2. Enthusiasm 1 2 3 4 5 N/A 3. Mannerisms 1 2 3 4 5 N/A 4. Use of English 1 2 3 4 5 N/A 5. Appropriate Dress 1 2 3 4 5 N/A 6. Professionalism 1 2 3 4 5 N/A Preparation by the Teacher 1. Did the lesson appear to be well planned? 12345 N/A 2. Were charts, tools, tests, instruction sheets, etc. ready for use? 12345 N/A Date Observer Signature 31
  • 32. CERTIFICATED STAFF EVALUATION QUALITY INDICATORS 1. TEACHING – LEARNING ENVIRONMENT A. UTILIZES PROFESSIONAL TEACHING STRATEGIES Demonstrate ability to organize and present instruction in a manner that will promote optimal learning opportunities Quality Indicators 1. Encourages and utilizes student ideas, interests, talents, and special abilities in developing the content of lessons 2. Plans successive lessons based on the ongoing success of student performance 3. Designs activities that help students experience success 4. Provides the students with frequent feedback of successes 5. Assures appropriate learning climate through proper teaching techniques and through the redirection of instructional errors 6. Provides unique opportunities for individual students with unique needs/talents 7. Involves students in learning activities throughout the day 8. Bases the instructional plan on observation and assessment data; plans lessons that are relevant and appropriate to student level and needs 9. Clearly states the lesson objective for each activity 10. Avoids extraneous instructional content 11. Presents a variety of materials and activities that challenges and stimulates students 12. Presents lessons that emphasize a variety of learning modalities 13. Adapts instruction to meet the special needs of students 14. Emphasizes concrete experiences and contextual learning 15. Uses a system of planned instructional progressions, which range from demonstration to independent practice with authentic assessment B. PROMOTES STUDENT LEARNING AND SOCIAL GROWTH Provides a positive environment that promotes learning and social growth Quality Indicators 1. Has an honest liking and sincere regard for all students 2. Is seen by students as a person with enthusiasm and a sense of humor 3. Has rapport with students 4. Is not threatened by mistakes 5. Uses a variety of self-evaluation instruments, including student evaluations 6. Approaches learning from a student’s point of view 7. Ensures that course expectations are clearly communicated and evaluated 8. Provides an organized and attractive environment conducive to learning 9. Provides consistent, positive reinforcement of appropriate behavior 10. Provides consistent feedback and monitoring of student work 11. Provides an environment where all students are actively involved in the ongoing curriculum 12. Avoids comments concerning students that are sarcastic or judgmental 13. Establishes relationships with students based on mutual respect and cooperation 32
  • 33. C. IMPLEMENTS REALISTIC STUDENT EXPECTATIONS Demonstrates the ability to recognize individual differences in establishing goals that are commensurate with student potential Quality Indicators 1. Assesses student performance in relation to expected outcomes 2. Understands normal development as it relates to delay in development caused by physical or mental impairment 3. Provides challenges within a range of activities that serve to stimulate and motivate students 4. Provides students with posted or printed examples of expected outcomes D. PROVIDES STUDENTS WITH OPPORTUNITIES TO ACHIEVE SUCCESS Provides students with opportunity to achieve success through a variety of experiences, activities and interactions Quality Indicators 1. Provides specific and timely feedback to students 2. Displays samples of student’s work 3. Presents lessons using a wide variety of instructional materials and activities to increase interest in repetitious concepts needing to be learned 4. Creates an environment where students can experience a feeling of success, thereby raising the level of students’ self-esteem E. PROVIDES ORGANIZED LEARNING ACTIVITIES Demonstrates the ability to select appropriate sequentially organized learning activities based on individual pupil age, ability and need Quality Indicators 1. Demonstrates expertise in course curriculum 2. Demonstrates an ability to organize and present an instructional program that uses specific knowledge gained through training and experience with students 3. Is motivated to acquire additional training in instructional areas where deficits or gaps appear, so that students are provided a comprehensive instructional program 4. Teaches and reinforces ESLR’s, academic, and industry standards F. EFFECTIVELY USES MATERIALS, TIME, AND RESOURCES Demonstrates the ability to make effective use of materials, time, physical arrangement of classroom, aides, and volunteer time Quality Indicators 1. Uses time effectively by preparing lesson, grading papers and being involved in student-centered activities 2. Uses preparation time appropriately 3. Ensures that materials are organized prior to each instructional day 33
  • 34. 4. Ensures that the classroom space is arranged so that it facilitates individual and group instruction, with student work areas arranged to reduce interfering behaviors and distractions 5. Ensures that the data collected on students documents the process of learning and growth; and tracks progress toward achievement of instructional objectives 6. Organizes instructional activities to maximize time on task 7. Provides smooth transitions between lessons G. PROVIDES CLASSROOM CONTROL AND DISCIPLINE Demonstrates the ability to use positive, firm, fair, consistent and appropriate behavior management Quality Indicators 1. Provides supervision for students at all times 2. Provides methods of classroom behavior management techniques that are appropriate, effective, consistently enforced, and clearly defined 3. Ensures expectations for student behavior are clearly communicated to students, parents, staff, and administrators 4. Clearly establishes routines for the classroom 5. Ensures that the physical room environment facilitates learning 6. Upholds standards of student behavior throughout the school 7. Displays student material to encourage positive successful behavior. 8. Ensures that relationships with student are based on mutual respect and cooperation 9. Controls classroom noise so that instructional activities can be conducted and distractions are kept at a minimum 10. Strives to be fair and consistent 11. Demonstrates a positive and constructive style when dealing with behavior 12. Refrains from emotional overreactions to misbehavior 13. Protects and maintains classroom, furnishings, material and supplies to maintain such items for their maximum life span 14. Demonstrates an ability to be assertive with misbehavior 15. Practices student control and restraint procedures in accordance with applicable ROP and district/school policies H. PROVIDES SUPERVISION OF ALL STUDENTS Provides supervision of all students while they are legally within the custody of the ESGVROP/TC Quality Indicators 1. Ensures that students, while in the classroom, are always under the supervision of an ROP or school employee 2. Regularly visits community worksites and interacts with students and employers 3. Communicates with worksite supervisors about student work schedules and makes sure that students are adequately supervised while working offsite 4. Maintains supervision of students until they leave campus 34
  • 35. I. MAINTAINS A SAFE ENVIRONMENT Maintains a safe environment appropriate to student levels of functioning and needs; follows established emergency procedures Quality Indicators 1. Manages classroom behaviors so that student activity is within safe limits 2. Ensures that emergency fire and earthquake procedures are posted, periodically discussed and practiced with students 3. Ensures that needed building repairs, safety hazards, and phone and intercom system failures are appropriately reported for repair 4. Considers what will happen in an earthquake; therefore ensures that materials are not overhead on cabinets and that cabinets, when possible, are anchored to wall J. PROVIDES CLEAR, AND FACTUAL SUBSTITUTE LESSON PLANS Quality Indicators 1. Provides a substitute lesson plan is current and available when absent 2. Provides a substitute lesson plan with pertinent information as to instructional activities, materials, and telephone numbers and emergency information 3. Provides the supervisor with representative copies of substitute lesson plans 2. ADMINISTRATION OF DUTIES A. ADHERES TO ESGVROP/TC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Acts in accord with policies, procedures and laws governing the ROP and school site Quality Indicators 1. Is familiar and follows appropriate laws and ROP/school district policies and procedures as they relate to instructor, classroom and school operation 2. Follows procedures established in ROP and school or district policies, regulations and administrative regulations 3. Has a basic knowledge of laws concerning students rights and discipline 4. Follows administrative directives B. MAINTAINS RECORDS AND SUBMITS REPORTS ON TIME Maintains Weekly Attendance Records (WARS) and school attendance registers and submits reports on time that are legible and accurate; records pupil progress and parent contacts Quality Indicators 1. Maintains appropriate records of parent and outside agency contacts 2. Maintains ongoing records of student progress, including completion of CC/CVE ITP’s, when applicable 35
  • 36. 3. Completes all reports correctly and punctually, including, but not limited to, attendance, grade reports, requests for field trips, purchase orders and survey responses 4. Maintains neat and accurate student cumulative records 5. Reports objective and accurate observations and conclusions of student performance resulting from tests, observations and class work 6. Develops and maintains daily/weekly lesson plans 7. Documents reportable events relating to student health and safety 8. Maintains records of course approval, advisory meetings and industry standards C. COMMUNICATES EFFECTIVELY WITH CO-WORKERS Demonstrates sensitivity and clarity when communicating with co-workers Quality Indicators 1. Works as a team member with other teachers and support staff 2. Reinforces a positive working relationship by demonstrating a sensitivity and positive attitude toward the needs of others 3. Maintains communication with school counseling offices D. COMMUNICATES EFFECTIVLY WITH PARENTS Informs parents of school progress; offers appropriate support and assistance through conferences, written communication and telephone calls Quality Indicators 1. Participates in school activities (i.e., open house, back to school) 2. Serves as a resource for the school, staff and community 3. Provides positive communication so that the parent(s) perceive the instructor and ROP as a support to them and their child 4. Is receptive to working with parents in order to solve student learning and discipline problems 5. Strives to be available before school, during the day, or after school in order to consult with parents 6. Develops reports to student and parents that communicate student growth in knowledge, skill and attitude E. PARTICIPATES IN PROFESSIONAL GROWTH Plans professional growth experiences which expand and improve teaching performance; is motivated to seek training in areas of deficit Quality Indicators 1. Has ongoing professional growth objectives 2. Strives to keep abreast of current trends in education and in the career-technical assignment area 3. Participates in non-required professional growth opportunities 4. Attends all required meetings (e.g., advisory committee, staff in-service) 5. Actively participates in staff and in-service meetings and programs 6. Is involved in at least one project each year in order to serve as a resource to other staff members 7. Uses a variety of self-evaluation procedures to assess personal performance 36
  • 37. F. PROVIDES SPECIFIC INSTRUCTION AND SUPPORT TO SUBORDINATES Provides specific instruction and assistance pertaining to teaching strategies, curriculum and classroom management Quality Indicators 1. On an ongoing basis provides the clerical/teaching assistant with role expectations, instructional responsibilities (if applicable), behavior limits within the classroom, and daily routine and instruction schedules 2. Monitors and provides feedback, consultation, and resources for technical instruction development 3. Facilitates a positive, supportive working relationship with the assistant 4. Involves supervisor immediately when there are concerns regarding the assistant’s performance 5. Prepares accurate anecdotal records and the draft of the assistant’s performance evaluation in a timely manner so that the supervisor can review prior to the evaluation conference 6. Conducts the performance evaluation conference with the assistant; the supervisor may also attend the evaluation conference 3. PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS A. DEPENDABLE AND PUCTUAL Quality Indicators 1. Demonstrates punctuality with class and duty assignments 2. Performs assessments and completes attendance and other reports within set timelines 3. Sends notices to parents and administration in a timely fashion 4. Orders materials and supplies in a timely fashion prior to depletion of existing supplies 5. Arrives on time to scheduled meetings 6. Returns calls and e-mails promptly 7. Follows through on assignments/requests made by supervisor 8. Requests substitutes in a timely fashion consistent with established procedures B. COOPERATES WITH OTHERS Demonstrates the ability to maintain a supportive working association with coworkers, parents and other professionals Quality Indicators 1. Works collaboratively; shows camaraderie in team, peer and support staff relationships 2. Willingly shares ideas, methods and materials 3. Willingly assist and mentor other instructors as needed; participates in joint duties and adheres to duty schedules 4. Assists in developing a cooperative work environment; focuses on positive rather than negative factors 37
  • 38. C. ACCEPTS DIRECTION Demonstrates the ability to take direction in a positive manner and act upon it to show improvement Quality Indicators 1. Attempts to improve skills through the implementation of suggestions and staff development/professional growth activities 2. Investigates new instructional material, strategies or in-service training 3. Demonstrates a general openness toward suggestions and/or directions in areas related to teaching assignments D. DEMONSTRATES FLEXIBILITY Demonstrates the ability to alter activities to meet the demand of new situations or assignments Quality Indicators 1. Collaborates in the change process to facilitate a smooth transition to new situations 2. Maintains a positive and supportive attitude in difficult circumstances 3. When dealing with students, families, peers and administration, demonstrates the ability to be flexible in an effort to reach a consensus 4. Takes direction from the supervisor in a positive manner 5. Places prime importance on the needs of students, rather than on personal preferences or convenience E. PRESENTS A PROFESSIONAL APPEARANCE Demonstrates the ability to present a professional appearance in meeting the responsibilities of the assignment. Quality Indicators 1. Dresses in a manner appropriate to the teaching assignment, and in keeping with that role 2. Recognizes the importance of being a role model to students 3. Dresses in a manner that positively represents the teaching profession and the expectations of the ROP, the participating school districts, and the community F. SEEKS ASSISTANCE AND SUPPORT WHEN NEEDED Quality Indicators 1. Keeps supervisor informed about school/class-related matters 2. Informs the supervisor and campus administration of foreseeable problems 3. Obtains supervisor’s approval consistent with ROP procedures as it relates to purchasing, reimbursements, field trip requests, requests for in-service 4. Informs supervisor of changes in activities that were initially approved by the supervisor 38
  • 39. DEFINITION OF RATINGS USED ON CERTIFICATED STAFF EVALUATON FORMS 1. OUTSTANDING: The instructor demonstrates mastery of every element of the performance indicator or standard and consistently performs at a level well beyond that normally expected. This level of performance approaches the best that the ROP might possibly expect of an instructor. Extraordinary and unique contributions are typical of this rating and should be specifically identified when this rating is assigned. 2. STRONG: The instructor meets all job requirements in this area and frequently performs at a level beyond that normally expected. This rating indicates a thorough knowledge of the assigned job, with duties performed at a high level of initiative and innovation. 3. SATISFACTORY: The instructor meets all the basic job requirements in this area in such a manner as to reflect full understanding of all position functions, and he/she demonstrates consistently satisfactory performance. This is a good rating and probably the most commonly indicated. 4. NEEDS IMPROVEMENT: The instructor performs below the acceptable level in this area. Improvement is needed and increased effort required. The instructor and administrator together should determine special training or specific improvements needed to bring performance to the acceptable level. Specific examples of areas where improvement is necessary must be identified and an improvement plan must be written. 5. UNSATISFACTORY: The instructor demonstrates inadequate performance and does not meet job requirements. Instructor has demonstrated inability or unwillingness to improve or meet expectations. When using this rating, specific examples of unsatisfactory performance must be identified, including dates, times, and/or places/events. THE OVERALL RATING ON THE EVALUATION FORM MUST BE CONSISTENT WITH FACTOR RATINGS, COMMENTS, AND DETAILS OF THE FOLLOW-UP CONFERENCE. There is no formula for computing the overall rating, however, it need not be an average of the performance factors. 39
  • 40. East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and Technical Center INSTRUCTOR PERFORMANCE EVALUATION REPORT Instructor: Evaluator: Date of Evaluation: Evaluation Period: to Mo/Yr Mo/Yr Course: INSTRUCTIONS: This form provides descriptions of activities, which relate to ESGVROP/TC philosophy of good instruction. Understanding that there are various acceptable methods and techniques of sound education, this is to be used as a guide sheet to aid the evaluator in observing and evaluating instructor performance objectively and fairly. Give your evaluation as to how this employee has performed relative to each factor listed. Concentrate on one factor at a time and circle the appropriate rating. Use the comments to provide a brief explanation. Rating Scale: 1 – Outstanding; 2 – Strong; 3 – Satisfactory; 4 – Needs Improvement; 5 – Unsatisfactory; N/A - Not Applicable EVALUATION AREA RATING COMMENTS 1. TEACHING – LEARNING ENVIRONMENT A. Utilizes professional teaching strategies. 12345 N/A B. Promotes student learning and social growth. 12345 N/A C. Implements realistic student expectations. 12345 N/A D. Provides students with opportunities to achieve 12345 N/A success. E. Provides organized learning activities. 12345 N/A F. Effectively uses materials, time and resources 12345 N/A G. Provides classroom control and discipline. 12345 N/A H. Provides supervision for all students. 12345 N/A I. Maintains a safe environment. 12345 N/A J. Provides clear, and factual substitute lesson plans. 12345 N/A 2. ADMINISTRATION OF DUTIES A. Adheres to ESGVROP/TC policies and procedures. 12345 N/A B. Maintains records and submits reports on time. 12345 N/A C. Communicates effectively with co-workers. 12345 N/A D. Communicates effectively with parents. 12345 N/A E. Participates in professional growth activities. 12345 N/A F. Provides specific instruction and support to 12345 N/A subordinates. 3. PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS A. Dependable and punctual. 12345 N/A B. Cooperates with others. 12345 N/A C. Takes direction in a positive manner. 12345 N/A D. Demonstrates flexibility. 12345 N/A E. Presents a professional appearance. 12345 N/A F. Seeks assistance and support when needed. 12345 N/A 40
  • 41. 1. What are the instructor’s areas of greatest strength? Specify examples of outstanding performance and qualities, which should be maintained and continued. 2. In what areas does the instructor need to improve performance and what steps should be taken by the employee to improve performance? (Give specific examples.) 3. Additional comments: Instructor’s Signature Date (My signature indicates that I have discussed this evaluation with my supervisor and have received a copy.) Evaluator’s Signature Date Signature of Reviewing Administrator Date Date Received for filing in the Personnel Department FOLLOW-UP CONFERENCE NOTES: Comments should be specific and should relate to the elements of performance evaluated above. 1. Changes in performance since last evaluation: 2. Performance Review: OVERALL PERFORMANCE RATING: (To be completed after the follow-up Conference) The overall rating must be consistent with factor ratings, comments, and the follow-up conference. There is no formula in computing the overall rating and it need not be an average of the performance factors. (refer to rating scale on front of evaluation) 1 2 3 4 5 Instructor’s Signature Date (My signature indicates that I have discussed this evaluation with my supervisor and have received a copy) Evaluator’s Signature Date Signature of Reviewing Administrator Date Date Received for filing in the Personnel Department Distribution: ORIGINAL: Personnel; COPY 1 Supervisor; COPY 2 Employee 41
  • 42. IV. CLASSIFIED STAFF 42
  • 43. CLASSIFIED EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE EVALUATION SYSTEM PROCEDURES The East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and Technical Center has an employee evaluation rating system designed to give fair evaluations of the quantity and quality of work performed by classified employees. 1. The performance evaluation system includes a diagnostic and goal-setting process at the beginning of the performance evaluation period. 2. Prior to the performance evaluation report becoming part of the employee’s personnel file, the supervisor and the employee must review the evaluation. 3. Performance evaluation reports are prepared and recorded in the employee’s personnel file for all regular full-time and regular part-time employees as follows: a. Probationary employees: evaluated at the third and fifth month and filed upon completion of the probationary period. b. Regular employees: annually, prior to step increase. c. At any time the supervisor feels that an evaluation would benefit the work performance of an employee. 4. Performance evaluation reports shall be made by the employee’s immediate supervisor on the appropriate ROP form. 5. The completed evaluation form shall be reviewed by the next highest supervisor (reviewing administrator). The reviewing administrator will discuss the appraisal with the evaluating supervisor prior to the evaluation conference. 6. The immediate supervisor shall schedule a performance evaluation conference and will meet with the employee to review and discuss the evaluation report. 7. The supervisor should ask the employee for input and encourage discussion of the evaluation. The supervisor should create an atmosphere where the employee feels safe enough to comment on areas where there might be disagreement. The supervisor, after listening to the employee, may make changes on the evaluation. If the employee’s performance needs to improve, the supervisor and the employee shall develop an improvement plan for areas of needed improvement. 8. The evaluation form shall be signed by the employee to indicate receipt, and the employee shall be given a signed copy. The employee’s signature does not indicate agreement with the contents of the evaluation. 9. If the employee refuses to sign the evaluation form, the supervisor shall write the date and time and write the statement: “the employee refused to sign the evaluation” and sign underneath the statement. The employee should still be given a copy of the completed evaluation form. 10. The performance evaluation is considered a confidential ROP record and the information shall not be disclosed except on a need-to-know basis, as determined by management. 11. An employee who is not satisfied with the performance evaluation report has ten days to write a statement expressing a response for his/her disagreement, and this shall be attached to the original evaluation and filed in the employee’s personnel file. 43
  • 44. CLASSIFIED EMPLOYEE DIAGNOSTIC AND OBJECTIVES SETTING PROCESS An important part of the employee evaluation process takes place at the beginning of the evaluation period. The evaluator (supervisor) schedules a meeting with the employee to jointly develop the objectives, i.e. what the employee expects to achieve during the year and how this will be accomplished. The “Employee evaluation objectives Form” should be used for this process. The employee should consider professional growth activities to improve or enhance performance even if he/she is meeting acceptable standards on the job. These professional growth activities should be realistic. If the timelines need to be changed at a later date, this may be done by mutual agreement. It is important to indicate on the form how attainment of the objective will be measured. (See the attached example.) If the evaluator believes the employee’s performance is below standard, the evaluator should discuss these concerns with the employee as they occur. If there are still areas needing improvement at the time of the objectives-setting conference, the evaluator should discuss these in the meeting. The evaluator should come to the meeting prepared to discuss performance concerns and to suggest objectives for improving the employee’s performance. In the meeting, the evaluator should ask the employee for input and, whenever possible, include the employee’s suggestions for corrective objectives; activities, methods and processes for achievement of objectives; timelines for completion; and how they will know that the objectives have been met. If the employee denies the existence of a performance deficit, the evaluator should give specific examples of problem areas to help the employee understand that improvement is necessary. The employee will try harder if there is “buy-in” on the improvement plan. The key to employee success in obtaining objectives is to ensure that the objectives are discussed and agreed upon. The evaluator and evaluatee should discuss the significance and priority of each objective. Some may be major areas of concern and others minor. This is important when it comes to the final examination. Possible constraints that may impede accomplishment of an objective should be discussed and noted in the first conference and throughout the year as they arise. At the end of the evaluation period (usually one year), the supervisor will complete the reverse side of the “Employee evaluation objectives Form” to comment on the employee’s attainment of objectives and differentiate between corrective objectives and developmental objectives. The supervisor (evaluator) will also note any obstacles or restrictions that may have kept the employee from reaching objectives, specific areas for improvement (if any), overall appraisal of job performance, and commendations. The objectives form must be attached to the Classified Employee Performance Evaluation Report before it is forwarded to the Personnel Director. 44
  • 45. EAST SAN GABRIEL VALLEY REGIONAL OCCUPATIONAL PROGRAM AND TECHNICAL CENTER EMPLOYEE EVALUATION OBJECTIVES Employee: Position: Date: Work Location: OBJECTIVES Objectives Strategies: Expected Date Evidence of Achievement: Progress Activities, Methods, and Processes of Completion: Reviewed: (What do you expect to achieve?) (How do you expect to do it?) (When will it be (How will you know that you met your (Comment Section completed?) objective?) for Supervisor) 45
  • 46. EAST SAN GABRIEL VALLEY REGIONAL OCCUPATIONAL PROGRAM AND TECHNICAL CENTER APPRAISAL COMMENTS/SUGGESTIONS/SUMMARY: (To be completed by Supervisor at the end of the evaluation period) Comment on attainment of objectives and differentiate between corrective objectives and developmental objectives. Note valid obstacles or restrictions, which may have kept the employee from reaching objectives, specific areas for improvement (if any), overall appraisal of job performance, and commendations. SUMMARY: COMPLETION OF OBJECTIVES: □ SATISFACTORY □ UNSATISFACTORY Reviewed by Designated Supervisor: Date: Note: Signature of evaluatee indicates the above comments and recommendations were discussed with the evaluator. If the evaluatee disagrees with the comments and/or recommendation, he/she may submit a written statement within 5 working days from receipt to the next level administrator, which will be attached to this form. Evaluatee’s Signature: Date: Reviewed by Personnel Director: Date: Original: Personnel; Supervisor: Copy; Employee: Copy 46
  • 47. CLASSIFIED STAFF EVALUATION QUALITY INDICATORS 1. QUALITY OF WORK A. KNOWLEDGE OF JOB RESPONSIBILITIES Demonstrates the ability to perform tasks that are fundamental to the job responsibility. Quality Indicators 1. Demonstrates expertise in responsible areas of support. 2. Demonstrates an ability to organize and perform specific tasks. 3. Is motivated to acquire knowledge of techniques and materials necessary to improve employees’ job skills. 4. Is familiar with the safe use of tools and/or equipment required to accomplish the tasks associated with the position. B. ACCURACY AND ACCEPTABILITY OF WORK Performs the tasks associated with the position with accuracy and completeness. Quality Indicators 1. Demonstrates an understanding of the expectations associated with the position. 2. Performs job responsibilities to the expectations delineated within their job description. C. COMMUNICATIVE SKILLS: Demonstrates an ability to clearly and effectively communicate thoughts and ideas with those that work with the employee. Quality Indicators Oral: Demonstrates the fundamental ability to express ideas verbally with enough detail to adequately convey their thoughts. Written: Demonstrate the ability to complete the required documents and reports that are required to perform the job responsibilities. D. THOROUGHNESS OF WORK Demonstrates the ability to complete tasks to the extent necessary so that others can utilize result to the benefit of the organization. Quality Indicators 1. Produces work product that is in a form that others can use. 2. Corrects obvious mistakes when they are discovered. 3. Considers time as a factor in the completion of tasks. 4. Recognizes when to ask questions of others. 47
  • 48. E. RECORD KEEPING Maintains records associated with the position that is legible and accurate. Quality Indicators 1. Maintains accurate and up to date records of contact with ROP staff, district staff and other personnel associated with the position. 2. Completes all reports correctly and punctually, including, but not limited to, student records, requisitions, purchase orders, grant documents and assessments. 3. Documents reportable events relating to student health and safety. F. COMMUNITY RELATIONS Supports the Mission of the organization through positive relations with outside agencies, school districts, and other ROP’s. Quality Indicators 1. When interacting with other agencies, presents a positive attitude and supports the ROP’s Mission. 2. Relates the ROP objectives to others effectively. 3. Participates in ROP/school activities (i.e., open house, programs, committees) 4. Serves as a resource for the ROP, school and community. G. VOLUME OF WORK Demonstrates the ability to regulate the volume of work so that time is used effectively. Quality Indicators 1. Uses time effectively. 2. Communicates with supervisor if the amount of work is in excess of their ability to complete tasks on time. 3. Communicates with supervisor if the amount of work is insufficient to maintain productivity. H. PLANS AND ORGANIZES WORKLOAD Demonstrates the ability to plan and organize tasks based upon reasonable priorities. Quality Indicators 1. Collaborates with supervisor and colleagues to determine the priorities of tasks to be completed. 2. Organizes the tools and materials to properly complete the task. 3. Asks questions of their supervisor when faced with a change in assumptions or circumstances. 48
  • 49. I. MAINTAINS SCHEDULES Demonstrates the ability to maintain and adhere to schedules for projects and/or reports. Quality Indicators 1. Ensures that schedules are met and/or keeps their supervisor apprised of changes. 2. Prepares a detailed schedule of activities for review by others. 2. WORK HABITS AND ATTITUDE A. ENTHUSIASM Approaches the job duties with enthusiasm and anticipation. Quality Indicators 1. Contributes to a positive atmosphere with the workplace. 2. Refrains from contributing to the spreading of rumors or misinformation. 3. Maintains a positive and supportive attitude in difficult times. B. ABILITY TO WORK INDEPENDENTLY Demonstrates the ability to work without direction when a supervisor is not available. Quality Indicators 1. Performs job responsibilities without constant supervision by others. 2. Willingness to instigate projects without being told. C. ADHERENCE TO ESGVROP/TC POLICIES Acts in accordance with policies, procedures and laws governing the ROP and school site. Quality Indicators 1. Is familiar with appropriate laws and ROP/school district policies and procedures as they relate the employee’s role within the organization. 2. Follows procedures established in the ROP and school or district policies, regulations and administrative regulations. 3. Has a fundamental knowledge of and adheres to the laws regarding sexual and other forms of harassment. 49
  • 50. D. KNOWLEDGE AND PRACTICE OF SAFETY RULES Maintains a safe environment within the workplace and follows established emergency procedures. Quality Indicators 1. Practices safety in the workplace. 2. Participates in organizational safety drills. 3. Maintains equipment is a safe working order. 4. Is aware of safety hazards and works to eliminate them. 5. Ensures that needed building repairs, safety hazards, and communications system failures are reported to the appropriate person. E. MAINTAINS A TIDY, EFFICIENT WORK AREA Maintains a work place that is functional and clean. Quality Indicators F. Keeps the work area free of debris and neat in appearance. G. Work area is safe from hazards that could endanger the employee or others. H. Work area is pleasant in appearance and promotes efficiency. 3. PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS A. DEPENDABLE AND PUNCTUAL Demonstrates dependability and punctuality over time. Quality Indicators 1. Reports to work on time. 2. Arrives on time to scheduled meetings. 3. Provides information to others in a timely manner. 4. Orders materials and supplies and notifies supervisor when resources are getting low. 5. Returns calls and e-mails promptly. 6. Follows through on assignments made by supervisor. 7. Calls in absences promptly. B. ADAPTABILITY Demonstrates an ability to adapt to changing conditions within the workplace. Quality Indicators 1. Deals with changing conditions without discord or anger. 2. Provides information to supervisor about the effects of change on projects, timelines and conditions. 3. Acts as part of a team. 50
  • 51. C. ACCEPTS DIRECTION Demonstrates the ability to take direction in a positive manner and takes responsibility for work product. Quality Indicators 1. Attempts to improve skills through the implementation of suggestions and staff development/professional growth activities. 2. Follows through by investigating and implementing new methods and strategies to complete job responsibilities. 3. Demonstrates a general openness toward suggestions and/or direction in areas relating to their job duties. D. APPEARANCE Presents a professional appearance in meeting the responsibilities of the assignment. Quality Indicators 1. Dresses in a manner appropriate to the job assignment and the duties being performed. 2. Recognizes the importance of being a role model. 3. Dresses for the safe execution of assigned job duties. I. INTER-PERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS Maintains a positive working relationship with co-workers and agencies that work with the organization. Quality Indicators 1. Facilitates a positive, supportive and professional relationship with those individuals that they interact with. 2. Maintains confidentiality and is discrete with information obtained during the workday. 3. Reports incidents of health and safety to a supervisor immediately when discovered. 4. Focuses on positive rather than negative factors of job assignments. F. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Seeks out new opportunities for improvement. Quality Indicators 1. Develops ongoing professional growth objectives. 2. Strives to keep abreast of current trends within the industry. 3. Attends all required meetings associated with the job responsibilities. 4. Actively participates in staff in-service meetings and programs. 51
  • 52. G. TRAINING OF SUBORDINATES Provides specific instruction and assistance pertaining to job responsibilities and performance to others Quality Indicators 1. On an ongoing basis provides their subordinates with role expectations, project responsibilities, and information necessary for their continued improvement. 2. Monitors and provides feedback, consultation, and resources for continued improvement. 3. Involves a supervisor when there are concerns regarding the continued professional development of a subordinate. H. DECISION MAKING Demonstrates the ability to make good decisions on a consistent basis. Quality Indicators 1. Makes informed decisions without hesitation when asked. 2. Provides rational for decisions to supervisor. 3. Consistently keeps the interests of the organization as the basis of decisions. 52
  • 53. DEFINITION OF RATINGS USED ON CLASSIFIED STAFF EVALUATION FORMS 1. OUTSTANDING: The employee has mastered every element of the performance indicator or standard and consistently performs at a level well beyond that normally expected. This level of performance approaches the best the ROP/TC might possibly expect of an employee. Extraordinary and unique contributions are typical of this rating and should be specifically identified where the rating is assigned. 2. STRONG: The employee meets all job requirements in this area and frequently performs at a level beyond that normally expected. This rating indicates a thorough knowledge of the job assigned, with duties performed at a high level of initiative and innovation. 3. SATISFACTORY: The employee meets all the basic job requirements in this area in such a manner as to reflect full understanding of all position functions, and he/she demonstrates consistently satisfactory performance. This is a good rating and probably the most commonly indicated. 4. NEEDS IMPROVEMENT: The employee performs below the acceptable level in this area. Improvement is needed and increased effort required. The supervisor and employee together should determine special training or specific improvements needed to bring performance to the acceptable level. Specific examples of areas where improvement is necessary must be identified, and an improvement plan must be written. 5. UNSATISFACTORY: The employee demonstrates inadequate performance and does not meet job requirements. The employee has demonstrated inability or unwillingness to improve or meet expectations. When this rating is used, specific examples of unsatisfactory performance must be identified, including dates, times, and/or places/events. THE OVERALL RATING ON THE EVALUATION FORM MUST BE CONSISTENT WITH FACTOR RATINGS, COMMENTS, AND DETAILS OF THE FOLLOW-UP CONFERENCE. There is no formula for computing the overall rating, however, it need not be an average of the performance factors. 53
  • 54. East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and Technical Center CLASSIFIED EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE EVALUATION REPORT Employee: _ Classification: Date of Evaluation: __________ Program/Location: _______________________ Evaluation Period: to _______ Evaluator: Mo/Yr Mo/Yr Type of Evaluation: Probationary ___ 3 mo. ___ 5 mo. Annual Special INSTRUCTIONS: Give your evaluation as to how this employee has performed relative to each factor listed. Concentrate on one factor at a time and circle the appropriate rating. Use the comments and suggestions section to explain or qualify your rating. Rating Scale: 1 – Outstanding; 2 – Strong; 3 – Satisfactory; 4 – Needs Improvement; 5 – Unsatisfactory; N/A - Not Applicable EVALUATION AREA RATING COMMENTS & SUGGESTIONS 1. QUALITY OF WORK A. Knowledge of job responsibilities. 1 2 3 4 5 N/A B. Accuracy and acceptability of work. 1 2 3 4 5 N/A C. Communicative Skills: Oral 1 2 3 4 5 N/A Written 1 2 3 4 5 N/A D. Thoroughness of work. 1 2 3 4 5 N/A E. Record keeping (Timeliness and accuracy of records and 1 2 3 4 5 N/A data collection). F. Community relations (Positive relations with outside 12345 N/A agencies, school districts, and other ROP’s). G. Volume of Work (as related to job requirements). 12345 N/A H. Plans and organizes workload effectively. 12345 N/A I. Follows schedules. 12345 N/A 2. WORK HABITS AND ATTITUDE A. Enthusiasm (exhibits positive and cooperative attitude). 1 2 3 4 5 N/A B. Ability to work independently (as required). 1 2 3 4 5 N/A C. Adherence to ESGVROP/TC policies and procedures. 1 2 3 4 5 N/A D. Knowledge and practice of safety rules. 1 2 3 4 5 N/A E. Maintains a tidy, efficient work area 1 2 3 4 5 N/A 3. PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS A. Dependable and Punctual 1 2 3 4 5 N/A B. Adaptability. 1 2 3 4 5 N/A C. Accepts Direction 1 2 3 4 5 N/A D. Appearance. 1 2 3 4 5 N/A E. Inter-personal relationships (effectiveness in working 1 2 3 4 5 N/A with supervisors, other employees, students, public). F. Professional Development. 12345 N/A G. Training of Subordinates 12345 N/A H. Decision Making 12345 N/A 54
  • 55. 1. What are the employee’s areas of greatest strength? Specify examples of outstanding performance and qualities, which should be maintained and continued. 2. In what areas does the employee need to improve performance and what steps should be taken by the employee to improve performance? (Give specific examples.) 3. Additional comments: OVERALL PERFORMANCE RATING The overall rating must be consistent with factor ratings, comments, and the follow-up conference. There is no formula in computing the overall rating and it need not be an average of the performance factors. 1 2 3 4 5 It is recommended that this employee: (Complete for Probationary Employees Only) Continue Probationary Period Be granted Regular Status Not be granted Regular Status Reasons: Employee’s Signature Date (My signature indicates that I have discussed this evaluation with my supervisor and have received a copy.) Evaluator’s Signature Date Signature of Reviewing Administrator Date Date Received for filing in the Human Resources Department Distribution: ORIGINAL: Human Resources; Copy 1 Supervisor; Copy 2 Employee 55
  • 56. V. LEADERSHIP STAFF 56
  • 57. LEADERSHIP PERFORMANCE EVALUATION SYSTEM Leadership employees shall be evaluated annually by the employee’s supervisor and receive approval by the Superintendent. The Leadership Employee Performance Evaluation form includes the following factors: I. Planning, Organization, and Operation of Department A. Effectively plans, organizes and implements departmental objectives and activities B. Accurately perceives total problem as well as component parts C. Reacts appropriately in crises or under difficult circumstances D. Takes responsibility for outcome of decisions E. Effectively plans and monitors departmental budget F. Appropriately delegates tasks within job description and maximizes staff abilities and potential G. Initiates needed changes H. Sets high yet attainable standards II. Professional Development of Staff A. Effectively utilizes the employee performance evaluation process for staff, which includes clarification of expectations, initial training, on-going coaching and feedback B. Assists employees to identify and correct job related problems C. Ensures individual professional development of staff III. Administrative Relationships A. Promotes positive relationships with agencies, school districts, and the community B. Demonstrates appropriate problem solving skills C. Exhibits the ability to listen with the intent of understanding the communicator’s point of view, and responds appropriately D. Effectively demonstrates fairness and consistency in working with staff E. Provides clear directions and communicates expected standards F. Effectively prepares written documentation G. Seeks additional information and asks questions if unclear about assignments or acceptable performance IV. Professional/Personal Attitude and Conduct A. Addresses issues openly and objectively B. Exhibits tact, poise and sound judgment C. Keeps current with changing issues, trends, and technology related to management responsibilities D. Effectively participates as a leadership team member E. Treats individuals fairly and equitably V. Personal Professional Development A. Participates in professional growth activities B. Participates in professional organizations 57
  • 58. East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Program and Technical Center LEADERSHIP EMPLOYEE EVALUATION REPORT Employee: Position: Date of Evaluation: Evaluation Period: to Mo/Yr Mo/Yr Evaluator: INSTRUCTIONS: Give your evaluation as to how this employee has performed relative to each factor listed. Concentrate on one factor at a time and circle the appropriate rating. Use the comments and suggestions section to explain or qualify your ratings. Rating Scale: 1 – Outstanding; 2 – Strong; 3 – Satisfactory; 4 – Needs Improvement; 5 – Unsatisfactory; N/A - Not Applicable EVALUATION AREA RATING COMMENTS 1. QUALITY OF WORK A. Effectively plans, organizes & implements 12345 N/A department/program objectives & activities. B. Accurately perceives total problem as well as component 12345 N/A parts. C. Reacts appropriately in a crisis or under difficult 12345 N/A circumstances. D. Takes responsibility for outcome of decisions. 12345 N/A E. Effectively plans and monitors department/program 12345 N/A budgets. F. Appropriately delegates tasks within job descriptions & 12345 N/A maximizes staff abilities & potential. G. Initiate needed changes. 12345 N/A H. Sets high, yet attainable standards. 12345 N/A 2. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF STAFF A. Effectively utilizes employee performance evaluation 12345 N/A process for staff that includes classification of expectations, initial training, on-going coaching and feedback. B. Assists employees to identify and correct job related programs. 12345 N/A C. Ensures individual professional development of staff. 12345 N/A 3. ADMINISTRATIVE RELATIONSHIPS A. Promotes positive relationships with other agencies. 12345 N/A B. Demonstrates appropriate problem solving skills. 12345 N/A C. Exhibits the ability to listen with the intent to understand 12345 N/A the communicator’s point of view and to respond appropriately. D. Effectively demonstrates fairness and consistency in 12345 N/A working with staff. E. Provides clear direction & communicates expected 12345 N/A standards. F. Effectively prepares written documentation. 12345 N/A G. Seeks additional information & asks questions if unclear 12345 N/A about assignments or acceptable performance. 4. PROFESSIONAL/PERSONAL ATTITUDE AND CONDUCT A. Addresses issues openly and objectively. 12345 N/A B. Exhibits tact, poise and sound judgment. 12345 N/A C. Keeps current with changing issues, trends and technology 12345 N/A related to leadership responsibilities. D. Effectively participates as a Leadership Team member. 12345 N/A E. Treats individuals fairly and equitably. 12345 N/A 5. PERSONAL PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT A. Participates in professional growth activities. 12345 N/A B. Participates in professional organizations. 12345 N/A 58
  • 59. 1. What are the employee’s areas of greatest strength? Specify examples of outstanding performance and qualities, which should be maintained and continued. 2. In what areas does the employee need to improve performance and what steps should be taken by the employee to improve performance? (Give specific examples.) 3. Additional comments: Follow-up conference scheduled (if desired): Date Employee’s Signature Date (My signature indicates that I have discussed this evaluation with my supervisor and have received a copy.) Evaluator’s Signature Date Signature of Reviewing Administrator Date Date Received for filing in the Personnel Department Distribution: ORIGINAL: Personnel; Copy 1 Supervisor; Copy 2 Employee 59

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