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  • 1. Talent is not generic – it is not a one size fits all Talent is situational – it is grounded in your company and the strategy You need to build down functional excellence 2. There is a direct correlation with talent and business results Hewitt, McKinsey studies Jim Collins, Good to Great, “It’s who first, then what…” There is nothing you can do to overcome poor leaders and average performers 3. Talent is the personal accountability of the CEO Discuss DDI research Leaders develop leaders “ If the CEO isn’t interested in talent, it’s time to work on the benefits package.” 4. Talent needs to be involved in all senior decisions Be clear about who owns talent and implement mechanisms for people to get visibility (allow them to move) Accountability is paramount and what drives performance People understand accountability as it relates to business objectives Leaders need to own talent planning and PM Talent planning = succession depth got mission critical roles PM – Does it improve performance? 5. Stop talking about careers and give people experiences Change toe language from “what is the next position” to “what is the next experience” Have people tell you about the experiences they’ve had (link it to interviewing/recruiting) 6. Since it is about the few, there is a notable lack of science in what we do Look at your mix. What is the mix of inside an outside talent? Great companies think thoughtfully about where, when and how you feed the pipeline. We need rigor and science in spotting and verifying potential 7. We must offer real insight on our people, the organization and the work of the organization We must have a deep grounding in the business We must have real expertise about how people develop the further and faster test – can you say they got further on their own steam or further with your help? Raise the talent bar by focusing on outcomes – execute better than others MR must be outcome focused. Period. 8. Rigor Link to economic value Specify investments that drive performance Facts/Data Tough-minded, soft hands Select against your criteria Train against it Execute, execute, execute
  • Some other design criteria for developing a succession plan: Must be easy to understand and easy to implement Low maintenance/have administrative simplicity Well-communicated Full commitment/buy-in Individual employee communication Employees part of process Shared ownership Understand and know people/skills Align with orientation Must be linked to overall business strategy – future business objectives paired with right people for the future
  • Boomers are 39 – 56 years old Boomers are putting unprecedented pressure on organizations as they begin to retire: Succession Planning Accommodated working arrangements New recruit/ Attrition strategies Birth rate in Canada, US, UK are steadily declining since the 1960’s 70% of the increase in workforce population will be in 55-64 age category Succession Planning and Human Capital Development is one measure to resolve demographic challenges Extensive skill, knowledge and experience
  • Today’s Traditionalists – Confident in social security and health care access following retirement, still plan to work during retirement. The Self-Reliant – Aggressive savers, confident in retirement savings, plan to work part-time for the sake of enjoyment mainly. The Strugglers – Not saving any money for retirement, not satisfied with current savings, concerned about social security and health care access, will need to work during retirement. The Anxious – Not optimistic about retirement, not satisfied with current savings, concerned about social security and health care access, will need to work during retirement. The Enthusiasts – Optimistic about retirement, do not plan to work when retired, can’t wait to retire.
  • Generation X are 24-38 years old 1/3 size of Boomers Xer’s respect workplaces that view them as valuable assets, not machines to squeeze higher productivity Approximately 20% of the size of Boomers Learned independence quickly from dual income or divorced parents Witnessed downsizing, radical career changes Grown up with computer and Information Revolution. Easier time deciphering information overloads. Post-Boomer market segment created by US mass media Xer’s expect: Clearly defined goals Shared vision Respect for individual roles Leaders who are accountable and respectful Definite contribution
  • Generation Y are 8-23 years old 3 times size of Generation X Shift in values from Boomers. Truth, humor, direct Not image and status conscious Independent, self-confident Have had lots of feedback all of their life and know self more than the Xers Are more comfortable with self-reliance More positive and optimistic outlook on life than Xers. 80’s workaholics, 90’s over-parenting to make up Job satisfaction is driven by playing a meaningful role that helps others. “Paid volunteers” mentality. Not because they have to , because they want to for something meaningful. Fiercely independent like Gen X’ers, but more comfortable with their self-reliance. “Of course I can fend for myself” versus “I’d better be able to fend for myself. Now get out of my way.” Generation Y: “Of course I can take care of myself” Have typically been micromanaged by parents, teachers, counselors that they are eager to manage their own time. Will not want to be micro-managed at work. Coach style good.
  • Harley Davidson – Therefore, there are several discussions of key talent, with lots of feedback and decisions oh high potentials that come from the circle rather than from an informal network among senior management “ In the land of opinion, the senior person wins” “ 90% of decisions are based on likeability” – Tim Sanders
  • Harley Davidson – Therefore, there are several discussions of key talent, with lots of feedback and decisions oh high potentials that come from the circle rather than from an informal network among senior management “ In the land of opinion, the senior person wins” “ 90% of decisions are based on likeability” – Tim Sanders
  • Leadership is the key to unleash performance

Driving Superior Performance:Aligning Talent and Succession ... Driving Superior Performance:Aligning Talent and Succession ... Presentation Transcript

  • The Power Tools for Nonprofits 2009 Conference Cathryn Gabor, SPHR Executive Service Corps Houston, Volunteer Consultant Partner, Ingenuity Search Partners, LLC November 18, 2009 Confidential Driving Superior Performance: Aligning Talent and Succession Management
  • Integrated Talent Management
    • “ You can win the war for talent, but
    • first you must elevate talent
    • management to a burning corporate
    • priority .
    • Then, to attract and retain the people
    • you need, you must create and
    • perpetually refine an employee value
    • proposition: senior management’s
    • answer to why a smart, energetic,
    • ambitious individual would want to
    • come and work with you rather than
    • the team next door.”
    Elizabeth G. Chambers et al., “The War for Talent,” The Mckinsey Quarterly 3 (1998)
  • Integrated Talent Management © Mercer HR Consulting Performance Leadership Competencies & Values Leadership/ Management Competencies and Training Aligning the Organization & People Career Development Performance Management & Assessment Rewards, Recognition & Benefits Talent Assessment and Evaluation HR Mission & Strategy Visible Measures of Organizational Success Communication
  • Talent Management – Our Responsibilities
    • What is our definition of talent?
    • How does it link to Strategy?
    • How much does talent matter? Why?
    • Who owns Talent Management?
    • Do you define the rules of the game?
    • How do you make Talent Management strategic?
    • What is the threat to successful Talent Management?
    • What is the HR franchise?
    • What do executives expect of us?
  • Developing Talent…A Shared Responsibility
    • Employee Development
    • Goal:
    • Raise Workforce Capability and Engagement
    • About the many
    • Everyone deserves an opportunity to grow
    • Measured by annual Engagement survey and retention
    • Broad programs
    • Career development framework
    • Strengthen business knowledge and skills
    • Leadership/Executive Development
    • Goal:
    • Build Leadership Capability and Bench
    • About the few
    • Which people have the potential to make meaningful leadership contributions?
    • Measured by experiences, transfer of knowledge and bench strength
    • Focused development
    • Variety of Experiences
    • Challenging Assignments
    • Rigor of assessment and succession process
    Executive Expectations Rigor – Link to economic value – Quantify investments that drive performance – Provide Data and Metrics Tough-minded, soft hands – Select against your criteria – Execute flawlessly
  • The CEOs Role in Talent Management
    • Chief executive officers (CEOs) are increasingly responsible for, and involved in, talent management. The heads of human resources departments play an important, supporting role in executing talent strategy
    • CEOs spend a large amount of their time — often more than 20% — on talent management. However, this effort is not typically guided by a formal talent strategy explicitly linked to the company’s overarching goals or embedded in the business planning process. Rather, CEOs engage in selected supporting activities where they believe they add value.
    • Talent management has become more important because of a growing recognition that it has become more important because of a growing recognition that it helps to drive corporate performance, even though the exact impact is hard to quantify.
    • Good talent management is not undertaken in a piecemeal fashion but consists of comprehensive development programs. These include the identification of leadership potential, performance evaluations, targeted development activities and job experience.
    • Many CEOs mentor executives in their organizations — an additional and important part of the program. They regard the development of the next generation of leaders as one of the best ways of leaving a strong legacy.
    © The Economist Intelligence Unit 2006
  • The Human Barriers % of Interviewees who ranked obstacle among the 8 most critical Obstacles preventing talent-management programs from delivering business Value Senior Managers don’t spend enough high-quality time on talent-management Line managers are not sufficiently Committed to people development Organization is “siloed” and does not encourage constructive collaboration, sharing of resources Line managers are unwilling to differentiate their people as top, average, and underperformers Senior leaders in organization do not align talent-management strategy with business strategy Line managers do not address chronic underperformance effectively Succession planning and/or resource allocation processes are not rigorous enough to match right people to roles CEO and/or senior team don’t have shared view of most pivotal roles 54 52 51 50 47 45 39 38 © The McKinsey Quarterly 2006
  • Your Organization’s Strategy for Succession Does your organization have an effective plan for executive succession?
    • Does your company have a plan for leadership growth to keep pace with business growth? Who is being developed and groomed?
    • Do you have a plan in place to fill the gaps and do they have plans for current employees to “step up to the plate” to fill those positions?
    • Do you have an objective plan in place to identify and develop the future leadership?
    • Do you have the bench strength for future leadership needs?
    How can an organization maximize the human asset potential and allocation for the best alignment with strategic objectives? "Leaders are responsible for future leadership. They need to identify, develop and nurture future leaders"   -Max DePree, Leadership is an Art
  • Identification of Successors and Key Positions Identification of Key Talent Assessment of Key Talent Development Plans and Assignment Management Talent Review Key Elements Succession Planning: Key Elements
    • Identification of Successors and Key Positions:
      • What are the competencies and experiences needed to qualify for each key position?
    • Identification of Key Talent:
      • Typically people at the top two levels of the organization and high potential employees one level below.
      • Identified by their management’s assessment of their performance and potential for advancement.
    • Assessment of Key Talent:
      • For each person on the radar screen, primary development needs are identified focusing on what they need in order to be ready for the next level.
    Succession Planning: Key Elements
    • Development Plans
      • A development plan is prepared for how we will help the person develop over the next year.
      • Assignments and projects to stretch individual and provide new experiences
    • Talent Review with the CEO
      • An annual or semi-annual talent review is held to review succession plan and progress of key talent; discuss and revise their development plans.
    Succession Planning: Key Elements
  • Succession Planning…
    • Isn’t
      • The Same Thing as Workforce Planning
      • A Selection Process
      • Worth Anything if Management Won’t Use it
    • Is
      • An Organization and People plan
      • A Series of Actions/Steps to Meet That Plan
      • A Vital Tool for Executing Your Organization’s Mission
  • Business Case for Succession Planning
    • Proactive planning will prepare your organization for the future
    • Provides a competitive advantage over unprepared organizations for attracting and retaining essential talent
    • Baby boomers are entering their fifties and starting to plan for retirement
    • Steadily declining skilled workforce population
    • Can help retain your current key staff at all levels
    “ There’s A Need To Grow Extensive Leadership Communities Inside All Organizations.” -Growing Leaders, PWC
  • Succession Criteria
    • Must be linked to overall business strategy
    • Easy to implement
    • Cost and time effective
    • Repeatable, sustainable, on-going process
    • Include both management and key/technical positions
    • Align with mission critical HR functions:
      • Performance Management
      • Development
      • Compensation – Reward Systems
    “ Even New Hires Should Be Looked Upon As A Rich Source of Future Upper Level Talent.” -HR.com
  • Core Principles Underlying Succession Planning
    • Leaders really do matter … in managing/driving accountability, results, culture.
    • Performance is what counts … top performers over high potentials (the “what” & “how” both count).
    • Today’s top performing leaders aren’t necessarily tomorrow’s … even our best leaders can fall behind or derail.
    • Talent is an enterprise resource … willingness to share talent makes the system work.
    • A broad set of experience & assignments is the best classroom …
    • yet a balanced approach is still necessary for development.
    • It’s incumbent upon today’s “top-100” to leave a legacy of future talent … current leaders must teach, mentor, & role model others on what it takes to succeed.
    • Invest in the best … focus the rest.
  • Implementing A Successful Succession Plan © 2000 Corporate Executive Board Obtain CEO Commitment – Ensure that the CEO and other senior executives are willing to get involved in the succession planning process to create the vision for the initiative within the organization. Draft a Policy Statement to be Reviewed by the CEO – Write the policy document in the words of the senior management committee to establish the tone of the succession planning program. Establish a Senior Management Committee – Identify top executives from all functional areas of the organization to oversee the succession planning process. This committee must have decision-making authority. Develop a Proposal for an Annual Cycle of Reviews – Draft a realistic succession plan that is attainable for the short-term; develop a more comprehensive plan after a few years of experience. Develop Forms and Instructions – Create basic succession planning forms that list positions and high-potential candidates and plans for their development. Develop Training Needs and Programs – Provide training to ensure that managers understand the succession plan procedures as well as the steps for assessing the potential of employees. Start the Process – Ensure that the CEO plays a pivotal role in the succession planning process to increase the likelihood of success. Evaluate and audit the process – Implement an audit process in the succession plan that tracks career paths, identifies supply and demand, and evaluates the plan. Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5 Step 6 Step 7 Step 8
  • Drivers of Succession Planning: Demographics BABY BOOMERS 1946-1963 GENERATION X 1963-1978 GENERATION Y 1979-1994 “ Demographically driven changes are affecting workplaces globally, primarily by the baby boom generation who are cited as the largest single sustained growth population.”   -BNAC Report, November 2001
    • Today’s Traditionalists
    • Confident in social security and health care access following retirement, still plan to work during retirement.
    • The Self-Reliant
    • Aggressive savers, confident in retirement savings, plan to work part-time for the sake of enjoyment mainly.
    • The Strugglers
    • Not saving any money for retirement, not satisfied with current savings, concerned about social security and health care access, will need to work during retirement.
    • The Anxious
    • Not optimistic about retirement, not satisfied with current savings, concerned about social security and health care access, will need to work during retirement.
    • The Enthusiasts
    • Optimistic about retirement, do not plan to work when retired, can’t wait to retire.
    Baby Boomers 1946 – 1963 Population 72 Million (USA) “ The baby boomer population, totaling 49% of the current workforce, will close in on retirement in the next 10 to 12 years. At the same time, Gen Xers make up just 23 % of the total workforce and are too few in number to adequately fill the potential labor gap.”   -Workspan, 2003
  • Baby Boomers 1946 – 1963 Population 72 Million (USA) “ 80% of boomers say they expect to work after retirement.”  -AARP Survey, 2001
    • Reality
    • Gen X’ers think about work differently than earlier generations…
    • Are cautious about investing in relationships with organizations and employers
    • Fear of unreliability
    • Invest emotionally in themselves and think like entrepreneurs
    • Are independent and creative problem solvers
    • Seek effective managers
    • Thrive on feedback so they can adjust to become more successful
    • Comfortable with computer
    • Technology and information overload
    Generation X 1964 – 1978 Population 62 Million (USA)
    • Myths
    • Gen X’ers have a bad reputation as…
    • Disinterested in the organization
    • Self-absorbed
    • Disloyal
    • View the organization with disdain
    “ Problem solving is one of the most desired skills employers are looking for – it is a talent many X’ers possess” -GCM, January 2001
    • … These are the sons and daughters of the boomers
    • Gen Y’ers want to work with a highly motivated team of committed people. This group has perfected multi-tasking.
    • Job satisfaction is driven by playing a meaningful role that helps others. “Paid volunteers” mentality.
    • Fiercely independent like Gen X’ers, but more comfortable with their self-reliance. “Of course I can fend for myself” versus “I’d better be able to fend for myself. Now get out of my way.”
    • Have typically been micromanaged by parents, teachers, counselors that they are eager to manage their own time. Will not want to be micro-managed at work.
    • Have never experienced life without computers – i n fact, were l earning computers at nursery school age.
    • Business Week, Sept. 2001 & Jan. 2002
    • Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, Jan. 2002
    Generation Y 1979 – 1994 Population 60 Million (USA) “ Generation Y is part of a generation that rivals the baby boom in size” -Business Week, January 2002
  • Best Practice – Leadership/High-Potential Development
    • Pitney Bowes – Leadership capabilities model – LEAD! Program
      • Leadership development curriculum targeted at managers at all levels, including high potentials
    • JPMorgan Chase – TM efforts focused on top 10% of its population
      • High Potentials – The company evaluates Performance and Potential against its leadership competency model and uses 360-degree feedback to help determine effectiveness
      • Leaders have many opportunities during the year to interact with top management, including a special two-day program with the CEO
      • Each person considered “top talent” has a mentor from the executive committee
  • Best Practice – Leadership/High-Potential Development
    • Harley Davidson – Circle People Days
      • Rigorous process for top talent
      • Organized into “circles” (e.g. products group, support)
      • Each circle has a process day for discussing talent and potential
      • Director and managers review each other using the 180-degree model
      • These reviews cascade through the circles, starting with the vice presidents per function and their direct reports discussing the “watchables.”
      • Watchables include 15 to 20 people per organization who are identified as high potentials and then discussed developmentally
      • The functional leadership group meets three times per year for three to four days and discusses the outcomes of Circle People Days
    • P&G – Global Experience Matters
      • P&G incorporates global assignments in its map of options for development roles
      • The company defines a range of “springboard” roles that would likely include large, strategic businesses
      • The company defines a range of “continuity” roles, including assignments in countries where P&G is more established
      • Talent Management Value Imperatives , The Conference Board
  • Talent Management Life Cycle Talent Management Performance Management Talent Acquisition and Assessment Development Leadership & Succession - Organization and Talent Review (OTR) Engagement and Retention Workforce Planning
  • Succession – Organization and Talent Review (OTR) Performance Management Talent Acquisition and Assessment Career Development Leadership & Succession – Organization and Talent Review (OTR) Engagement and Retention Talent Management Workforce Planning
  • Leadership Development = V+C+L Variety of Experiences + Challenging Assignments + Ability & Willingness to Learn Leadership Development Center for Creative Leadership
  • Leadership Definition Leadership is a way of thinking, making choices and acting that catalyzes extraordinary performance
  • AXA’s Leadership Strategy Performance AXA People Management Strategy Leadership - Competence - Engagement 1000 “ Top 300” and Successors CUSTOMERS Aligned, committed best-in-class CEOs and leadership teams (top 300), backed-up by a deep bench strength (top 1000), practicing an empowering and energizing leadership style Competent workforce, seen in particular by customers as a competitive differentiator of AXA in the marketplace High performance organization, characterized by an engaged workforce and a high performance culture (results x values) Leadership Bench
  • AXA’s Leadership Framework EMPLOYEES SHAREHOLDERS CUSTOMERS Catalyze High Performance Build To Grow Share to Succeed Focus on Customers Lead through Actions
  • How Leadership Drives Performance GAPS Underlying Leadership Traits Focus of Leadership Framework Leadership Challenges Leadership Behaviors AXA’s Current State Ambition 2012 Business Agenda Business Performance Other Traits Mindset Skills Knowledge
  • Leadership Behaviors From AXA’s Leadership Framework … … to scales of observable behaviors… Lead through Actions
    • To provide shared references
    • To foster better assessment
    • To calibrate competencies
    • To provide development opportunities
  • Integrating AXA’s Leadership Framework Strategic Vision Building Capability Market & Customer Knowledge Team L eadership Change L eadership Collaboration Results Orientation
    • Talent Acquisition and Assessment
    • Performance Management
    • Career Development & Mobility
    • Learning & Development Programs
    • Leadership Programs
    • 360 o Assessments
    • Organization and Talent Review (OTR)
    Catalyze High Performance Focus On Customers Share to Succeed Lead Through Actions Build To Grow Ambition 2012 Leadership Dimensions Key AXA HR Processes
  • Building Leadership Bench Build AXA’s Leadership Bench Our purpose Our process Talent selection and succession 2012 LEADERSHIP CRITERIA
    • Assessment
    Executive development LEADERSHIP FRAMEWORK EXTERNAL BENCHMARKS CALIBRATION
  • Succession – AXA’s Organization and Talent Review (OTR) Performance Management Talent Acquisition and Assessment Career Development Leadership & Succession – Organization and Talent Review (OTR) Engagement and Retention Talent Management Workforce Planning
  • Performance Management & OTR Lifecycle Mid-year Performance, Objectives and Development Plan Review Annual Performance Appraisal Build Development Plan Annual Objective Setting Executive Compensation Review Organization and Talent Review Monthly Ongoing Feedback Personal Development Actions Catalyze High Performance Build To Grow Share to Succeed Focus on Customers Lead through Actions
  • The Case For Succession Aligned, committed best-in-class CEOs and committed best-in-class leadership teams (top 300), backed up by a deep bench (top 1000), practicing up by a deep bench strength and energizing leadership style AXA has been attracting and retaining high quality leadership talent across the Company for 20 years 70% combine proven competence and “ stability” in their job But… 10% new to their job and around 30 to 50% ready for a move within 3 years Over 10% potential performance issue; appointment mistakes 5% < 2 year AXA seniority; 30% 2 to 5 years; 65% > 5 years 20% have no successor identified in the next 3 years Different leadership styles … and words don’t always match actions 36% have international experience and 12% with transversal experience More than 90% are “highly competent” and “stable”; diverse representation Around 20% less than 1 year in their job and around 20% about to move Around 10% performance stretch issue; over 80% appointment success at 2 yrs 80% of “Top 300” are promoted from within, with AXA seniority > 3 yrs For more than 90%, 2 or 3 strong potential successors are identified Shared vision; consistent leadership styles; leaders clearly walk their talk More than 60% have international experience; for their back-ups it is 70% How do we want to look in 2012? Then… Valuing Stable C ompetence Proactively Managing M obility Strictly A ssessing & S electing Developing Global Leaders Retaining Talent Developing Desired S tyle Building a Talent Flow How did we look in 2005?
  • Organization and Talent Review (OTR) What?
    • Developing Talent… a shared responsibility
      • Strengthen the leadership of AXA Executives
      • Reach AXA business objectives and increase its market positions in line with Ambition 2012
      • Manage the present and prepare the future of the company
    • Population
      • Senior Executives: 270*
      • Potential successors: 351*
      • Emerging Talent: 296*
      • Expatriates: 236*
      • *Source :OTR 2006 consolidation
    • OTR Briefings
    • An annual collective meeting involving:
      • Group Management Board
      • Group HR - Executive Management
      • Human Resources Managers from each entity/ region
    • Why has OTR been implemented?
      • To build a solid and robust leadership pipeline 
      • To increase the scope of OTR, the process is conducted at the leadership level (Group OTR) and at the
      • professionnal family level (IT OTR, Finance OTR)
    • What is OTR focused on?
      • The individual succession plans and conceivable positions for Senior Executives and their potential Successors
      • The individual development plans and actions for Senior Executives and their Successors, which focus on developing
      • technical and/or managerial skills
      • The identification of Emerging Talent
      • The review of all Expatriates and r epatriation plans
  • Organization and Talent Review (OTR) Who?
    • Who Participates in OTR?
    • Senior Executives
    • Successors & Key Positions
    • Emerging Talent
    • The OTR process has been specifically designed by AXA Group to prepare and identify leadership bench strength
    270 90,228 Employees Worldwide OTR 351 Senior Executives Successors Emerging Talent
  • Organization and Talent Review (OTR) Why?
    • The OTR process has been designed and implemented:
    • To have a clear picture of the entities Talent and key positions within AXA
    • To identify key Senior Executives, potential Successors and Emerging Talent for the Group
    • To anticipate and prepare executives next moves and replacements
    • To identify organizational and succession gaps, and corrective actions to be taken to address these issues
    • To review the population of Expatriates and plans for repatriation
    Why has OTR been implemented? The main objective of the Organization and Talent Review is to build a robust and solid talent pipeline to ensure that AXA attracts, develops and retains talent that is needed to create a sustainable competitive advantage.
      • AXA Talent Pipeline :
    What we have … … and what we need
  • Emerging and High Performing Talent Aspiration Ability Engagement High Potential Employee Is someone with the ability, engagement, and aspiration to rise to and succeed in more senior and more critical positions.
    • Innate characteristics
    • Learned skills
    Ability
    • Drive and ambition for success at the next level
    Aspiration
    • Emotional & Rational
    • Commitment
    • Discretionary effort
    • Intent to stay
    Engagement Corporate Leadership Council Research The Corporate Leadership Council assessed potential through a series of 64 survey items given to both employees and their managers that collectively measured ability, engagement and aspiration (11,000 completed surveys from 59 organizations across 29 countries and 15 industries).
  • Emerging Talent (HiPos) Definition Potential Mindset Leadership Behaviors and Values Emerging Talent Performance Learning Agility Able to Take Risks Ability to demonstrate AXA’s leadership behaviors consistent with expectations for the role/level
    • Average rating of 3.5 or above for the last 3 years
    • Superior performance in current assignment with client focus
    • Open to change
    • Interest and career aspirations
    • Willing to take new challenge
    • Global mindset
    • Operates under a responsible mindset
    • Positively impacting the organization
    An Emerging Talent (HiPos) is someone with the ability, engagement and aspiration to rise to and succeed in more senior and more critical positions (two steps up) within 5 – 7 years
  • High Performing Professional Talent (HiPros) Definition Learning Agility Able to Take Risks Ability to demonstrate AXA’s leadership behaviors consistent with expectations for the role/level
    • Average rating of 3.5 or above for the last 3 years
    • Superior performance in current assignment with client focus
    • Open to change
    • Interest and career aspirations
    • Willing to take new challenge
    • Global mindset
    • Operates under a responsible mindset
    • Positively impacting the organization
    High Performing Professionals (Hi Pros) are individuals with the ability, engagement and aspiration to rise to and succeed in key positions/roles and are highly valued for their functional expertise Potential Mindset Leadership Behaviors and Values High Performing Professionals Performance
  • Questions
  • Ingenuity Search Partners, LLC About Us   Ingenuity Search Partners is a boutique firm that delivers superior execution and placement of top talent for Fortune 1000 clients   Ingenuity Search Partners client specialties include: Executive Recruiting Executive/Leadership Assessment Executive Coaching Succession Planning Pipelining Talent – identify, assess and present highly qualified talent for multiple positions (pre-search)   We are known for our vast network of associations, which helps reduce the length of a search and land top talent   **Executive search services are billed per search or project as a % of the candidates’ first year cash compensation of flat-fee**   Ingenuity Search Partners professional consulting specialties include: Career Coaching Branding Yourself Resume Review Behavioral Mock Interviewing StrengthsFinder Assessment   **Professional consulting services are billed on an hourly basis for executives that want to refine their brand and approach to the market**  
  • Ingenuity Search Partners, LLC About Our Functional Practices   We are strong Generalists with exceptional assessment capabilities, specializing in:   Chief Executive, Financial Officer, Diversity, Information Officer, Human Resources, Legal, Marketing Officer and Senior-level Management search assignments for a wide variety of clients   About Our Philosophy   Ingenuity Search Partners is a woman-owned business, serving clients throughout the US with offices in Chicago and Houston   Core beliefs: We lead with integrity and a deeply held belief to pay-it-forward We are known as corporate executives who excel in talent management, career development and succession planning We specialize in recruiting top talent for all sizes of organizations We are committed to a strong relationship-driven approach, in-depth research, and to maintaining a vast network of contacts/associations We are thought leaders and have a passion for helping our clients find the right talent Contact Information: Cathryn Gabor, (713) 808-9240 office, (205) 790-7040 cell, ingenuitysearch@comcast.net