Classified Employee Performance Evaluation Guidelines 2005

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Classified Employee Performance Evaluation Guidelines 2005

  1. 1. Classified Employee Performance Evaluation Guidelines 2005
  2. 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS WHY WE DO EVALUATIONS 2 ABOUT THE EVALUATION FORM 3 COMPLETING THE FORM 3 Instructions for Completing Section I - Performance Ratings 3 Instructions for Completing Section II - Performance Review and Comments 4 Instructions for Completing Section III - Supervisor’s Overall Rating 5 Instructions for Completing Section IIIA – Performance Improvement Plan 5 Instructions for Completing Section IV – Employee Development Plan 5 PREPARING FOR THE EVALUATION INTERVIEW 6 THE EVALUATION INTERVIEW 7 SUMMARY 7 APPENDIX A - CLASSIFIED EMPLOYEE EVALUATION WORKSHEET 8 APPENDIX B - EMPLOYEE DEVELOPMENT PLAN WORKSHEET 12 APPENDIX C - PROCEDURAL STEPS FOR EVALUATION PROGRAM 14 APPENDIX D - IMPROVING COMMUNICATION: TIPS FOR SUPERVISORS AND EMPLOYEES 16 APPENDIX E - A WORD ON PROBATIONARY EVALUATIONS 20 APPENDIX F – EMPLOYEE DEVELOPMENT PLAN PROGRESS REVIEW NOTES 22 APPENDIX G – COACHING/PROGRESS REVIEW NOTES 24
  3. 3. WHY WE DO EVALUATIONS The performance evaluation is a critical employee development tool. Kent State University is committed to an evaluation program that supports continuous organizational and individual improvement. It is also a requirement that all classified civil service staff be evaluated twice during a 120-day probationary period. A probationary period begins when an employee is hired or promoted. After the employee has been in the new position for sixty days, he or she is evaluated by the immediate supervisor. This occurs again after ninety days in the new position. In addition, the State of Ohio requires that each classified civil service employee be evaluated annually. At Kent State University, annual evaluations are usually conducted each spring during the months of March and April. Employees who are still on probation should be evaluated using the probationary evaluation form. The annual performance evaluation is both a “year in review” and “a look ahead.” In other words, the evaluation not only examines the employee’s performance for the prior year, but also establishes goals and objectives for the upcoming year. (Note: A quick step-by-step summary of the evaluation procedure is located in Appendix C.) Job-specific performance goals and objectives are the cornerstone of the program. Meeting goals and objectives can require individual contribution, team effort, or a combination of both. The accomplishment of goals provides the opportunity to recognize individual achievement and personal development. This year, we are inviting supervisors and employees to incorporate previously communicated job-specific expectations in the rating section of the evaluation. To summarize, the evaluation program is designed to: • Improve individual performance by providing positive, constructive and developmental feedback. • Identify and integrate organizational and individual objectives and expectations. • Encourage individual employee growth and development. • Provide data to document performance. A performance evaluation focuses on measuring an employee’s job performance and is not an evaluation of the employee’s personality. Work performance is evaluated on the basis of standards which have been communicated and discussed in advance. The supervisor and the employee work together to determine what changes are needed in order to improve how the employee performs his or her job. Although the evaluation of employee performance is approached in a formal way at least once each year, the overall success of the program depends on the fact that employees and supervisors work toward building and maintaining relationships that allow for continual, two- way communication and feedback. An employee should not find out about a performance problem for the first time during an evaluation interview. For example, if attendance or tardiness is a problem, it should be addressed when it occurs. If the problem has been resolved by the time evaluations are prepared, the supervisor could note that there was a problem but it has been corrected. If it has remained a problem, it should be addressed more formally. Employee Relations and Development 5/12/05 Page 2
  4. 4. ABOUT THE EVALUATION FORM Effective for 2005, annual evaluations for classified employees will be submitted in an on-line format. A worksheet has been provided as Appendices A and B of this document to assist you in preparing for the on-line evaluation. The evaluation period is from May 16 through June 30. Probationary evaluations are mailed to supervisors after an employee has either been hired or promoted. Evaluations are due after the first sixty days from the date of hire or promotion and again after ninety days. The ninety-day evaluation form has a special section which must be completed by the supervisor. The supervisor must make a final recommendation regarding the continued employment of the probationary employee. We anticipate that the probationary evaluation will be submitted through an on-line form starting in fall 2005. COMPLETING THE FORM The supervisor who evaluates the performance of an employee should be personally familiar with the employee's work and have a thorough understanding of the job requirements for the position. This is a necessary prerequisite for giving a meaningful evaluation to the employee. A supervisor who is not directly familiar with an employee’s work should obtain input from others as appropriate. The supervisor reviews the employee's performance since the last evaluation, making note of changes, improvements, and/or problems. Every effort should be made to set aside personal feelings or emotions that might bias the ratings. The supervisor should: • Avoid the halo effect. Do not let ratings on one factor influence ratings on other factors. Objectively evaluate each factor independently. An employee may rate high in one area and low in another. • Avoid length of service bias. While an employee who has been employed the longest might expect higher ratings, ratings should focus on work performance during the evaluation period. Likewise, a new employee should not deliberately be given low ratings with the idea of giving him or her “room to grow.” • Rate work performance on the basis of established standards, rather than as comparisons with other employees. Instructions for Completing Section I - Performance Ratings The purpose of Section I is to give the employee feedback on general workplace behaviors which apply to most positions at the university, such as quality and quantity of work performed, knowledge of job, work orientation, and contacts with others. If the employee is also a supervisor of other classified employees, there is an additional set of skills to be evaluated at the bottom of the page. Section I is completed by the supervisor and should be an evaluation of the employee’s job performance during the period since the last evaluation for the period in which the employee has been under the current supervisor. Employee Relations and Development 5/12/05 Page 3
  5. 5. Note the rating guidelines at the top of the each category: Use the following guidelines for rating levels: Below minimum: Employee does not meet minimum standards in this category. Needs to improve: Performance must improve for employee to be successful in this category. Consistently meets: Employee consistently meets and occasionally exceeds performance standards. Often exceeds: Employee often exceeds performance standards. NA = Use only if there has been no opportunity to observe performance in this category. The supervisor should complete each category of Section I line by line, carefully considering the employee’s performance in that particular area. Select the rating that best represents your assessment of the employee’s performance. Due to the complexity of the university, not all workplace behaviors will apply to the same degree in all positions. Therefore, an employee should be given feedback only on factors which are applicable to the employee’s particular position. If an item or a category does not apply, the supervisor should select “NA.” Some categories do not provide the “NA” option, because they should apply to all jobs. In a limited number of cases where the performance identified reflects something that either the employee complies with or not, the “Often Exceeds” option is not provided. Instructions for Completing Section II - Performance Review and Comments Section II of the performance evaluation is intended to initiate and facilitate dialogue between the supervisor and the employee when they meet in the evaluation interview. Used to its fullest advantage, it has great potential to positively impact performance and improve communication. However, success requires that both the supervisor and employee give serious consideration to their response to each item and come to the interview prepared to discuss ideas and suggestions for improving the services of the department. The supervisor and employee should complete Section II as a team, providing answers to the following questions. Although this is a joint project, in most cases the supervisor will actually complete the form and it is the supervisor’s responsibility to see that it is done. 1. What are the strongest aspects of the employee’s performance? The supervisor should provide feedback to the employee on the strongest aspects of the employee’s performance. The supervisor should let the employee know the area(s) in which he/she is positively contributing to the department’s operations, providing examples if possible. The employee should identify the area(s) he or she perceives to be his or her strengths. 2. Describe progress made on previous goals and objectives. The previous year’s goals should be reviewed and progress discussed. The supervisor and employee should discuss what facilitated or prevented goal accomplishment. Employee Relations and Development 5/12/05 Page 4
  6. 6. 3. What are the future employee performance expectations? The supervisor and employee should mutually set future performance expectations. These expectations should be based on organizational needs and core job responsibilities. These expectations should be periodically reviewed during the course of the year. Instructions for Completing Section III - Supervisor’s Overall Rating Given your assessment of the employee’s performance identified in Section I and Section II, indicate your overall evaluation: ____ 1 Does not meet minimum standards of performance ____ 2 Needs to show improvement ____ 3 Consistently meets standards of performance ____ 4 Often exceeds standards of performance Instructions for Completing Section IIIA – Performance Improvement Plan If the supervisor rated the employee’s performance as “Needs to improve” or “Below minimum” in any category, then a performance improvement plan must be developed in concert with the employee. The on-line evaluation will automatically prompt the supervisor to enter information for each category in Section I where an unsatisfactory rating was entered. The supervisor and employee should mutually set future goals and a timetable to improve the employee’s performance in areas identified as needs to show improvement. Both supervisor and employee should initial each section of the Performance Improvement Plan where there is a need to improve. The worksheet in Appendix A prompts the supervisor to enter this information in each category in Section I. Instructions for Completing Section IV – Employee Development Plan The employee development plan provides a context for supervisors and employees to engage in the planning and goal-setting at a personal level. The annual evaluation meeting is a time to review current and future departmental needs, the employee’s current competencies and interests, and identify opportunities that promote individual and departmental success. Some examples of ways in which a development plan can add value to the supervisor-employee relationship are listed below: • In some areas, new technology or new work processes require new skills and knowledge. The planning process can help to clarify what skills are needed and how they can be learned. It also provides a context to discuss the impact of change on the workplace and on people and to identify ways to make change with less disruption to daily work life through reasonable expectations and mutual commitment to common goals. • In the recent Internal Planning Conference conducted by the executive officers, we identified a university-wide initiative to create a “culture of caring,” with particular focus on those departments that provide direct service and support to students. The employee development plan provides an opportunity to collaborate with staff members Employee Relations and Development 5/12/05 Page 5
  7. 7. in building interpersonal skills and a customer service orientation. • Some employees would like to develop a skill or competency, either for career advancement or for personal interest. The employee development plan can be the means for identifying learning opportunities that also meet a departmental goal. PREPARING FOR THE EVALUATION INTERVIEW Adequate preparation is essential to maximizing the benefits of the evaluation process. Both the employee and the supervisor can contribute to the success of the evaluation interview by doing some advance “homework.” Prior to meeting with the employee, the supervisor should: 1. Complete the Classified Employee Evaluation Worksheet for each employee. Review the guidelines for completing the evaluation on page 3. 2. Complete Section I of the worksheet, identifying examples to clarify ratings as appropriate. 3. Draft comments for completing Section II of the form during the evaluation interview. A review of departmental goals and objectives may be helpful. 4. If performance improvement is required, think about how to best give constructive feedback. (See Appendix D for suggestions.) 5. Prepare some questions which will help to elicit employee suggestions, for example, “Do you have any ideas on how we can reduce the time it takes to process a requisition?” 6. Remember that the subject of the evaluation is the employee’s work performance, not the employee’s personality, and that the employee’s performance is to be evaluated on the basis of established standards, not as a comparison with other employees. The supervisor may wish to develop an attachment to the evaluation with a statement of specific expectations and standards. 7. If appropriate, discuss the ratings in Section I with the management reviewer. (The management reviewer is normally the next higher level of management.) 8. Select a meeting site that is comfortable, assures confidentiality, and minimizes distractions and interruptions. Schedule ample time for discussion. 9. Notify the employee at least one week in advance of the date, time, and location of the evaluation meeting. 10. Optionally, provide the employee with a blank copy of the evaluation and employee development plan worksheets and invite the employee to prepare for the meeting by evaluating themselves and preparing their own draft development plan. Prior to meeting with the supervisor, the employee should: 1. Review his or her work performance since the last evaluation. 2. Identify positive and negative performance in areas being evaluated and prepare examples. 3. Review goals and objectives from the prior evaluation. Employee Relations and Development 5/12/05 Page 6
  8. 8. 4. Draft comments for completing Section II during the evaluation interview. Prepare suggestions or questions regarding future objectives and a plan for growth or improvement. THE EVALUATION INTERVIEW During the interview, the supervisor AND employee should: 1. Discuss the ratings in Section I. The supervisor should provide examples as needed and respond to any questions the employee may have regarding a particular rating. (If appropriate, aspects of this discussion may be recorded under “Comments” in each category of Section I.) 2. Agree on the nature of the responses to items 1-3 in Section II. Review opportunities for improvement and agree on a plan of action to follow to reach established goals. Set time limits when appropriate. 3. Discuss any other work performance issue(s), addressing both strengths and weaknesses. Avoid the temptation to ignore what is wrong and only dwell on what is right. 4. Take the time to listen to each other without interrupting. Ask questions to clarify meaning if necessary. 5. Keep the conversation on a positive, constructive track. SUMMARY By basing evaluations on job-specific goals and objectives and established standards, performance expectations are clear to both supervisor and employee. The evaluation interview focuses on solving problems and improving operations. Understanding and following evaluation process guidelines can help reduce the anxiety that tends to accompany evaluations and can transform the evaluation meeting into an opportunity to improve individual performance, enhance communication, and achieve departmental and university goals. Employee Relations and Development 5/12/05 Page 7
  9. 9. APPENDIX A - Classified Employee Evaluation Worksheet Kent State University -- Employee Development Plan Worksheet This is a worksheet to prepare for the on-line evaluation. Please DO NOT send this worksheet to HR Records. Performance Ratings for __________________________ Completed by: ο Employee ο Supervisor SECTION I – Performance Ratings Consistently meets Needs to improve Below minimum Use the following guidelines for rating levels: Often exceeds Below minimum: Employee does not meet minimum standards in this category. Needs to improve: Performance must improve for employee to be successful in this category. Consistently meets: Employee consistently meets and occasionally exceeds performance standards. Often exceeds: Employee often exceeds performance standards. NA NA = Use only if there has been no opportunity to observe performance in this category. 1. Quality and Quantity of Work A. Completes work assignments on time B. Completes work assignments accurately C. Communicates information accurately both verbally and in writing D. Follows instructions E. Observes work time responsibly F. Avoids tardiness / unscheduled absenteeism G. Exercises good judgment and makes appropriate decisions in performance of duties H. Recognizes and resolves actual and potential conflict situations COMMENTS (If you rated the employee “Below minimum” or “Needs to improve” for any category in this section, please describe the action necessary for the employee to perform successfully. You will enter this in a separate Performance Improvement Plan in Section IIIA of the on-line evaluation.) 2. Knowledge of Job A. Demonstrates an understanding of day-to-day work assignments B. Follows department policies and procedures C. Observes required safety practices D. List formal job training completed during prior year: COMMENTS (If you rated the employee “Below minimum” or “Needs to improve” for any category in this section, please describe the action necessary for the employee to perform successfully. You will enter this in a separate Performance Improvement Plan in Section IIIA of the on-line evaluation.) Employee Relations and Development 5/12/05 Page 8
  10. 10. SECTION I – Performance Ratings Consistently meets Needs to improve Below minimum Use the following guidelines for rating levels: Often exceeds Below minimum: Employee does not meet minimum standards in this category. Needs to improve: Performance must improve for employee to be successful in this category. Consistently meets: Employee consistently meets and occasionally exceeds performance standards. Often exceeds: Employee often exceeds performance standards. NA NA = Use only if there has been no opportunity to observe performance in this category. 3. Work Orientation A. Displays interest and takes initiative in performance of job duties B. Adjusts to change and responds positively to suggestions for improvement C. Willingly acquires new skills and learns new procedures D. Keeps supervisor informed as needed (e.g., work activities, potential problems, etc.) E. Actively seeks to assist co-workers as time and responsibilities permit F. Strives to continually improve performance COMMENTS (If you rated the employee “Below minimum” or “Needs to improve” for any category in this section, please describe the action necessary for the employee to perform successfully. You will enter this in a separate Performance Improvement Plan in Section IIIA of the on-line evaluation.) 4. Contacts With Others A. Provides appropriate assistance with professionalism and courtesy B. Contributes to a cooperative climate C. Works effectively with others COMMENTS (If you rated the employee “Below minimum” or “Needs to improve” for any category in this section, please describe the action necessary for the employee to perform successfully. You will enter this in a separate Performance Improvement Plan in Section IIIA of the on-line evaluation.) 5. Supervisory Skills Does this employee supervise other employees ο Yes ο No Type of employees supervised: ο Classified ο Student ο Other ______________ A. Demonstrates effective supervision B. Keeps staff updated on policies and procedures C. Takes prompt action to resolve job and performance problems D. Provides necessary feedback to staff E. Promotes teamwork with an emphasis on working toward common goals COMMENTS (If you rated the employee “Below minimum” or “Needs to improve” for any category in this section, please describe the action necessary for the employee to perform successfully. You will enter this in a separate Performance Improvement Plan in Section IIIA of the on-line evaluation.) Employee Relations and Development 5/12/05 Page 9
  11. 11. SECTION I – Performance Ratings Consistently meets Needs to improve Below minimum Use the following guidelines for rating levels: Often exceeds Below minimum: Employee does not meet minimum standards in this category. Needs to improve: Performance must improve for employee to be successful in this category. Consistently meets: Employee consistently meets and occasionally exceeds performance standards. Often exceeds: Employee often exceeds performance standards. NA NA = Use only if there has been no opportunity to observe performance in this category. 6. Job-Specific Criteria In order for an employee to receive a rating for a job-specific criterion, the performance expectations for the employee must have been clearly communicated in advance. If this is not the case, and you wish to establish job-specific criteria for incorporation in the 2006 evaluation process, use the employee development plan to document expectations and development opportunities. Examples of job-specific performance criteria: o Demonstrates facility with SIS data entry procedures. o Effectively and safely uses pesticides and fertilizer. o Maintains financial records for the department. Enter description: Enter description: Enter description: COMMENTS (If you rated the employee “Below minimum” or “Needs to improve” for any category in this section, please describe the action necessary for the employee to perform successfully. You will enter this in a separate Performance Improvement Plan in Section IIIA of the on-line evaluation.) Employee Relations and Development 5/12/05 Page 10
  12. 12. SECTION II – Overall Performance Review and Comments Enter general comments regarding the employee’s performance over the course of the evaluation period. 1. What are the strongest aspects of the employee’s performance? 2. Describe progress made on previous goals and objectives: 3. What are the future employee performance expectations? SECTION III – Supervisor’s Overall Rating Given your assessment of the employee’s performance identified in Section I and Section II, indicate your overall evaluation: ____ 1 Does not meet minimum standards of performance ____ 2 Needs to show improvement ____ 3 Consistently meets standards of performance ____ 4 Often exceeds standards of performance Employee Relations and Development 5/12/05 Page 11
  13. 13. APPENDIX B - Employee Development Plan Worksheet SECTION IV – Employee Development Plan Kent State University -- Employee Development Plan Worksheet This is a worksheet to prepare for the on-line evaluation. Please DO NOT send this worksheet to HR Records. Employee Development Plan for _____________________________________ The employee development plan provides a context for supervisors and employees to engage in planning and goal- setting at a personal level. The annual evaluation meeting is a time to review current and future departmental needs, the employee’s current competencies and interests, and identify opportunities that promote individual and departmental success. Some examples of ways in which a development plan can add value to the supervisor-employee relationship are listed below: • In some areas, new technology or new work processes require new skills and knowledge. The planning process can help to clarify what skills are needed and how they can be learned. It also provides a context to discuss the impact of change on the workplace and on people and to identify ways to make change with less disruption to daily work life through reasonable expectations and mutual commitment to common goals. • In the recent Internal Planning Conference conducted by the executive officers, we identified a university-wide initiative to create a “culture of caring,” with particular focus on those departments that provide direct service and support to students. The employee development plan provides an opportunity to collaborate with staff members in building interpersonal skills and a customer service orientation. • Some employees would like to develop a skill or competency, either for career advancement or for personal interest. The employee development plan can be the means for identifying learning opportunities that also meet a departmental goal. You are encouraged to work with each employee to identify an Employee Development Plan that is focused on future department needs and/or employee personal or professional goals. The questions in this section will help you identify which resources are appropriate for this employee. 1. Is the job/work environment changing so that the employee must acquire new or additional skills or competencies in order to be successful in the future? If you answered “yes” to this question, complete the section in the on-line evaluation entitled, “Employee Development Plan: Skill/Competency Needed.” 2. Has the employee completed an Employee Development Plan worksheet identifying personal or professional development goals? If you answered “yes” to this question, complete the section in the on-line evaluation entitled, “Employee Development Plan: Personal/Professional Goals.” Identify the area(s) for development: ο Basic Skills (writing, general communication, basic mathematics, etc.) ο Interpersonal Skills (teamwork, customer service, etc.) ο Desktop Computing Skills ο Supervisory Skills ο Other Identify the specific skill or competencies: Employee Relations and Development 5/12/05 Page 12
  14. 14. Identify the work-related purpose or objective for acquiring the identified skill or competency: Identify action steps, including deadlines and who is responsible for completing each step: Action step: Person responsible: Deadline for completion: Action step: Person responsible: Deadline for completion: Action step: Person responsible: Deadline for completion: Identify indicators of progress or success: Employee Relations and Development 5/12/05 Page 13
  15. 15. APPENDIX C - Procedural Steps for Evaluation Program 1. Employee Relations and Development notifies supervisors that the process is underway. 2. Supervisor reviews data pertinent to evaluation process. 3. Supervisor completes Section I of evaluation worksheet and drafts comments for Section II, consulting next level of management prior to meeting with employee, as appropriate. Supervisor determines what kind of employee development plan is appropriate. 4. Supervisor schedules evaluation meeting with employee giving at least one week's notice. 5. Employee prepares for meeting and drafts comments for Section II. 6. Evaluation interview occurs, during which supervisor and employee review Section I, discuss responses to Section II and employee development plan, if appropriate. 7. Supervisor responsible for completion of Section II. 8. Supervisor responsible for completion of Section III. 9. Supervisor and employee complete employee development plan, if appropriate. 10. Supervisor finalizes on-line evaluation and employee development plan and prints a hard copy. 11. Employee and supervisor sign printed form. 12. Form is submitted to next level of management for review and signature. 13. Department gives copy of finalized form, with signatures to employee. 14. Department sends original to Human Resources – Records by June 30. Employee Relations and Development 5/12/05 Page 14
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  17. 17. APPENDIX D - Improving Communication: Tips for Supervisors and Employees The performance evaluation process requires constructive feedback not only from the supervisor to the employee, but from the employee to the supervisor. The supervisor provides feedback concerning the employee’s work performance. The employee should also provide feedback with particular attention focused on the factors positively and negatively impacting performance. The employee actively participates in setting goals and objectives. Feedback is a two-way process. The following are some tips for giving and receiving feedback. GIVING CONSTRUCTIVE FEEDBACK • Give Positive Feedback Before Negative. Most people respond to praise, encouragement, and recognition. Preface negative feedback with a positive statement, and it is more likely to be favorably received. For example, “I appreciate the time you take to give me specific instructions when assigning projects. However, I am often rushed by the deadline you set.” • Be Specific. Give specific details and/or examples. Detailed feedback provides more opportunity for understanding and learning. Avoid general comments such as, “That was good.” Instead, explain how it was good. For example, “The way you organized the information in that report was helpful to me because . . .” Focus on personally observed behavior; avoid hearsay. • Allow the Other Person to Accept or Reject Your Feedback. Refrain from attempting to force opinions or attitudes on another. At best, a demand for change is met with initial resistance; at worst, inflexibility and feelings of resentment. Skillful feedback offers people information about themselves which they can consider and from which they can learn, but it may not happen on the spot. In the end, whether or not feedback is acted upon is a matter of personal decision. • Offer Alternatives. Turn negative feedback into positive suggestions. For example, “This isn’t working well this way. How about...?” • Describe Rather Than Judge. In offering feedback, do so by describing a situation which illustrates the point, refraining from editorializing. This is more useful than offering a value judgment such as, “That was awful.” • Confirm That You Have Been Heard and Understood Correctly. Ask the recipient to restate or summarize the feedback, or if he or she understood the point. Simple misinterpretation can cause significant problems. • Ask Whether or Not the Recipient Agrees with the Feedback. Give the other person a chance to think about and then discuss the feedback until agreement is reached. A person is much more likely to act upon a suggestion with which he or she agrees. • Involve the Recipient in the Process. The two most positive steps toward setting a clear objective about change are first, to enable someone to acknowledge the need for change and, second, to allow that person to reach his or her own conclusions about how things could be done differently. Ask the recipient to specify what he or she could do differently, when the Employee Relations and Development 5/12/05 Page 16
  18. 18. change will be put into practice, and how it will be apparent that the change has been effective. RECEIVING CONSTRUCTIVE FEEDBACK During the performance evaluation meeting, both the supervisor and the employee will receive feedback. The ability to honestly and objectively receive feedback is crucial to an effective performance evaluation. Some constructive feedback may be taken as criticism. Everyone will face criticism in his or her life. It is important to respond appropriately to that criticism, whether it is justified or unjustified by not getting defensive, not counter-attacking, and not over-apologizing. Consider your response carefully, and react appropriately. When receiving feedback: DO • take the time to carefully assess the feedback before responding. • respond to what is being said, not to what you think is being implied. Ask for clarification if necessary. • choose your response carefully. • understand that feedback about your performance is not a rejection of you as a person. DON’T • Deny the feedback before taking the time to consider whether it may be valid. • Become defensive. • Counter criticize. This is merely a way to avoid dealing with the issue at hand. ADDRESSING PROBLEM AREAS - SOME SPECIAL ADVICE FOR SUPERVISORS What do you do if an employee has performance problems or has failed to meet objectives? • It is critical to focus on the problem or the performance, not the employee. • Resist the temptation to avoid the problem, hoping time will correct it. • Review the previous discussions you have had with the employee regarding the problem. • Ask for the employee’s input as to why the problem continues to exist and listen carefully. Use open-ended questions to get the employee involved in the discussion. • Encourage the employee to identify the cause of the problem and to offer solutions. • Explain why the performance must improve. Review the original goals or performance standards. • Ask the employee for ideas as to what he or she can do to improve. The objective is to have the employee take ownership of the problem. • If the employee has no ideas, be prepared with some suggestions. Remember, an Employee Relations and Development 5/12/05 Page 17
  19. 19. employee is more likely to implement a solution if he or she feels ownership. ADDRESSING CONFLICT An assumption guiding the evaluation program is that supervisors and employees both want a meaningful and productive evaluation. For this to occur, both the supervisor and the employee need to be mutually committed to resolving issues productively. However, sometimes tension and conflict arises which may make this difficult to achieve. If conflict begins to develop during the evaluation interview, it may be appropriate to conclude the meeting and to schedule an additional meeting at a later time. This gives both the supervisor and the employee time to think about the problem and ways to resolve the conflict. Resolving conflict requires commitment and sensitivity. As individuals, people have different limits of how much conflict is tolerable. When conflict exists, both parties need to be aware of three conditions which make resolving conflict more difficult: • When "emotional heat" becomes too great. • When there is no progress toward resolution. • When one or both parties are too tired to continue. When any of these conditions arise, employees and supervisors are advised to schedule another meeting to address the problem at a later date. Good communication is crucial to conflict resolution. Both parties need to carefully consider what they say before they say it, and to select language which is: • Clear • Specific • Focuses on the issue • Focuses on the here and now When conflict is resolved in a mutually respectful manner, it can actually improve the relationship between supervisor and employee. However, conflict which is not resolved usually surfaces again. Employee Relations and Development 5/12/05 Page 18
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  21. 21. APPENDIX E - A Word on Probationary Evaluations • Probationary evaluations are particularly important because they determine whether or not the employee's appointment will become final. • It is essential that the supervisor completing the sixty-day probationary evaluation assess demonstrated performance levels in each area of Section I, indicating whether or not they are satisfactory. • Supervisors should avoid any tendency to rate a performance level as satisfactory because additional improvement is anticipated or promised. • Supervisors are advised to communicate to the probationary employee, perhaps in writing, examples of unsatisfactory performance as they arise, rather than waiting to record them on a probationary evaluation. • Supervisors should strive to avoid a probationary separation for poor performance in an area that was evaluated as satisfactory on the sixty-day performance evaluation. Employee Relations and Development 5/12/05 Page 20
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  23. 23. APPENDIX F – Employee Development Plan Progress Review Notes For Evaluation Period ___________ (This internal form is used to track the coaching/progress of the employee’s development) Employee Name: Title: Supervisor: Title: Department: Development Area: Objective: Action Steps (What needs to Timeline Date Action Feedback Initials occur) Steps Completed Emp Supv. 1. Employee: Supervisor: 2. Employee: Supervisor: 3. Employee: Supervisor: Employee Relations and Development 5/12/05 Page 22
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  25. 25. APPENDIX G – Coaching/Progress Review Notes (The purpose of this form is to track coaching/progress meetings) Employee’s Name: ____________________________________ Supervisor’s Name: ____________________________________ Date:_____________________ Issues Discussed: Date:_____________________ Issues Discussed: Date:_____________________ Issues Discussed: Employee Relations and Development 5/12/05 Page 24

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