1
A New
     SECTION ONE




Performance
Management
Framework
The Rationale
                                                                      1             CHAPTER ONE




for Chan...
freedom and equality and enable diversity in            of race, culture, religion, language, location,
     our society t...
The Charter’s performance management
framework
                                                                     princi...
Table 1

                                Policy Adviser             Regulator             Purchaser               Provider...
The New
                                                         2            C H A P T E R T WO




Framework



Achievin...
achieving and maintaining such a fair society.     All portfolio agencies are employers, and all will
Appropriate diversit...
Overview of the performance management framework
                                                                         ...
Policy adviser                                                    Achieving Government outcomes
                          ...
POLICY ADVISER
                                                                                                       1
 P...
Performance indicator                                              Performance measure                                    ...
REGULATOR
                                                                                                                ...
Purchaser                                                                agreements or partnership agreements. These
     ...
Performance indicator                         Performance measure                         Rating
                         ...
Provider                                                  • evidence an understanding of and a capacity
                  ...
Performance indicator                           Performance measure                             Rating
                   ...
Employer                                                 Achieving Government outcomes
                                   ...
Performance indicator                         Performance measure                             Rating
                     ...
The New Framework
                                                    3         CHAPTER THREE




In Action



     With a...
Table 2
                                                                                                                  ...
A case study — Policy Adviser
 Department of Family and Community Services
 As a strategy for reviewing welfare policy, an...
A case study — Purchaser
                                                                                                 ...
A case study — Provider
 Centrelink
 Centrelink Customer Service Centres provide a         of requests for interpreters ar...
Relevance of core roles                                  report was understood to be beneficial and an
                   ...
Consultation and communication strategies,            areas typically have very well developed
where reported, appear soun...
The Next Steps
                                                         4             CHAPTER FOUR




Lessons learnt in t...
A number of other diversity management tools         access and equity annual report and built upon in
and case studies ha...
Statistics (ABS) published Standards for
Statistics on Cultural and Language Diversity.9
                                 ...
A New Performance Management Framework
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A New Performance Management Framework

  1. 1. 1 A New SECTION ONE Performance Management Framework
  2. 2. The Rationale 1 CHAPTER ONE for Change The Charter of Public Service in a Culturally individual cultural heritage within an overriding Diverse Society (the Charter) represents a commitment to Australia and the basic structures nationally consistent approach to ensuring that and values of Australian democracy. It also refers government services are delivered in a way that specifically to the strategies, policies and is sensitive to the language and cultural needs programs that are designed to: of all Australians. It draws its rationale from Australia’s multicultural policy, which was • make our administrative, social and economic updated in December 1999 as the infrastructure more responsive to the rights, Commonwealth Government’s statement obligations and needs of our culturally A new agenda for multicultural Australia1 diverse population; (New Agenda). • promote social harmony among the different cultural groups in our society; and A new agenda for multicultural Australia • optimise the benefits of our cultural diversity The New Agenda stresses the Government’s for all Australians. commitment to enhance and focus Australian We have built a social infrastructure of multiculturalism to: institutions, traditions and processes on our • make it relevant to all Australians; and democratic foundation. These are the foundations of Australian multiculturalism. • ensure that the social, cultural and economic Cultural diversity is one of our great social, benefits of our diversity are fully maximised cultural and economic resources. Australian unity in the national interest. in this diversity is based on such moral values as The New Agenda says: respect for difference, tolerance and a common commitment to freedom, and an overriding The term Australian multiculturalism summarises commitment to Australia’s national interests. the way we address the challenges and For multicultural Australia to continue to flourish opportunities of our cultural diversity. It is a term for the good of all Australians, multicultural which recognises and celebrates Australia’s policies and programs should be built on the cultural diversity. It accepts and respects the foundation of our democratic system, using the right of all Australians to express and share their following principles: 1 You can obtain a copy of A new agenda for multicultural • Civic Duty, which obliges all Australians to Australia from the Department of Immigration and Multicultural support those basic structures and principles Affairs, PO Box 25, Belconnen, ACT 2616 or through its web site: http://www.immi.gov.au of Australian society which guarantee us our 3
  3. 3. freedom and equality and enable diversity in of race, culture, religion, language, location, our society to flourish; gender or place of birth; and • Cultural Respect, which, subject to the law, • Productive Diversity, which maximises for gives all Australians the right to express their all Australians the significant cultural, social own culture and beliefs and obliges them to and economic dividends arising from the accept the right of others to do the same; diversity of our population. • Social Equity, which entitles all Australians The Government established the Council for to equality of treatment and opportunity so Multicultural Australia to assist it with that they are able to contribute to the social, developing and implementing a multifaceted political and economic life of Australia, free plan of action to implement the New Agenda. from discrimination, including on the grounds What is the Charter for Public Service in a Culturally Diverse Society? The Charter is a key tool to assist government • Responsiveness — Government services programs to meet the needs of our culturally should be sensitive to the needs and and linguistically diverse society. It integrates a requirements of clients from diverse set of service delivery principles concerning linguistic and cultural backgrounds, and cultural diversity into the strategic planning, responsive as far as practicable to the policy development, budget and reporting particular circumstances of individuals; processes of government service delivery — • Effectiveness — Government service irrespective of whether these services are providers should be ‘results oriented’, provided by government agencies, community focussed on meeting the needs of clients organisations or commercial enterprises. from all backgrounds; These principles are: • Efficiency — Government service providers • Access — Government services should be should optimise the use of available public available to everyone who is entitled to resources through a user-responsive them and should be free of any form of approach to service delivery which meets discrimination irrespective of a person’s the needs of clients; and country of birth, language, culture, race • Accountability — Government service or religion; providers should have a reporting • Equity — Government services should be mechanism in place which ensures they are developed and delivered on the basis of fair accountable for implementing Charter treatment of clients who are eligible to objectives for clients. receive them; The Charter also incorporates a best practice • Communication — Government service guide for achieving and reporting on providers should use strategies to inform government services. You can obtain a copy eligible clients of services and their of the Charter from the Department of entitlements and how they can obtain them. Immigration and Multicultural Affairs, Providers should also consult with their PO Box 25 Belconnen, ACT 2616 or through clients regularly about the adequacy, design its web site: http://www.immi.gov.au and standard of government services; 4 A C C E S S A N D E Q U I T Y A N N U A L R E P O R T 2 0 0 0
  4. 4. The Charter’s performance management framework principles of the Charter of Public Service in a Culturally Diverse Society might be 1 relevant to their diversity management Since 1997, progress on implementing the and planning processes, and develop Charter has been reported in access and equity similar charters appropriate to their annual reports. These reports are tabled in specific environment and the needs of Parliament by the Minister for Immigration and their constituents, customers and Multicultural Affairs. While there has been employees.2 significant progress, there is a need for a more comprehensive assessment of Charter outcomes. The Government’s New Agenda indicated that, Qualitative progress on Charter outcomes can be while government cannot be prescriptive about assured when diversity management is charters or programs for the private sector, embedded in portfolio agency performance where benefit can be derived from adapting the management processes. As a first step in principles of a government program to a achieving this, a draft performance measurement company’s operations, this ought to be pursued. framework was included in the Access and The Council for Multicultural Australia is Equity Annual Report 1999. addressing this. During 2000 the new framework has been The Charter performance management framework revised and trialed in five agencies. The results has been developed as a tool to assist portfolio of this trial are reported in Chapter 3 and agencies to evaluate diversity management. It Appendix A. differs from past reporting practices in that it seeks to identify outcomes achieved within five The Access and Equity Annual Report 2000 core government roles (policy adviser, regulator, signals an important evolution in the purchaser, provider and employer). It asks implementation of the Charter. The Charter portfolio agencies to report on their handling of has traditionally been viewed solely as a social any business implications that arise when equity tool. While it has continuing relevance as language and cultural diversity intersect with the such, the New Agenda signifies a broader role work of the policy adviser, regulator, purchaser, for the Charter that encompasses the active provider and employer. pursuit of the benefits that diversity can bring. The National Multicultural Advisory Council The performance indicators for the core roles recommended in its April 1999 report to identified in the Charter’s framework correlate the Government that: closely to the Charter’s principles. This can be mapped as follows: private and community sector organisations consider how the Australian Public Service values and the 2 Australian multiculturalism for a new century: Towards inclusiveness. You can obtain a copy of this report from the Department of Immigration and Multicultural Affairs, PO Box 25, Belconnen, ACT 2616 or through its web site: http://www.immi.gov.au C H A P T E R 1 : T H E R A T I O N A L E F O R C H A N G E 5
  5. 5. Table 1 Policy Adviser Regulator Purchaser Provider Employer Access ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ Equity ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ Communication ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ Responsiveness ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ Accountability ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ It is worth noting that the principles of effectiveness and efficiency are an intrinsic part of the broader mandate of all Commonwealth departments and agencies and as a consequence they have not been specifically targeted as part of the performance management framework. During 2001 the framework will be further refined in consultation with Commonwealth portfolio agencies and State, Territory and Local Governments. This will include discussion on how best to integrate the framework with the Charter itself. 6 A C C E S S A N D E Q U I T Y A N N U A L R E P O R T 2 0 0 0
  6. 6. The New 2 C H A P T E R T WO Framework Achieving outcomes diversity management strategies and indicates that management thinking appears to treat The new performance management framework diversity more as a problem than as a resource. builds on the increasing focus, at a Commonwealth level, on individual portfolio In the Australian Public Service, departments and agencies taking greater accountability for agencies are required to prepare workplace achieving defined outcomes. diversity plans and to keep data about and/or report on a range of diversity related matters. Diversity management strategies must contribute The subject of such data and reporting embraces to achieving corporate outcomes and the Charter many aspect of human diversity in the workplace performance framework has been designed with — including disabilities, gender, language and this in mind. Its purpose is to assist portfolio cultural background, client demographics and agencies to achieve the outcomes defined in staff profiles. Portfolio Budget Statements and it complements existing reporting tools such as departmental Government programs serve the whole annual reports, state of the service (workplace community. Subject to the purpose and eligibility diversity) reports and client service criteria of individual programs, they ought to charter reports. be inclusive. They ought to be available to all Australians. They must meet the needs of our Workplace and marketplace diversity is a reality culturally diverse society. and it makes sense to leverage this diversity. The need for practical diversity management tools for In relation to cultural and linguistic diversity both the private and public sectors to help them inclusion means that portfolio agencies should to use our diversity to derive economic and social address the disadvantages faced by certain benefits is clearly apparent from commissioned individuals in participating in Australian society research, annual diversity reporting and (the most common barrier being effective anecdotal sources. communication) and maximise the benefits of this diversity. Addressing disadvantage and For instance, research commissioned by the maximising the benefits of diversity are Department of Immigration and Multicultural investments for the future. A fair society allows Affairs shows that the vast majority of senior individuals to reach their potential and to make managers in the private sector acknowledge that an increased contribution to society. workplace diversity (whether internal or external) can be a source of business strength. However, The Charter is a reminder to all public sector the research also highlights the general lack of managers that they have a role to play in 7
  7. 7. achieving and maintaining such a fair society. All portfolio agencies are employers, and all will Appropriate diversity management strategies are have at least one other role additional to that of one important indication that managers accept the employer. The responsibilities of some this responsibility. organisations may cover all five roles, and in most cases the roles will be decentralised within Five core roles the portfolio agency. Accountability is, therefore, widely distributed within organisations. The Charter is primarily concerned with ensuring that government services are delivered with due The performance management framework regard to the language and cultural backgrounds highlights this accountability by pointing to of clients. The main focus of implementing the how each role assists in achieving government Charter to date has been on the role of the outcomes, and by specifying performance service provider, although the importance of indicators. other roles has been highlighted from time to time. The new performance management The framework, including the performance framework makes explicit the Charter-related indicators, was trialed by five portfolio agencies responsibilities of five core roles: during 2000 and revised in accordance with the feedback received. Wide consultations at • policy adviser; Commonwealth, State, Territory and Local • regulator; Government levels are planned for 2001. • purchaser; • provider; and • employer. 8 A C C E S S A N D E Q U I T Y A N N U A L R E P O R T 2 0 0 0
  8. 8. Overview of the performance management framework 1 Role Performance indicators The policy adviser is responsible for strategic • Appropriate consultation on policy/program planning and formulating new initiatives proposals. and/or revisions to current government • Potential differential impacts of policy programs and services in response to either proposals identified prior to decision. government policy, identified community • Policy/program proposals have an appropriate needs or both. communication strategy. The regulator is responsible for implementing • Public information communicated to all the regulatory framework as designed by the Australians. policy function. • Regulatory compliance reporting is in accessible mediums. The purchaser ensures that funding is • Appropriate consultation on policy/program allocated on a basis that gives effect to the proposals. established policy framework. • Purchasing specifications are consistent with the Charter. • Complaints mechanisms are sensitive to language needs. Providers of services also work within • Work processes are consistent with the established boundaries, often derived from the Charter. purchasing frameworks that accompany the • Data collections meet statistical standards on receipt of funds. diversity. • Service standards address any differential impacts. • Complaints mechanisms are sensitive to language needs. All portfolio agencies undertake the role of • Corporate governance is consistent with the employer, involving the provision of a range Charter. of work conditions, including wages, in • Employment policies/practices are consistent exchange for the provision of labour to with the Charter. produce goods and services. • Learning programs include a focus on the benefits of diversity. • Complaints mechanisms are sensitive to language needs. Detailed information on each of the core roles and the related performance indicators follows. C H A P T E R 2 : T H E D R A F T F R A M E W O R K 9
  9. 9. Policy adviser Achieving Government outcomes To achieve the Government’s desired outcome of The role addressing disadvantage and maximising the The policy adviser role involves developing the benefits arising from cultural and language policy guidelines within which organisations diversity, the policy adviser should: conduct their business. It is the policy adviser role that considers the needs of different groups • reflect the culturally diverse nature of the and sectors and decides the desired impacts and community in the development and review of results (outcomes) that should be achieved for policy advice including in analysing the range the community. Common functions of the policy of needs; adviser role include but are not restricted to: • actively involve people from a variety of cultural and linguistic backgrounds (for • determining and evaluating community example, migrant and Indigenous outcomes; backgrounds) in the policy development and • deciding broad priorities and developing review process whether through direct policy parameters; participation or via consultation; • managing long-term strategic planning3 for • assess and quantify the differential impacts community outcomes; of policy directions on the lives of people • holding purchasers accountable for their from different cultural and linguistic performance; backgrounds in the Australian community in the short, medium and longer term; and • being accountable to the community (through Parliament); and • make publicly available policy information accessible, for example, by using ethnic and • ensuring the appropriate legislative and Indigenous media, translated information, regulatory framework is in place.4 interpreters or multilingual staff. Typically policy adviser functions would involve At times this role will involve taking on a little direct interaction with members of the leadership role and a pro-active approach to the public in the form of service delivery operations. management of emerging issues and needs. However, the policy adviser role has a responsibility for initiating and developing policy that can directly affect service provision. 3 This includes the identification and specification of service gaps, changing needs and emerging needs. 4 Funder, Owner, Purchase, Provider – Exploring the Concepts: A GMF Discussion Paper, FOPP Working Group, State Government of South Australia, June 1997, p10. 10 A C C E S S A N D E Q U I T Y A N N U A L R E P O R T 2 0 0 0
  10. 10. POLICY ADVISER 1 Performance indicator Performance measure Rating** Indicator 1: New or revised policy/program Sampling* of new or revised policy/program proposals with a differential impact on the proposals to determine the extent to which lives of people from particular cultural and organisations: linguistic backgrounds are developed in • consider the differential impact of ❑ consultation with people from those proposals in terms of the outcome, target backgrounds. and alignment of priorities of government services using both qualitative and quantitative indicators; • establish reference groups of people from ❑ particular cultural or linguistic groups to inform the development of new/revised policy proposals; • liaise with appropriate representative ❑ organisations; • use focus groups with representation of ❑ individuals from a variety of cultural and linguistic backgrounds; and • distribute discussion papers concerning the ❑ proposals through established networks to reach people from particular backgrounds. Indicator 2: New or revised policy/program Sampling* of new or revised policy/program proposals identify, prior to decision, any proposals to determine the extent to which differential impacts on the lives of people portfolio agencies: from particular cultural and linguistic • document the impact of policy on the lives ❑ backgrounds. of people from particular backgrounds; • use feedback gathered during consultations ❑ from people and organisations representing a range of cultural and linguistic backgrounds to develop/modify proposals; • use case studies of people from a variety ❑ of backgrounds to highlight the differential impact of policies; and • provide funds to facilitate access, such ❑ as, interpreters for people who do not speak or read English. (continued on next page) C H A P T E R 2 : T H E D R A F T F R A M E W O R K 11
  11. 11. Performance indicator Performance measure Rating Indicator 3: New or revised policy/program Sampling* of new or revised policy/program ❑ proposals have an appropriate proposals to determine the extent to which communication strategy. portfolio agencies: • use ethnic media and networks to ❑ distribution information; • use plain English to explain the proposal; ❑ • translate policy/program information; ❑ • use community leaders to disseminate ❑ information in particular communities; and • use imagery rather than text based ❑ communication. * Note: The sampling strategy should ensure that corporate policy priorities identified in each portfolio agency’s business plan and the Portfolio Budget Statements are represented in the sample. ** Consultation about possible rating scales will be undertaken in 2001. Both numeric and descriptive scales will be considered. Regulator functions of the regulator role include but are not restricted to: The role • compliance monitoring; The regulator role5 usually involves the enforcement of legislation or other government • performance reporting; ‘rules’ which influence the way people behave. • accreditation; Regulations apply to all Australians and are not • complaint management; and limited to primary or delegated legislation, but also include ‘quasi-regulation’ (such as codes of • investigation. conduct, advisory instruments or notes) where Achieving Government outcomes there is reasonable expectation by government of To achieve the Government’s desired outcome of compliance.6 Authority for independent decision government regulation that recognises the making and administration may accompany this cultural and language diversity of Australian function to support the separation of certain society, the regulator should: powers from executive government. Common • ensure information about the regulatory process and associated specifications is publicly available and in accessible formats; and • ensure that performance information is 5 Some examples of regulators include the Australian Securities readily available to the public and in and Investments Commission, Australian Competition and Consumer Commission and Department of Communications, accessible formats. Information Technology and the Arts. 6 Guidelines for Commonwealth Regulation Impact Statements, Office of Regulation Review. 12 A C C E S S A N D E Q U I T Y A N N U A L R E P O R T 2 0 0 0
  12. 12. REGULATOR 1 Performance indicator Performance measure Rating Indicator 1: Publicly available information Sampling* of communication strategies used on regulations and quasi-regulations is to convey information about regulations and communicated to all Australians, regardless quasi-regulations to determine the extent to of cultural or linguistic background. which organisations: • have communication strategies that reach ❑ people from a variety of cultural and linguistic backgrounds; • use plain English and translated material; ❑ • use interpreted information; ❑ • distribute information through the ethnic ❑ media and networks; • use community leaders to inform members ❑ of particular communities; and • use imagery rather than text based ❑ communication media. Indicator 2: Regulatory compliance Sampling* of publicly available reports to reporting is in accessible mediums for determine the extent to which organisations: all Australians, regardless of cultural or • have communication strategies for the ❑ linguistic background. distribution of regulations that reach people from a variety of cultural and linguistic backgrounds; • use plain English and translated material ❑ • use interpreted information; ❑ • distribute information through the ethnic ❑ media and networks; • use community leaders to inform members ❑ of particular communities; and • use imagery rather than text based ❑ communication media. * Note: The sampling strategy should ensure that corporate policy priorities identified in each portfolio agency’s business plan and the Portfolio Budget Statements are represented in the sample. C H A P T E R 2 : T H E D R A F T F R A M E W O R K 13
  13. 13. Purchaser agreements or partnership agreements. These mechanisms are usually supported by The role performance monitoring and reporting The purchaser acts as an agent of the policy requirements. adviser. Having been advised of the outcomes sought by the policy adviser, purchasers Achieving Government outcomes determine the precise outputs to be purchased To achieve the Government’s desired outcome (usually specified in terms of price, volume and of government purchasing that recognises the quality) and nominate the providers who may be cultural diversity of Australian society, the public, private or not-for-profit organisations. purchaser should: Common functions of the purchaser role include but are not restricted to: • involve the views of people from an appropriate range of cultural and linguistic • determining conditions of effective service backgrounds in the development of the tender design and delivery (price, quantity, quality, where a program may have a differential location etc) including the outcomes to be impact on the lives of people due to their achieved; cultural or linguistic backgrounds; • negotiating and contracting with providers for • ensure the specifications of both the tender volume and quality at best price; and purchase contract comply with the Charter; and • monitoring performance and appropriateness of services being purchased; and • ensure that the complaints mechanisms enable people from all cultural and linguistic • encouraging competition between providers.7 backgrounds to have their issues heard and Frequently, those who purchase services use addressed. mechanisms such as purchase contracts, memoranda of understanding, service level PURCHASER Performance indicator Performance measure Rating Indicator 1: Purchasing processes with Assessment of the major new purchasing differential impacts on the lives of people processes to determine the extent to which from particular cultural and linguistic portfolio agencies: backgrounds are developed in consultation • use reference groups of people from ❑ with people from those backgrounds. particular cultural or linguistic groups to inform the development of purchasing processes; (continued on next page) 7 FOPP Working Group, op cit p8. At times market forces may require focus on establishing cooperation between providers to ensure the required services can be provided rather than simply letting market forces dictate. 14 A C C E S S A N D E Q U I T Y A N N U A L R E P O R T 2 0 0 0
  14. 14. Performance indicator Performance measure Rating 1 • liaise with appropriate representative ❑ organisations; • use focus groups with representation of ❑ individuals from a variety of cultural and linguistic backgrounds; and • distribute discussion papers concerning the ❑ proposed purchasing specification through ethnic networks to reach people from particular backgrounds. Indicator 2: Tendering specifications and Assessment of the tendering specifications and contract requirements for the purchase of contract requirements for major new purchasing goods or services are consistent with the processes to determine the extent to which Charter where there may be a differential portfolio agencies: impact on people from particular cultural • highlight the needs of people from ❑ and linguistic backgrounds. particular backgrounds and seek a range of strategies from providers on how to address such needs; • specify in contracts data collection ❑ standards and reporting requirements that enable the needs of people from particular backgrounds to be monitored; and • ensure contracts require providers to ❑ establish complaints handling mechanisms that can effectively respond to people from all cultural and language backgrounds. Indicator 3: Complaints mechanisms Assessment to determine the extent to which enable people (irrespective of cultural and relevant purchase arrangements provide for: linguistic background) to address issues • the establishment of complaints/grievance ❑ and raise concerns about the performance mechanisms; of purchasers and providers. • information on complaints handling ❑ processes and procedures in accessible formats; • the use of interpreters to assist in the ❑ complaints lodgement and hearing process; and • analysis of the outcomes of complaint ❑ processes in terms of cultural or linguistic factors. C H A P T E R 2 : T H E D R A F T F R A M E W O R K 15
  15. 15. Provider • evidence an understanding of and a capacity to provide services to people from the range The role of cultural and linguistic backgrounds in Providers deliver the services they have been Australian society; contracted or mandated to provide under • provide access to culturally and linguistically specified conditions. Common functions of the appropriate services; provider role include but are not restricted to: • have established mechanisms for quality • managing resources effectively to produce assurance and quality improvement in place and deliver services as specified by which suit our multicultural society; purchasers; • have a service charter that defines the roles, • developing and marketing (if appropriate) responsibilities and accountabilities of both services to consumers/users and to the provider and consumer. Such a charter purchasers; and should account for the needs of society in • ensuring viability of their organisations, which there are people from a range of financially and in relation to long term backgrounds; productive capacity.8 • have established mechanisms for considering consumer satisfaction which suit the diversity Achieving Government outcomes of our society; and To achieve the Government’s desired outcome of providing services that recognise the cultural and • have established complaints handling language diversity of Australian society, the mechanisms to address concerns raised provider should: by their consumers which suit our multicultural society. PROVIDER Performance indicator Performance measure Rating Indicator 1: Providers have mechanisms for Assessment of the mechanisms for planning, implementation, monitoring and planning, implementation, monitoring and review of services that take into account the review across major functional areas to Charter principles. determine the extent to which portfolio agencies: • consider cultural and linguistic diversity ❑ issues in strategic and operation plans of functional areas; • develop strategies that provide accessible ❑ information to individuals from all language and cultural backgrounds; (continued on next page) 8 FOPP Working Group, op cit, p8. 16 A C C E S S A N D E Q U I T Y A N N U A L R E P O R T 2 0 0 0
  16. 16. Performance indicator Performance measure Rating 1 • establish consultative committees that ❑ include people from a variety of backgrounds to advise on the provision of services and the development of new/revised policy proposals; and • evaluate outcomes and undertake ❑ research on the differential impacts of service provision. Indicator 2: Data collection systems are in Assessment of data collection systems to accordance with the ABS Standards. determine the extent to which: • provider data collection systems are in ❑ accordance with the Standards for Statistics on Cultural and Language Diversity or portfolio agencies are taking action to comply with the Standards. Indicator 3: Providers have service standards Assessment of provider’s service standards to that identify and respond to any differential determine the extent to which portfolio agencies: impact on people from particular cultural • monitor responsiveness of services to ❑ and language backgrounds. ensure that customers receive appropriate services; • tailor products to respond to the needs of ❑ particular cultural and language groups; • tailor workforce skills to better respond ❑ to the diverse needs of the client base; • include representatives of people from ❑ different cultural and linguistic backgrounds in customer councils; and • analyse and evaluate the potential for ❑ differential impact on people from particular cultural and linguistic backgrounds. Indicator 4: Complaints mechanisms enable Assessment to determine the extent to which people (regardless of cultural and linguistic portfolio agencies: background) to address issues and raise • establish complaints/grievance mechanisms; ❑ concerns about the performance of providers. • provide information on complaints handling ❑ processes and procedures in accessible formats; • use interpreters to assist in the complaints ❑ lodgement and hearing process; and • analyse outcomes of complaint processes ❑ in terms of cultural or linguistic factors. C H A P T E R 2 : T H E D R A F T F R A M E W O R K 17
  17. 17. Employer Achieving Government outcomes To achieve the Government’s desired outcome for The role recognising the cultural diversity of Australian All portfolio agencies undertake the role of society, the employer should ensure that: employer. The employment role usually involves the provision of a range of work conditions, • corporate governance mechanisms and including wages, in exchange for the provision of processes give effect to the principles labour to produce goods and services. Common underpinning the Charter; functions of the employer role include but are • employment policies and procedures for not restricted to: departments and agencies comply with the requirements of the Charter and any diversity • development of employment policies and requirements of relevant legislation such as procedures; the Public Service Act 1999 and the • recruitment and induction of new staff; Commonwealth Authorities (EEO) Act; • staff training and development; • staff training and development programs • individual performance monitoring; (eg induction, supervisory, policy development, contract management, • payment of wages and salaries; and client services) include information on • human resource management. diversity and the benefits of effective diversity management; and Portfolio agencies are encouraged to highlight and promote the benefits which flow from a • staff training and development programs are diverse workforce (the dividend approach), rather accessible to employees from all cultural and than to simply focus on programs to overcome linguistic backgrounds. disadvantage (the deficit approach). EMPLOYER Performance indicator Performance measure Rating Indicator 1: Corporate governance Assessment of corporate governance mechanisms and processes give effect arrangements to determine the extent to which: to Charter principles. • organisational values are consistent ❑ with the Charter ; • strategic and operational plans identify ❑ strategies that respond positively to cultural and linguistic diversity; • organisational communication strategies ❑ and mechanisms take into account cultural and linguistic diversity; and • performance monitoring mechanisms take ❑ into account cultural and linguistic diversity. (continued on next page) 18 A C C E S S A N D E Q U I T Y A N N U A L R E P O R T 2 0 0 0
  18. 18. Performance indicator Performance measure Rating 1 Indicator 2: Employment policies, procedures Assessment of new and revised employment and practices comply with the requirements policies, procedures and practices to of the Charter. determine the extent to which: • employment practices are free of any form ❑ of discrimination based on a person’s country of birth, language, culture, race or religion; • employment policies and procedures are ❑ communicated appropriately; • employee data collection systems are in ❑ accordance with the Standards for Statistics on Cultural and Language Diversity; and • workforce planning strategies consider ❑ the demographics of the organisation’s client base. Indicator 3: Performance and learning Sampling of major learning and development programs give specific focus to strategies programs to determine the extent to which: to maximise the benefits of cultural and • programs highlight any differential impacts ❑ linguistic diversity. due to cultural and linguistic factors; • course design and curriculum incorporates ❑ examples and case studies that reflect Australia’s cultural and linguistic diversity; • learning programs take into account the ❑ cultural and linguistic diversity of the workforce; and • performance development systems have ❑ strategies to promote and maximise the advantages of cultural and linguistic diversity. Indicator 4: Complaints mechanisms enable An analysis of the complaints/grievances to employees (irrespective of cultural and determine whether: linguistic background) to address issues • there is any evidence of a differential impact ❑ and raise concerns. due to cultural and linguistic background; • information on complaints handing is in ❑ accessible formats and interpreters are used in the complaints lodgement and hearing process; and • complaints data collection systems are in ❑ accordance with the Standards for Statistics on Cultural and Language Diversity. C H A P T E R 2 : T H E D R A F T F R A M E W O R K 19
  19. 19. The New Framework 3 CHAPTER THREE In Action With any new approach in The departments and agencies that participated in the trialing phase were: assessing and measuring • Department of Defence; diversity management • Centrelink; performance it is important that • Department of Family and Community Services (FaCS); the framework is sufficiently • Australian Taxation Office (ATO); and flexible and robust to account • Department of Immigration and Multicultural for the wide range of roles, Affairs (DIMA). responsibilities and functions Each organisation: undertaken by departments • identified which of the core roles it performs; and agencies. • determined the areas within their organisation responsible for these functions The framework has been developed to give each (some organisations involved a range of areas organisation opportunity to assess diversity while others concentrated on one or two); management in relation to its core business. • identified how the performance indicators The framework is not intended to be prescriptive; could be linked into current performance its focus is on achieving sustainable management systems eg data collection improvements over time. processes, monitoring processes and reporting mechanisms; and The trialing process • implemented the performance measures Trialing the framework was a critical part of relevant for each functional area. the development process. It was necessary to determine the framework’s ability to measure Brief descriptions of the core roles covered by those functions that have a real and direct each organisation participating in the trialing impact on effective diversity management as phase can be found in Appendix B. The roles well as to assess its capacity to be applied tested by each organisation are listed in the within a range of workplaces with different table below. priorities and business activities. 20 A C C E S S A N D E Q U I T Y A N N U A L R E P O R T 2 0 0 0
  20. 20. Table 2 1 Policy Adviser Regulator Purchaser Provider Employer Defence ✔ ATO ✔ ✔ Centrelink ✔ ✔ FaCS ✔ ✔ DIMA ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ Note: The roles tested by individual organisations should not be regarded as the only roles undertaken by the organisation — they are a sample used for the purposes of refining the performance management framework. The information analysed in the trialing phase is summarised in Table 3. Table 3 Role Examples Policy Adviser DIMA – Australian Multiculturalism FaCS – Commonwealth Disability Strategy FaCS – International Agreements FaCS – Welfare Reform Regulator ATO – Excise Purchaser DIMA – Integrated Humanitarian Settlement Strategy DIMA – Adult Migrant English Program FaCS – Family Relationships Program FaCS – Disability and Carers Support FaCS – Community Program Provider DIMA Centrelink Employer DIMA Defence Centrelink ATO – Excise C H A P T E R 3 : T H E D R A F T F R A M E W O R K I N A C T I O N 21
  21. 21. A case study — Policy Adviser Department of Family and Community Services As a strategy for reviewing welfare policy, an national and regional press in late October independent Welfare Reform Reference Group 1999. The total number of submissions was established to explore options for received from members of the public and improving the welfare system. The Group was organisations was 366; asked to address two main issues: • 17 submissions received from organisations • ways in which welfare arrangements specifically representing people from can help prevent the problems that result migrant backgrounds; in people needing assistance in the first • the Group met bilaterally with over 25 key place; and national peak representative groups during • how welfare recipients can best be helped this time, including with three specifically to improve their capacity for self-reliance so representing people from particular cultural that they can reduce either their extent or and linguistic backgrounds; and duration of welfare dependency. • over 315 individuals and organisations The Group was assisted by FaCS in the provided comments on the interim report via consultation process. This included: a feedback questionnaire including six from organisations representing people from • public submissions made to the Group in migrant backgrounds. response to advertisements placed in the A case study — Regulator Australian Taxation Office The ATO has regulatory responsibilities as a • plain English brochures provide potential collector of around $19.8 billion per annum in claimants with information on how to claim excise revenue from payments by the a grant or rebate; petroleum, tobacco, beer, spirits and crude oil • the development of close links with industry industries. Information on regulations and organisations and associations. Most have quasi-regulations is communicated to all established advisory forums with industry Australians, regardless of cultural or linguistic representation. The forums ensure that background through a communication strategy. policy information is accessible and publicly This strategy includes: available and that forum members are • the provision of information on excise actively involved in the policy development matters on the ATO Assist website. Clients and review process; and can ask questions online or request • consultation with ATSIC and local information by facsimile (‘Fax from Tax’) for Indigenous communities to determine the the cost of a local call; impact of the new Diesel Fuel Rebate • Call Centre staff receive induction training Scheme on Aboriginal communities, on how to use the Translating and especially in relation to electricity Interpreting Service; generation. 22 A C C E S S A N D E Q U I T Y A N N U A L R E P O R T 2 0 0 0
  22. 22. A case study — Purchaser 1 Department of Immigration and Multicultural Affairs DIMA purchases services under the Integrated In July 2000, DIMA prepared and circulated for Humanitarian Settlement Strategy (IHSS). The discussion a paper on Community Support for strategy is a national framework for better Refugees, a component of the IHSS. The paper targeting and integrating settlement services asks some critical questions about the for humanitarian program entrants. The potential exploitation of humanitarian entrants purchasing of individualised case management and the need for a code of conduct for services from providers ensures that the Community Support for Refugees groups. special needs of these entrants are met. All services purchased must conform to the The Review of Material Assistance to IHSS service principles. These principles are Humanitarian Program Entrants conducted in comprehensive in their coverage of diversity early 1999 carried out community consultations issues. For example, services are designed and and sought submissions from the community on administered so as to promote humanitarian linking humanitarian entrants with the program entrants’ mobility and level of appropriate settlement services. independence. Furthermore, the purchase contract requires liaison with the relevant The IHSS contract requires the provider to state and territory members of the National conduct client satisfaction surveys to elicit Forum of Services for Survivors of Torture and feedback on the extent to which the service Trauma to ensure integration and appropriate meets output specifications and standards and delivery of services. complies with the service principles. As part of quality assurance, the Department reserves the right to conduct random inspections of the accommodation provided to entrants. C H A P T E R 3 : T H E D R A F T F R A M E W O R K I N A C T I O N 23
  23. 23. A case study — Provider Centrelink Centrelink Customer Service Centres provide a of requests for interpreters are met range of customer services including income within three working days. The current support payments on behalf of a number performance is 99 percent; of government departments. Centrelink’s • provision of a National Multilingual customers include retired people, families, sole Call Centre; parents, people looking for work, people with a short term incapacity, people with a disability, • provision of a range of multilingual students, young people, Indigenous people and communication strategies to customers — migrants. More than 1 million of Centrelink’s in person, through printed material, ethnic customers were born in a non English speaking press, community and SBS radio, and via the country. To reflect this customer base, Internet in up to 42 languages; and Centrelink has the following strategies: • consultative forums are held at local, state • when providers are planning, implementing, and national levels on multicultural services. monitoring and reviewing services, they take The forums are used to seek feedback on account of Charter principles; performance standards and to ensure service delivery and development is • provision of a range of language services inclusive regardless of cultural and (interpreting and translating). The linguistic background. performance standard is that 95 percent A case study — Employer Department of Defence As an employer the Department of Defence has The Defence APS education and training a number of corporate policies and initiatives program adopts a case management approach that give effect to the principles underpinning where a nominee identifies as having special the Charter. For example, the Equity and needs. The program ensures a range of Diversity policy instructions and the policy different strategies are employed in the design instructions for preventing, managing and of learning programs. In addition, the language eliminating unacceptable behaviour both used in learning programs is appropriate and provide advice on equity, efficiency and does not give offence to people from particular effectiveness. ethnic, religious, or linguistic backgrounds. The examples and case studies used reflect the The Department’s Employee’s Industrial diverse makeup of the workplace and avoid Agreement 2000–01 commits Defence to help stereotyping. prevent and eliminate discrimination on the grounds of race, colour, sex, sexual preference, During the last financial year Defence has had age, physical or mental disability, marital three complaints made under the Racial status, family responsibilities, pregnancy, Discrimination Act and no formal grievances on religion, political opinion, national extraction the basis of cultural or linguistic background. or social origin. 24 A C C E S S A N D E Q U I T Y A N N U A L R E P O R T 2 0 0 0
  24. 24. Relevance of core roles report was understood to be beneficial and an improvement on past reporting requirements. 1 In the main the trial group found that it was more effective to determine core roles at the The preliminary findings highlight the potential organisational level. An organisational perspective benefits that can be achieved from such an was seen to have the following advantages: approach. In addition, the feedback received provides invaluable guidance in further refining • strategies could then be more readily the performance management framework so as identified on how best to engage key to ensure its relevance and applicability in organisational areas in measuring various work settings. performance; and Interpretation of results • more streamlined data collection strategies could be developed and more broad based The following, necessarily tentative, sampling strategies established. interpretation of the results has been derived from: the trial (see Appendix A); the good Overall, a performance management framework practice examples from portfolio agencies not based on core public sector roles was seen to involved in the trialing (see Chapter 5); and the encourage a much more comprehensive view of experience of past years as reported in access the organisation’s performance. and equity annual reports. Where necessary Application of the framework information was derived from bilateral meetings between DIMA and other portfolio agencies. To ensure that the framework can be applied In some cases, conclusions are drawn from the effectively, the commitment of all staff, but lack of reported information. especially senior staff, is critical. Management plays a crucial role in applying the framework to Aside from reporting on the trialing of the day to day operations. Charter’s performance management framework, a key aim of the 2000 annual report is to develop Performance monitoring areas within a preliminary assessment of current performance organisations also have a key role to play in this against each of the five core roles. Because the process. They are able to identify how the trial was somewhat limited in scope — it tested framework can be integrated with the only a sample of functions in five portfolio organisation’s own performance monitoring agencies — there is a degree of subjective processes and are often responsible for judgement in these assessments. As the establishing data collection systems to support process develops in future years, it should performance reporting. yield assessments which give a surer indication of performance. Preliminary results to date Policy adviser: Policy advisers do not appear to The new performance management framework routinely factor language and cultural diversity was seen to have high acceptance within issues into their deliberations, except where the organisations — with the linkage of performance policy is directed primarily at migrant or reporting to core business activities seen as a Indigenous groups. The overwhelming majority of major strength. In addition, the clarity offered by these cases involve programs aimed at the framework in providing guidance on what to addressing a perceived disadvantage. C H A P T E R 3 : T H E D R A F T F R A M E W O R K I N A C T I O N 25
  25. 25. Consultation and communication strategies, areas typically have very well developed where reported, appear soundly based, although communication strategies that take proper limited to the principal target group. There is account of the English language proficiency of insufficient data to gauge if policy advisers their clients. Strategies are utilised to both routinely consider the possibility of any potential meet client needs and to achieve operational differential impacts of policy proposals on efficiencies. Some business related programs particular groups. make conscious efforts to leverage diversity. Little is known about other service providers, Regulator: Regulations apply to all Australians since they tend not to report in the context of and key regulatory agencies have a good record the access and equity annual report. of factoring language and cultural diversity into their communication strategies. These strategies Social and welfare service providers generally appear to be embedded in normal business meet the Charter’s performance indicators, and processes. some business service providers make a particular effort to broaden service coverage Regulators appear to meet the Charter’s when it is linked to increased business activity. performance indicators to a fairly high degree, although little is known about regulatory Employer: Many corporate planning documents functions that constitute a small proportion include references to diversity management. of a portfolio agency’s work. Staff with employer responsibilities seem to be generally very conscious of language and cultural Purchaser: There are many different types of diversity and can readily point to good practice purchasing. In many cases it would not be examples of responding to this diversity. More necessary to consider language and cultural data and analysis is required, however, to diversity issues in the purchasing process. In determine what proportion of such corporate other cases, for instance where a service has governance arrangements have Charter principles been outsourced and is being purchased under embedded in them. The good practice examples contract arrangements, diversity issues could be provided are typically designed to address quite important and such purchasers appear to disadvantages, including by seeking to overcome be generally aware of this. A proper assessment English language proficiency barriers. No data is cannot be made, however, without access to a currently available to determine the extent to representative sample of contracts. which portfolio agencies use employer functions to leverage workplace diversity for corporate Provider: Service providers who manage across- benefit. However, there are examples in this the-counter types of services appear to be report of recruitment policies and strategies to generally aware of the demographics of retain particular staff to increase the capacity to their clients. Those in the social and welfare be responsive to particular clients. 26 A C C E S S A N D E Q U I T Y A N N U A L R E P O R T 2 0 0 0
  26. 26. The Next Steps 4 CHAPTER FOUR Lessons learnt in the trialing summarise the organisation’s core corporate business. Trialing the Charter’s performance management framework in the five portfolio agencies provided It is important that the performance indicators much valuable information, as a direct result of for the Charter are directly linked with agency which, the framework document was simplified processes for determining performance and a number of performance indicators indicators, and that responsibility for Charter were amended. framework reporting is embedded in normal performance management processes. The trial also pointed to the imperative of linking the management framework to existing corporate Identifying new performance indicators can be a outcomes reporting processes, and of articulating lengthy process and it takes time to build up a cogent business case for developing the new performance information. Where Charter Charter’s framework. framework reporting entails new measurements, these ought to be developed as part of the Outcomes reporting portfolio agency’s overall reporting processes. A key part of the rationale for developing the Charter’s performance management framework The most important assessment of performance was to ensure that the Charter principles add for portfolio agencies is the extent to which the value to the work undertaken to achieve corporate outcomes defined in the PBS are corporate outcomes. achieved. The trial has highlighted, however, the need for subsidiary measures. In the case of the The trial confirmed that a considerable amount Charter, such a measure would be the extent to of useful performance information could be which the organisation leverages language and generated by assessing the impact of Charter cultural diversity in achieving its corporate principles on departmental operations. Portfolio outcomes. This would include assessing how agencies are required to define their outcomes it addresses its customers’ needs. and outputs in the Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS). They are held publicly accountable for Diversity management tools achieving these outcomes and are resourced to Where diversity raises issues of business achieve them through purchasing agreements importance, management typically looks for that have been (or are being) negotiated with guidance or tools to implement a suitable the Department of Finance and Administration. diversity management strategy. The Charter’s In short, the outcomes identified in the PBS performance management framework is one of these tools. 27
  27. 27. A number of other diversity management tools access and equity annual report and built upon in and case studies have been, and are being, future years. Discussion will also be needed on developed within the Productive Diversity how best to integrate the performance Partnerships Program managed by the management framework with the Charter. Department of Immigration and Multicultural Affairs (DIMA). The Program began in 1999 when Review of annual reporting DIMA commissioned a series of research projects The New agenda for multicultural Australia by business educators, in partnership with pointed to a strong link between the effective leading corporations, into various aspects of utilisation of diversity in the workplace and diversity management. The results of this effective client service to a diverse community. research were presented to the 21st Century The Government’s approach to diversity Business — Delivering the Diversity Dividend management incorporates both an organisation’s conference in Melbourne on 13–14 November workforce and its clients. It is committed to 2000. The conference outcomes are being reviewing the reporting responsibilities for further developed with a view to producing access and equity (by DIMA), client service curricula material and a range of practical charters (by the Department of Finance and diversity management tools. The wealth of Administration) and workplace diversity (by the information and analysis generated by the Public Service Commissioner). This review will be Program will be used and built on in as many commenced in early 2001 and will take into ways as possible. account the differing functions and A crucial research finding of the Partnerships responsibilities of these organisations, the Program is that Australia’s Chief Executives rank varying accountability obligations on which the internal efficiency as the most important strategy reports are based, the varying aims and for their company. An effective diversity coverage of the reports and the differing management strategy is a pre-requisite for interests of stakeholders in them. optimising internal efficiency. While the review may make recommendations The outcomes of the Charter performance about how portfolio agencies report on their management framework and the Productive diversity management responsibilities, it does Diversity Partnerships Program are to be further not signal a lessening of the Government’s developed during 2001. commitment to the Charter’s principles. The review will give active consideration to a Consultations range of accountability options, including the incorporation of diversity management In early 2001 there will be a wide-ranging considerations in auditing guidelines. consultation on the Charter’s performance management framework. The consultations will Standardised statistics be managed through the Interdepartmental Committee on Multicultural Affairs, chaired In order to evaluate the inclusiveness of by DIMA. government policies and programs it is crucial that portfolio agencies have access to robust This will include discussion about data concerning cultural and language factors, implementation strategies and what baseline including levels of English proficiency. In data can realistically be reported on in the 2001 November 1999 the Australian Bureau of 28 A C C E S S A N D E Q U I T Y A N N U A L R E P O R T 2 0 0 0
  28. 28. Statistics (ABS) published Standards for Statistics on Cultural and Language Diversity.9 Indicative implementation timeline 1 The Standards provides guidance in the The following table summarises planned future collection and analysis of information relating to development of the Charter’s performance the origins of individuals and cultural diversity. management framework. Table 5 Year Action to be undertaken by portfolio agencies 2001 • Examine corporate performance reporting processes for consistency with the Charter’s performance management framework. • Supplement corporate performance indicators, where necessary, to include those in the Charter. • Test performance indicators in key areas of the organisation. 2002 • Build the Charter performance indicator information into regular corporate planning processes and performance reports. • Ensure that all key areas consider and, where appropriate, report against Charter performance indicators. • Assess extent to which Charter performance indicators are contributing to corporate outcomes. 2003 • Reassess Charter performance indicators for appropriateness. • Assess extent to which Charter performance indicators are contributing to corporate outcomes. 9 Copies are available from the ABS (ABS Catalogue Number 1289.0) or through the ABS website www.abs.gov.au C H A P T E R 4 : T H E N E X T S T E P S 29

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