APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT
THE BERRI BARMERA COUNCIL CASE STUDY




           The Be...
APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT
THE BERRI BARMERA COUNCIL CASE STUDY


           Governan...
APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT
THE BERRI BARMERA COUNCIL CASE STUDY




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APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT
THE BERRI BARMERA COUNCIL CASE STUDY



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APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT
THE BERRI BARMERA COUNCIL CASE STUDY




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APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT
THE BERRI BARMERA COUNCIL CASE STUDY




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APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT
THE BERRI BARMERA COUNCIL CASE STUDY


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APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT
THE BERRI BARMERA COUNCIL CASE STUDY




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APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT
THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF CEDUNA CASE STUDY




The District...
APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT
THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF CEDUNA CASE STUDY


Ceduna is the ...
APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT
THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF CEDUNA CASE STUDY


As stated earl...
APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT
THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF CEDUNA CASE STUDY


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APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT
THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF CEDUNA CASE STUDY




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APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT
THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF CEDUNA CASE STUDY




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APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT
THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF KAPUNDA AND LIGHT CASE STUDY




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APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT
THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF KAPUNDA AND LIGHT CASE STUDY




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APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT
         THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF KAPUNDA AND LIGHT CASE ST...
APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT
         THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF KAPUNDA AND LIGHT CASE ST...
APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT
THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF KAPUNDA AND LIGHT CASE STUDY


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APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT
THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF KAPUNDA AND LIGHT CASE STUDY




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APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT
THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF KAPUNDA AND LIGHT CASE STUDY


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APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT
THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF KAPUNDA AND LIGHT CASE STUDY




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APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT
    THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF KAPUNDA AND LIGHT CASE STUDY

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APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT
    THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF KAPUNDA AND LIGHT CASE STUDY

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APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT
THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF KAPUNDA AND LIGHT CASE STUDY


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APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT
THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF KAPUNDA AND LIGHT CASE STUDY




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APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT
THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF KAPUNDA AND LIGHT CASE STUDY


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APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT
CITY OF ONKAPARINGA CASE STUDY




City of Onkaparinga

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APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT
CITY OF ONKAPARINGA CASE STUDY




Council Profile

The Ci...
APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT
CITY OF ONKAPARINGA CASE STUDY




•      Strategy and Dev...
APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT
CITY OF ONKAPARINGA CASE STUDY




By way of an example, t...
APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT
CITY OF ONKAPARINGA CASE STUDY




•   workshops for Elect...
APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT
CITY OF ONKAPARINGA CASE STUDY




and budgetary processes...
APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT
CITY OF ONKAPARINGA CASE STUDY




A separate exercise was...
The Berri Barmera Council
The Berri Barmera Council
The Berri Barmera Council
The Berri Barmera Council
The Berri Barmera Council
The Berri Barmera Council
The Berri Barmera Council
The Berri Barmera Council
The Berri Barmera Council
The Berri Barmera Council
The Berri Barmera Council
The Berri Barmera Council
The Berri Barmera Council
The Berri Barmera Council
The Berri Barmera Council
The Berri Barmera Council
The Berri Barmera Council
The Berri Barmera Council
The Berri Barmera Council
The Berri Barmera Council
The Berri Barmera Council
The Berri Barmera Council
The Berri Barmera Council
The Berri Barmera Council
The Berri Barmera Council
The Berri Barmera Council
The Berri Barmera Council
The Berri Barmera Council
The Berri Barmera Council
The Berri Barmera Council
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The Berri Barmera Council

  1. 1. APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT THE BERRI BARMERA COUNCIL CASE STUDY The Berri Barmera Council This Case Study has been prepared by the Council in collaboration with the Consultant. Project Description: Development of a new Strategic Plan and a Framework for Business and Operational Plans Aims for the Project: The Berri Barmera Council project aims to: • Explore and discuss the environment in which the Council operates • Ascertain Elected Member and senior officers' thoughts about the critical issues that the Council needs to address, its vision, and potential strategies to achieve that vision. • Survey the community to ensure the validity of assumptions that Council has made about the above. This involved two processes. • Integrate the above into an agreed Strategic Plan. • Develop an approach to developing Business and Operational Plans, for endorsement of Council, designed to achieve the above Strategic Plan. • Developed the strategic management skills of senior officers. Contact Person: Mike Hurley and David Fensom Phone 8582 1922 Email bbc@riverland.net.au Website: www.riverland.net.au/~bbc/ Consultant assisting: George Siokos and Peter Graves, Australian Business Enterprise Development 36
  2. 2. APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT THE BERRI BARMERA COUNCIL CASE STUDY Governance: 13 Elected Members Background: The need to undertake a strategic planning process was recognised by Council following its amalgamation process. The Council was keen to consult with its “new” community to identify the priority issues for them and their expectations of Council in responding to these issues. The Council would then formulate its Strategic Plan in consultation with the community and put in place business and operational plans to implement the strategies identified. Council Profile: The Berri Barmera Council was formed following the merger of the District Council of Berri and the District Council of Barmera in October 1996. It was officially gazetted as “The Berri Barmera Council” a few months later. The Berri Barmera Council is approximately 220 km east of Adelaide, approximately 40 km from the Victorian border and is located in South Australia’s Riverland. It has a population of over 11,500 people, a total road length of 389 kms and is bordered by the District Council of Renmark Paringa to the east, the District Council of Loxton Waikerie to the south west, and unincorporated areas to the north. The Council is presently divided into five Wards and consists of twelve Elected Members and a Mayor. Total revenue is approximately $10 million with rates representing 34% of income. Council employs 64 staff which includes 37 outside employees. The principal office of the Council is located at Berri and a branch office is located at Barmera. Townships located within the district include Berri, Barmera, Cobdogla, Loveday, Monash, Glossop, Winkie and Overland Corner. The Berri Township is situated adjacent to the River Murray, whilst Barmera Township is nestled on the foreshore of Lake Bonney. When the area was first surveyed in the early 1900's all townships in the region were irrigation settlements, many blocks being allocated to soldier settlers. During the 1920's roads were constructed, the Townships grew and the area witnessed a rapid and vigorous growth which has steadily continued over the years to the extent that Berri is now recognised as the regional centre for the Riverland. With the current boom in wine sales, the entire district is experiencing a healthy growth in vineyard production, whilst also enjoying growth in tourism. The River Murray and its houseboat trade and tranquil beauty, Lake Bonney and its many and varied aquatic sports, together with local wineries, industries, caravan parks, National Parks and historical centres offer much to the visitor to the area. It is estimated that the Monash Adventure Park alone attracts in excess of 50,000 visitors to the area annually. The Berri Barmera area is serviced by a wide range of shopping, sporting, recreation, educational and medical facilities, Service Clubs, Choral Groups and even a Nudist Club at Lake Bonney! 37
  3. 3. APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT THE BERRI BARMERA COUNCIL CASE STUDY Berri Barmera Council Strategic Planning Methodology Phase 1 Phase 2 Phase 3 Community Program Strategic Consultation Launch Plan (Stage 1) Phase 6 Phase 5 Phase 4 Community Consultation Business Review of (Stage 2) Plans Strategic Plan Phase 7 Phase 9 Phase 8 Finalise Implementation** Strategic & Operational Business Plans** Plans** **Stages yet to be completed 38
  4. 4. APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT THE BERRI BARMERA COUNCIL CASE STUDY Strategic & Business Planning Methodology Stage Description Method Who's Involved 1 Program Provision of an overview of the Formal Elected Members, Launch concepts and principles that underpin presentation, Senior Staff with Strategic Planning and the links to workshop and facilitation by the business and operational planning to discussion by Consultants. seek agreement on the process to be those present. adopted. 2 Develop the Council undertook an exercise to A two day Elected Members, Draft “scan” the environment in which the workshop Senior Staff with Strategic Council and its community is facilitation by the Plan operating. The primary objective of Consultants. the exercise was to identify what the Council ought to address in its Strategic Plan. As a result of the above Council developed a draft of its vision and mission, 7 major strategies and the values that it considered necessary for its success. The 7 major strategies included: • organisation development • infrastructure • health • environment • community participation • tourism • lifestyle • economic development For each strategy specific goals were determined, along with potential timeframes and resource requirements. 39
  5. 5. APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT THE BERRI BARMERA COUNCIL CASE STUDY Stage Description Method Who's Involved 3&6 Community Council considered that an important Surveys were Consultants Consultation element of the development of the dispatched by Senior Staff (Stages 1 and strategic plan was community post to all 2) consultation. properties. The community Stage 1: The first stage of the consultation community consultation gathered process was quantitative data to assess: promoted in the local press. • The extent to which the community was aware of the range of core services provided by Council, and • The extent to which core services met community expectations. In total, 440 responses were received from across the community. Respondents to the survey were also asked whether they would be interested in participating in interviews as the process developed. Approximately 80 persons indicated they were prepared to be interviewed. The major findings included: • High level of awareness across the community of the services provided by council • Greatest need for improvement was in the infrastructure area (streets, footpaths and associated infrastructure). Stage 2: Interviews of approximately Random selection Consultants assisted 120 households across the was made via with the design of the community. Households were voter’s role and methodology, but randomly drawn from the amongst those surveying is being assessment roll and reviewed to offering to be part undertaken by Elected confirm that it was representative of of an interview Members. Staff key community demographics. process (at stage assistance has been Those persons indicating an interest 1) offered to Elected in being surveyed (sought at stage 1) Members. were also part of the random selection made. 40
  6. 6. APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT THE BERRI BARMERA COUNCIL CASE STUDY Stage Description Method Who's Involved 4 Review of Draft In light of the data gathered above, One-day Senior Staff with Strategic Plan Council was able to confirm workshop with facilitation by the community expectations and subsequent Consultants. therefore what should be included in presentation to its strategic plan. Council also put in Elected Members. place a process that would enable each Elected Member to interview up In addition: to 12 persons selected at random Interview from those indicating that they would processes were be prepared to be interviewed and established in through a random selection taken addition to the from the voter’s role. above. (At the time of preparing this case study the interview processes were still being completed). 5 Business In preparation for implementation of Workshop and Senior Staff facilitated Planning the strategies outlined in the draft sessions with by the Consultants and Framework Strategic Plan Council staff staff. work undertaken with commenced consideration of its staff in each Business Planning framework. For departmental area. each draft strategy goal further detailed consideration was given to the extent to which resources, timeframes, staff responsibilities etc required allocation. This work has not yet been confirmed/completed as Council awaits the final outcomes of its consultation on the strategic plan. However, it is considered that this parallel activity will have it well placed to confirm its Business Plan/s when the Strategic Plan is formally endorsed. 7 Finalise The draft Strategic and Business It is proposed to Senior Staff facilitated Strategic & Plans will be reviewed in light of the conduct a by the Consultants. Business Plans outcomes of the Community workshop with Consultation process (stages 2&4). senior staff. Presentation to Should the survey process determine Council for that there is a degree of alignment consideration. between the key strategies and what is of concern to the community, then Council can proceed to implement and achieve the strategies. Should the findings from the community survey process be inconsistent with the strategies, then Council may need to rethink specific strategies to ensure consistency. 41
  7. 7. APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT THE BERRI BARMERA COUNCIL CASE STUDY Stage Description Method Who's Involved 8 Development It is proposed that once the Strategic Workshops Initial workshop of Operational and Business Plans are signed off, facilitated by the Plans operational plans will be developed consultants, involving for each of the Departments. This will senior staff. provide the Council with the ability to Subsequently guide the day to day operational workshops facilitated by activity in order to achieve the managers with staff. strategic goals and objectives. 9 Implementation The issue of how to launch the Management to Consultants assisted Strategic Plan has not yet been facilitate with the design of the determined. implementation of methodology, but operational plan surveying was to be In addition the Business Plan will be with employees in undertaken by Elected a key management tool and it too will each department. Members and staff. need to be formally launched to staff Linked to of Council to enshrine their reporting and commitment to the process. performance measurement It is proposed that the operational mechanisms. plan be linked to the organisation’s performance management system. This would involve reporting mechanisms and review processes to assess organisational performance at strategic and operational levels. 42
  8. 8. APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT THE BERRI BARMERA COUNCIL CASE STUDY Conclusions/Hints Consultation and Consideration of Regional, State and National Policy/Strategies The new Local Government Act 1999, will require Council to indicate the extent to which it has participated with and given consideration to regional, State and National objectives and strategies when developing strategic management plans. Whilst this is a new provision to be completed by 2002, the Berri Barmera District Council did give consideration to this issue. The Berri Barmera Council did consider regional, State and National policies and strategies, but only to the extent that they matched Council’s vision for the district. It was considered difficult to access policies and strategies of external agencies and governments. Council concluded that their objectives were generally similar to these external agencies and governments due to a common goal to see the development and diversification of the local horticultural industry. Community Consultation Council was very keen to have an active and participative consultation process with its community. The decision to take this path was largely due to the amalgamation process and the desire to project a “one Council” approach and to demonstrate the strength of the new Council. This approach has been time consuming but Council is of the view that the benefits to be derived outweigh the constraints of time. The decision to have Elected Members conduct interviews with community persons representative of the demographic profile of the Council area has been very well received by the community. The Council has certainly projected a strong image that it is keen to listen and respond to community issues. Undertaking the Strategic and Business Planning Process almost Concurrently This approach enabled the staff at all levels to critically review the impact of the strategic plan on their departments, jobs and operations. Whilst the framework and potential content will require confirmation once the Strategic Plan is finalised and endorsed by Council it was an excellent way to bring the Strategic Plan to “life” for the staff. 43
  9. 9. APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF CEDUNA CASE STUDY The District Council of Ceduna This Case Study has been prepared by the Council in collaboration with the Consultant. Project Description: Development of new Strategic Plan with Action Plans. Aims for the Project: To develop a best practice strategic plan with linkages to financial and budget processes and with strong accountability for implementation. Contact Person: Tony Irvine Phone 8625 3407 Email dcceduna@tpg.com.au Consultant assisting: Joe Collins Collins Anderson Management Governance: 8 Elected Members Council Profile: The District Council of Ceduna is the most western Local Government area of South Australia, being one of the most isolated and remote Councils of the State. The town of Ceduna is located on the Far West Coast of South Australia, on the scenic shores of Murat Bay on the Great Australian Bight, approximately 800kms from Adelaide and 1900 road kms to Perth. The word Ceduna is believed to have come from the Aboriginal word Cheedoona that is “a place to rest”. The District Council of Ceduna shares its boundaries with the District Council of Streaky Bay (to the south and east) and the Outback Areas Community Development trust area (Out of Districts) to the west and north. The District Council of Ceduna has a total revenue of approximately $6.7 million and employs 27 staff of which 15 are based at the depot. 44
  10. 10. APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF CEDUNA CASE STUDY Ceduna is the major regional business centre of the Far West Coast of Eyre Peninsula. It is the established focal point of a wide range of services to a diverse regional economy. The Eyre Highway or National Highway Number One passes directly through Ceduna with approximately 400,000 tourists passing through the town annually (Nicholas Clarke & Associates, May 1996). Ceduna has a population of 3,559 people as at the 1996 Census. A high proportion of this number of people live in Ceduna/ Thevenard with the towns of Koonibba, Smoky Bay, Denial Bay and having smaller populations within the Council’s boundary. Ceduna has the highest percentage of Aboriginal people of all Local Government areas in South Australia with the population currently standing at 22.4% (799) of the population. In addition there are Aboriginal communities in adjacent unincorporated areas that should be considered a part of the Ceduna community. This is one of the highest percentages in Australia and perhaps for a locality that includes a medium sized town. Ceduna has been described as having one of the most complex multi-cultural communities in the country (Nicholas Clarke & Associates May 1996) with many other Nationalities also prominent in the population. Ceduna is the base for a large contingent of Government organisations, in particular Aboriginal organisations. The town is the headquarters for Wangka Wilurrara Regional Council and Maralinga Tjarutjta Inc. for example. Agriculture is one of the main economic drivers of the region with the main focus being sheep, high protein hard wheat, barley and other cereals. Production is carried out in arid and semi arid conditions with dry land farming techniques being successfully applied. The product output varies from year to year, as it is totally seasonally dependent. The aquaculture industry on Eyre Peninsula in recent years has grown dramatically in the farming of a range of species, Ceduna and region has been no exception. The oyster industry has been established for 10 years in Denial Bay and Smoky Bay with industry not being able to keep up with the domestic market demand. Ceduna is the second and Smoky Bay the third largest producing areas of oysters in the State. There is significant potential for further expansion of the aquaculture industry in the area. The two largest mining commodities being exported through the Port of Thevenard is salt and gypsum. The region has the largest deposit of gypsum in the Southern Hemisphere with 1.2 million tones being exported per annum. An average yield of 100,000 tones of salt per year is exported through the Port of Thevenard to the Eastern States of Australia and overseas. Over the past few years there has been increased interest in the nearby Gawler Craton for mining potential. An airborne geophysical survey discovered an extraordinary magnetic anomaly, which was found in the Yumbarra Conservation Park (approximately 30 kms to the north of Ceduna). This has been recognised generally as one of the most significant anomalies ever found in the State. Limited exploration in the area is currently being undertaken by companies to determine the mining potential of the region. 45
  11. 11. APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF CEDUNA CASE STUDY As stated earlier approximately 400,000 tourists pass through the town each year. Most tourists only make a brief stop in Ceduna. There is significant potential to expand this industry through the increase in tourism ventures and attractions in the region. There are numerous attractions surrounding Ceduna: Davenport Creek, the offshore islands - St Peters Island, St Francis Island and the Nuyts Archipelago, Smoky Bay, Denial Bay - oyster farming and the rich fishing grounds. In recent years the development at the Head of the Bight by the Yalata community for whale watching (Southern Right Whales) provides one of the best viewing platforms in the world. Many tourists use Ceduna as the major base for visiting the whales and this is continuing to develop especially with bus tours and flights. The sealing of the runway 11-29 at the Ceduna Airport will allow for better access to the town by bigger planes. Ceduna is dependent on the sustainability, further diversification and growth of these existing industries. Encouraging the development and investment of new industries and business to the town and region will provide a range of opportunities for the community and this in turn can only assist in the prevention of the population drift away from the town and region. A brief demographic profile of the Council area is: - Population: 3559 Out Of Districts: 738 Under Age 15: 25.2% Out Of Districts: 23.6% Over Age 65: 9.3% Out Of Districts: 6.5% Aboriginal Descent: 22.4% Out Of Districts: 34.4% Size (Area): 5431sq Kms Roads: 1712kms 46
  12. 12. APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF CEDUNA CASE STUDY Ceduna Strategic Planning Methodology Stage Description Method Who’s Involved 1 Project The Elected Members and staff were given a detailed • presentation to • consultant Initiation presentation by the Consultant and afforded the Elected Members opportunity to comment. The presentation included a • information session • consultant description of the conceptual model that was utilised in to senior staff the preparation of the plan and overviewed in detail the • open letter to all • consultant/CEO process that would be utilised to develop it. Roles, staff responsibilities of Elected Members, staff and the community were outlined in detail. The development of the plan was discussed in the light of the current Federal, State and Regional agendas affecting the rural sector. The presentation and discussion format enabled a clear picture to be presented to Councils and expectations arising from the strategic planning process to be clarified. The importance of community and other key stakeholders input was highlighted during this session. 2 Initial Ceduna decided not to undertake formal public • residents • Corporate Consultation meetings due to the large amount of consultation questionnaires Services Manager being undertaken on boundary and other issues. • letters and surveys • CEO/Mayor The response to a community questionnaire was to key business and significant and the quality of the information good. community groups All data obtained through consultation was entered into • staff workshop • Consultant a database and then summarised for input into the involving cross process. section of employees 3 Intensive The Ceduna workshop held at Streaky Bay over two • Analysis of today’s • Elected Members Workshop days was a very positive event and provided a good environment and staff opportunity to talk through a diverse range of strategic • Vision and Mission (facilitated by and operational issues. • Core Values consultant) The workshop Involved all Elected Members and senior • Analysis of the staff and provided the framework for the development internal and of the plan. external Community consultation information was utilised during environment the workshop sessions. • Establishment of The utilisation of professional facilitation was a core objectives significant benefit during this process. • Formulation of strategies • Plenary Session 47
  13. 13. APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF CEDUNA CASE STUDY 4 Strategy and The development of strategies continued the process • refine workshop • Management Action Plan started in stage three. Sessions were held over a two- strategies Team/consultant Development day period because of the distance involved in • undertake research travelling by the Consultant. Individual managers were as required given responsibility for specific objectives and assisted • undertake strategy in formulating draft actions. These draft action plans development with were discussed as a management team and alterations consultant made. • formulate action Allocation of resources, responsibilities, priorities and planning templates timeframes were then made to action plans. • develop actions • allocate priorities • estimate costs • allocate responsibility • allocate time frames 5 Draft Plan Extensive discussion on the presentation format of the • discuss Management Format plan was undertaken. The Council strongly believed presentation options team/consultant that the strategic plan should be a professionally • undertake costing presented document and also facilitate easy updates as • prepare final draft the strategic plan is implemented. • distribute to key stakeholders The strategic plan enables regular updates to be • make amendments inserted and easily adapted to the management process. 6 Final The draft report was circulated to key stakeholders and • Prepare covering Management team agencies for comment. Public display of the plan was letter undertaken. Alterations to the plan occurred after • Distribute plan Community assessing all comments received from the final • Document consultation process. comments Consultation • Alter strategic plan 7 Marketing The Council strategically linked the plan to an • Prepare marketing Management team integrated marketing plan for the area. plan The development of associated marketing material • Develop marketing using internal resources included a video and area tools capability Statement linked to promote the council area. • Coordinate launch The graphic design and production of the strategic plan was of professional standard. The launch of the plan was comprehensively undertaken and well supported by local media. A specially designed “launch” flier was a major feature. 48
  14. 14. APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF CEDUNA CASE STUDY Conclusions/Hints Consultation and Consideration of Regional, State and National Policy/Strategies The new Local Government Act 1999, will require Council to indicate the extent to which it has participated with and given consideration to regional, State and National objectives and strategies when developing strategic management plans. Whilst this is a new provision to be completed by 2002, the District Council of Ceduna did give consideration to this issue. Marketing the plan to all key stakeholders is important if acceptance of the strategic plan is to be achieved. Effective marketing of Council’s plan achieved a number of positive outcomes: • Increased profile of council to key stakeholders and decision makers • assisted in positioning council for increased grants • marketed the area for new and expanding business • increased pride and morale of staff • increased confidence of community in the council Resources should be allocated to producing a professional document that can be marketed through a range of mechanisms including an official launch, media and local community groups. A well-marketed strategic plan is an effective management tool to influence key decision-makers. The marketing of Ceduna’s strategic plan is a feature of this case study. 36
  15. 15. APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF KAPUNDA AND LIGHT CASE STUDY THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF KAPUNDA AND LIGHT The District Council of Kapunda and Light This Case Study has been prepared by the Council in collaboration with the Consultant. Project Description: Development of new Strategic Plan with Action Plans Aims for the Project: To develop a best practice strategic plan with linkages to financial and budget processes and with strong accountability for implementation. Contact Person: Geoff Sheridan Phone 8566 2101 Consultant assisting: Joe Collins Collins Anderson Management Governance: 11 Elected Members Council Profile: The District Council of Kapunda and Light was formed from the merger of the District Council of Kapunda and the District Council of Light in 1996. The Council’s southern boundary is 45 kilometres north of Adelaide with the district boundaries bordered by the Barossa, Mallala, Gawler, Mid Murray and Clare and Gilbert Valleys Councils. The total area is 1,274 square kilometres. The major townships located within the district are Kapunda, Freeling, Greenock, Roseworthy, Wasleys and Hewett. The Council is represented by a Mayor and ten Councillors and has a population of approximately 9,900. Annual revenue is approximately $7 million. The principal office of the Council is located in Kapunda with a branch office in Freeling. The Freeling office accommodates the Environmental Services and Works and Technical Services. The Council is faced with some enormous challenges due to booming economic growth, primarily in viticulture, along with significant growth in tourism, light industry and an expanding agricultural base. 50
  16. 16. APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF KAPUNDA AND LIGHT CASE STUDY The developmental pressures include new winery applications, vegetable processing plants, an export abattoir, SACBH doubling the size of silos and Roseworthy, the new $28 million All Seasons Barossa Valley Resort and a significant increase in new dwelling applications. The accessibility to metropolitan Adelaide and relatively cheap residential land has resulted in the Council area having a growth in population. This new development is creating huge demands on an already poor physical infrastructure. The development of the Strategic Plan has provided an opportunity for Council to prioritise its actions to meet these demands, whilst maintaining the rural lifestyle and heritage of the area. Following amalgamation, the initial draft Strategic Plan provided the foundation for developing the Organisational Structure of Council. The senior management positions were called for and filled to meet the directions identified in the Strategic Plan. The draft plan has been reviewed and adopted and now provides for the enhanced provision of services by increasing human physical and financial resources and will provide an increased capacity and opportunity for the improvement of productivity and innovation. The District Council of Kapunda and Light is currently developing a more formal five year strategic financial plan that will comprehensively detail goals, strategies and actions which will be fully costed and included in Council’s Five Year Financial Plan. 51
  17. 17. APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF KAPUNDA AND LIGHT CASE STUDY Kapunda and Light Strategic Planning Methodology Stage Description Method Who’s Involved 1 Project Initiation An overview of the process was presented in • Written overview to • Consultant written format to the Council and verbally to CEO the CEO by the Consultant. The CEO briefed • Executive briefing • CEO the full Council and Management team on the • agenda item to full requirements of an effective strategic planing Council process. • information session to staff It was considered important to ensure that Elected Members and staff understood the theory behind strategic planning and how the Council was going to develop the plan. 2 Initial The DC of Kapunda & Light’s strategic • Analyse existing • CEO Consultation planning process was commenced in community consultation November 1997. This followed extensive information consultation arising from the amalgamation • Send letters and debate in the region. It was felt that information surveys to key business obtained through this consultation process and community groups would be suitable for use in the preparation of • Summarise community the strategic plan. information from surveys and letters As a result of the strategic plan development the Council has implemented a comprehensive policy re consultation on key community issues. Letters and surveys were sent to key business and community groups seeking additional comment. 3 Intensive A one-day workshop was undertaken. The • Analysis of today’s • Elected Members Workshop workshop provided a valuable opportunity for environment and staff the senior management team and Elected • Vision and Mission (facilitated by Members to work together on the plan. Whilst • Core Values consultant) the workshop sessions were streamlined due • Analysis of the internal to time constraints the benefits derived from and external the sessions were significant to the success of environment the plan. • Establishment of core objectives • Formulation of strategies • Plenary Session 4 Strategy The development of strategies continued the • refine workshop • Consultant Development process started in stage 3. strategies Research on key strategies was undertaken by • undertake research as • CEO/Management the CEO and management team, these required Team strategies were then integrated into the final • undertake strategy • CEO/Consultant draft of the strategic plan. development with consultant 52
  18. 18. APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF KAPUNDA AND LIGHT CASE STUDY Stage Description Method Who’s Involved 5 Action Planning The CEO, Management Team and Consultant • formulate action • CEO/ developed action plans. planning templates Management team/ The action plans described how the strategic • develop actions consultant plan is to be implemented. • allocate priorities Action plans included resources, • estimate costs responsibilities, priorities and timeframes. • allocate responsibility • allocate time frames 6 Staff A presentation of the draft plan was made to • present plan • Consultant/CEO Presentation all staff and comments received. • gain input • make changes 7 Draft Plan The format of the draft plan, whilst a superficial • discuss presentation • CEO/Consultant Format requirement was considered an important options element because how people react to the plan • undertake costing will depend on the presentation and marketing • prepare final draft of the document. • distribute to key stakeholders • make amendments 8 Marketing A newsletter was professionally produced for • prepare articles • Corporate Services the community and key stakeholders. • design newsletter Manager & • distribute newsletter Librarian 53
  19. 19. APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF KAPUNDA AND LIGHT CASE STUDY Conclusion/Hints Consultation and Consideration of Regional, State and National Policy/ Strategies The new Local Government Act 1999, will require Council to indicate the extent to which it has participated with and given consideration to regional, State and National objectives and strategies when developing strategic management plans. Whilst this is a new provision to be completed by 2002, the District Council of Kapunda and Light did give consideration to this issue. The Strategic Plan must be part of an “holistic” planning process. Planning in its broadest context was considered a critical element for success. The Strategic Plan was considered to be the pivotal document from which business and operational planning falls out. A strategic planning process should not be commenced unless there is clear documentation of the total planning process and clarification of the linkages between all the elements. Unless it is clearly identified how outcomes from the Strategic Planning process can flow into the operation of the Council there will be little impact on the organisation. The strategic plan should link into the business and operational planning process. The Kapunda & Light Strategic Plan has been integrated into the financial management processes of Council. Monthly financial updates are being presented to Council and the outcomes of the plan are closely linked to the annual budget and 5 year financial planning process. Accountability for implementation and measuring of performance will ensure the maximum gain from the plan. Perhaps the most important element in the strategic planning process is the facilitation of its implementation. The allocation of responsibilities to key staff is essential. Implementation of the strategic plan should be linked directly to performance appraisal and management systems. Ongoing reviews and alteration of the plan is required to ensure its ongoing relevance. The update of the plan should be an integral component of the Council’s management process. Once produced and responsibilities assigned, key staff members should be required not only to implement but to continuously review and alter the plan. Elected Members input should occur at least every 6 months. Individual managers should be responsible for the coordination of specific goals across the organisation. 54
  20. 20. APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF KAPUNDA AND LIGHT CASE STUDY District Council of Mount Remarkable This Case Study has been prepared by the Council in collaboration with the Consultant Project Description: Development of a new Strategic Plan with Action Plans Aims for the Project: To state the vision of Council, its community and its future direction and the strategies to achieve this over the next 5 years. Contact Person: Phyllis Robinson Phone 8666 2014 Email pfr@mtr.sa.gov.au Consultant assisting: Joe Collins Collins Anderson Management Governance: 9 Elected Members Council Profile: The area of the District Council of Mount Remarkable is located in the Southern Flinders Ranges of South Australia. Some of the most spectacular scenery, views, lookouts, gullies, gorges and sheer rockfaces within the Ranges are located in the Council area. Complimenting this locality, the Council borders the upper reaches of the Spencer Gulf and encompasses the broad Willochra plain with the Flinders Ranges as the natural backdrop/spine of the Council area. The large River Red Gums which line the many creeks and the vast array of other types of eucalypts and native vegetation are a feature of district. National Parks located in the area are principal tourist attractions. The Mount Remarkable National Park, which includes Alligator Gorge and Mambray Creek together with the Mount Brown National Park and the Telowie Gorge Conservation Park, are of particular interest. Both the Heysen and Mawson Trails pass through the area. The Main North Road and National Highway One traverse the Council area from 50
  21. 21. APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF KAPUNDA AND LIGHT CASE STUDY North to South and the main traffic link between the Eastern States of Australia with the West linking Broken Hill/Perth also passes through the district. The scenic Horrocks Pass and Port Germein Gorge provide the principal traffic routes through the spine of the Ranges to Port Augusta and Port Pirie. The township of Melrose at the foot of Mount Remarkable is the oldest town in the Flinders Ranges and is the location of the Council Office. History abounds in this town wherever you turn and the local National Trust Museum, located in the former Police Station and Court House, helps the visitor understand the story of the development of the district. Other towns located within the Council area include: • Wilmington - once called Beautiful Valley, is the home of the first Night Rodeo ever held in South Australia. • Wirrabara - the picturesque area surrounding the town includes a pine forest and fruit orchards and abundant bird life. • Booleroo Centre - is the hub of a rich agricultural area but by far the greatest attraction is the State’s largest display of Stationary Engines. 150 perfectly preserved machines can be seen at the Booleroo Steam and Traction Preservation Society Museum. • Port Germein - located on Spencer Gulf, features the longest wooden jetty in the southern hemisphere and was once 1.7 kilometres in length. The jetty has recently been repaired but not to its entire original length. Additional smaller towns and settlements throughout the area include Appila, Mambray Creek, Murray Town, Willowie, Hammond and Bruce. With a Mediterranean climate and a large variance in rainfall - 650mm within the Wirrabara forest to 320mm in the north - the agricultural enterprises are diverse. Cereal crops of wheat, barley, oats, peas, beans, lupins and canola are grown along with sheep for meat and wool and cattle grazing. Small pockets of apiarists, fruit orchards and intensive forestry are located in the southern portion of the Council area. Intensive animal keeping in the form of piggeries and poultry batteries together with sheep and cattle feedlots are located throughout the area. New horticultural industries including vineyards and olive orchards are developing. There is significant potential to expand the tourism industry and the enhancement of visitor attractions is one of the districts principal challenges for the future. The district is uniquely placed in that it offers peace, tranquillity and scenic beauty and is in close proximity to the provincial cities of Port Augusta and Port Pirie. These centres provide employment, shopping and entertainment creating a ‘best of both worlds’ lifestyle for our residents. The Council covers an extensive area of 3,422 sq kilometres, has a population of over 3,000 people and maintains over 2,000 kilometres of unsealed roads. Total revenue is approximately $2,000,000 with rates representing 40% of the income. Council employs a total of 17 staff which includes 11 outside workers. The District Council of Mount Remarkable was formed in July 1980 with the amalgamation of the District Councils of Wilmington and Port Germein. The Council area is divided into four wards that represent communities of interest formed because of topographical features and road networks. It has taken many years to develop a cohesive and united community that has a sense of ownership of the Council district. 51
  22. 22. APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF KAPUNDA AND LIGHT CASE STUDY However, through the consultative processes that have been developed by the Council, the community now has a strong commitment to ensuring the continuation of the Council as it stands today. 52
  23. 23. APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF KAPUNDA AND LIGHT CASE STUDY Mount Remarkable Strategic Planning Methodology Stage Description Method Who’s Involved 1 Project Initiation The Elected Members and staff were given a • presentation to • Consultant detailed presentation by the Consultant and Elected Members afforded the opportunity to comment. The • information session to • Consultant presentation included a description of the senior staff conceptual model that was utilised in the • open letter to all staff • CEO preparation of the plan and overviewed in detail the process that would be utilised to develop it. Roles, responsibilities of Elected Members, staff and the community were outlined in detail. The development of the plan was discussed in the light of the current Federal, State and Regional agendas affecting the rural sector. The presentation and discussion format enabled a clear picture to be presented to Council and expectations arising from the strategic planning process to be clarified. The importance of community and other key stakeholder input was highlighted during this session. It was considered important to the process for Elected Members and staff to be aware of their roles in the development of the strategic plan. 2 Initial Mount Remarkable undertook a comprehensive • Public • Chairman, Consultation process that not only obtained important data for meetings/workshops CEO, and the planning process but achieved considerable • Resident/Ratepayer Consultant goodwill through the small community. Public questionnaires • CEO and meetings were of a workshop nature designed to • Letters and surveys Admin integrate into the planning process. The public to key business and Officer “workshops” were also integrated into the review community groups of the development plan (PAR) and reduced • staff workshop • Consultant considerable duplication. involving cross All data obtained through consultation was section of employees entered into a database and then summarised for utilisation in developing the plan and distributed to Elected Members. 3 Intensive The two-day workshop involved all Elected • Analysis of today’s • Elected Workshop Members and senior staff. Held off site on a environment Members Saturday and Sunday it provided the framework • Vision and Mission and staff for the development of the plan. Consideration • Core Values (facilitated by was given to regional, state and national • Analysis of the consultant) objectives and strategies, where relevant to internal and external Council’s strategic plan. Data received through environment the community consultation was fed into various • Establishment of core sessions over the two days. The workshop was objectives specifically designed to develop teamwork, • Formulation of leadership and ownership of the plan. strategies • Plenary Session 53
  24. 24. APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF KAPUNDA AND LIGHT CASE STUDY Stage Description Method Who’s Involved 4 Strategy The development of strategies continued the • refine workshop • Consultant Development process started in stage three. Further research strategies on key strategies was undertaken by the CEO • undertake research • CEO and and Admin Officer and new strategies identified. as required Admin The consultant and CEO worked together to • undertake strategy Officer finalise the strategies. development with consultant • CEO and Consultant 5 Performance Performance indicators were developed linked to • Highlight high priority • CEO and Indicators key outcomes of the plan. Approximately 40 outcomes Consultant quantitative and qualitative indicators were • develop indicators identified by the CEO and consultant. that if achieved will • CEO and result in successful Consultant implementation of the plan 6 Action Planning Action plans were developed incorporating • Formulate action • CEO, timeframes, responsibilities and resources which planning templates Admin clearly identified an implementation process • develop actions Officer and involving all levels of staff. • allocate priorities Consultant • estimate costs • allocate responsibility • allocate time frames 7 Draft Plan The consultant prepared a draft format for • discuss presentation • CEO, Format consideration by senior management. options Admin • undertake costing Officer and The format of the draft plan, whilst a superficial • prepare final draft Consultant requirement was seen as an important element. • distribute to key Council considered it was important to see how stakeholders people would react to the plan as this would • make amendments influence how it was presented and marketed . 8 Final Community An extensive final community consultation stage • direct mail to • CEO, Consultation was undertaken. There was however, little community Admin request for alteration to the plan. • media release to Officer and local press Consultant • display at Council office and library • agenda item to Council 9 Marketing The resources available influenced the extent of • designed marketing • CEO and marketing undertaken, however, the Council plan Admin utilised a number of mechanisms to market their • develop timetable Officer achievement including local press and radio, • implement marketing community groups and Council’s community plan newsletter. A launch involving all Council staff, Elected Members and key stakeholders was undertaken and associated with a social activity. 54
  25. 25. APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF KAPUNDA AND LIGHT CASE STUDY Conclusions/ Hints Consultation and Consideration of Regional, State and National Policy/Strategies The new Local Government Act 1999, will require Council to indicate the extent to which it has participated with and given consideration to regional, State and National objectives and strategies when developing strategic management plans. Whilst this is a new provision to be completed by 2002, the District Council of Mount Remarkable did give consideration to this issue. During the preparation of the strategic plan the District Council of Mt Remarkable consulted in writing with PIRSA, PIRSA Forestry, National Parks, Port Pirie Regional Economic Development Board and the Coast Protection Board. Discussions were also held with adjoining Councils on the planning process. Generally these external parties provided an issues based response when sought, but there was no obvious coherent set of policies and strategies. Council ensured they did not conflict with the State Development Plan and Mount Remarkable National Park Management Plan and researched federal grant programs and policies prior to determining their strategic plan. The Council intends to coordinate service delivery with external agencies in so far as their objectives agree. The consultation process did unearth some issues where Councils preferred method of service delivery will conflict with state agencies (ie burning rubbish dumps). You can never “over” consult the community Not only is the consultation process an excellent opportunity to interface with the community it results in reinforcing the important elements of the plan. It is unwise to presume that “we know what the community wants”. Council felt it should not just rely on one or two communication mechanisms to achieve community input. Consideration of at least three of the following provided a much broader base for consultation: • market research eg. telephone surveys • informal focus groups (having a good cross section of the community is important) • individual meetings with a range of key stakeholders eg. MPs, private industry, business groups, government agencies, service providers • written letter to key stakeholders • public meetings across the Council area • community newsletter • local paper, radio and television • personalised letter to residents • questionnaires widely distributed - ratepayers/electors/residents 55
  26. 26. APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF KAPUNDA AND LIGHT CASE STUDY Naturally the more extensive the consultation the more time and resources are to be committed by Council to the preparation of the strategic plan, nevertheless if the process is done correctly it can achieve a number of positive outcomes: • reinforce and shape the vision of Council • clearly support high level goals and objectives • highlight lower level outcomes to be incorporated into the planning process • market the Council as progressive and forward looking A team approach to development involving Elected Members and management will result in the best product Elected Members play an important role not only for the formation of policy but for establishing the strategic framework from which policy is based. The Strategic Plan must have initial and ongoing input. It should not be seen as another management document. Political ownership is essential. The Mount Remarkable case study clearly showed that even those Elected Members sceptical of strategic planning appreciated the chance to participate and give input. It is important to clearly plan for Elected Members’ input at various stages of the planning process. In particular involvement in workshops, public meetings and focus groups. The establishment of a strategic planning steering committee including Elected Member representation ensured ongoing political ownership. A well planned weekend workshop was held off site at Port Augusta which was very successful in achieving teamwork between management and Elected Members and ensured ownership and commitment to the outcomes. They jointly developed the vision, mission, core values, major objectives and key strategies. A successful strategic planning process should incorporate quality time for Elected Members and management to have open and frank discussion concerning the future of their community. It won’t work without the Council leaders driving the process The Chairman, CEO and the Administration Officer were key drivers of the process and, whilst taking advice and guidance from the consultant, owned the process. Their strong involvement ensured a successful outcome. Strategic Planning is a good instrument to initiate change directly or indirectly. Elected Members and senior staff looked to the Chairman and CEO for leadership and corporate direction. If the CEO is not inspired to drive and have input the strategic planning process quickly looses its effectiveness through the organisational structure, then middle management might see it as another task they have to do rather than the blue print for change. 56
  27. 27. APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF KAPUNDA AND LIGHT CASE STUDY Mount Remarkable’s committed approach highlighted the importance of strong leadership in the process. Allocate time and resources in achieving the high priority strategies A common concern in the strategic planning process was the time and resources required for implementation. The prioritising of strategies and actions was important in ensuring the “big ticket “ items were achieved. Implementation and Linkages Regular updates on the Strategic Plan are being presented to Council and the meeting agendas and minute books now refer to the appropriate strategy and action plan numbers. Council’s budget has also been linked and cross-referenced to the Strategic Plan ensuring integration in the day to day management of Council. 57
  28. 28. APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT CITY OF ONKAPARINGA CASE STUDY City of Onkaparinga This Case Study has been prepared by the City of Onkaparinga. Project Description: Framework to Link Service Delivery to Business and Strategic Planning. Aims for the Project: The City of Onkaparinga sought to identify and/or create a strategic framework that would link service delivery to business and strategic planning. A conceptual framework was developed and revised in- house. It identified and addressed the relevant components and their linkages. The linkages between the component parts, as envisaged by the strategic framework, needed to be created. To this end, the funds from the LGA Strategic Planning Project examined the application of the Outcome-Output model widely utilised in New Zealand and State and Federal Government agencies. This model purported to link policy or strategic outcomes to business planning outputs. Development of the City of Onkaparinga’s first strategic directions and the evolution of its business planning processes (namely business plans, the budget process, long term financial directions and a corporate directions document) were follow-on initiatives. As all these matters are heavily interrelated, the bounds of the LGA Strategic Planning Project quickly fused with the other strategic initiatives occurring within the organisation. Contact Person: Debra Just Phone 8384 0666 Email debjus@onkaparinga.sa.gov.au Consultant assisting This project was managed and undertaken in-house Governance: 20 Councillors plus Mayor 62
  29. 29. APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT CITY OF ONKAPARINGA CASE STUDY Council Profile The City of Onkaparinga was incorporated on 1 July 1997 following the amalgamation of the whole of the former Cities of Happy Valley and Noarlunga and part of the District Council of Willunga. It is South Australia’s largest Local Government entity with a population of approximately 147,000 persons and also encompassing an area of 518 square kilometres. The City of Onkaparinga straddles the rural/urban fringe located to the south of Adelaide CBD. (Figure 1). Its terrain, land uses and socio-demographic profile are very diverse. The amalgamation of the three Councils brought together, for example, areas that had consistently recorded the lowest level of unemployment with those which recorded high levels. It blended rural, industrial and residential land uses, a large regional centre and a number of rural townships. It encompassed the young family profile of new and developing suburbs, older families and couples from mature suburbs and aged persons clustered in some long-established suburbs, rural and coastal settlements. The western boundary of the City of Onkaparinga is marked by 35 kilometres of unique and varied coastline with open beaches, reefs, dunes and cliff formations. The coastline stretches from O’Sullivan Beach in the north to Sellicks in the south. Extending inland from the coast are undulating plains which rise up to the foothills of the southern Mount Lofty Ranges, the latter forming the Council’s eastern boundary. The Onkaparinga River bisects the area as it meanders through the central plains to meet the coast at Port Noarlunga. Other rivers, namely the Sturt and Field Rivers, define the northern extent of the City. (Figure 1). Council and Administration Profile: The Council has an annual budget of around $70M with 59% derived from rate revenue. Significant expenditure occurs in the areas of economic development, job creation and tourism; environmental projects (recycling, wetlands, effluent disposal); area beautification (main streets, townships, industrial precincts); heritage conservation (an incentive scheme, advisory service, aboriginal cultural heritage survey); road works; technological upgrades and service delivery. The Elected Council consists of a Mayor and 20 Councillors. The Mayor is elected at large and the Councillors are elected from nine wards. In May 2000, following the second Council election to be held for the City of Onkaparinga, an electoral review will be conducted. As part of the efficiencies proposed in the amalgamation plan, it was envisaged that staff numbers would be reduced from approximately 550 to 500 FTE’s within a period of three years. That process is on track. The initial structure for the organisation was revisited within two years of the amalgamation and resulted in a “flatter” structure. In essence, the structure reflects a grouping of like functions without utilising a hard purchaser provider model. The three functional groupings (of the six departments) are: • Corporate Support, including human resource management, contracts and specifications, organisational development (including business planning and continuous improvement), media relations and publications, governance, information technology, records and finance. 63
  30. 30. APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT CITY OF ONKAPARINGA CASE STUDY • Strategy and Development, incorporating areas such as strategic planning, policy formulation, area planning, economic development, infrastructure design, asset and major project management. • Service Delivery, encompassing the functions of customer and community services, libraries, development services, health and regulatory services, environmental projects, waste and recycling, infrastructure construction and maintenance. An important feature of the restructure is the creation of cross functional groups with a strategic (rather than project) role. The Chairs of these groups will combine with the Senior Management Team to form the Strategic Advisory Group. Because of the sizeable emphasis that existed within the structure, and consequently the associated in-house skills, the City of Onkaparinga has developed much of its strategic planning processes internally. It continued to do so in relation to the LGA Strategic Planning Project, rather than to take up the option of utilising the resources of external consultants. Forces for Change As a newly amalgamated entity, with increased geographic area and the accompanying diversity of issues and aspirations, the task for the Council was to create strategic directions for the region’s future that could be shared by the newly combined communities. There was a sense of urgency that this should be done as soon as possible following amalgamation. In addition, the business planning processes of the administration needed to respond to these new strategic priorities and to reflect this in resource allocations and business plans. The challenge was to tie the day-to-day business to a desired future. The approach has been one of “learning by doing”; exploring existing models and formats but eventually resulted in the development of a “home-grown” product tailored to the City’s needs rather than using an “off the shelf” solution. Knowledge has grown in an incremental fashion and the process has been iterative. Project Methodology Strategic Framework The Strategic Framework indicates that the strategic processes are the starting point in the chain which flows through to business planning and service delivery (Figure 2). To make the Framework more legible, simple headings were used to group components with similar functional outcomes; namely: Set the direction Decide what to do Plan how to do it Do it The component groupings articulated the role each element played as well as the desired sequence. For example, business plans should translate the strategic directions into actions through projects and programs and be prepared in advance of the budget process. In this way, the budget begins to reflect the strategic directions. The sequencing of the relevant components can also then be presented as a Gantt Chart. (Figure 6). 64
  31. 31. APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT CITY OF ONKAPARINGA CASE STUDY By way of an example, the service of road maintenance within the City of Onkaparinga, can respond to the strategic direction of “enhancing economic development” by redirecting resources within the relevant budget line to the wine districts and the other prime tourist destinations such as the coast. The long-term financial directions provide a tool for ensuring not just the long term viability of the Council, but also the increasing re-direction of resources to achieve longer term strategic objectives and directions. Strategic Directions The City’s first strategic directions document was launched in October 1998, some 15 months after the amalgamation and less than one year after the appointment of the relevant staff. The parameters for developing the City’s strategic directions included: • the desire to actively create a more desirable future • recognition of the context within which Local Government was operating while not being constrained by it • knowledge of existing circumstances and future trends • the premise that the plan would set broad directions for a preferred future with some example strategies, but that the strategies would be more fully articulated in the annual business plans • a consultation mechanism which recognised the extensive level of consultation previously undertaken within the existing communities; and • a format that engaged public interest and was widely distributed. The steps in the preparation of the Strategic Directions document are outlined in Figure 3 and were: • establishing the context through a trend and SWOT analysis. It identified influences upon Council and the community at global, national, state and local levels together with emerging trends and paradigms shifts in the way Councils operated. This was a critical process to undertake as such information may not emerge from dialogue with the community. It is the element that specialists are required to develop to blend with broader community input. • utilising existing knowledge through the review of former Councils’ studies which had been subjected to consultation (some 50 in number); statistics regarding the area and contained within the City’s Statistical Bulletin and Social Atlas; community views expressed at Forums, in requests and complaints and from Elected Members’ local knowledge. Local Members of Parliament also contributed their knowledge through the Southern Partnership forum. The Southern Partnership is a bipartisan action group of state and federal Members of Parliament and highly regarded members of the community committed to progressing the south. 65
  32. 32. APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT CITY OF ONKAPARINGA CASE STUDY • workshops for Elected Members. The use of Special Meetings of Council, during which the standing orders were suspended to facilitate workshops on specific issues, was a process adopted early in the life of the City of Onkaparinga and has continued throughout its short history with between one and three such workshops being held most months. The workshops have proved to be immensely valuable for developing a sound understanding of complex matters and for articulating the views of all Elected Members. They promote a cooperative, rather than adversarial, style of decision making. At one workshop, the Elected Members utilised a visioning exercise to assist them to articulate a preferred future for the City. As it is impossible to know what events, technologies and values will influence successive generations, it is extremely difficult to articulate a single preferred future or vision. Instead, the workshop established commonly desired characteristics, namely prosperity, vitality and pride; especially pride in the area’s diversity. These characteristics, while broad, were able to be translated into actioning strategies such as those outlined in Creating our Future. The visioning exercise also provided insight into undesirable legacies for future generations that the subsequent strategies sought to eliminate or redress. Recurrent themes included avoidance of economic depression, environmental degradation and social inequities. The process utilised avoided the production of a slogan that would be difficult to act upon. • consultation, including pre-publication consultation on the content and format with staff and Elected Members and post-publication community consultation, primarily through the questionnaire. This approach of seeking consultation on a draft document contrasted with the approach taken to many other planning initiatives in the City where community consultation forms a basis of the information gathering phase prior to the preparation of a plan. The latter approach works well in area planning, theme or issue based situations. The reasons for the post-publication public consultation process related to the extensive nature of prior community consultation and the need to prepare a plan as a matter of priority to guide the new Council and the City of Onkaparinga. • preparation of the strategic directions document, Creating our Future in a format that engaged public interest and was widely distributed. This led to a brief, four-page broadsheet format which utilised full colour, photographs and an annotated map. The broadsheet formed the centrespread of Council’s community newspaper that is distributed to every household. Additional copies were delivered to businesses and placed in Council offices and other community facilities. A questionnaire was enclosed for responses and resulted in an unusually high rate of return for a strategic document and overwhelmingly positive responses for the strategic directions articulated. This format has subsequently been replicated by at least one other Council. Business and Annual Budget Planning The City of Onkaparinga has produced three business plans and annual budgets since amalgamation (Figure 4). The first business plan was prepared for the 6 month period immediately post staff placements in December 1997 to cover the remainder of that financial year. It was necessary to ensure that services continued to flow while the organisation grappled with the immediate post-amalgamation combinations of different systems, policies, procedures and organisational cultures. Two business planning processes have occurred since with the formats of the associated templates and guidelines documents changing in response to the organisation’s increasing knowledge of the relationships between strategic 66
  33. 33. APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT CITY OF ONKAPARINGA CASE STUDY and budgetary processes. The plans have been developed at the service unit level and have become simpler and less expansive through the revision process. The 1997 decision to utilise a system of templates and instructional guidelines reflected a desire to devolve the responsibility for compiling business plans to the appropriate service area while retaining a uniform format which aligned strategic, budgetary and business goals. The first budget (1997/1998) was produced as an amalgam of individual budgets set for each of the three former Councils. As such, the 1998/1999 budget was the first produced for the City of Onkaparinga as a new entity per se. In the absence of a strategic plan, the 1998/1999 budget was guided by a Major Trend and Influences analysis which concluded with a translation of those factors into budget priorities (Figure 7). For the 1999/2000 budget, the strategic directions were encapsulated in Creating our Future and budget bids were assessed for compliance with those directions through a criteria checklist and budget commentaries . Workshops were used to align the annual budget and long term financial plan to the strategic directions. The programs, projects and services that related to each of the strategic directions were grouped together under broad headings. (Refer to example of working tear sheet hereafter). Working in small groups, Elected Members identified what they believed should happen to the funding levels over the next three years for each of these strategic groups. This was done in a simple qualitative manner through the use of arrows indicating an increase in resources, a decrease or a static situation. In addition, those programs that should be reviewed for funding in a manner other than Council rates eg co-funding, grants, private investment etc, were identified. In the process of developing the draft 1999/2000 budget and attaching figures to the programs, a comparison of the dollars value of those proposals was made with the previous budget (1998/99) and checked against the direction arrows from the aforementioned exercise. The time horizon was subsequently extended to 5 years. Strategic Directions Groupings Direction Dollars Potential Budget Priorities 1999/00 2000/01 2001/02 1989/99 1999/00 Funding 1 Local employment opportunities $901,296 $720,600 (eg employment programs, traineeships, apprenticeships etc) 2 Local business support $328,500 $330,500 (eg BEC, Exporters Club, Business Association Support 4 Tourism/events/festivals $432,000 $815,200 (eg Visitors Centre, Fleurieu Marketing Board, tourism promotion, special events, Year 2000, caravan parks, car parks, public toilets etc) 5 Main Street Programs $683,937 $975,500 (eg Beach Road, McLaren Vale) 6 Road construction – wine areas $0 $300,000 (recommendation from wine industry needs audit) 7 Road construction – general $3,739,448 $1,766,500 Road construction - coastal $0 $956,000 etc = external funding 67
  34. 34. APPROACHES TO STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT CITY OF ONKAPARINGA CASE STUDY A separate exercise was also conducted employing different coloured dots to hone in on the top 5 groupings which Elected Members believed should be funded as a matter of priority together with the lowest five. This exercise sought to establish where funding could be redirected from in order to resource the top priorities. In preparation at present are Corporate Directions, and 5-year Financial Directions. The former will identify the major corporate (administrative) challenges, the desired future directions and strategies to achieve them. These initiatives will place annual business and budget planning processes within a longer-term context. Creating the Linkages between Strategic and Business Planning To create the linkages between strategic directions and the business plans, the Outcome- Output model was reviewed. The process involved research by Strategy and Policy staff, including interviews with practitioners, with the findings being the subject of Senior Management Team briefings and workshops. In summary, the model links the desired results (outcomes) articulated by those with responsibility for policy setting (Council, cabinet) with the goods and services (outputs) purchased to meet the desired outcomes. The key terms are defined in a public sector setting as follows: • Outcomes – the results government seeks to achieve in order to meet community needs and government priorities. These desired community impacts are articulated by those with responsibility for setting policy directions (eg Council, cabinet, etc). An example of an outcome might be a lowered rate of vandalism. • Outputs – Goods or services which are “purchased” by government in order to help achieve the desired outcome. These are defined by the corporation/administration and usually have the performance dimensions of quantity, quality, time and cost. For example, services utilised to contribute to a lowered rate of vandalism might include policy advice, enforcement of regulations and surveillance services. • Inputs – the resources used to produce goods and services. These can be measured in terms of capital, human resources, equipment, information and time. resources goods or desired used to services community Inputs Outputs Outcomes produce purchased impacts and outputs to meet govt. priorities outcomes Investigations into how the outcome-output model had been applied revealed that is was rarely utilised to define strategic or policy outcomes with the same rigour applied to defining corporate outputs. The desired outcomes for the community tended to be narrowly expressed in terms of the corporation’s area of responsibility rather than a broader measure of impact on the community. 68

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