Strategic Consulting Report

4,095
-1

Published on

Published in: Business
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
4,095
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
142
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Strategic Consulting Report

  1. 1. Strategic Consulting Report Harnessing the potential in The Gambia to foster development through sustainable business Zeenith Ebrahim, Mariah Hartman, Mike Quinn, and Jelka Schlagenhauf    
  2. 2. ABOUT THE AUTHORS  Zeenith  Ebrahim  completed  her  first  degree  at  the  University  of  Cape  Town  focused  on  Finance  and  Accounting.  She  began  her  career  at  Procter  &  Gamble  in  South  Africa  where  she  spent  four  years,  most  recently as a Brand Manager. At the same time, she assisted a start‐up company aimed at uplifting the lives of  artists across the region to market their art internationally.  Zeenith’s passion for development also led her to  work with a local NGO to set up a Southern African network of young  people  advocating  against  exploitation  of  children,  and  go  on  to  represent African youth at a number of local and international forums.  Zeenith  joined  Oxford  University’s  Saïd  Business  School  (SBS)  MBA  Class of 2008 as a recipient of the Nelson Mandela Scholarship, where  she has used her time as a platform to initiate an investment fund for  women entrepreneurs in Southern Africa.   Mariah  Hartman  began  her  marketing  career  in  1996  as  a  Product  Manager  with  CHEMICON  International  after  completing  a  BSc  in  Biology  (with  Honours)  at  the  University  of  California,  Riverside.  In  2000, she joined Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics also as a Product  Manager. During her seven year career there, she was promoted first  to  Senior  Product  Manager  and  then  to  Associate  Director  of  Marketing. She has spent 4 years as participant, mentor, volunteer, and community outreach advocate for the  Leukemia  Lymphoma  Society’s  Team  in  Training  triathlon  group,  personally  raising  over  $20,000.  As  an  avid  athlete  she  has  competed  in  7  half  marathons,  2  marathons,  countless  10K  races,  4  Olympic‐distance  triathlons, 5 half iron‐man triathlons, and 1 Iron Man. After completing her MBA at SBS, Mariah will join Space  Doctors as Senior Account Director to further pursue her passion for marketing.   Mike Quinn held a Skoll Scholarship for Social Entrepreneurship at SBS in 2007‐08 as he completed his MBA  with  Dean’s  List  standing.  He  also  has  an  MSc  in  Development  Management  from  the  London  School  of  Economics, where his dissertation compared agricultural cooperatives with contract farming in Africa. Prior to  studying  in  the  UK,  Mike  spent  16  months  in  Zambia  and  10  months  in  Ghana  implementing  agricultural  commercialization  projects  as  a  volunteer  for  Engineers  Without  Borders  (EWB)  Canada.  He  is  currently  launching  a  non‐profit  venture  company  called  African  Enterprise  Partners,  whose  mission  is  to  "build  agricultural value chains with African entrepreneurs." Mike’s first degree was in Mechanical Engineering from  the University of British Columbia, where he also received the 2006 alumni award for Global Citizenship.  Jelka  Schlagenhauf  grew  up  in  Germany  in  an  entrepreneurial  family  and  has  always  been  interested  in  business, especially how technology can be leveraged to improve people’s lives. She completed a Bachelor’s  degree in Business at the University of Applied Sciences Cologne in 2002 and went on to work in a software  company as a Project Manager focused on the development of new products. It was the chance to set up her  own  business  with  an  ambitious  team  that  made  her  leave  this  position  in  2004.  She  then  became  the  Co‐ Founder  and  Managing  Director  of  nAmbition,  a  nanobiotechnology  company  that  develops  and  sells  molecular analytic research tools globally. Jelka’s other main interest lies in reading and discovering as many  different  topics  as  possible,  ranging  from  historical  biographies  to  multimedia  to  neuroscience.  After  completing her MBA at SBS, Jelka will join a medium‐sized company focused on business development.  2 
  3. 3. TABLE OF CONTENTS  ABOUT THE AUTHORS ........................................................................................................................2  TABLE OF CONTENTS .........................................................................................................................3  LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS....................................................................................................................4  I. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ....................................................................................................................5  II. STRATEGIC CONSULTING PROJECT OVERVIEW........................................................................7  2.1 Background on GiG ......................................................................................................................7  2.2 Key Issues from GiG’s Point of View............................................................................................8  2.3 SCP Objectives and Outputs........................................................................................................9  2.4 Reconciled Objectives and Outputs .............................................................................................9  III. APPROACH....................................................................................................................................10  3.1 The Strategic Visioning Framework............................................................................................10  3.2 Strategic Visioning Workshop.....................................................................................................12  IV. KEY ISSUES ..................................................................................................................................14  4.1 Is GiG a Business or Development Project? ..............................................................................14  4.2 Foreign Dependency ..................................................................................................................15  4.3 Staff Motivation and Integration..................................................................................................15  4.4 Lack of Decision Making Processes and Tools ..........................................................................15  4.5 Sub-Optimal Communication Systems and Processes ..............................................................16  4.6 Seasonality .................................................................................................................................16  V. STRATEGIC RECOMMENDATIONS..............................................................................................17  5.1 Strategy 1: Optimise Local Horticulture Production to Meet Year Round GiG Demand ...18  5.1.1 Production..........................................................................................................................18  Introduce the Contract Manager system ............................................................................... 18  Strategically contract Commercial Private Gardens .............................................................. 21  Involve partner organisations in the CM system.................................................................... 21  Identify strategic uses for GiG Farm...................................................................................... 21  Optimise monthly production planning .................................................................................. 22  Guarantee access to inputs to contracted growers ............................................................... 22  5.1.2 Sales and Marketing..........................................................................................................23  Improve demand planning ..................................................................................................... 23  Use vegetable profitability as a tool for production choices................................................... 24  5.1.3 Human Resources .............................................................................................................24  Introduce PM reporting system.............................................................................................. 24  5.2 Strategy 2: Optimise Operational Effectiveness and Efficiency ..........................................24  5.2.1 Management.......................................................................................................................24  Map communication paths and processes ............................................................................ 24  5.2.2 Production..........................................................................................................................25  Improve effectiveness and efficiency of garden visits ........................................................... 26  Strengthen communication and teamwork ............................................................................ 27  5.2.3 Quality and Stock Control ................................................................................................27  3 
  4. 4. Reduce recorded and unrecorded stock loss ........................................................................ 27  Improve container management............................................................................................ 29  Simplify grading and collection processes............................................................................. 30  5.2.4 Human Resources .............................................................................................................31  Overhaul holiday work policy............................................................................................. 31  5.3 Strategy 3: Build the Right Team with the Right Tools.........................................................31  5.3.1 Production..........................................................................................................................31  Implement production database ............................................................................................ 31  Implement production manager reporting system ................................................................. 32  Create objection handling template ....................................................................................... 32  5.3.2 Human Resources .............................................................................................................32  Develop staff training plan ..................................................................................................... 32  Institutionalise business best practices ................................................................................. 34  Ensure access to basic tools for business success............................................................... 35  Implement performance management system ...................................................................... 35  Create career progression chart............................................................................................ 35  Develop incentive packages.................................................................................................. 38  Make theft deterrent a collective responsibility...................................................................... 38  Build on staff insights............................................................................................................. 38  5.3.3 Sales and Marketing..........................................................................................................39  Use the sales representatives to do more business development work................................ 39  Promote benefit of GiG products to customers ..................................................................... 39  5.3.4 Finance ...............................................................................................................................39  Develop key performance indicators ..................................................................................... 39  Improve reporting and analysis tools..................................................................................... 40  5.4 Strategy 4: Strategically Pursue New Market Opportunities................................................41  Maximise current peak selling months .................................................................................. 41  Maximise off-season selling .................................................................................................. 42  Investigate adjacencies to aid profitability ............................................................................. 42  5.5 Organisational Structure .........................................................................................................43  5.6 Organisational Culture.............................................................................................................46  VI. CONCLUSION................................................................................................................................48        LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS SBS – Saïd Business School  SCP – Strategic Consulting Project  GiG – Gambia is Good  CU – Concern Universal  4 
  5. 5. INGO – International Non‐Governmental Organisation  BLCF – Business Linkages Challenge Fund  MBA – Master’s in Business Administration  DFID – Department for International Development  D – Dalasi  PPO – Peak Performance Organisation  WR – Western Region  NBR – North Bank Region  S&M – Sales and Marketing  HR – Human Resources  QSC – Quality & Stock Control  CPG – Commercial Private Garden  CM – Contract Manager  PM – Production Manager  NATC – Njawara Agricultural Training Centre  BTC – Besse Training Centre  GM – General Manager  QCM – Quality Control Manager  KPI – Key Performance Indicator      I. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  Executive Summary  The  Gambia  currently  ranks  155  out  of  177  on  the  UNDP’s  Human  Development  Index,  with  approximately  60%  of  the  population  living  on  less  than  $1  per  day1,  three  quarters  of  whom  are  engaged  in  agriculture.                                                                    1  UNDP 2007 Human Development Index.  5 
  6. 6. Although  winter  tourism  is  a  major  export,  much  of  the  economic  value  has  historically  been  captured  by  Western‐owned tour operators, airlines and hotels, with few internal linkages and very little trickling down to  local food producers.   Gambia is Good (GiG) is a fresh produce marketing company which was conceived as a partnership between  Concern  Universal  (CU)  and  Haygrove  Ltd,  a  leading  horticultural  SME  based  in  the  UK,  with  the  purpose  of  linking small scale rural producers with the high value tourist market. With CU’s network of local partners and  Haygrove’s commercial acumen, GiG has been able to inspire entrepreneurship at community level and deliver  a marketing service which is of equal value to producers and buyers alike. Since it started trading in 2004, with  seed capital from DFID’s Business Linkages Challenge Fund, the business has come a long way and now collects  from  more  than  1000  farmers,  supplying  20  tonnes  of  produce  per  tourist‐season‐month  to  more  than  40  hotels and restaurants.   However, GiG is at a crossroads.   On  one  hand,  it  is  gaining  international  recognition  as  a  social  enterprise  that  has  catalysed  The  Gambia’s  domestic horticulture sector. Customers have praised GiG for delivering a variety of products that previously  had to be imported from Senegal or abroad, and for improving the overall quality of local produce. Farmers  have benefited from a stable and growing market outlet for their crops and have realised increased incomes  from GiG’s ‘customer‐driven’ business model.   On the other hand, GiG’s current financial situation is one of a fledgling small business. There have only been  two  profitable  months  since  GiG’s  inception,  and  a  budget  shortfall  of  £20k  is  projected  for  2009.  The  hard  reality is that GiG would cease to exist without continued subsidy from foreign stakeholders.  This report seeks to reconcile this contradiction by providing a strategic way forward for GiG to live up to its  promise. It contains a holistic analysis conducted by a team of four Saïd Business School (SBS) MBA Candidates  in July‐August 2008. The result is both an articulation of GiG’s long‐term vision and a blueprint for how it can  meet its short‐term goal of becoming financially self‐sufficient within 18 months.  Achieving  this  goal  is  crucial  for  three  reasons.  First,  financial  independence  is  necessary  for  GiG’s  survival;  without  it,  the  newly  established  shared  vision  will  be  short‐lived.  Second,  it  serves  as  a  challenge  for  all  of  GiG’s key stakeholders to rise above the crowd and demonstrate an innovative social enterprise model to the  world. A profitable GiG would prove not only that a successful business can be built with smallholder farmers  in Africa, but also that it can be run by locally‐sourced and internally‐developed management. Third, it would  inspire  a  new  role  for  SMEs  in  the  industrialised  world  to  drive  local  economic  development  in  the  South.  Haygrove has been a pivotal actor in the development of the business, and a successful exit in the near to mid  future  would  set  a  positive  precedent  for  other  visionary  SME  leaders  who  see  potential  in  similar  partnerships.  With strategic support from both Concern Universal and Haygrove, it is up to the GiG team on the ground to  execute the following six strategic recommendations:  1. Commit to being a business rather than an NGO project: For GiG to become a stand‐alone business,  clear and consistent leadership, communication, and action are required from key leaders and decision  makers, along with changes to GiG’s organisational culture and structure.   6 
  7. 7. 2. Emphasise  the  development  of  local  management:  Local  managers  must  be  provided  with  opportunities to make increasingly important decisions and learn from their mistakes.  3. Motivate local staff to perform: Management must act to foster a team identity, enhance the abilities  of GiG staff to succeed in their jobs, and provide incentives for when they do.  4. Establish clear decision making criteria: Decisions should be based on a set of guiding principles with a  clear focus on profitability.  5. Formalise  and  enforce  critical  processes  and  communication  paths:  Where  informal  processes  and  systems  exist,  they  should  be  documented  and  enforced  by  management;  where  they  do  not,  they  must be established.  6. Enhance  seasonal  differentiation  strategies:  Along  with  capturing  the  upside  potential  in  the  full  tourist season, strategies for reducing operating costs and increasing revenues in the off‐season must  be developed.  This report contains a set of specific recommendations broken down by functional area that are intended to  bring GiG’s strategic focus, structure, and organisational culture into alignment. These recommendations will  need to be implemented diligently, gradually, and simultaneously in order to realise synergies and transform  GiG from a development project into a financially independent social enterprise. The goal is formidable but at  least the path ahead is now clear.  The SBS Team    II. STRATEGIC CONSULTING PROJECT OVERVIEW  In July 2008, a team of four Saïd Business School (SBS) MBA Candidates travelled to The Gambia to conduct a  full  strategic  review  of  Gambia  is  Good  (GiG).  GiG  is  a  social  enterprise  that  markets  horticultural  products  from smallholder producers to the hotel and restaurant industry.   This report is intended to act as a blueprint for GiG towards its short term goal of achieving profitability within  18 months and its long term goal of becoming an internationally recognised company focused on developing  local management.   This  section  provides  a  background  on  GiG’s  business  model  including  a  list  of  key  issues,  objectives,  and  outputs  given  by  GiG  to  the  SBS  team  at  the  beginning  of  the  Strategic  Consulting  Project  (SCP).  These  SCP  objectives and outputs were refined with the GiG team after the SBS team’s arrival in The Gambia on July 1,  2008.   2.1 BACKGROUND ON GIG  7 
  8. 8. In 2001, Concern Universal (CU),2 an international non‐governmental organisation (INGO), conducted a study  on  the  high‐value  consumption  sector  of  the  horticulture  produce  market  in  The  Gambia.3  It  uncovered  a  market failure: smallholder growers were missing out on trade with high value tourist hotels, restaurants, and  supermarkets.  Despite  interest  in  buying  high‐quality  Gambian  produce,  these  businesses  were  forced  to  import produce from Europe and neighbouring Senegal because of unreliable local supply, inconsistent quality,  and shortages of produce during the peak tourist season. Meanwhile, smallholder growers had no incentive to  increase their productivity and quality because they were part of a captive supply chain dominated by market  intermediaries who captured a large portion of the profits.4  As a result of this research, CU partnered with the UK’s leading organic fruit producer, Haygrove,5 in 2004 to  form GiG with £197,000 in grant seed capital from DFID’s Business Linkages Challenge Fund (BLCF).6 GiG was  designed  with  the  mission  to  become  “a  pro‐poor,  fresh  produce  marketing  company  providing  tangible  economic  and  social  benefits  in  poor  rural  Gambian  communities  by  linking  them  to  the  main  tourism  industry.”7 The project had three objectives:8  • To  use  GiG  as  a  catalyst  to  stimulate  a  vibrant  Gambian  fresh  produce  market  that  develops  local  livelihoods,  inspires  entrepreneurship,  and  reduces  the  environmental and social cost of imported produce  • To  establish  the  best  practice  and  up‐take  of  low  cost,  appropriate  packing,  storing,  and  grading  of  fresh  produce  by  small‐scale farmers  • To  leverage  technical  excellence  in  horticulture  as  a  catalyst  to  improve the livelihoods of the rural poor and to replicate the GiG  approach in other countries in West Africa  Four  years  later,  GiG  has  achieved  some  commendable  successes  and  helped CU win the award for 2008 UK Charity of the Year.9 Most notably,  GiG  has  been  able  to  mobilise  a  core  group  of  up  to  1000  smallholder  growers  (mostly  women)  for  off‐season  commercial  production  where  profit margins are much higher for both the farmers and GiG. Hotels and  restaurants  have  warmly  responded  to  the  improvement  in  consistent  availability of produce and quality of local fruits and vegetables during the crucial tourist season from October  to  April.  Furthermore,  GiG  has  assembled  a  talented  and  extremely  dedicated  team  in  The  Gambia,  and  is  eager to take the next step to become a self‐sustaining model social enterprise.    2.2 KEY ISSUES FROM GIG’S POINT OF VIEW                                                                    2  www.concern‐universal.org  3  Concern Universal, “Horticultural Produce Market in the Hotel, Restaurant and Supermarket Sector – The Gambia,”  August 2001.  4  Concern Universal, “A Miracle of Marketing.”  5  www.haygrove.co.uk  6  http://www.dfid.gov.uk/funding/businesslinkages.asp  7  Interview with Andrew Hunt, outgoing GiG General Manager, May 17, 2008.  8  BCLF Final Proposal  9  http://www.concern‐universal.org/index.php?/article/_news/concern_universal_wins_national_charity_award!/30.htm  8 
  9. 9. Despite numerous successes, GiG has not achieved hoped‐for commercial viability. There have only been two  profitable months since GiG’s inception and a budget shortfall of £20k is projected for 2009.10 From GiG’s point  of view, the key issues hindering profitability were:11   • High overheads starting with the need for an international General Manager (GM)  • Seasonality of the tourist market demand and agricultural production  • Excessive wastage and unacceptable unrecorded stock loss  • Ineffective production planning process  • Operational management difficulties  • Low customer loyalty  • Unsustainable cash flow   • Overdependence on donor funding for horticultural capacity building  • Lack of long term strategic vision  • Uncertain role for the internally owned and managed GiG Farm  2.3 SCP OBJECTIVES AND OUTPUTS  An SCP was requested by GiG to investigate the above key issues and achieve the following objectives:  1. Facilitate the development of an inspiring and holistic strategic vision  2. Develop  a  realistic  business  plan  which,  if  successfully  implemented,  will  lead  to  full  commercial  viability  3. Appraise the potential for a new ‘tourism’ enterprise  In addition, GiG reduced these objectives into four tangible outputs:  1. Full strategic review and long term strategy development  2. 3‐5 year fully fleshed out business plan   3. Set of recommendations for operational management and internal administration  4. Feasibility study for new pro‐poor tourism enterprise  2.4 RECONCILED OBJECTIVES AND OUTPUTS  Once  the  consulting  team  arrived  in  The  Gambia  and  conducted  an  independent  assessment  of  what  was  realistically achievable and most needed, the above objectives and outputs were modified with the GiG team.  Specifically,  objective  3  and  output  4  were  excluded,  as  the  feasibility  of  a  new  pro‐poor  tourism  enterprise  was deemed outside the scope of the SCP. In exchange, the team agreed to focus more on finding solutions to  pressing operational challenges.   The new jointly agreed outputs of this SCP were as follows:                                                                    10  Provided by Andrew Hunt (Outgoing GiG General Manager)  11  See the original terms of reference in Appendix A for more details.  9 
  10. 10. 1. Strategic  visioning  workshop  with  key  GiG  stakeholders  to  establish  a  shared  vision,  long  term  goal,  short term goal, overarching strategies, and guiding principles (see Section III)  2. Strategic  consulting  report  containing  operational  and  strategy  recommendations  to  achieve  these  goals (this document)  3. 18 month action plan with key recommendations for each functional area (see Appendix B)  4. Set of operational tools for each functional area (see Appendices)  5. Final presentation to CU and Haygrove (at SBS September 5, 2008)    III. APPROACH  The  approach  taken  by  the  SBS  team  to  meet  the  above  reconciled  objectives can be summarised in four steps:     1. Holistically assess the current state of the business. For the first  ten  days  in  The  Gambia,  the  SBS  team  undertook  a  comprehensive  audit  of  the  GiG  business  model,  including  its  strategic  objectives,  operational  effectiveness  and  efficiency,  human  resource  capabilities,  financial  constraints,  and  developmental  goals.  This  involved  field  trips  to  rural  areas  to  meet with GiG suppliers (both individual farmers and community  gardens)  and  to  understand  (as  best  as  possible  given  time  constraints)  the  local  context.  The  team  also met with a variety of GiG’s customers to gain insights into how GiG could better meet their needs.  This  audit  produced  an  independent  set  of  key  issues  (Section  IV)  and  informed  functional  area  strategies (Section V).     2. Conduct  a  strategic  visioning  workshop  and  follow‐up  sessions  with  each  functional  team  (see  Section 3.2). The strategic visioning workshop was designed to include all key stakeholders to facilitate  the development of a shared vision and devise strategic goals.     3. Develop and implement the most pressing strategies (see Section V). Due to the seasonal nature of  the business and its difficult financial position, it was imperative that some strategies (i.e. introduction  of production contract system) were implemented immediately to facilitate improved sales and profit  margins in the upcoming tourist season.    4. Document process improvement opportunities for future implementation. Throughout the process, a  conscious awareness of the need to gradually introduce changes led to a toolbox of recommendations  for future implementation along with an 18 month operational action plan (see Appendix B).  3.1 THE STRATEGIC VISIONING FRAMEWORK  A clear shared vision provides a robust framework for all business choices and helps keep everyone working  toward a common goal. It is widely accepted that a shared vision with strategies that are aligned throughout  an organisation is crucial to success.   10 
  11. 11. To  facilitate  an  inspiring  shared  vision  for  GiG,  the  SBS  team  leveraged  the  Peak  Performance  Organisation  (PPO)  framework12  (Figure  1).  PPO  theory  provides  an  alternative  to  the  conventional  strategic  visioning  development  process  by  drawing  from  some  of  the  most  successful  sporting  teams  of  all  time  and  applying  their  best  principles  to  business.  This  framework  has  been  used  by  a  number  of  the  most  successful  fast  moving consumer good and marketing companies in the world.    Figure 1: The Strategic Visioning Framework  Inspirational Dream: A mental image of an ideal state or destiny for the organisation that provides meaning  and  recognition  for  the  individuals  who  work  there.  It  relates  to  why  activities  are  undertaken  rather  than  what must be achieved by those activities. As a consequence – it is not measurable. The inspirational dream  must also be common to all areas of an organisation.13   Greatest Imaginable Challenge: The dream in action. It is the most demanding and rewarding tangible event  that can be imagined for the organisation. It must be conceivable and feasible, as well as important, stretching  and exciting. It must also be measurable, so that the achievement is clear.14   Most  Important  Goals:  The  tangible,  measurable,  shorter‐term  goals  that  drive  the  day‐to‐day  strategic  and  operational  decisions  of  the  organisation.  They  establish  priorities  and  are  used  as  the  basis  to  measure  individual and organisational performance.                                                                    12  Gilson, Clive, Mike Pratt, Kevin Roberts, and Ed Weymes. 2001. Peak Performance: Business Lessons from the world’s  top sports organizations.  13 Ibid.  14  Ibid.  11 
  12. 12. Strategic  Focus:  The  concentration  of  energy  on  actions  necessary  to  achieve  the  organisation’s  purpose.  It  provides clear direction and interest for participants, and involves identifying specific actions to be undertaken,  rather  than  targeting  the  end  result  required.  Strategic  focus  clarifies  priorities  and  aligns  everyday  tasks.  People  focus  their  attention  and  energies  on  meaningful,  challenging  goals  as  an  essential  ingredient  to  achieving peak performance.15   It is important to note the order of the framework; it starts  by  establishing  the  organisation’s  inspirational  dream  followed by a more measurable challenge and set of goals,  and ends by outlining strategies required to achieve these  goals.  These  concepts  are  mutually  reinforcing  and,  in  combination,  provide  the  all  important  clarity  of  purpose  essential for success.  3.2 STRATEGIC VISIONING WORKSHOP  The Strategic Visioning Workshop was conducted on the 12  th 16 and  13   July  with  GiG’s  key  stakeholders   (Appendix  C)  to  develop  inputs  to  the  PPO  framework  described  above. The idea was to define a shared vision, outline the building blocks needed to achieve that vision, and  initiate  a  subsequent  process  to  mobilise  the  GiG  team  for  action.  Active  participation  from  all  stakeholders  was requested to develop a vision, goals, and strategies that were both inclusive and motivational. Throughout  the process it was imperative that everyone was listened to and that their input was demonstrated as being  valuable; the workshop agenda was designed to facilitate this. The GiG team left the workshop having reached  consensus  on  all  four  components  of  the  strategic  visioning  framework  (Figure  2),  as  well  a  set  of  guiding  principles  (Appendix  D),  and  a  full  summary  of  discussed  strategies  and  actions  (Appendix  E).  These  were  subsequently compressed into one document showing ‘GiG on a Page’ and distributed to staff (Appendix F).                                                                     15  Ibid.  16  See Appendix C for a list of attendees and workshop agenda.  12 
  13. 13.   Figure 2: GiG Strategic Visioning Workshop Outcome  The  greatest  imaginable  challenge  to  become  an  internationally  recognised  company  focused  on  developing  local  management  reflects  a  collective  desire  for  GiG  to  eventually  be  run  by  Gambian  management  but  acknowledges that this is only feasible as a long term goal.   The  short  term  goal  of  achieving  profitability  in  18  months  means  that  GiG  will  become  financially  self‐ sustaining and independent of donor funding for its core horticulture business. It is realised that donor funding  will still be necessary for some capacity building activities and to experiment with new opportunities that have  long term potential (e.g. fair trade exporting). The remainder of this report focuses on the strategies for how to  achieve these goals while ensuring that they are aligned with GiG’s inspirational dream.       13 
  14. 14. IV. KEY ISSUES  During the overall audit of the business as described in Section III, the SBS team identified six underlying key  issues that must be addressed in order for GiG to achieve the shared vision and goals defined in the strategic  visioning workshop. These can be divided into three groups:  • Social  enterprise  issues  (4.1  business  vs.  development  project,  4.2  foreign  dependency,  ,  4.4  lack  of  decision making processes and tools)  • Young business issues (4.3 staff motivation and integration, 4.4 lack of decision making processes and  tools, 4.5 sub‐optimal communication systems and processes)   • Industry related issues (seasonality)  4.1 IS GIG A BUSINESS OR DEVELOPMENT PROJECT?  The most fundamental key issue relates to GiG’s identity: is GiG a business or a development project? To the  senior  management  team,  the  answer  was  clear.  GiG  was  established  with  the  goal  of  becoming  a  self‐ sustaining,  profitable  business  built  with  Gambian  smallholder  farmers.  However,  if  GiG  was  registered  as  a  business, it would immediately have to pay a 30% sales tax (i.e. regardless of profitability), destroying already  tight gross margins. In addition, GiG would never have existed (and would possibly cease to exist) without the  assistance  of  grant  funding  and  soft  support  that  it  has  received  because  of  its  status  as  a  development  project.  The  problem  is  that  a  business  should  be  run  very  differently  from  a  development  project  and  has  very  different  end‐goals.  A  business  is  meant  to  grow  by  outperforming  competitors  and  capturing  market  share;  therefore  its  sustainability  is  measured  by  its  very  existence.  In  contrast,  a  development  project  has  a  finite  end  date  (typically  only  a  few  years)  with  the  implementing  organisation  often  moving  on  to  a  different project in a different area. Trying to be both at the same time  can  have  perverse  effects  on  strategic  decision  making  and  staff  incentives.  For  example,  the  strategic  decision  to  spread  scarce  production  resources  among  11  dispersed  community  gardens  in  the  Western Region (WR) as opposed to concentrating on better farmers in  fewer  gardens  reflects  a  conventional  development  project  mentality.  Similarly,  allocating  crucial  management  time  to  sourcing  and  writing  grant  proposals  to  meet  budget  shortfalls  (a  typical  Senior  Manager  activity  in  an  NGO)  comes  at  the  expense  of  addressing  fundamental  strategic and operational problems.  Being  ‘stuck  in  the  middle’  between  a  business  and  development  project  is  a  common  problem  to  social  enterprise models and often a reason for their failure. Funders eventually grow tired of the need to subsidise  critical components of the business model and pull out, which is what Haygrove has indicated they will have to  do if GiG is unable to achieve its short term profitability goal. This identity problem can only be solved at the  14 
  15. 15. top  with  clear  leadership,  communication,  and  action,  and  will  require  changes  in  strategy,  structure,  and  organisational culture to become reality.   4.2 FOREIGN DEPENDENCY  Most senior  decision‐making positions  in GiG are occupied by expatriates, leading  to tangible and intangible  costs.  For  the  former,  overhead  costs  of  GiG  are  disproportionally  high  mainly  because  of  the  GM’s  international  salary  and  benefits  package.  Yet  without  this,  it  would  be  difficult  to  attract  qualified  international staff, which has been crucial to GiG´s development thus far. For the latter, expatriate presence  may have an adverse effect on the perception of GiG in The Gambia. For example, the SBS team spoke with a  customer who said that her local customers have questioned why she is buying from Toubabs (foreigners) who  are using GiG’s name to make money for themselves. Though this may be an isolated case, it is a point that GiG  must  be  aware  of  (especially  if  any  government  officials  develop  this  impression).  Furthermore,  expatriate  management may have de‐motivating effects on local staff or at least give the impression of the existence of a  ‘glass ceiling.’   Therefore, the gap between decision makers (mainly expatriates) and the team responsible for operations on  the  ground  (mainly  locals)  must  be  closed  for  GiG  to  progress  towards  both  its  short  and  long  term  goals.  Though a business of GiG’s size (15 direct employees) should not require a layer of middle management at this  point,  one  may  be  necessary  to  provide  local  staff  with  practical  management  experience  and  demonstrate  that they are the future of GiG.   4.3 STAFF MOTIVATION AND INTEGRATION  Overall, the GiG team is a close‐knit group and employees are extremely committed to their jobs. However, it  was  revealed  during  personal  interviews  and  time  spent  shadowing  staff  that  the  production  team  felt  that  they  were  not  respected  within  GiG  and  were  always  placed  below  sales  and  marketing  (S&M).  One  of  the  reasons  may  be  due  to  history:  GiG  has  undergone  a  necessary  transition  from  ‘producer  first’  to  ‘customer  first’  over  the  past  few  years,  which  may  have  resulted  in  the  production  team  feeling  less  valued  by  management.  Another  reason  may  be  attributed  to  GiG’s  organisational  structure,  which  excluded  the  production  team.  GiG’s  three  Production  Managers  (PMs)  were  technically  CU  employees,  reporting  to  the  Horticultural  Specialist,  and  had  their  contracts  renewed  on  an  annual  basis  depending  on  project‐specific  funding. As a result, while the S&M side of the business was being intensively managed and developed by GiG  management,  the  production  side  was  accountable  to  a  different  reporting  structure.  The  production  team  focused primarily on solving technical problems in the field with less attention paid to how it could work more  effectively and efficiently as an arm of the GiG business.   Finally, all staff desire more transparency, fairness, and inclusion. They would like to understand what personal  development opportunities are available, why certain people are given funds for training, and would also like  to be consulted more on future strategies and key decisions.  4.4 LACK OF DECISION MAKING PROCESSES AND TOOLS   GiG  suffers  from  the  typical  ‘young  business’  syndrome  that  focuses  on  increasing  sales  with  little  time  for  developing the processes to facilitate more efficient business practices. The lack of decision making processes  15 
  16. 16. and tools results in the under‐use of financial information, lack of dynamic market response, and inability to  promptly respond to customer feedback. Generally, it is not always clear on what basis decisions are or should  be made. This dangerously masks the effect of unsubstantiated decisions on overall profitability and leads to a  large portfolio of considered future actions with the danger of ‘doing too many things at once.’  There appear to be two sources to this problem. First, a young business like GiG tends to have more ‘flexible’  structures  and  processes  as  compared  to  grown  organisations.  Yet,  in  these  cases  there  are  normally  underlying guiding principles (that were lacking in GiG prior to the strategic visioning workshop) that allow an  organisation  to  make  decisions  based  on  general  business  rules  in  absence  of  specific  ones.  Second,  GiG’s  confused identity on whether it wants to be a stand‐alone business or development project (as described in  4.1) has hindered it from recognising opportunity costs when making strategic choices.  4.5 SUB‐OPTIMAL COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS AND PROCESSES  Throughout GiG, communication paths and underlying processes related to daily operational tasks are either  missing,  not  clear,  or  not  properly  enforced,  which  leads  to  inefficient  and  even  ineffective  operations.  For  example, the existing delivery packing process is suboptimal, often causing confusion and sometimes botched  deliveries.  Also,  the  process  for  planning  the  collection  of  produce  involves  too  many  people  and  is  not  standardised,  leading  to  backlash from growers when their harvested crops are not collected  as promised.   GiG suffers from the widespread phenomenon where management  says that processes and communication systems are in place but are  simply  not  followed.  On  the  other  hand,  GiG  employees  claim  that  they are not always aware of the rules and that it does not make any  difference  whether  they  adhere  to  them  (especially  when  the  purpose  of  the  rules  is  not  clear).  In  order  to  make  GiG  profitable,  it  is  imperative  that  GiG  establishes,  formalises,  and  trains  staff  on  clear  processes  and  communication  paths  and  then  follows  up  with  stringent  enforcement.   4.6 SEASONALITY  An industry related key issue is the seasonality of the horticulture business, which has two dimensions. First,  horticulture demand is highly dependent on tourists who come to The Gambia from October – April. Many of  GiG’s customers close down outside of these months. Second, local horticulture production is concentrated in  the  dry‐season  from  November  –  March.  Despite  a  tropical  climate  that  is  conducive  to  year‐round  horticulture  production,  GiG  has  to  cope  with  the  technological,  capability,  and  behavioural  constraints  of  smallholder farmers in the context of underdeveloped institutions and poverty. The result is an undersupply of  production during the critical period of October – January, an oversupply from February – May, with market  prices fluctuating accordingly. Furthermore, the quality requirements of GiG’s customers changes depending  on  product  availability.  This  all  suggests  the  need  for  season‐specific  strategies  that  are  aligned  with  GiG’s  underlying strategic focus.  16 
  17. 17. V. STRATEGIC RECOMMENDATIONS   As discussed in Section III, the strategic visioning workshop produced a consensus on the following strategic  focus for GiG on the path towards a shared vision, long term goal, and short term goal:   1. Optimise local horticulture production to meet year round GiG demand  2. Optimise operational effectiveness and efficiency  3. Build the right team with the right tools  4. Strategically pursue new market opportunities  This section contains a set of strategic recommendations for each one of these strategies broken down by the  following six functional areas:   • Production  • Sales and Marketing (S&M)  • Quality and Stock Control (QSC)  • Human Resources (HR)  • Finance  • GiG Farm  Although every functional area has responsibilities to contribute to each strategy, what follows is a prioritised  list that addresses the crucial changes that are especially necessary for GiG to achieve its short term goal of  becoming  profitable  within  18  months.  Therefore,  not  all  functional  areas  have  been  addressed  under  each  strategy; this should be done by GiG management on an ongoing basis to ensure that all activities are aligned  with these overarching strategies. A full summary of the Strategy‐Function Matrix can be found in Appendix G.  In  addition,  this  section  will  conclude  with  recommendations  for  necessary  changes  to  GiG’s  organisational  structure and culture in order for them to align with the strategic focus. While the right strategic direction is  essential for GiG to ‘leap forward,’ all three components must be aligned for successful execution (Figure 3).     Figure 3: Strategy – Structure – Culture Framework17                                                                    17  Tim Morris, Developing Effective Organisations class notes.  17 
  18. 18. 5.1  STRATEGY  1:  OPTIMISE  LOCAL  HORTICULTURE  PRODUCTION  TO  MEET  YEAR  ROUND  GIG  DEMAND  Strategy 1 is to optimise GiG’s core horticulture business by continuing to support Gambian growers to meet  demand  specified  by  GiG’s  S&M  team.  It  is  expected  that  this  ‘GiG  demand’  will  continue  to  grow  as  new  markets are sourced (such as regional export markets). GiG will also continue to give preference to its core of  smallholder  growers,  but  ‘local  horticulture  production’  will  expand  to  include  commercial  private  gardens  (CPGs)  and  the  GiG  Farm.  Production  and  S&M  are  the  main  functional  areas  responsible  for  executing  this  strategy. The human resource management involved in this strategy is also crucial.  5.1.1 PRODUCTION  INTRODUCE THE CONTRACT MANAGER SYSTEM  Achieving a secure and reliable supply of the right fruits and vegetables at the right time is arguably the most  critical gap in GiG’s current business model. Despite the existence of a monthly production plan that more or  less  reflects  what  needs  to  be  produced  by  targeted  growers  to  meet  established  demand,  there  are  still  shortages of key items at crucial times of the year while the same items are in oversupply at other times. For  example,  when  the  SBS  team  arrived  in  The  Gambia,  GiG  could  not  find  a  supply  of  tomatoes,  its  most  important sales item, anywhere in the country.   In contrast, growers complained during interviews that GiG would not purchase all of their grade 1 tomatoes in  February because they were in oversupply.   There  are  many  reasons  for  GiG’s  sub‐optimal  production  system.  On  the  surface,  these  include  a  lack  of  execution  by  the  production  team,  growers  failing  to  deliver  on  their  promises,  problems  with  pests  and  diseases, and lack of access to inputs for growers at the right time. However, unreliable supply is a problem  that is common to agricultural enterprise development projects across Africa that target smallholder farmers.  The pattern that emerges is usually as follows:   1)  The  shift  from  supply  to  demand  orientation  (i.e.  from  a  conventional  agricultural  development  project to an enterprise‐based model) catalyses supply;   2)  Demand  begins  to  outpace  supply  as  smallholder  farmers  struggle  to  increase  productivity  and  meet  quality  requirements;   3) The buyer (i.e. lead firm) becomes impatient and begins to  look elsewhere for supply;   4)  The  model  either  collapses  completely  or  smallholder  farmers  are  replaced  by  larger  commercially‐oriented  growers that are easier and more reliable to work with.  If  working  with  smallholder  growers  is  central  to  the  objectives  of  GiG,  the  way  to  avoid  this  trap  is  to  first  recognise that all smallholder farmers are not equal and strategically decide which ones to target; and second  18 
  19. 19. uncover  and  align  (as  best  as  possible)  their  underlying  incentives.  The  former  strategy  goes  against  the  conventional  development  wisdom  that  allocating  resources  on  an  equal  basis  in  the  field  is  desirable.  Achieving  the  short  term  goal  of  being  a  profitable  business  requires  selecting  only  the  best  smallholder  growers and working with them more intensively to improve their productivity. Equally important (but more  difficult to implement in practice), it requires consciously choosing not to work with those farmers whom GiG  has invested resources in and developed relationships with but who have proved unreliable.   The  latter  strategy  is  more  difficult;  it  requires  acknowledging  that  the  underlying  drivers  of  smallholder  behaviour  are  complex  and  oversimplifying  them  to  economically  rational  terms  will  produce  disappointing  results. For example, the best way to get women in community gardens to stake their tomatoes may not be  simply  telling  them  how  much  money  they  would  gain  from  doing  so,  but  rather  trying  to  understand  the  underlying reasons for why they don’t stake them and then identifying and training the most influential people  (i.e. not necessarily the best growers) to change their behaviour. This requires the development of trust‐based  personal relationships with influential growers that must not be taken for granted.   The primary recommendation to begin tackling existing production challenges is to target the best growers  with  a  contract  system  –  the  Contract  Manager  System.  This  system  uses  the  principle  of  self‐selection  to  better  align  the  incentives  of  growers  with  those  of  GiG.  In  the  Western  Region  (WR),  a  GiG  Production  Manager (PM) is freely allowed to choose an individual Contract Manager (CM), who is in turn free to select  four other growers to sub‐contract (Figure 4). With  technical input from the  PM, the CM  will choose from a  pre‐determined  selection  of  crops  (based  on  demand  provided  by  S&M)  for  the  entire  group.  GiG  will  then  issue  an  individual  contract  (Appendix  H)  to  the  CM  containing  a  guaranteed  minimum  buying  price  and  a  promise to pay more if the market price is higher on the purchase day.   In  addition,  the  CM  and  her  sub‐contracted  growers  will  receive  purchasing  priority  over  other  growers  for  their  secondary  crops  (i.e.  those  not  under  contract)  as  an  additional  incentive.  GiG  can  only  commit  to  purchasing Grade 1 quality produce, but will buy any left‐over lower grade produce from contracted growers  when a secure market has been sourced.   19 
  20. 20. Figure 4: The Contract Manager System in the WR  With  the  exception  of  one  community  garden  (FENCES  garden),  the  CM  system  will  need  to  be  modified  slightly  in  the  North  Bank  Region  (NBR)  where  growers  are  predominantly  commercially‐oriented  individual  males who do not want to work in groups. Here, contracts can still be issued to individual CMs chosen by a PM,  but  the  CMs  will  not  be  required  to  sub‐contract  to  other  growers.  However,  it  is  envisioned  that  they  will  begin to do so over time, facilitated by GiG offering increasingly larger contracts to the best performing CMs.   The roll‐out of the CM System should be gradual and start with targeted (i.e. scarce) crops at strategic times.  It is crucial that contracts only be issued to the best growers who are freely selected by GiG PMs even if the  demand  from  S&M  exceeds  what  is  contracted.  This  will  optimise  the  positive  effects  of  self‐selection  and  allow for the PMs to be held accountable. Contracts should also be issued seasonally (i.e. twice per year) based  on  what  S&M  deems  as  ‘guaranteed  demand’  to  strengthen  relationships  between  GiG  and  contracted  growers  and  facilitate  better  planning  by  both  parties.  As  the  system  becomes  adopted  and  adapted,  the  selection of crops, number of CMs, and individual contract sizes should be increased with the vision that GiG  eventually achieves 100% of its ‘guaranteed demand’ under contract.   The introduction of the CM system will be a major component of Strategy 1 and is likely to address many of  GiG’s production problems. However, it should not be viewed as a silver bullet since the  contracts are non‐ enforceable in either direction. Contracts will not replace the importance of PMs selecting the right growers to  work with in the field and providing individualised support to enhance their productivity. The CM system also  requires a commitment to favouring some growers over others which may be difficult to execute in practice  and result in some negative push‐back from growers in the short term (including the possibility of decreased  production). Over the long term, GiG’s supply chain will be much stronger and more reliable with CMs helping  to increase agricultural productivity and catalyse development in rural Gambia.  20 
  21. 21. STRATEGICALLY CONTRACT COMMERCIAL PRIVATE GARDENS  In  addition  to  the  above  mentioned  smallholder  farmers,  GiG  is  currently  working  with  three  commercial  private gardens (CPGs) that are much larger and more advanced (both managerially and technologically) than  the  targeted  community  or  smallholder  gardens.  These  CPGs  are  strategically  important  for  three  reasons.  First,  they  can  supply  crops  that  are  in  demand  during  certain  times  which  smallholder  farmers  do  not  like  to  grow  (e.g.  cabbage  during  the  rainy  season).  This  will  help  boost  GiG’s  sales  volume  and  profit  margins.  Second,  CPGs  can  be  contracted  to  offset  necessary  imports from Senegal, reinforcing GiG’s guiding principle  of being Gambian First. Third (and most importantly), if  GiG  does  not  buy  from  these  gardens  they  pose  a  significant  competitive  threat.  One  large  and  well‐ managed  CPG  will  always  be  able  to  outperform  smallholder  gardens  on  quality  (if  not  also  price)  and  could conceivably become a preferred supplier to any of  GiG’s existing customers. Therefore, it is recommended  that GiG view all CPGs as important suppliers rather than competitors and strives to contract as much produce  as possible from them (Appendix I). This implies a need to find alternative markets (including export markets)  in order to handle the increased volume and continue giving purchasing preference to smallholder growers.   INVOLVE PARTNER ORGANISATIONS IN THE CM SYSTEM  GiG  currently  works  with  two  partner  organisations,  the  Besse  Training  Centre  (BTC)  in  the  WR  and  the  Njawara  Agricultural  Training  Centre  (NATC)  in  the  NBR.  These  partners  train  students  in  horticulture  production and frequently supply GiG with ‘Grade 1’ quality fruits and vegetables. As such, investing in these  partnerships  should  be  part  of  GiG’s  long  term  strategy  to  improve  the  capacity  of  smallholder  vegetable  growers  in  The  Gambia  and  groom  future  CMs.  One  way  to  do  this  is  to  include  BTC  and  NATC  in  the  CM  system  so  that  they  can  train  their  students  in  fulfilling  production  contracts  and  adhering  to  strict  quality  requirements.  The  contracts  should  be  issued  in  the  same  way  as  for  smallholder  growers  and  CPGs,  but  should be managed by the Director of the partner organisation.  IDENTIFY STRATEGIC USES FOR GIG FARM  One of the uses of the GiG Farm is to fill holes in the production plan and to  produce  more  highly  demanded  produce  at  the  right  time.  With  the  introduction of the CM system and the recommended strategy to purchase  as much as possible from CPGs, the strategic role of the GiG Farm will have  to change. It is recommended that rather than acting as a significant source  of GiG’s production, the GiG Farm should fall behind contracted smallholder  farmers,  CPGs,  and  partner  organisations  when  allocating  production  targets.  This  will  maximise  the  proportion  of  GiG’s  total  production  from  local  smallholders  and  minimise  competition  from  CPGs.  Two  other  21 
  22. 22. potential  strategic  uses  for  the  GiG  Farm  to  meet  GiG  demand  are  to  commercially  produce  specialty  crops  that are in undersupply (e.g. broccoli) and act as a research centre to pilot new crops and farming practices to  later  disseminate  to  GiG’s  core  suppliers.  It  is  important  that  the  profitability  of  the  GiG  farm  as  a  separate  business entity is considered in the strategic development of its role.  OPTIMISE MONTHLY PRODUCTION PLANNING  Even with production contracts being issued on a seasonal basis,  monthly production planning will still be necessary to cope with  demand  fluctuations,  predict  and  mitigate  supply  shortfalls  or  surpluses,  and  allocate  production  targets  for  non‐contracted  crops.  The  recommended  strategy  to  optimise  monthly  production planning should be implemented in two stages. First,  a monthly meeting with the production and S&M teams should  be  held  to  update  the  demand  forecast  for  the  coming  month  and reconcile it with the expected harvest for all crops (i.e. not  just  those  under  contract).  Next,  the  PMs  should  go  out  to  the  field  and  issue  short  term  contracts  to  growers  who  have  verifiable crops that will be ready to harvest within the specified  period (Appendix J). Preference for short term contracts can be given to smallholder growers and can be used  as trials for future CMs before they are issued seasonal contracts. Short term contracts should then be issued  to CPGs and partner organisations up to the maximum demand specified at the monthly meeting. GiG should  also  quantify  any  remaining  standing  crops  at  CPGs  with  the  goal  of  identifying  markets  and  placing  them  under contract before they are harvested and sold independently to GiG’s customers.  By  contracting  standing  crops  that  can  be  verified  in  the  field,  this  system  will  help  close  the  gap  between  supply and demand while significantly improving the reliability of GiG’s supply chain. GiG should aim to have  100%  of  its  sales  demand  under  contract  (either  seasonal  or  short  term)  by  the  time  of  purchase.  The  proportion of seasonal to short term contracts should gradually increase as the CM system is adopted.  GUARANTEE ACCESS TO INPUTS TO CONTRACTED GROWERS  A  reliable  supply  chain  requires  growers  to  have  access  to  inputs  (seeds,  pesticides,  and  fertilisers)  when  they need them. In The Gambia, this is not always the case. Smallholder growers may not have cash or access  to credit to purchase inputs, there may be no local supplier, or inputs may simply not be in stock.   A lack of input availability means that growers frequently miss key planting windows (thus contributing to over  and  undersupply)  and  do  not  deal  promptly  and  effectively  with  pests  and  diseases,  dramatically  reducing  yields.  For  the  CM  system  to  work  effectively,  GiG  needs  to  guarantee  access  to  inputs  to  selected  CMs  without  increasing its own exposure to bad debt. Two strategies are recommended.   First, the PMs should be supplied with an emergency stock of critical inputs that they can sell to growers on a  cash basis. The PMs should also be given the power to source these inputs on their own so that they can be  22 
  23. 23. held accountable for ensuring that they are available to growers. It will remain each grower’s responsibility to  purchase input from GiG’s PM. This strategy is most applicable in the NBR where there is only one input shop  that often runs out of stock.  Second, GiG should set up a revolving fund to provide some inputs on credit to CMs, which can later be directly  deducted from crop purchases. Rather than sourcing new funding for this, it is recommended that a portion of  an existing revolving fund ‐ currently managed jointly with a partner organisation in the WR (St Joseph’s) ‐ be  managed internally. GiG’s credit exposure should be limited to CMs and St. Joseph’s should continue to manage  the portion of the fund that remains accessible to non‐contracted growers. In the NBR, growers have access to  a separate revolving fund managed by another partner organisation (NATC) that cannot be internalised at this  time.  However,  it  is  in  GiG’s  best  interests  to  work  closely  with  NATC  to  ensure  that  this  fund  is  managed  properly.   5.1.2 SALES AND MARKETING  IMPROVE DEMAND PLANNING  GiG’s  existing  demand  planning  process  does  not  adequately  reflect  market  demands  and  contributes  to  wastage  from  overproduction  or  product  shortages  at  crucial  times.  The  current format, which is limited to a monthly meeting led by  the  Horticulture  Specialist,  ensures  a  thorough  review  of  the  production  process  but  does  not  afford  enough  opportunity  for market‐based input.   Specifically, the demand by month is not specified anywhere.  There  are  two  documents  that  attempt  to  match  demand  to  production:  the  budget18  and  the  production  plan.  However,  these  documents  are  not  linked;  the  budget  is  not  used  to  determine  production  and  the  production  plan  does  not  clearly  highlight  an  inability  to  meet  demand.  Neither  document provides a base for understanding what products are needed and when.   The  ideal  system  would  be  for  the  S&M  team  to  specify  the  required  production  with  a  data‐based  understanding  of  the  market.  In  addition,  a  product  collection  schedule  (Appendix  O)  is  needed  at  the  container  to  facilitate  better  planning  of  when  additional  produce  is  needed.  Therefore,  the  team  should  implement  a  regular  S&M  meeting  which  reviews  a  new  demand  planning  spreadsheet  and  weekly  delivery  schedule.                                                                      18  The budget is a financial plan that commits the most realistic targets and highlights the profitability gap to key  stakeholders.   23 
  24. 24. USE VEGETABLE PROFITABILITY AS A TOOL FOR PRODUCTION CHOICES  Product expansion decisions (i.e. which vegetables to produce) are currently limited to the market knowledge  of individuals. This results in additional complexity with more items being added to GiG’s product line, some of  which  are  not  as  profitable  as  perceived.  Decisions  of  what  products  to  offer  customers  are  made  based  on  scarcity and the relative price increases during times of high demand, rather than profitability net of delivery  costs.    Discussions with the GiG team also highlighted the halo effect (how the availability of one product results in  sales of others) of some items, particularly tomatoes. Hence  the  decision  making  criteria for evaluating new  products  should  be  done  seasonally  considering  both  of  these elements.  5.1.3 HUMAN RESOURCES  INTRODUCE PM REPORTING SYSTEM  With  a  new  GM  set  to  start  in  early  September,  now  is  the  time  to  incorporate  stronger  supervision  and  focus  for  the  production  team.  The  production  team  will  need  to  submit  weekly  planning  reports  to  the  GM  every  Friday.  These  reports should outline their major activities for the following week as well as provide a brief summary from the  week  past.  Items  to  focus  on  include  farmer  visits,  sowing  dates,  input  requirements  and  availability,  and  harvests. The PMs should also report via text message daily to the GM and Horticulture Specialist (cc’d to other  PMs) on successes, issues, and any changes to their weekly plan. To facilitate this, mobile phone agreements  (Appendix K) and updated job descriptions (Appendix L) have been put in place.  5.2 STRATEGY 2: OPTIMISE OPERATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS AND EFFICIENCY  Strategy  2  is  a  general  strategy  relevant  to  all  functional  areas  to  improve  GiG’s  overall  effectiveness  and  efficiency.  Successful  implementation  of  this  strategy  should  enable  GiG  to  make  a  big  step  towards  profitability.   5.2.1 MANAGEMENT  MAP COMMUNICATION PATHS AND PROCESSES   Even  with  production  from  the  GiG  Farm,  GiG  is  unable  to  meet  the  full  market  demand.  GiG  works  with  hundreds  of  independent  and  widely‐dispersed  farmers  with  limited  communication  access.  This  makes  communication  and  setting  up  smooth  processes  more  challenging  than  for  a  business  with  an  integrated  production model. Yet, the lack of formalised processes and communication paths that are found throughout  GiG,  especially  between  S&M  and  production,  makes  a  clear  communication  and  process  policy  crucial  to  strengthen operational effectiveness and efficiency. Additionally, GiG sometimes sources product sporadically  from suppliers in Senegal and the local market (Serrekunda), which adds to the operational complexity of its  24 
  25. 25. supply  chain.  Overall,  the  number  of  parties  involved,  miscommunication  and  unclear  processes  are  major  drivers of GiG´s poor effectiveness and efficiency.   As  a  starting  point  towards  a  set  of  recommended  solutions,  it  is  necessary  to  gain  an  overview  of  GiG´s  functional relationships and the process steps involved in the business model. Figure 5 shows GiG´s ‘business  cycle’ and the link between functions, starting with demand and production planning and ending with credit  control.  Production Finance Trips to Dakar Planning Credit  Production Control Customer  Collection/  Cash Feedback Grading Float Quality & Stock retire sales Control Record keeping Deliver Transport Serrekunda market Pack Receive Senegal Serrekunda market Customer  Sales & Order Store Marketing Opportunistic sales Container Finance Human Resources Management   Figure 5: GiG´s business cycle  The key tasks for management are to improve communication and formalise processes throughout this cycle,  and then enforce these changes. This requires developing clear instructions and standardised processes (e.g.  collection  of  produce  from  growers)  and  delegating  clear  line  manager  responsibility  for  enforcing  them.  Appendix O contains the example of a recommended ideal process system for QSC (see “simplify grading and  collection  processes”  for  more  details).  The  goal  for  GiG  should  be  to  create  similar  documents  for  other  crucial functions/process steps like production and S&M.  5.2.2 PRODUCTION  25 
  26. 26. IMPROVE EFFECTIVENESS AND EFFICIENCY OF GARDEN VISITS  The existing GiG production system consisted of working with over 900 growers in 11 community gardens in  the  WR  and  100  individual  smallholder  growers  in  the  NBR.  This  system  was  neither  effective  nor  efficient  because the PMs were not able to allocate their time to focus on the best locations and best farmers within  them. Furthermore, the distance between the growers and the GiG container varied immensely (Table 1). In  the WR, this meant that the PMs would by‐pass many capable growers near‐by to provide extension support  to  far  away  growers.  As  a  result,  the  closer  gardens  performed  sub‐optimally  while  GiG’s  operating  costs  remained excessively high.   Garden Ranking19 Garden  Distance from GiG  1  Ndenban Tenda  78 km  2  Ndenban Japichum  75 km  3  Gunjur 1  46 km  4  Besse Training Centre  73 km  5  Gunjur 2  46 km  6  Kambong  115 km  7  Dobong  130 km  8  Ndenban Jarjuekunda 79 km  9  Kartong  55 km  10  Ndemban Jola  80 km  11  Kandunku  90 km  Table 1: WR Community Gardens as Ranked by PMs                                                                    19  As determined by the PMs.  26 
  27. 27. An additional challenge was that PM  workload was not distributed evenly. In the WR, one PM was assigned  four community gardens to support and was stationed permanently in the field so that she could easily move  among  them  on  a  motorbike.  The  other  WR  PM  was  responsible  for  visiting  seven  community  gardens  that  were scattered throughout the region and would travel daily from the office. However, he would also regularly  visit  the  four  gardens  not  assigned  to  him  because  he  had  superior  technical  knowledge  and  was  more  confident  in  his  diagnoses.  He  was  also  supporting  three  CPGs  that  were  strategically  important  for  GiG  but  outside of his old job description. The NBR PM (who was permanently based in the NBR) was also overloaded,  having to allocate his time between visiting many individual growers, the FENCES community garden, collect  loan repayments for the NATC revolving fund, and carry out other duties as specified under his CU contract.   STRENGTHEN COMMUNICATION AND TEAMWORK  Despite the geographic limitations, there is considerable scope for the production team to work more closely  together.  With  three  PMs  and  two  regions,  one  idea  is  for  the  eventual  promotion  of  one  of  the  PMs  to  a  ‘Team  Leader’  role  where  he  or  she  would  work  in  both  regions  depending  on  the  time  of  year  and  the  demand  in  the  field.  For  example,  the  NBR  is  more  advanced  in  off‐season  production  so  it  may  be  more  efficient  for  GiG  to  allocate  two  PMs  to  this  region  during  critical  times.  The  Team  Leader  could  provide  an  important link between both regions and help to boost teamwork.  Another idea is for the PMs to rotate periodically. This would facilitate cross‐team learning and allow the PMs  to  face  fresh  challenges  and  strike  more  of  a  balance  between  commanding  the  respect  of  an  outsider  with  having the trust of an insider.   Finally, the production team should be in regular communication with one another and with the Horticulture  Specialist  to  share  ideas  and  increase  their  technical  capacity  to  respond  to  problems  in  the  field.  With  the  introduction of a new reporting system, this should now be more practical.   5.2.3 QUALITY AND STOCK CONTROL  REDUCE RECORDED AND UNRECORDED STOCK  LOSS   Addressing  the  unacceptably  high  levels  of  recorded  and  unrecorded  stock  loss  is  a  perhaps  the  most  pressing  operational  challenge  that  must  be  solved  for  GiG  to  become  profitable.  The  first  step  to  address  this  issue  is  to  clearly  define  what  is  meant  by  ‘recorded’  and  ‘unrecorded’  stock  loss.  The  SBS  team noted that different definitions were frequently  27 
  28. 28. use by GiG, which is reflected in GiG’s financial reports.20 Here, the following definitions will be used:  • Recorded stock loss = wastage  • Unrecorded stock loss = difference in stock that was not or could not be recorded (i.e. from using  different scales, theft, or loss due water being lost from crops (e.g. watermelon))  • Total wastage = recorded stock loss (wastage) + unrecorded stock loss  Though recorded and unrecorded stock losses are related, they have different impacts and relevance on the  business  and  therefore  need  to  be  treated  differently.  Unrecorded  stock  loss  was  called  “a  Gambian  phenomenon” by Haygrove during the strategic visioning workshop, and should be nonexistent since it derives  either from incorrect recording (which should be accounted for in recorded stock loss) or through theft.   The  12‐month  average  of  GiG´s  unrecorded  stock  loss  was  7.9%  of  purchases,  which  contributed  to  50%  of  total  wastage  (13.7%  of  purchases)  between  July  07  and  June 08 and translated to D 421,527 being lost due to total  wastage. Comparing this value to GiG’s overall loss during  this  period  of  D  508,244  shows  how  critical  it  is  to  deal  with  this  issue.  Total  wastage  in  June  08  alone  is  approximately  equivalent  to  the  salary  of  four  full  time  employees.   Since  there  are  many  functional  areas  involved,  it  is  important  to  address  the  issue  from  a  holistic  point  of  view. It starts with demand planning, which must be translated into the right amount of production from GiG’s  many growers, and ends with collecting the right quantity of produce at the right time to deliver promptly to  customers.   In order to find solutions to this issue, it is important to identify the underlying causes, which are:  • Mismatch between production and demand  • Unclear pick up policy (amount of produce, time, and location)  • Improper storage of produce and/or careless handling  • Lack of procedures to turn unrecorded stock loss into recorded stock loss      Figure 6 illustrates that generally unrecorded stock loss accounts for half of the total wastage, which suggests  that  a  certain  amount  of  unrecorded  stock  loss  is  actually  wastage  and  not  theft.  The  highest  peak  is  in  the  beginning  of  the  tourist  season  (April),  which  suggests  that  the  GiG  team  needs  to  adjust  to  the  change  in  season and not get careless as they get busier. As an alternative hypothesis, a new Stock Controller started in  April 08, which might explain the spike was a result of him getting used to his new job.                                                                     20  cf. the ‘Budget Analysis’ sheet in GiG’s Management Accounts.  28 
  29. 29.   Figure 6: 12‐month overview of stock loss  Solutions to reduce total wastage:   • Appendix M provides a summary of all process steps that are contributing to total wastage and ways to  reduce it  • New  container  policy  to  avoid  wastage  due  to  rotting  (see  “Container  Management  /  Inventory  cold store management/Store” below)   With proper implementation and enforcement of these  new  processes,  it  is  entirely  feasible  for  GiG  to  achieve  its targets of 5% recorded stock loss and 2% unrecorded  stock loss in the short term. In the long term, the target  for unrecorded stock loss should  be 0%. It is important  to note that since it seems that most unrecorded stock  loss  derives  from  improper  recording  of  wastage  (recorded stock loss) it is likely that recorded stock loss will go up or cancel out some of the positive effects  in the short run during this adaptation period.  IMPROVE CONTAINER MANAGEMENT  The  storage  container  is  a  central  element  of  the  GiG  business,  it  functions  as  part  of  the  store  for  retail  customers and as storage for hotel and restaurant (i.e. wholesale) customers. The current management of the  container leads to a number of operational issues:  • Reduced shelf life: The thermometer was ‘permanently’ broken and the container door was often  left open, leading to a shorter shelf life of produce  29 

×