Partnerships for Improving Community Health

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Partnerships for Improving Community Health

  1. 1. “Comprehensive Assessment, Strategic Success” Partnerships for Improving Community Health Web Conference Series Nuts and Bolts of Partnership Development Florida Department of Health Office of Health Statistics and Assessment Spring 2009
  2. 2. Series Goal Strengthen capacities for collaborative community-based health improvement efforts
  3. 3. Today’s Objectives • Implement strategies for building and sustaining partnerships • Use tools to identify/inventory roles/skills needed for the partnership • Use skills learned to identify and retain active partners
  4. 4. Community Health Assessment and Health Improvement Planning • The practice of collecting, analyzing and using data to educate and mobilize communities, develop priorities, gather resources, and plan and implement actions to improve public health. (Institute of Medicine)
  5. 5. Why Assess the Health of Your Community? • Understand health problems, challenges – Risk factors, contributing causes • Identify strengths, gains in health status – Assets, resources • Learn community perceptions about health- related issues • Use data/information to establish priorities, improve systems
  6. 6. How? Planning Models Matrix
  7. 7. MAPP is • Community-wide strategic planning tool for improving public health • Method to help communities prioritize public health issues, identify resources for addressing them, and take action Mobilizing for Action through Planning and Partnerships
  8. 8. MAPP Concepts • Mobilizing – Engaging the community • Action – Implementing a health improvement plan • Planning – Applying strategic planning concepts • Partnerships – Involves local public health system and community partners
  9. 9. A Paradigm Shift
  10. 10. Links to Community, Agency Strategic Planning Vision for Agency Vision Community’s Health Mission of Partnership Agency Mission Assessment Assessment Results: SWOT Analysis Results LPHSA, Community Health Status Common Strategic Issues Community Strategic Agency Strategic Issues Issues Goals and Strategies Goals and Objectives Action Plan and Action Plan and Monitoring Plan Monitoring Plan
  11. 11. Needs/Priorities of those we serve Partnerships Partners’ Convening Goals Program’s Goals
  12. 12. Local Public Health System Local Public Health System Police Home Health EMS Community Churches MCOs Corrections Centers Health Department Parks Schools Elected Doctors Hospitals Officials Nursing Mass Transit Philanthropist Homes Environmental Civic Groups Health CHCs Fire Tribal Health Economic Laboratory Drug Mental Employers Development Facilities Treatment Health
  13. 13. Two Key Goals: Alignment of Resources and Alignment of Individual Interests with Collective Ones To change this . . . . . To this . . . . . .
  14. 14. The Good, the Bad and The Ugly of Community Partnerships The Bad: • not all partners on the same page • lack of follow through • lack of leadership The Good: • becoming stagnant • networking • maintaining involvement • more resources • sustainability • more ideas • different priorities/interests • more people to help • meeting just to meet share the work • too many chiefs • less duplication • shared vision The Ugly: • learn from past experiences • arguing among partners • different expertise/knowledge • negative/disruptive people • not valuing people’s time • asking partners to step down • different agendas • misunderstandings • same people involved • not open to change or new ideas • small town politics • unprofessional-ism
  15. 15. Benefits of Collaboration in the Public Health System • Creates a healthy community and better quality of life • Increases visibility of public health • Anticipates and manages change • Creates a stronger public health infrastructure • Builds public health leadership • Creates advocates for public health • Builds stronger partnerships
  16. 16. Questions to keep in mind as you build your partnerships: • Why are community partners so important? • What does an effective partnership look like? • How do you measure success in your partnership?
  17. 17. Key Ingredients in Partnership Development  Identify potential partners  Recruit & retain partners  Maintain active involvement  Determine role of partners  Create partnership agreements  Plan for sustainability- every step of the way  Evaluate the partnership constantly  Celebrate successes
  18. 18. Partnership Development First Step: Identify & recruit partners • Who needs to be at the table? • What are their expectations? • What is our mission and vision? • What are our goals and objectives? • Let them know what they can expect; how long will the partnership last?
  19. 19. Identifying Partners Why are we seeking partners? What are our needs? What do we hope to gain from a potential partnership? What kind of partners are we looking for (law enforcement, education, health care, etc) ? Are we looking for support from key decision makers in the community?
  20. 20. Identifying Partners What do we have to offer potential partners? What value or benefit can we offer potential partners? Do we have expertise or resources that would be useful to others? Are we trying to reach the same clients or potential partners?
  21. 21. Develop your own Partnership Skills Make your own self-improvement plan Evaluate your commitment to other partnerships Are you a good partner?
  22. 22. How do we Market our Partnership? • Marketing creates greater awareness of your partnership in the community • Through marketing, a partnership can emphasize its association with other community partners • Marketing builds confidence in the community group. • Marketing encourages participation • Marketing helps develop contacts and expands everyone’s knowledge base
  23. 23. Sample Partnership Information Sheet What is family literacy? Family literacy is a relatively new approach to literacy development. The goal is to prevent the cycle of intergenerational problems of low literacy, by building on the strengths of the family and their existing uses of literacy. Why is family literacy important here? We believe that a family literacy program is needed here in our community. Statistics Canada figures from 1989 show that nearly one in every three Canadians has difficulty with everyday reading tasks. Working in partnership Family literacy is not just about reading and writing. It is about developing stronger relationships between parents and their children. It is about getting parents involved in their children's education. It is about building stronger families and healthier communities. We know now that the issues and challenges families face are multifaceted and complex, and we also know that we need to work together to address those issues. Your agency has expertise and insights that we need to plan and develop a family literacy project for our community. By working in partnership, we can reach those families that most need the support, and help each other deliver more effective, efficient services at the same time. For more information, please call: The Mosquito County Family Literacy Organization at (555) 555-1212.
  24. 24. Are the right partners at the table? Who is missing?
  25. 25. Identifying Community Partners Activity: After brainstorming, list the partners you would like to include in your community partnership. List by agency/organization and name 1. ____________________________________________________________ 2. ____________________________________________________________ 3. ____________________________________________________________ 4. ____________________________________________________________ 5. ____________________________________________________________ 6. ____________________________________________________________ 7. ____________________________________________________________ 8. ____________________________________________________________ 9. ____________________________________________________________ 10. ___________________________________________________________ 11. ___________________________________________________________ 12. ___________________________________________________________
  26. 26. Role Inventory What are some of the roles needed in our partnerships?
  27. 27. Potential Roles Do you have a partner who can  Evaluate components of the partnership  Manage partner database and meeting notifications  Provide guidance for policy development and program planning  Collect and analyze data; conduct community assessments  Develop Social Networking tools for the partnership  Develop and present education and training programs for partners  Educate elected officials and policy makers on health issues  Market the partnership  Monitor/analyze health-related legislation (Legislative issues)
  28. 28. Partner Skill/Expertise Inventory • Example tool to ascertain skills, expertise of partnership members • Use inventory results as a guide in assigning or selecting roles
  29. 29. Partner Roles and Skills/Expertise Checklist Use this grid to identify partnership roles, skills needed for those roles, and if you need/have a person in that role. Roles Skill or Area of Expertise Needed Need Have Who? •Partnership Management Program management skills, social networking skills •Fiscal manager Budget management •Meeting planner Event planning •Meeting facilitator Facilitative leadership expertise •Recorder Writing skills •Membership coordinator Database management •Planners Strategic planning Action planning •Program Planning Design educational materials, activities Implement educational materials, activities •Evaluator Evaluation •Goals, objectives Writing measurable goals, objectives •Quality assurance Performance improvement •Communication Public speaking, working with media •Marketing Public relations Social marketing •Spokesperson Public speaking •IT Social media •Policy Policy development •Health Content Specialist Trainers, educators, public heath professionals •Health status Data analysis, interpretation
  30. 30. The Good, the Bad and The Ugly of Community Partnerships The Bad: • not all partners on the same page • lack of follow through • lack of leadership The Good: • becoming stagnant • networking • maintaining involvement • more resources • sustainability • more ideas • different priorities/interests • more people to help • meeting just to meet share the work • too many chiefs • less duplication • shared vision The Ugly: • learn from past experiences • arguing among partners • different expertise/knowledge • negative/disruptive people • not valuing people’s time • asking partners to step down • different agendas • misunderstandings • same people involved • not open to change or new ideas • small town politics • unprofessional-ism
  31. 31. Case Study Musical Chairs What would you do if this happened in your partnership? You are the leader of the Sunshine County Health Coalition. You and the coalition members have worked hard to get the right partners to the table. One very important agency sends a different representative every time the coalition meets. Before new business can be conducted, precious time is wasted bringing the new person up to speed. Commitments made by the agency’s previous representative aren’t honored. How do you ensure that the right partners stay engaged? How would you handle the issue of broken promises?
  32. 32. Case Study Possible solutions • Provide new member orientation and educate on roles and responsibilities • Re-examine the meeting time and place • Survey members to find out their needs, expectations, and benefits they've gained (or not gained) • Hold elections - elect representatives from organizations (the partnership chooses its members) • Let peer pressure handle it • Be sure the minutes reflect what's been happening • Use a memorandum of agreement • Have leader take direct approach with offending organization (meet face-to-face)
  33. 33. Tools and Resources • COMPASS website • Florida MAPP Field www.doh.state.fl.us Guide /COMPASS – On-line and print – Step-by-step guide – Tip sheets, worksheets • Marketing materials – Florida MAPP Tour Book • Technical assistance – On site, web conference, phone
  34. 34. Tools and Resources • www.floridacharts.com • Foundational resource for community-based health planning
  35. 35. Need More Information? • Visit CHARTS www.floridacharts.com • Visit COMPASS website www.doh.state.fl.us/COMPASS/ Contact DOH Office of Planning, Evaluation and Data Analysis • Christine Abarca at 850-245-4444 ext 2071, e-mail: Christine_Abarca@doh.state.fl.us • Laurie Osgood at 850-245-4444 ext. 2036, e-mail: Laurie_Osgood@doh.state.fl.us
  36. 36. Future Modules • August 12 – Techniques for Sustaining Community Partnerships • August 19 – Leadership and Facilitation presented by the Dept. of Health’s Office of Performance Improvement • September 2 – Evaluating your Partnership All modules take place from 2-3 pm ET

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