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Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
Ohio CVISN Business Plan.doc
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  • 1. Public Utilities Commission of Ohio OHIO Ohio Dept. of Taxation CVISN BUSINESS PLAN Ohio Commercial Vehicle Information Systems and Networks (OCVISN) Ohio Dept. of Transportation Revised June, 2002 Ohio Dept. of Public Safety • Ohio State Highway Patrol • Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles
  • 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1 1.1 CVISN Background...............................................................................................................3 2.0 BUSINESS PLAN DEVELOPMENT PROCESS 6 2.1 Development Of Strategic Concepts.....................................................................................6 2.2 Data Collection.....................................................................................................................6 2.3 Data Analysis.........................................................................................................................7 2.4 Project Definition..................................................................................................................7 2.5 Report Writing.......................................................................................................................7 3.0 DESCRIPTION OF THE STATE 8 3.1 Current State CVO Program.................................................................................................9 3.2 Issues and Options...............................................................................................................12 4.0 MISSION STATEMENT FOR ITS/CVO FOR OHIO 13 4.1 The Mission.........................................................................................................................13 4.2 Vision Elements...................................................................................................................13 4.3 Ohio’s ITS/CVO Vision.......................................................................................................16 4.4 Strategic Analysis................................................................................................................17 5.0 PROGRAM ACTIVITIES 22 5.1 Description of Projects........................................................................................................22 5.2 Project Assessment..............................................................................................................25 5.3 Project Ranking...................................................................................................................28 5.4 Project Summary Sheets....................................................................................................29 5.5 System Requirements and Design.......................................................................................36 5.6 Work Breakdown Structure.................................................................................................36 6.0 ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT 37 6.1 Training and Outreach Plan...............................................................................................37 6.2 Funding Approach...............................................................................................................38 6.3 Memorandum of Agreement................................................................................................39 Appendix A - Data Collection and Analysis 43 Appendix B - Work Breakdown Structure 51 Appendix C – Organization Charts 56 Appendix C1 - State of Ohio Organization Relating to Commercial Vehicle Operations ......56 Appendix C2 - Program / Project Organization.......................................................................57 Appendix C3 - Inter Agency Coordinating Group (Alternate members not listed)...................58 I
  • 3. Appendix D – Project Schedules 60 Appendix D1 – Project Wide Schedule......................................................................................60 Appendix D2 – Integration Schedule ........................................................................................61 Appendix D3 – Safety, Credentialing and E-Screening Schedule.............................................62 62 Appendix E – Work Assignments 63 Appendix F – Procurement Strategy 64 Appendix G – COACH Part 2, Management Checklists 65 Appendix H – CVISN Grant Agreement 68 Appendix I - Acronyms 69 II
  • 4. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Ohio has aggressively initiated and participated in a variety of ITS/CVO initiatives in recent years. The success of these projects provides the impetus and enthusiasm to pursue higher forms of technology in addressing issues relating to CVO. This document provides a concise summary of long term strategic concepts, goals, objectives and projects as well as a decision making framework within the context of the ITS/CVO program for Ohio, specifically regarding the Commercial Vehicle Information Systems and Networks (CVISN) program. Ohio's Mission for ITS Commercial Vehicle Operations Ohio’s mission for ITS Commercial Vehicle Operations revolves around achieving safe and efficient commercial transportation operations on public highways and at transportation facilities through effective implementation of motor carrier safety, registration and taxation provisions while maintaining efficiency and effectiveness in motor carrier operations. This mission also seeks to enhance the growth of commerce in Ohio, the region and the nation through improvements in CVO productivity while also ensuring quality and equitable service for commercial carriers and the public by maintaining a safe, efficient, accessible and integrated transportation system. Ohio's ITS/CVO mission is supported by five defined vision elements. The first element is to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of CVO through "paperless" electronic credentialing and taxation processes, while maintaining privacy and confidentiality of information. The second element is to improve highway safety through efficient and timely data exchange to help eliminate unsafe and illegal operations. The third element is to enhance CVO productivity, efficiency and effectiveness by improving efficiency in roadside screening for inspections, thereby providing incentives for safe operations. The fourth element is to support state, regional and national economic growth and global competitiveness through improvements in CVO productivity. The fifth and final element is to facilitate voluntary regulatory CVO compliance of motor carriers by creating a user-friendly environment for agency and industry interactions. Strategic analysis was used to develop the strengths and weaknesses of the existing systems in Ohio and to identify the opportunities and threats for future ITS/CVO programs in the state. A variety of problems were identified by the analysis. For instance, certain aspects of the current credentialing processes were found to be cumbersome, slow and time consuming and involved excessive amounts of paperwork. The number of IRP application sites in Ohio was found to be limited and renewal periods were seen as restrictive. Safety inspections were seen as not always being completely uniform or consistent. Carrier selection for safety inspections was identified as not always being based solely on safety-performance criteria. Finally, the potential for commercial vehicles to experience long delays at roadside inspections with unnecessary delays being imposed on compliant carriers was also observed. A number of opportunities were also identified. In this case it was noted that Ohio's regulatory and enforcement processes could be more efficient and effective. Higher technology options could be deployed. A paperless credentialing environment could be created through electronic one-stop shopping. Safety could be improved by targeting high-risk carriers more effectively. 1
  • 5. Higher technology would enhance uniformity and consistency in safety inspections. Delays at inspection sites could be reduced. Enforcement resources could be more efficiently utilized. Voluntary compliance with safety and economic regulations could be encouraged and increased industry awareness could improve acceptance and participation. To address these problems and take advantage of the opportunities that are present the following projects have been identified. Ohio will provide on-line, real time motor carrier safety and credentialing information from state, regional and national information bases to enforcement officers at the roadside. The state will also implement a data exchange system utilizing current "snapshots" of carrier, driver, and vehicle data from various agencies to be provided to government and private entities needing the data. The use of roadside electronic screening systems that use safety and credentialing criteria for electronic pre-clearance in the enforcement of safety and economic regulations will be upgraded and an “electronic one-stop shop” to fully automate the credentialing, taxation, permitting and payment process and participate in regional and national credentialing (IRP and IFTA) clearinghouses (if available) will be implemented. This document outlines the cooperative plans of the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio, the Ohio Department of Public Safety, the Ohio Department of Taxation, and the Ohio Department of Transportation to undertake the projects listed above in conjunction with the Ohio Trucking Association and other interested organizations and agencies. 2
  • 6. 1.0 INTRODUCTION The purpose of the Ohio Commercial Vehicle Information Systems and Networks (CVISN) business plan is to develop a safe, effective, efficient and productive CVISN system in Ohio that fits within frameworks of regional and national CVISN initiatives. The business plan serves as a concise program summary that achieves consensus on CVISN policies among state agencies and the motor carrier industry and that will allow development and deployment of CVISN projects in a coordinated manner. The business plan identifies specific projects to be undertaken to address the specific CVO problems and achieve the CVISN vision for Ohio. The business plan was originally organized and developed in 1998 by the Battelle Memorial Institute in association with a Steering Committee consisting of representatives of the state agencies and the motor carrier industry and associations in Ohio. The Business Plan was subsequently revised by the Steering Committee. The Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO) is the administrative lead agency in the business plan development effort. The Departments of Taxation, Public Safety (Bureau of Motor Vehicles and State Highway Patrol), Transportation, and the Ohio Trucking Association supported the development of the business plan. The development of Ohio's ITS/CVO business plan was supported by a grant from the FMCSA ITS/CVO “mainstreaming” funds. In January 2001, this plan was updated to reflect significant progress, increased funding, and modified goals. In February 2002, this plan was again updated to reflect organizational changes, updated schedules and current status on previously planned activities. 1.1 CVISN Background As part of a national policy initiative, the U.S. Department of Transportation has expressed its intent to spend considerable funds in the next several years to relieve traffic congestion and improve highway safety through the use of electronic technologies. The term “intelligent transportation systems (ITS)” is being used to encompass the entire scope of electronic systems that may be utilized to address improvements in the nation’s transportation systems. The ITS concept is broken down into seven major elements: x Travel & Transportation Management x Travel Demand Management x Public Transportation Management x Electronic Payment x Commercial Vehicle Operations (ITS/CVO) x Emergency Management x Advanced Vehicle Control & Safety Systems The ITS/CVO element includes the ITS technologies which uniquely support Commercial Vehicle Operations (CVO). The scope of CVO includes the operations associated with moving goods and passengers via commercial vehicles over the North American highway system and the activities necessary to regulate these operations. It includes activities related to safety assurance, 3
  • 7. commercial vehicle credentials and tax administration, roadside operations, freight & fleet management, and vehicle operation. The term “commercial vehicle information systems and networks (CVISN)” refers to the ITS information system elements that support CVO. CVISN is essentially information system elements that support commercial vehicle operations. This includes information systems owned and operated by governments, motor carriers, and other stakeholders. CVISN is not a new information system, but rather a way for existing systems to exchange information through the use of standards and the US commercially available communications infrastructure. CVISN will enable government agencies, the motor carrier industry, and other parties engaged in CVO safety and regulation to exchange information and conduct business transactions electronically. The proposed use of these new technologies to support commercial vehicle operations (CVO) centers on two primary areas: • Electronic exchange of business transactions among motor carriers, government agencies, and related entities such as insurance companies and banks, and • “On highway” systems to expedite and improve safety of motor carrier operations, such as electronic “pre-approval” for safe trucks to bypass weigh stations. The CVISN Program is proceeding in five major steps. The first step develops the management (plans) and technical (architecture) frameworks necessary to coordinate the subsequent phases. The second step is to prototype the technology in an integrated way in two states (Maryland and Virginia) to demonstrate operational concepts and validate requirements. The third step, ongoing at this time, is to pilot the approach in a limited number of "model" states. This allows testing and evaluating in a project of manageable size before proceeding to widespread deployment. The fourth step, is expansion from the model states to a number of partner states. This should be a smooth expansion, since each partner state will be coordinating with a model state in the same region. The final step allows for deployment to all interested states. Expected Benefits for State Governments 1. Data interchange among states, carriers, financial institutions, and insurance carriers will be electronic and efficient. 2. Administrators and enforcement personnel will have electronic access to required data. 3. Enforcement resources can be focused on high-risk carriers and drivers. 4. Credentials issuance, taxation, inspections, and compliance reviews will be automated to proceed more efficiently. 5. Better enforcement of weight, size, safety, and tax regulations. 6. In the long term, re-engineered policies and practices can be based on measured data and careful analysis. Expected Benefits for Motor Carriers 4
  • 8. 1. Reduced administrative burden in regulatory compliance. 2. Vehicles of safe and legal carriers will incur less delay. 3. Technology investment can support multiple services. 4. Uniformity of services across North America. 5. Focus on unsafe carriers will “level the playing field.” 6. Reduction in exposure to lane change movements at inspection sites. 7. Increased commercial vehicle fuel efficiency. 5
  • 9. 2.0 BUSINESS PLAN DEVELOPMENT PROCESS This section describes the steps involved in developing the CVISN business plan for Ohio. The lead agency (PUCO) established a Steering Committee that consisted of representatives of the motor carrier industry and representatives of all state agencies with CVO responsibilities. The initial consultant (Battelle) worked closely with the Steering Committee in developing the business plan. The development of Ohio's CVISN business plan involved five major steps as discussed below. 2.1 Development Of Strategic Concepts The first step developed the strategic concepts. This step consisted of defining the overall long- range mission statement for ITS/CVO for Ohio; developing the underlying assumptions ("guiding principles") for program development; outlining the broad achievements (goals) desired; and establishing specific objectives within the goals. The guiding principles were developed as elements of the vision for the future in ITS/CVO. The development of the strategic concepts formed the basis for the data collection effort and definition of projects in the subsequent steps. 2.2 Data Collection The second step was data collection. This consisted of five elements (i) kick-off workshop; (ii) literature review; (iii) interview; (iv) site visits, and (v) focus groups. Kick-off workshop: The kick-off workshop was held in 1997 for representatives of all stakeholders to present and discuss the strategic concepts and outline the potential benefits to the state agencies and motor carrier industry. This workshop was conducted to encourage participation and buy-in of stakeholders in the ITS/CVO program for Ohio. The workshop provided the opportunity for the stakeholders to start communicating. This effort was necessary to facilitate agreement on the guiding principles, common goals and objectives for the ITS/CVO program for Ohio. Literature review: Available literature on ITS/CVO was reviewed to develop a "best practices" white paper of ITS/CVO implementation that focused on Ohio's vision. Recent developments including ITS early deployment plans, CVISN deployment plans in pilot states as well as business plans from other states were reviewed. Interview: Data was gathered through interviews of state and industry representatives. The questionnaire was structured to capture information relating to current practices and responsibilities; type, level and plans for future deployment of technology relating to CVO; problems and concerns relating to ITS/CVO; and strategies or opportunities for overcoming barriers. Separate questionnaires were used for state agencies and motor carriers. Site visits: As part of the data collection effort, on-site visits were made to weight and safety enforcement locations: one to a weigh scale that employs mainline automated screening (i.e., 6
  • 10. part of the former Advantage CVO program) and one visit to a weigh scale that has no ITS/CVO technology. These site visits provided first hand information on the functioning of the existing roadside systems, any technical problems and insights for future modifications. These visits also provided the opportunity to solicit opinions from the enforcement personnel and drivers. Focus groups: Data collected through the interviews was then reviewed and refined through focus groups. Two focus groups were used, one for private sector CVO stakeholders and one for state agencies. These groups were identified in consultation with the Steering Committee. This effort was essential to ensure that there is reasonable agreement on the issues and concerns identified during the individual interviews. The results are summarized in Appendix A. 2.3 Data Analysis The third major step was the analysis of data. This involved procedural analysis to determine specific CVO problems from the agency and motor carrier standpoints in Ohio that can be addressed through ITS/CVO implementation. This was followed by strategic analysis to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the CVO systems in Ohio and the opportunities for addressing these problems and the potential threats. The Strength, Weakness, Opportunity and Threat (S.W.O.T.) analysis allowed the vision elements of Ohio's ITS/CVO program to be aligned to the opportunities, threats and CVO problems in Ohio. The strategic analysis develops the organizations strategic path towards realizing the vision elements. Results of the S.W.O.T. analysis are also attached in Appendix A. 2.4 Project Definition The fourth step defined the projects to address the CVO problems based on the S.W.O.T. analysis. This involved two items (1) identification of the relationship between the vision elements and the four major ITS/CVO functional areas, and (2) definition of projects under each major area. Concepts for the individual projects for each of the major areas are described as part of this task. Information from the "best practices" was used to develop the concepts. The use of "best practices" information is to ensure conformity and compatibility with the nationwide effort to create a coordinated information system for CVO. The projects were assessed based on a set of criteria relating to cost, resources, technology, simplicity, etc. A schedule for project deployment was then generated. 2.5 Report Writing The final step in the business plan development process combined the findings from the previous steps into a draft business plan. This was then reviewed and revised by the Steering Committee before a final report was prepared summarizing the business plan for Ohio. 7
  • 11. 3.0 DESCRIPTION OF THE STATE This section describes the existing systems relevant to the functional areas of ITS/CVO. The relationships to regional and national ITS/CVO initiatives are first outlined. The current CVO activities and issues and opportunities that impact CVO in Ohio are discussed. The Nation As part of the national policy initiative, the U.S. Department of Transportation has expressed its intent to spend considerable funds in the next several years to relieve traffic congestion and improve highway safety through the use of intelligent highway system technologies. The scope of the CVO component of the ITS technologies includes operations associated with passenger and freight movement via commercial vehicles and the activities necessary to regulate these operations. The national ITS/CVO goals and objectives recognized four elements as producing benefits through improving highway safety, streamlining credentials and tax administration, reducing congestion costs for motor carriers, and ensuring regulatory compliance and equitable treatment. The national ITS/CVO goals are accomplished within a framework defined by safety assurance, credentials administration, electronic clearance, and carrier operations. The Region Ohio is a member of the Great Lakes truckshed, and former member of the Advantage CVO States and the Alliance CVO Mainstreaming. The geographic location of Ohio places it in a central position providing an essential link to East-West freight movement in the US and North- South international trade between the U.S. and Canada. The region is composed of industrial states in the Midwest and industrializing states in the Southeast. Ohio has established a record of working with public-private partnerships to accomplish CVO goals in the region. The State With seven major Interstate highways (I-70, 71, 75, 76, 77, 80 and 90) and being situated in a primary East-West commercial traffic corridor, Ohio is a showcase of commercial highway transportation. Often referred to as the "crossroads of the Nation", Ohio is centered between U.S. commercial and population concentrations. Ohio's participation in regional and national ITS/CVO initiatives is an expansion of existing projects relating to applying ITS technologies to the regulations and enforcement of Federal safety regulations. Ohio has established a "track record" of success in unique technology-related projects. These include: the Advantage I-75 mainline automated clearance project, initiation of the fax back customer service for carriers, piloting the multi-state adoption of the Single State Registration System (SSRS) projects, pilot state in the implementation of the ASPEN and ISS software, pilot state in the Uniform Hazardous Materials Transportation permit project, introduction of an electronic application for oversize / overweight (OS/OW) permit, internet renewal of non-commercial vehicle registrations, and electronic filing of insurance verifications of for-hire carriers. Approximately 365,000 general-purpose non-International Registration Plan (IRP) commercial vehicles are registered in Ohio in addition to 47,000 truck tractors and 115,000 commercial 8
  • 12. trailers (527,000). Ohio has a total of 113,435 miles of highways. About 11,000 companies are registered in Ohio with the FMCSA. Approximately 1,000 "for hire" busses are based in Ohio, along with over 2,000 private buses. State agencies and their responsibilities for the various administrative and enforcement processes of the motor carrier safety and economic regulations are discussed in the following sections. 3.1 Current State CVO Program This section outlines CVO programs in Ohio. Highlights of current administrative and enforcement procedures are provided. Existing CVO projects in Ohio that are ITS oriented are also listed. Currently, processing of various types of applications for permits, licenses and registrations for commercial motor vehicle are handled by four separate state agencies. The PUCO and the Ohio State Highway Patrol, a Division of the Department of Public Safety, jointly handle enforcement of the regulations. The agencies and their responsibilities are summarized in Table 3.1. Transactions involving for-hire operating authority and insurance filings are handled via mail, facsimile, or Internet by the PUCO. This includes the SSRS and the intrastate registration. The PUCO also administers Hazmat permits. As one of the original states in the Uniform Hazardous Materials Transportation Procedures ("The Alliance"), Ohio has developed extensive, unique data and administrative systems for base-state and federal registration of Hazmat carriers. These transactions are handled via mail and fax, but the extensive data system for state use has been developed with the intent of later utilization for a variety of "external" services for carriers and other potential users. Vehicle registration and operators' licenses are the responsibility of the Bureau of Motor of Vehicles (BMV) of the Department of Public Safety, mostly through private-party deputy registrars under contract to BMV. The IRP transactions are handled through the Affiliated Computer Systems (ACS) IRP Center, and intrastate commercial vehicle registrations through the local deputy registrars. These transactions are handled via mail or in person. Affiliated Computer Systems (ACS) provides a "turn key" IRP center for the state using VISTA/RS; i.e., it provides all personnel, hardware, and software for IRP processing. In early 2001, four regional IRP processing centers were opened under an Affiliated Computer Systems (ACS) contract. Currently, there is no direct electronic communication between the IRP Center and carriers. The current BMV contract with Affiliated Computer Systems (ACS) expires in June, 2003. Commercial vehicle driver licenses (CDL) are also processed in person by local deputy registrars. In 2000, non-commercial license plate renewal was made available on the Internet via a third-party vendor under contract to the state (see www.oplates.com). The Ohio Department of Taxation (ODT) issues fuel use tax (FUT) and the International Fuel Tax Agreement (IFTA) permits and accepts related tax filings from carriers. ODT processes the information through Affiliated Computer Systems (ACS) VISTA/TS system. State employees perform data entry, and Affiliated Computer Systems (ACS) software is utilized for record keeping and calculations. These transactions are handled via mail or facsimile. In 2000, the ODT was successful in modifying state laws to eliminate small transaction fees in preparation for later Internet activity in CVISN. 9
  • 13. The Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) issues oversize / overweight (OS/OW) permits. The system allows for electronic application submissions and receipt for frequent- users. This system utilizes a software system developed for and operated by ODOT. The Ohio Department of Public Safety has signed an agreement with HELP, Inc., for installation / operation of the PrePass electronic pre-clearance system in Ohio. This system will permit vehicles of qualified carriers to be pre-cleared at weigh stations by using advanced technologies to verify the carrier’s safety and credential status. PrePass is a voluntary program that carriers opt to participate in. PrePass is currently operational at 16 sites on Ohio’s interstate highways. The Ohio State Highway Patrol in association with the PUCO carries out MCSAP safety inspections and roadside enforcement. Ohio was the first state to utilize the ASPEN software to input all MCSAP roadside inspection data into portable computers at the roadside and to upload the information electronically to Safetynet. Currently, a total of 118 staff from the PUCO and Ohio State Patrol are involved in the program. Inspectors utilize the ASPEN program to conduct about 60,000 safety inspections annually. Once the inspection data is uploaded to Safetynet at the state level, the information is automatically processed to generate fax-back copies to carriers requesting that service, and generate violation information for Ohio's unique civil forfeiture (penalty) system. Since motor coaches are not inspected at fixed scale sites in Ohio (destinations such as amusement parks are used), those carriers are less affected by CVISN potential changes in roadside screening; however, passenger carriers will be able to take advantage of the same electronic “one-stop shop” features as other carriers in credentialing processes. The trade association representing motor coaches is being kept informed of potential CVISN developments and will participate in the planning process as needed. Phase I of Ohio’s Multi-Agency Radio Communications System (MARCS) is scheduled to begin in August of 2002. This 800 MHZ trunking system, costing over $280 million, will provide a key communications link for all roadside operations involved in the CVISN efforts. Originally it was anticipated that this system would also be utilized as a data link between roadside personnel and Ohio’s CVISN systems. However, after further research into the capabilities of the system, it is likely that Ohio will pursue an alternative method of data communications such as cellular or microwave technology. 10
  • 14. TABLE 3.1 REGULATORY AND ENFORCEMENT FUNCTIONS OF STATE AGENCIES Function Area State Agency Responsibility Department of Public Safety: • IRP (Affiliated Computer Bureau of Motor Vehicles Systems (ACS) VISTA/RS) Administrative • Intrastate Registration • CDL Department of Taxation • IFTA (Affiliated Computer Systems (ACS) VISTA/TS) • FUT (intrastate tax) Department of Transportation • OS/OW permit • SSRS Public Utilities Commission of Ohio • Hazmat permit • Intrastate registration • Operating authority • FMCSA Safetynet Data Enforcement Department of Public Safety: • Roadside inspections Ohio State Highway Patrol • OS/OW enforcement Public Utilities Commission of Ohio • Safety inspections • Hazmat inspections ITS/CVO projects that are currently being implemented in Ohio include the following: • Electronic application and issuance of OS/OW permits by the Department of Transportation, • Participation in the Help, Inc. PrePass program involving mainline automated clearance systems currently installed at 16 sites, • Deployment of lap-top computers and ASPEN2, ISS2, CDLIS software for all safety inspectors in Ohio, • Hazmat inspection specialists equipped with lap top computers and ASPEN2, CAPRI, CDLIS, MCREGIS and other FMCSA programs Ohio's ITS/CVO plans are defined as projects in this business plan. The major thrust is to move further to deploy systems that improve safety, efficiency and productivity in CVO through the 11
  • 15. development and deployment of technologies that improve efficiency in the state agencies' credentialing, safety information exchange and roadside inspections functions. 3.2 Issues and Options Major issues that affect the administration and enforcement of CVO regulations may typically present both opportunities and obstacles to the application of ITS technologies. In Ohio, those issues include the following: • The Department of Taxation (ODT) has been moving toward paperless tax filings and this falls in line with CVISN concepts. The department uses Affiliated Computer Systems’ VISTA-TS computer system to administer the International Fuel Tax agreement (IFTA). The VISTA-TS system is also used by several other states involved in CVISN and Affiliated Computer Systems already interfaces with the IFTA Clearinghouse. Electronic filing of tax returns and registrations and the electronic sharing of information fit the department of Taxation’s goals for the future. • The Public Utilities Commission plans to initiate an effort to completely redesign the structure and format of all databases included in the Commission’s Ohio Motor Carrier Information System (OMCIS), which will include all MCSAP inspection, compliance review, and crash data as well as registration of for-hire, hazmat, and household goods carriers, both intra and interstate. • The Bureau of Motor Vehicles of the Department of Safety currently contracts with Affiliated Computer Systems (ACS) for the "turnkey" processing of IRP applications. Affiliated Computer Systems (ACS) is also the service provider for a number of states that are CVISN prototype or pilot states. The company's experience in developing CVISN compatible interfaces with state legacy systems provides a great opportunity for Ohio's ITS/CVO program. Affiliated Computer Systems (ACS), under contract to BMV, has recently opened four new regional IRP processing centers, indicating a further commitment to customer service. • The Bureau of Motor Vehicles has recently initiated on-line renewal of non-commercial license plates (see www.oplates.com). This commitment to new technologies for customer service is a major step toward similar CVISN concepts for commercial vehicles. • The Department of Transportation has developed an ITS strategic deployment plan for the I-71 corridor in Ohio. Preliminary plans include commercial vehicle electronic clearance, roadside CVO safety and driver / vehicle safety monitoring components. These are consistent with the ITS/CVO vision elements for Ohio and the core features are in compliance with the national ITS infrastructure. The deployment schedule includes short and long term projects. Experiences from these projects will be useful in CVISN deployment in Ohio. 12
  • 16. 4.0 MISSION STATEMENT FOR ITS/CVO FOR OHIO This section describes the strategic concepts for the ITS/CVO program for Ohio. The mission, guiding principles, goals and objectives are described. 4.1 The Mission • To achieve safe and efficient commercial transportation operations on public highways and at transportation facilities through effective implementation of motor carrier safety, registration and taxation provisions while maintaining efficiency and effectiveness in motor carrier operations. • To enhance the growth of commerce in Ohio, the region and the nation through improvements in CVO productivity. • To ensure quality and equitable service for commercial carriers and the public by maintaining a safe, efficient, accessible and integrated transportation system. 4.2 Vision Elements Ohio's vision for ITS/CVO is composed of a number of defined elements that can be used to evaluate potential ITS/CVO projects in the state. These elements represent the guiding principles or assumptions underlying the development of the business plan. The elements are: I. Improve efficiency and effectiveness of CVO through "paperless"electronic credentialing and taxation processes, while maintaining privacy and confidentiality of information. II. Improve highway safety through efficient and timely data exchange to help eliminate unsafe and illegal operations. III. Enhance CVO productivity, efficiency and effectiveness by improving efficiency in roadside screening for inspections thereby providing incentives for safe operations. IV. Support state, regional and national economic growth and global competitiveness through improvements in CVO productivity. V. Facilitate voluntary regulatory CVO compliance by motor carriers by creating a user- friendly environment for agency and industry interactions. 13
  • 17. These guiding principles or vision elements are used to tailor the goals and objectives of Ohio's ITS/CVO program. The specific multiple objectives that embody the goals are identified. These broad goals and objectives associated with each vision element are discussed in this section. These guiding principles are in agreement with the "CVISN Guiding Principles" as developed and published by the ITSA/ CVO Program Subcommittee. Those principles have been accepted and adopted by the Ohio CVISN Steering Committee to ensure that all CVISN activities in Ohio will be conducted in accordance with these guiding principles. I. Improve efficiency and effectiveness of CVO through "paperless"electronic credentialing and taxation processes, while maintaining privacy and confidentiality of information. This vision element is seen is an embodiment of the overriding goal of the ITS/CVO program to streamline and improve CVO in Ohio. This element is directed at the opportunities for paperless processes for both state agencies and motor carriers. Broad goal: Improve efficiency and effectiveness in administrative processes including registration, credentialing and taxation through electronic applications without creating additional information requirements or compromising confidentiality. Objective: Implement an "electronic one-stop shop" for credentialing, permitting and payment functions. Objective: Reduce the steps, time and effort required by industry and state agencies to fulfill regulatory obligations. Objective: Reduce administrative burden on the part of motor carriers in complying with safety and economic regulations. II. Improve highway safety through efficient and timely data exchange to help eliminate unsafe and illegal operations. This element extends the opportunities for improving highway safety through effective screening for safety enforcement based on accessibility to and timely delivery of real time safety data. Carriers with good safety performance records will experience efficiency in their operations by virtue of the ability of enforcement personnel to easily identify and target less safe operators. Similarly, unsafe operators will be more effectively identified and removed from operation. Broad goal: Improve highway safety of CVO. Objective: Reduce the rate and severity of crashes involving commercial vehicles in Ohio. Objective: Improve motor carrier voluntary compliance with safety regulations. Objective: Provide a real-time safety information exchange system to facilitate roadside screening to identify and target high-risk carriers for inspections. Objective: Implement reliable high-speed communication systems and data transfer technologies. 14
  • 18. III. Enhance CVO productivity, efficiency and effectiveness by improving efficiency in roadside screening for inspections thereby providing incentives for safe operations. A major component the ITS/CVO program is directed towards enhancing economic growth through improvement in productivity and efficiency in freight movement by trucks. This element is perceived as one of the high priority areas by virtue of its relationship with safety. The element has as its central focus, streamlining enforcement procedures through the application of ITS technologies so that parallel benefits to private and public sectors can be realized. Broad goal: Enhance CVO productivity and efficiency. Objective: Reduce inspection delays to safe operators in Ohio and create incentives for voluntary compliance with safety and economic regulations. Objective: Enhance efficiency and effectiveness in enforcement of safety and economic regulations. Objective: Expand and enhance electronic screening capabilities on highways. IV. Support state, regional and national economic growth and global competitiveness through improvements in CVO productivity. This vision element aligns with the goals and objectives of the regional and national ITS/CVO initiatives. It focuses on the quality of choices between alternative processes in streamlining CVO. Broad goal: Support state, regional and national economic growth and global competitiveness. Objective: Implement technologies that are compatible with regional and national initiatives. Objective: Identify and eliminate unproductive requirements, regulations and enforcement procedures. Objective: Identify and eliminate state specific regulatory and enforcement requirements that may unnecessarily hinder economic growth or create barriers to smooth traffic flow through Ohio. V. Encourage voluntary regulatory compliance by motor carriers by creating a user-friendly environment for agency and industry transactions. This vision element unifies the expectations of the motor carrier industry and the regulating agencies to ensure the success of the ITS/CVO programs in Ohio. Conflicts in goals and interests of all stakeholders need to be resolved for the success of any programs that are implemented. Broad goal: Encourage voluntary compliance with safety and operating regulations. 15
  • 19. Objective: Create an environment that encourages dialogue between agencies and industry. Objective: Strengthen partnership with associations of motor carriers through exchange of ideas and information to improve performance of ITS/CVO systems. Objective: Provide seminars and training sessions on regulatory changes, new technology developments and implementation, and systems enhancements. 4.3 Ohio’s ITS/CVO Vision In the year 2005: High technology systems for regulating Commercial Vehicle Operations in Ohio have been built to improve safety, productivity and efficiency as well as enhance economic growth. The systems have been designed to ensure that secure and accurate electronic information is gathered to allow fast and error-free credentialing process. The systems encourage safe and smooth flow of goods and services on the highways without the burden of paper documents or the need to stop at all inspection sites. The advanced information technology systems improve efficiency and effectiveness in the administrative regulatory processes, identification and removal of unsafe carriers from the traffic stream and provide incentives for voluntary compliance with safety and economic regulations. The steps, time and effort requirements of industry and state agencies to fulfill regulatory obligations are remarkably reduced or virtually eliminated. The systems have in-built performance-based screening criteria that have reduced the number of crashes on the highways due to commercial vehicles. These systems have been built as a service to industry with no extra taxes or surcharges placed on the motor carrier industry. The open architecture standards allow systems that ensure uniformity in services across the U.S. to motor carriers. The benefits of these systems to Ohio are also manifested in efficiency in tax collection and enforcement resource utilization. Industry and state partnerships to promote greater economic growth at state, regional and national levels have been established. Private sector involvement and support from research and development firms in Ohio contributed immensely to the success of the Ohio's ITS/CVO program. 16
  • 20. 4.4 Strategic Analysis This section describes the analysis of data. The vision elements and opportunities are aligned to the CVO problems. The project team in consultation with the Steering Committee developed the strategic concepts for the CVISN/ITS/CVO program for Ohio. Based on the guiding principles, broad goals and objectives, interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with representatives of all state agencies and the motor carrier industry. The questionnaire and the interviews were structured to gather sufficient information to map and describe the current CVO processes in Ohio, the level of technology deployment, plans for future deployment of technologies, CVO problems (technical and non-technical), and suggestions to address the problems and issues. A strategic analysis was then carried out to develop the strengths and weaknesses of the existing systems and identified the opportunities and threats for ITS/CVO programs in Ohio. The results of the data collection and S.W.O.T. analysis are included in Appendix A. The S.W.O.T. analysis allows the inter- relationships between agencies, their problems and vision elements to be easily identified. The vision elements are first matched with the CVO problems and opportunities in Ohio, then the potential threats are aligned with them. Each vision element addresses one or more opportunities and threats, and can be associated with one or more CVO problems in Ohio. These are summarized in Figure 4.1 and discussed in the following sections. 17
  • 21. FIGURE 4.1 DATA ANALYSIS Vision Element SWOT Opportunity SWOT Threat Ohio Problem I. CVO through paperless • Higher use of technology • Lack of commitment • Slow application process credentialing and taxation • Electronic one-stop shopping • Cost • Delays in credentialing process processes • Paperless environment • Lack of access to technology • Too much paperwork • Error free credentialing • Lack of privacy of information • Safety mission compromised • Multiple agency dealings • Move from people to technology • Limited IRP application sites (Problem has been addressed) • Limited IRP renewal dates II. Improved highway safety • Higher use of technology • Mistrust of regulators' motivation • Crash costs • Targeting high risk carriers • Non-objective targeting criteria • Infrastructure damage • Efficient use of resources • Non-uniform standards • Inconsistent safety inspections • Uniform system • Consistency in safety inspections • Misdirected focus on carrier selection III. Enhanced CVO • Higher use of technology • Lack of commitment • Excessive delays at roadside productivity, efficiency and • Paperless environment • Non-objective targeting criteria inspections effectiveness • Level playing field for industry • Lack of access to technology • Non-uniform safety enforcement • Reduced delays at inspection sites • Non-uniform standards practice • Uniform system • Inconsistent enforcement IV. Support economic • Higher use of technology • Lack of commitment • Inconsistent compliance growth and global • Increased industry awareness • Lack of access to technology requirements competitiveness • Regional system uniformity • Non-uniform standards • Unnecessary delays to compliant • Level playing field for industry carriers V. Facilitate voluntary • Increased industry awareness • Mistrust of regulators' motivation • Roadside delays regulatory CVO compliance • Higher use of technology • Lack of commitment • Application restrictions • Level playing field for industry • Lack of access to technology • Slow application process • Voluntary compliance • Move from people to technology 18
  • 22. 4.4.1 Improve Efficiency and Effectiveness of CVO Through "Paperless" Electronic Credentialing and Taxation Processes, While Maintaining Privacy and Confidentiality of Information. This vision element addresses the problems associated with the credentialing and taxation processes in Ohio. Development and deployment opportunities in higher use of technology can be used to implement electronic one-stop shop that will reduce the time and effort required in credentialing processes. An electronic one-stop shop will eliminate multiple agency dealings and limitations on IRP application sites and time frames. This will create a paperless environment that is expected to improve efficiency and effectiveness in the administrative processes without the need for additional information requirements or compromising confidentiality. An electronic credentialing process is also expected to reduce delays in the application process. Ohio is committed to developing systems that will reduce the steps, time and efforts required to fulfill regulatory obligations. The system will be provided as a service and made available to industry at no cost. The use of higher technologies will not result in Ohio's safety mission being compromised. The implementation of an electronic one-stop shop for credentialing purposes requires industry's accessibility to the technology in order to communicate effectively with the state agencies. The move from people to technology is viewed as a positive endeavor that is expected to result in a fast and error free credentialing process and enhance efficiency in resource utilization. 4.4.2 Improve Highway Safety Through Efficient and Timely Data Exchange to Help Eliminate Unsafe and Illegal Operations. This vision element extends the opportunity for improving highway safety through the use of higher technology to identify and remove high-risk carriers and illegal operators from operation. It is anticipated that such technologies will result in efficient and effective use of enforcement resources. Availability of real time and accurate data on carriers to enforcement personnel through the deployment of higher technology is expected to encourage consistency and uniformity in safety inspections. Targeting of carriers will be based on criteria that include safety performance of carriers where no particular category of carriers by virtue of size or operating characteristics will be the focus of enforcement efforts. The use of higher forms of technology is also expected to limit bias in the roadside screening process. The systems will be deployed with the primary objective to improve safety on the highway and reduce costs associated with commercial vehicle crashes and potential damage to the infrastructure. The systems will be developed and deployed in collaboration with the motor carrier industry in order to avoid any mistrust and suspicion on the part of motor carriers as to the real purpose of the systems. This partnership is also expected to enhance industry's awareness and encourage participation and commitment to the goals and objectives of the ITS/CVO program in Ohio. In pursuance of the goals of national ITS/CVO initiatives, Ohio envisions the adoption of systems that comply with the uniform open standards in the technologies so as to achieve a uniform system direction that promotes uniformity in the enforcement process and fairness to the motor carrier industry. 4.4.3 Enhance CVO Productivity, Efficiency and Effectiveness by Improving Efficiency in 19
  • 23. Roadside Screening for Inspections Thereby Providing Incentives for Safe Operations. Ohio views enhanced economic growth through improved CVO productivity and efficiency as a major component of the ITS/CVO program. Higher forms of technology that promote a level playing field where carriers of different sizes and operations are treated fairly will be deployed. Operations in a paperless environment and the use of higher forms of technology in roadside screening processes will translate into an efficient and productive motor carrier industry. The question of excessive delays at roadside presents the opportunity to use advanced forms of technology to make carrier safety data available to enforcement personnel in a timely fashion to assist in making screening decisions. Such a system will not only reduce delays to complaint operators but also promote consistency and uniformity in the entire enforcement process and serve as incentives for safe operations. Improving roadside screening reduces delays and offers the opportunity for voluntary compliance with regulations. Ohio is committed to improving efficiency and productivity in truck operations. The technology will be accessible to industry so that they have the opportunity to conduct paperless transactions with the state agencies. Targeting of carriers for inspection will be based on criteria that include safety performance and credentials information of carriers where no particular category of carriers by virtue of size or operating characteristics will be the focus of enforcement efforts. 4.4.4 Support State, Regional and National Economic Growth and Global Competitiveness Through Improvements in CVO Productivity. Ohio seeks to implement higher forms of technology that are compatible with regional and national initiatives. Ohio is committed to supporting economic growth and global competitiveness by eliminating state specific regulatory and enforcement requirements that may unnecessarily hinder economic growth or create barriers to smooth traffic flow through the state. Ohio will identify and eliminate unproductive compliance requirements and enforcement procedures. This will also promote consistency in the enforcement processes. Supporting state, regional and national economic growth enables Ohio to pursue opportunities in promoting regional systems uniformity. The opportunity to deploy higher technology in accessing safety information will enable enforcement personnel to focus attention on less safe carriers thereby reducing the possibility of causing unnecessary delays to compliant and safe carriers. It is envisioned that the technology will be accessible to industry to facilitate communication between the agencies and industry. The potential benefits of the systems offer the opportunity for increased industry awareness of the ITS/CVO program and encourages their participation and involvement. Partnership between state agencies and industry is viewed as an essential element in demonstrating trust, commitment and increased awareness for the success of the ITS/CVO program. 4.4.5 Encourage Voluntary Regulatory Compliance by Motor Carriers by Creating a User- friendly Environment for Agency and Industry Transactions. This vision element is important for the long-term success of ITS/CVO programs in Ohio. It 20
  • 24. unifies the expectations and commitment of the motor carrier industry and state agencies to achieve the goals of the ITS/CVO program. Ohio seeks to create an environment that encourages voluntary regulatory compliance with the safety and operating regulations. This vision element enables Ohio to use the opportunity to increase industry awareness through seminars and training sessions on regulatory changes, new technology development and implementation and systems enhancements. Increased industry awareness of the potential benefits of the ITS/CVO programs is expected to eliminate suspicion of the agency’s motives and intentions of the use of higher technology. Increased awareness instills confidence and encourages participation and commitment to the ITS/CVO program including electronic systems designed to reduce delays in the credentialing processes and at roadside inspections. Streamlining CVO operations through the use of higher forms of technology that remove time wasting restrictions in credentialing processes, reduces delays at roadside inspections and offers the opportunity for voluntary compliance. The use of higher forms of technology for credentialing purposes will be accessible to industry in order to communicate effectively with the agencies or the electronic one stop shop. The move from people to technology is expected to increase efficiency and speed in the credentialing processes and also limit bias in the roadside screening process. 21
  • 25. 5.0 PROGRAM ACTIVITIES 5.1 Description of Projects This section identifies the projects in each of the major functional CVISN areas that address problems and are targeted to the vision elements. Project definition is accomplished in two steps. First, the linkage between the vision elements and the ITS/CVO functional areas are identified. This is then followed by a description of the conceptual framework of the individual projects. The concepts are developed based on information gathered from the "best practices" white paper developed as part of the data gathering effort. It is based on practices in CVISN pilot states. The use of "best practices" information is to ensure conformity with the nationwide effort to create a coordinated information system for CVO. The major functional areas are: • Safety assurance (safety information exchange) • Credential administration (deskside) processes • Roadside electronic screening Figure 5.1 shows Ohio's ITS/CVO vision and project matrix. An "X" in a cell indicates a strong linkage between the vision element and the functional area where the vision element is an important consideration in developing projects in that functional area. A blank cell indicates that the vision element is of little importance within the context of the functional area under consideration. FIGURE 5.1 ITS/CVO VISION AND PROJECT MATRIX Functional area Projects Credentialing Roadside Safety Administration electronic Information Vision element Systems screening Exchange Systems Paperless CVO credentialing X X X and taxation processes Improved highway safety X X Enhanced CVO productivity, X X X efficiency and effectiveness Support economic growth and X X global competitiveness Facilitate voluntary regulatory X X X CVO compliance The following are projects identified to address the CVO problems and opportunities. These are 22
  • 26. described in detail in the following sections. The first project is within the functional area of administrative processes, the second project is within roadside electronic screening systems functional area, and the third and fourth projects are within the safety information exchange functional area. 1. Credential administration system that provides an electronic one-stop shop to fully automate the credentialing, taxation, permitting and payment process and participate in regional and national credentialing (IRP and IFTA) clearinghouses, if available; 2. Expand use of roadside electronic screening hardware and software that use safety and credentialing criteria for electronic clearance in the enforcement of safety and economic regulations; 3. Provide safety information exchange systems that allow for on-line, real time motor carrier safety and credentialing information from state, regional and national information bases to enforcement officers at the roadside; and provide data exchange systems utilizing current "snapshots" of carrier, driver, and vehicle data from various agencies to be provided to government and private entities needing the data. The following sections describe the concepts for these projects. 5.1.1 Credentials Administration Processes Credentials administration (CA) processes include a combination of carrier and state agency systems. These systems are aimed at automating the complete credentialing and permitting processes. All aspects of the commercial vehicle credentialing process will be integrated to include: electronic submittal of applications, automated processing and cross-checking of applications, automated fee calculation and invoice transmittal, electronic fee payment, and automated issuance and printing of credentials. Ohio plans to operate an “electronic one-stop shop” for all credentialing systems. The goal is to provide carriers with an on-site fully electronic credentialing system. This requires user-friendly software that allows communication between each of the agency systems and motor carriers. Ohio plans to utilize an internet “web-based” system for the vast majority of transactions, with alternative standards such as XML or EDI to be considered later for larger carriers. Tentative system plans call for servers to be housed at the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO), operating custom-designed software designed specifically for the CVISN program. This central system will handle the interchange of data from carriers to the legacy credentialing systems maintained by each of the state agencies involved in the CVISN program. 23
  • 27. Ohio plans to deploy systems that interface the state systems with the IRP and IFTA clearinghouses, if available. Potential legacy system interfaces to be upgraded to operate as a one-stop shop are: • International Registration Plan (IRP) • International Fuel Tax Agreement (IFTA) • Oversize / overweight permits • Fuel use tax (FUT) permits • Intrastate Tax (for -hire carriers) • Hazmat permitting • Single State Registration System (SSRS). Initially, IRP and IFTA systems will be included in the one stop shop system, and others will be added as interfaces are developed for that purpose and funding becomes available. During initial system design, determinations will be made as to which credentialing systems can be included "up front" and which may take longer for development. 5.1.2 Roadside Electronic Screening Roadside electronic screening includes the electronic screening of vehicles at fixed and mobile inspection sites to confirm that vehicles are safe, at legal weight, have appropriate credentials, or have not been placed out-of-service. The projects under this functional area are designed to develop systems that perform automatic electronic screening so that safe, compliant trucks can proceed on the highway without stopping while potentially unsafe or non-compliant trucks can be pulled in for closer inspection and confirmation of proper operating credentials. The Ohio Department of Public Safety has signed an agreement with HELP, Inc., for installation of the PrePass electronic pre-clearance system at 16 weigh stations in Ohio. Sixteen sites are operational and two of the sites have mainline weigh-in-motion (WIM) capabilities. A steering committee is prepared the criteria and policies for operation of the system. 5.1.3 Safety Information Exchange Safety information exchange systems are designed to collect, store and exchange current safety information relating to carriers safety to assist in making screening decisions at the roadside. This includes exchange of data between agencies within a state and between other states. Safety information of interest includes carrier (credentials and safety rating), vehicle (inspections and citations) and driver. Ohio plans to use hardware and software tools to improve automation of the safety inspection process. All safety inspections in Ohio are currently conducted with the ASPEN software loaded on laptop computers. The ASPEN software enables safety inspectors to electronically collect and disseminate inspection data at the roadside. The laptop computers offer flexibility in accessing safety information from remote locations and improved communications between field 24
  • 28. and administrative staff. ASPEN provides the safety inspector with an inspection selection algorithm and the most current data to assist in determining which vehicles should be inspected. Phase one of Ohio’s Multi-Agency Radio Communications System (MARCS) is scheduled to begin in August 2002. Originally it was anticipated that this system would be utilized as a data link between roadside personnel and Ohio’s CVISN systems. However, after further research into the capabilities of the system, it is likely that Ohio will pursue an alternative method of data communications such as cellular or microwave technology. 5.2 Project Assessment Having identified the projects to address the CVO problems and given the opportunities and potential threats, their suitability can be evaluated in terms of parameters related to cost, practicality, resource, etc. The criteria summarized in Figure 5.2 can be used to help rank potential ITS/CVO projects based on their relative merits. Figure 5.3 shows the characteristics of projects relative to the evaluation criteria. 25
  • 29. FIGURE 5.2 ITS/CVO PROJECT ASSESSMENT CRITERIA Cost: Efficiency: • Capital investment? Fixed & ‘Variable’ • Does this project lower costs for the private • Maintenance? sector, the public agency, or the general public? • Operating? • Does it increase the capabilities of any sectors? • Does it encourage voluntary compliance Funding: Safety: • Potential sources of funding? • Does it improve highway safety, and how? • Timing of fund availability? • Can it be measured in dollars and/or lives? • Special conditions attached to the funding? Personnel: Equity/fairness: • # of person-hours by skill types? • Does it treat users fairly, or improve the • Internal/external availability? equitable application of laws or regulations? • Ease of procurement? • Does it enhance fairness to users? • New personnel needed after project completion? • Impact on existing personnel? Technology: Political/Economic: • Expected technical capability of the technology? • Current political/administrative configuration • How much training (user-friendliness)? likely to last? • Does it support the open standards of CVISN? • Can other, external political circumstances suddenly impact the project? • If it works, will it solve the problem? • Does it improve CVO productivity, economic • If it works, is it sustainable? growth? • Compatibility with other technologies (current, future, and with outside agencies/states e.g., national architecture)? Duration and Timing: Organization/Cooperation: • Sequencing dependencies? • Departments/agencies are involved? • External processes or events? • Buy-in at a management level of agencies? • How long to implement? • Sufficient cooperation to coordinate the project? • Cooperation and support from industry? Simplicity: Alternative Methods: • Does this make the current task easier? • Are there easier, cheaper, simpler ways to accomplish the same goal? • Does it create expectations of increased capabilities and thus more work and responsibilities? • Does it rely on other agencies/people who cannot be directed by this project? 26
  • 30. FIGURE 5.3 PROJECT EVALUATION SUMMARY Credentialing Electronic Screening Safety Info Systems Systems Total Fed & $1,500,000 est. $0 (Private investment) $1,500,000 est. State Cost Funding FMCSA and State Private FMCSA and State Time 20 months 6 months 20 months CI/CVIEW vendor, System vendor (PrePass) Internal Programmers, Personnel Programmers, Training, Maintenance Training, Maintenance Technology New, Open Standards New, Open Standards Less carrier and staff Process more carriers in Efficiency time less time. Focus on high Identify more violators Burden or regulatory risk carriers compliance reduced Simpler process but not Probably simpler than Probably more complex Simplicity at expense of present system(s) software & equipment compliance Safety Reduce risk of crashes Easy identification of high risk carriers More complete Safe carriers advantaged More attention on Equity/fairness coverage of carriers Objective targeting unsafe carriers criteria Regulatory agencies, Regulatory agencies, Regulatory agencies, Cooperation carriers, clearing carriers states, carriers houses Demonstrate privacy Political / protected economic CVO productivity Alternative Simpler paper process Visual monitoring, Use of diskettes methods Sample weigh 27
  • 31. 5.3 Project Ranking Following the project assessment summarized above and a review by the Steering Committee, and in view of the national ITS/CVO program, highway safety is viewed as the top priority in Ohio's ITS/CVO program. Projects related to improving highway safety through regulation and enforcement are therefore ranked highest. This is followed by projects relating to efficiency and effectiveness in the roadside enforcement process. The following is a relative ranking of Ohio's ITS/CVO projects in order of decreasing priority: • Roadside Electronic Screening - Provide on-line, timely motor carrier safety and credentialing information from state, regional and national information bases to enforcement officers at the roadside • Safety Information Exchange - Provide data exchange system utilizing current "snapshots" of carrier, driver, and vehicle data from various agencies to be provided to government and private entities needing the data. • Credentials Administration - Develop electronic one-stop shop to fully automate the credentialing, taxation, permitting and payment process and participate in regional and national credentialing (IRP and IFTA) clearinghouses, if available. 28
  • 32. 5.4 Project Summary Sheets I. Project Title: "ONE STOP" ELECTRONIC CREDENTIALING (CREDENTIALING) Project Description: Provide carriers' software interface (primarily Internet) for electronic credentialing, to include IFTA and IRP —both interstate based. Will work toward and later include if possible SSRS, intrastate fuel tax, vehicle registration, hazmat registration, OS/OW permits, and for-hire operating authority credentials. Goals & Objectives: Allow Ohio-based carriers to utilize PC software in their offices to electronically apply, pay for, and receive credentials to include interstate fuel tax (IFTA) and interstate vehicle registrations (IRP). Interface with national/regional IRP and IFTA clearinghouses. Determine feasibility and include if possible SSRS, Ohio intrastate fuel tax, vehicle registrations, for-hire operating authority, and hazardous materials registration. System(s) to be compatible with ITS CVO national architecture. Desired Outcomes: • Reduce administrative burdens on carriers and state agencies • Reduce errors in data • Provide credential issuance in a more-timely manner Project Location: Offices of Ohio Dept. of Taxation, Ohio Dept. of Public Safety, and Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO). Ohio-based carriers' offices. Technical Approach: • Establish "credentials interface (CI)" server at state to communicate between carrier software and existing government systems, and with national systems. • Use software products from CVISN pilot/model states to extent possible. • Work with existing state IRP/IFTA contractor to determine steps necessary for it to implement desired system changes. • Review and revise if necessary state laws and regulations pertaining to electronic filing of official documents and electronic payment (EFT) systems. Organization & Management: Overview will be under administration of OCVISN Steering Committee, since all members have an involvement (ODPS, ODT, ODOT, PUCO, OTA). Each state agency will have primary responsibility for programs it administers (e.g., ODT for IFTA/ FUT). Schedule and Milestones: See Appendix D – Project Schedule 29
  • 33. Funding Approach: • Technical consulting, software development, and hardware –- CVISN Deployment and state funding. ($1,500,000) • Continuing operations and maintenance ---- state agencies (offset by data-entry cost savings) • Carriers—no extra cost to file electronically Key Issues/Concerns: • Determine role of primary contractor (Affiliated Computer Systems (ACS)) that currently provides all IRP functions and the data-processing (except entry) for IFTA. • Intrastate electronic vehicle registration may destabilize current private vendors system. ODPS will explore all ramifications. • State laws and regulations might need to be modified to authorize issuance without on-site display of some paper products as proof (e.g., original vehicle title for IRP) 30
  • 34. II. Project Title: ON-LINE ENFORCEMENT ACCESS TO CMV DATA (SAFETY) Project Description Project Description: State roadside and headquarters commercial motor vehicle (CMV) enforcement staff will utilize laptop and desktop computers to access CMV databases on- line via new wireless and/or landline connections. CMV databases and systems will include OMCIS, ASPEN/AVALANCHE, SAFER, and CDLIS, and possibly later intrastate fuel use tax (FUT), vehicle registrations, and operating authority credentials. Existing laptops will be upgraded to allow reading of document barcodes, scanning and transmission of digital images, etc. New state 800MHZ radio system may be adapted and utilized. Goals & Objectives: • Improve roadside access to and uploading of safety information (timeliness, accuracy). • Identify carriers, drivers, and vehicles operating unsafely or illegally. • Reduce frequency and duration of stops for safe and legal carriers (customer service) • Increase reliance on mobile enforcement by providing roadside access to CVO data. Desired Outcome: • Immediate access to safety and credentialing data for roadside enforcement personnel. • Accurate safety data at roadside. • Immediate uploading of safety data for use by others in enforcement community • Enforcement efforts are focused on illegal and/or unsafe carriers, allowing safe and/or legal carriers to operate with less regulatory scrutiny. • Deploy enforcement resources where and when problems are anticipated Project Location: All desktop and laptop computers in use by CMV enforcement field staff. All state agency headquarters offices involved with CMV safety records. Technical Approach: • As needed, upgrade and replace existing laptop computers and related equipment in use by CMV enforcement field staff to take advantage of upgrades in federal systems and software. • Identify all vendor communications system(s) with ability to provide wireless and/or landline connectivity to national and state data systems (to include state’s MARCS 800 MHZ radio system). • Purchase and install hardware/software and communications links to enable all enforcement field staff to have continuous access to relevant CMV databases at national and state levels. • Coordinate continuously with development of CI & CVIEW server software. 31
  • 35. Organization & Management: OSHP and PUCO will be primary agencies involved in procurement and implementation since CMV enforcement field staff are assigned to them. OSHP will be primary coordinator with state MARCS radio system. PUCO will handle primary coordination with OMCIS/CVIEW/CI servers. Schedule and Milestones: See Appendix D – Project Schedule Funding Approach: Hardware and software - CVISN deployment funds, MCSAP basic grant funds, and state funding. ($800,000) Communications links – MCSAP, state-operating funds. ($100,000 annual) Key Issues/Concerns: • Continuing changes in general design plans and concepts for federal, interstate communications, especially involving intrastate data. • Constant changes in technology and systems available make it difficult to plan communications systems for extended periods of use. Flexibility needs to be built into any systems. • Line and air-time charges will be difficult to estimate initially due to lack of experience with actual use • Communications systems may be used for multiple purposes, making it difficult to allocate costs to CVO. 32
  • 36. III. Project Title: INTER-AGENCY CMV DATA SHARING (CVIEW) Project Description: New data exchange system (CVIEW- Commercial Vehicle Information Exchange Window) will be developed to exchange carrier, driver, and vehicle "snapshots" of safety and credential information between state and federal databases and end-users such as state enforcement officers and credential agencies. The CVIEW system will be developed utilizing guidelines developed in the national ITS/CVISN program and will conform to national ITS architecture. CVIEW will allow exchange of information among all existing state CMV databases as well as federal systems and will be housed on servers at the PUCO. Goals & Objectives: Provide useful and current "snapshots" of carrier (and later, vehicle and driver) information from existing state and federal CMV databases to authoritative end-users such as governmental agencies, insurers, shippers, etc. Desired Outcome: • Provide agencies with accurate and complete safety information when making credential and authorizing decisions. • Provide accurate and complete safety and identification information to roadside enforcement officers. • Improve efficiency and effectiveness of CMV database systems by avoiding duplication and inaccurate information. Project Location: Database system will be distributed among various state and federal agencies. Technical Approach: • Complete inventory of all existing state-level CMV-related database systems to include software and hardware. Identify areas of commonality and redundancy. • Develop system design with assistance of contracted specialists and participating agencies. Study use of JHU/APL’s CVIEW product and State of Washington’s SQL-server based product. Determine extent of merging with CI functions from Project 1, above. • Contract for development of software components. Organization & Management: A separate and permanent "CVIEW Policy and Steering Committee" will be established to guide the development and operation of the CVIEW system. State agencies with primary CMV databases will be represented as well as user groups such as enforcement community, insurers, carriers, etc. Schedule and Milestones: See Appendix D – Project Schedule 33
  • 37. Funding Approach: • Initial design and hardware/software procurement - CVISN Deployment funds, MCSAP, state agency budgets ($500,000 – may blend with CI funding from Project 1) • System continuing operation and maintenance - Included in state agency budgets with some offset from user fees (insurance companies, etc.). Key Issues/Concerns: • Interface with wide variety of existing databases will be complex and require considerable work. • Although all data currently exists and is public record in Ohio, Policy & Steering Committee will need to establish procedures, fees, etc. for access. 34
  • 38. IV. Project Title: ROADSIDE ELECTRONIC SCREENING (E- SCREENING) Project Description: Implement electronic pre-clearance systems at all major truck weigh stations in Ohio, utilizing the HELP. Inc. PrePass System. Mainline weigh-in- motion (WIM) will also be utilized at least two of the same locations. Operations will be conducted in accordance with national guidelines under oversight of a PrePass state Steering Committee. See http://www.prepass.com/ Goals & Objectives: Improve traffic safety at weigh station sites, reduce delays to carriers at weigh stations, and permit enforcement personnel to focus efforts on inspections more likely to detect violations; all through implementation of pre-screened voluntary enrollment of “safe” carriers in a national CMV automatic vehicle identification (AVI) system. Desired Outcome: • Reduce backups and delays of trucks waiting at congested weigh stations • Avoid inspections and delays of carriers with good safety records • Permit enforcement staff to focus efforts on inspections more likely to detect violations Project Location: Fixed weigh stations at 16 locations, primarily on interstate highways. Technical Approach: Stand-alone systems are being deployed at each site by private vendor. Organization & Management: Primary responsibility for weigh station operation rests with Ohio State Highway Patrol. Oversight by State Prepass Steering Committee. Schedule and Milestones: All 16 PrePass sites are operational. See Appendix D – Project Schedule for E-Screening integration with CVIEW Funding Approach: All funding through private investment. Key Issues/Concerns: • None 35
  • 39. 5.5 System Requirements and Design Ohio has developed a top-level design that addresses each of the CVISN deployment projects (detailed in section 3.0). These designs were developed as a part of the FMCSA-sponsored workshop series and are included in the Ohio Top-Level Design document. This document contains details regarding: - System requirements (Top Level Design Section 2.0); - System design (Top Level Design Section 3.0); - Modifications to existing systems (Top Level Design Section 4.0); - System interface specifications (Top Level Design Section 2.4); and, - Unresolved issues (Top Level Design Section 6.0). To implement the CVISN program in Ohio, the state must invest in a series of new hardware and software systems. In addition, many of the existing state systems will also need to be modified and or upgraded. Finally, deployment of CVISN will also necessitate the proper integration of each of these systems and to ensure that all systems communicate with one another proper testing will be essential. 5.6 Work Breakdown Structure The Ohio CVISN team has developed a work breakdown structure (WBS) for its Program. The WBS documents much of the same information contained in the Project Schedule (Appendix D), including specific tasks for each project and anticipated dates of completion, but presents it in a spreadsheet format. The WBS also assigns responsibility for each task to a specific owner. The complete WBS for the Ohio CVISN Program is included in Appendix B. 36
  • 40. 6.0 ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT This section outlines the organization and management approach and the responsibilities of all stakeholders. The organizational charts (Appendix C) show the CVO/CVISN planning and program management structure as well as the key agencies responsible for implementing ITS/CVO projects. Alan Martin, Manager of Federal Transportation Programs at the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio Transportation Department, functions as ITS/CVO program administrative manager. The program manager has direct contact with all parties responsible for the administration and enforcement of the regulations in Ohio. The ITS/CVO Steering Committee, chaired by the program manager, has representatives from all relevant state agencies and motor carrier associations. The Steering Committee has the mandate to review and approve project proposals contained in this business plan. The Steering Committee is responsible for planning, coordinating and scheduling the individual projects through the PUCO as the administrative lead agency. PUCO is responsible for project management, financial reporting and coordination with other agencies. PUCO staff members have been designated to provide technical support to the ITS/CVO program manager. Such assistance includes program and technology exchange and development. The PUCO has hired two full-time technical staff members to support CVISN implementation. Technical staff members of other participating state agencies will assist as needed. The staffs (technical and administrative) have been designated for each of the required task areas. Private sector involvement in the development of ITS/CVO programs in Ohio is expected to continue and expand. The OCVISN Steering Committee will formally review and update this Business Plan as necessary. The Committee will meet regularly and will formally assign tasks and review progress. Details of the agencies responsible for CVO administration and enforcement as well as key individuals who impact CVO planning and programs are shown in Appendix C2 – Program/ Project Organization. 6.1 Training and Outreach Plan The CVISN Steering Committee members have successfully completed all three of the CVISN Deployment Workshops offered by FMCSA. Staff members have communicated regularly with other CVISN states, to include a trip via state-owned plane to Virginia to review CVISN activities of that pilot state. On-site training will be provided, as necessary, to agency staff involved in the development and deployment of the CVISN systems by selected vendors of system hardware and software and through regional and national CVISN "mainstreaming" training classes. The offer of training will be included in the agreements with the selected vendors. CVISN staff will continue to participate in national and regional training sessions and workshops as they become available.
  • 41. The Ohio Trucking Association (OTA) is represented on the Steering Committee and plans to assist in communications with and education of the carriers. On-going regional meetings and seminars of OTA will provide the forum for communication and training. CVISN outreach program to carriers will be designed to increase industry awareness of changes to existing systems, new system deployment and as a means on providing training and support to carriers in applying the new systems. CVISN efforts will be publicized by OTA, the Ohio Bus Association, and participating state agencies through direct mailings, local seminars, trade shows, and newsletters. 6.2 Funding Approach On September 14, 2001 a grant agreement between the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration and the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio was executed. The total participating cost of the program is projected to be $3,174,458.00. The Federal share of the program will be $1,587,229.00 and the state share will be $1,587,229.00 (Appendix I). Grant guidelines state that if sufficient federal funding is not provided for full deployment, first priority should be given to safety information exchange (Ohio projects 2 and 3). During the first half of CY2002, Ohio CVISN participating agencies intend to develop a detailed financial plan to be presented to the State Controlling Board, which has the authority to modify agencies’ biennial budgets mid-term. That plan will reflect that the first priority expenditure will be contracting with vendor(s) for the development of the “core” software (CVIEW & CI) which must be in place before most other aspects of the CVISN project can proceed. Substantial, if not all, portions of the state’s matching funds may come from expenditures for state personnel working on the project(s) and state expenditures for safety information exchange communications development (i.e., MARCS and related systems). Use of the private investment in PrePass, as private matching funds will also be explored. When the state’s financial plan is completed by mid-CY2002, a clearer outline of the financial program will be available.
  • 42. 6.3 Memorandum of Agreement
  • 43. NOTE REGARDING PAGE THREE OF MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT The Ohio Trucking Association has participated in the OCVISN Steering Committee since its inception in 1996 and has actively supported the CVISN concept, with special emphasis on electronic pre-clearance. Original CVISN guidelines called for the Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) to be signed only by participating state agency executives. These guidelines were modified to request that the primary state trucking association also sign the MOA and page 3 represents that addition.
  • 44. Appendix A - Data Collection and Analysis Results of Ohio CVISN Data Collection Report on Data Collection Results Commercial Vehicle Operations State of Ohio CVISN Kick-off Workshop A half-day Ohio CVISN kick-off workshop was held on October 30, 1997 to present and discuss the strategic concepts and outline the potential benefits of CVISN to the state agencies and motor carrier industry. The workshop participants included representatives from all Ohio agency stakeholders, and a representative from the motor carriers. The workshop was also conducted to encourage participation and buy-in of stakeholders in the ITS/CVO program for Ohio, as well as provide the opportunity for stakeholders to start communicating. As a result of the kick-off workshop, the agency stakeholders agreed upon the mission statement. Data Collection Data on the current regulatory and enforcement processes, as well as CVO concerns and problems were collected through interviews and focus groups. Two questionnaires were developed to assist in the data collection process. One questionnaire was geared toward state agencies, the other toward state motor carriers. Each questionnaire was structured to capture information relating to current practices and responsibilities; type, level and plans for future deployment of technology relating to CVO; problems and concerns relating to ITS/CVO; and strategies or opportunities for overcoming barriers. In person interviews were conducted to complete the agency and motor carrier questionnaires. Both the state agency and motor carrier participants were identified in consultation with the Steering Committee. The data collected through the interviews was then summarized and reviewed through focus groups. Once again, two focus groups were formed; one for state agencies and one for motor carriers. This effort was essential to ensure that there is reasonable agreement on the issues and concerns identified during the individual interviews. The results are summarized in Table A-1 and A-2.
  • 45. Table A-1 Summary of Agency Responses to Ohio CVISN Questionnaire Agency Responsibility/ Current Process Problems / Concerns Technology Plans for Non-Technical Suggestions for Improvement Functional Deployed Future Barriers & CVISN Potential Area Department of IFTA -Paper applications -IFTA data is not available to highway -FUT uses in- -In-house DB -Cost -IFTA Clearinghouse interface. Taxation FUT -Strength: Once patrol, but should be. house system. for both FUT effectiveness of -Paperless application process information is -Hwy Patrol does not have easy access to -Resides on a & IFTA is electronic fund would improve and streamline Credentials keyed-in, the real-time tax information mainframe, not a currently transfer (EFT) processes. process is efficient -Receipt of citation information not timely relational under because decal -Access to state databases by -Weakness: Paper -Hwy Patrol does have direct access to database. File development cost is only $2 roadside enforcement personnel driven and FUT database, but not to IFTA database structure is index (ITAS) each -Use of transponders: actual requires data entry -Dissemination of information to motor (VSAM ) and -- Quarterly road usage will provide – during tax return carriers is difficult. Sequential bills or accurate tax triggering time, there is a lot -Inefficient method of verifying currency quarterly EFT’s information to key in of information in filing taxes: very time to make it cost 0Use CVISN for FUT and -IFTA contracted consuming and does not rely on current effective IFTA credentials and for out to Affiliated data. processing quarterly tax returns Computer Systems 0Access of IFTA data to (ACS) VISA/TS enforcement personnel System, expires 8/99 and replacement strategy must in place by 8/98 Bureau of IRP -Walk-in, paper -For Motor Carrier: amount of paperwork -Law Enforcement -Connecting -BMV not -Real-time updating of Motor Vehicles Intra-State -IRP: and led by required and Data System deputy ready for on- registration database from Registration Affiliated (LEADS) used registrars on- line registration deputy registrar terminals CDL Computer Systems by Hwy Patrol line, real- because of -Transponders: road usage (ACS) -Blocking of time with fiscal impact on verification from the devices Credential -CDL & Intra-State: registration if BMV deputy registrar would help provide useful at Deputy driver or vehicle system information for IRP Registrar account is not -Sending paid information to BMV is automated -Other agencies not utilizing information Public Utilities SSRS -Paper applications -Difficult to obtain proof of insurance due -MCIS mainframe -Integrate -Coordinating -Electronic (paperless) Commission of Intra-State and updates to lack of communication with motor database mainframe information application process Ohio Registration information carrier & insurance company --In-house information with MCIS -Establish Electronic Fund -Application forms -No two-way communication back to the database, no (MCIS) with computer Transfer Credential are available on enforcers is established. contractor the FHWA system -Issue credentials electronically the Internet, -Auditor’s inability to access carrier PC-based -Adopting -Request insurance company however, the information from PUCO system from program national system request to file electronically. carrier has to mail remote locations SSRS them back to -Amount of paperwork involved is PUCO frustrating to motor carrier Public Utilities Hazmat -Hazmat carriers -MCS 90’s (proof of insurance) is most -Carrier profile -HARPS -Insurance companies to send Commission of required to obtain difficult to obtain form the motor carrier from FHWA’s upgrade from proof of insurance Ohio Credential & a permit from -Paperwork is a problem MCMIS Access to electronically
  • 46. Agency Responsibility/ Current Process Problems / Concerns Technology Plans for Non-Technical Suggestions for Improvement Functional Deployed Future Barriers & CVISN Potential Area Safety & PUCO -Fee schedule is very difficult to Ohio’s own Sybase (RSIS -On-line registration or mailing Roadside -Initial paper understand. This is a motor carrier database of contractor) a disk to carrier to complete applications frustration. They are usually under or violations and -Adapt application -Computer program over on fee. penalties HARPS to -Computerized fee calculation flags -Lexis/Nexis future & scheduling overpayments and Hazmat carriers development -Use of digital camera at underpayments of database of national roadside inspections. Attach fee -SAFESTAT on- registration picture to violation entries on -11 specialized line system mainframe. Hazmat roadside HARPS inspectors DTR: Hazmat civil forfeiture MCMIS: to create a new record Public Utilities Enforcement -Audits -Accident information only sent -CAPRI: FHWA -ASPEN -Improve link with Public Commission of Civil and Hazmat periodically for download into system, PC-program for upgrade Safety for access to the Ohio Safety & Forfeitures and thus is not real time. auditors and -Current VAX Accident Information Roadside Repair certification: compliance mainframe -Electronic Fund Transfer for information is review changing to Forfeitures manually entered -Copies a disk sent Alpha -Electronic information into database to PUCO (VAX) transmission to carriers -Accident Enforcement personnel to have information access to real time data gathered at Public Safety and sent electronically to PUCO -ASPEN: FHWA PC-program for inspections -VAX mainframe Department of OS/OW -In person -System uses an older code, and the code -PC server -Fully -Fear on part of -Paperless permitting Transportation On-line application could use some enhancements. network automated motor carrier -Automated routing Credential -Credential is faxed -Usual turn around time is 2 hours. But, --Novel Netware system, by -Privacy of -Single trip permitting only -Enforcement could be 6 hours. code automating information -24 hour access information is -Delay to motor carrier during busy time -On-line the route -Small verified by phone Verification limited to normal working application analysis companies may during normal hours process not have access hours. to computers; -System is user need to friendly; a phone accommodate bill if filing them. electronically Ohio State Enforcement -Troopers are -Difficult for the driver to locate the -Laptops -Upgrade -Privacy -Create one-stop shops Highway involved with proper permit in the volume of permits, computers laptops to -Cost -Infra-red data transmissions, Patrol Roadside motor carriers on registrations and other documents the equipped with Windows 95 -Resistance to cellular communications, bar CDL, IFTA, driver carries. Inspection -Goal of new codes Registration and -Currently unable to verify permits issued Selection System achieving technologies -Access to safety information speed violations by the PUCO & ODOT for authenticity. and ASPEN wireless databases-National standard in
  • 47. Agency Responsibility/ Current Process Problems / Concerns Technology Plans for Non-Technical Suggestions for Improvement Functional Deployed Future Barriers & CVISN Potential Area -MC Officers are -Concerned about technology being communicati technology deployed involved with tamper-proof, resistant to failure ons -Education to carriers motor carriers if (durability) and cost. Determine information vehicle has visible -Concerns with cost of equipping all law requirements against motor defect within their enforcement officers with equipment to carrier’s rights to privacy and scope of authority, read transponders, bar codes, etc. establish clear guidelines no speed concerning this issue violations Note: This table represents a snapshot in time. Since it was completed, Ohio has continued to move forward with the implementation of CVISN. Consequently, some barriers and suggestions for improvement have already been addressed.
  • 48. Table A-2 Summary of Carrier Responses to Ohio CVISN Questionnaire Motor Size and Operation Current Process Problems / Concerns Roadside Delays and Roadside Non-Technical Barriers Suggestions for Improvement Carrie Enforcement & CVISN Potential r MC # 1 -For hire -Safety Manager -Not many frustrations -Experience delays (usually safety -80% Locally, 20% obtains credentials inspections) Regionally -65% of every day -Avg. delay: 1 hour -Small dedicated to -Significant loss is time: 1-2 hours per -Somewhat time credentials week sensitive shipments -Mail-in or walk-in -Generally good roadside enforcement applications program -Manual paper applications -No automation MC # 2 -For Hire -Safety/Maintenance -Experience frustration with Usually no delays -Stagger or change licensing -Locally & person obtains BMV in May – only time -If they are delayed, usually for brake process so everyone is not there Regionally credentials for tags adjustment at same time -Small -Spends 4hrs/week -CVO problem is licensing -Avg. delay: 2 hours -Make inspections consistent -Time Sensitive -Mail-in and walk-in --No assistance available to -No significant loss to company over year-round applications carriers March – May the year -Operate weigh scales more No automation -Delays at weigh scales -Hwy Patrol are proficient and efficiently to avoid delays -More inspections in Ohio professional than in other states MC # 3 -For Hire -Safety Director -Only 2 IRP places in the -Experience delays (mostly because -Cost -Pay for licenses though a (owner/operator obtains credentials state, results in delays they look unprofessional since all payment plan, or stagger all -Locally & -Spends 10/hrs/week -No accessible assistance, owner/operator) licenses within one company Regionally -Obtain credentials in no handbook on how to -Avg. delay: 30-45 min. -Stagger IRP registration -Small person complete all credentialing Stopped unnecessarily -Very time sensitive -No automation correctly, -Inconsistency in inspection shipments -Requirement to paying all -PUCO inspectors not proficient licenses at one time -State Hwy Patrol more proficient and -Limited access to professional computer, and/or computer illiteracy MC # 4 -For hire -One person obtains -Lost time -Experience delays -Lack of trust – unsure of -Electronic clearance type -Locally credentials -Lack of CVO drivers -Avg. delay: 45 min intentions of program projects -Medium Spends 50% of time -Inspectors treating drivers -Significant loss is time but does not -Gold card concept: a good -Somewhat time -Hazmat: mail-in with no respect result in lost business safety record or other agreed sensitive -PUCO in person -Roadside CVO enforcement is good upon criteria enables you to by- -Tax: mail & in person pass PUCO inspections -IRP: in person -Commitment is important -BMV: in person -No automation
  • 49. Motor Size and Operation Current Process Problems / Concerns Roadside Delays and Roadside Non-Technical Barriers Suggestions for Improvement Carrie Enforcement & CVISN Potential r MC # 5 -For hire -Safety Director -Unnecessary delays in -Experience delays -Locally, Regionally obtains credentials credential application -Avg. delay: 10-15 min & Nationally -Spends 2-4 hrs/month process due to lack of -Significant loss is money: $300 or less -Medium (IFTA saves time) guidance from agency per citation -Very time sensitive -Walk-in applications -Disagreement between -Very seldom do they loose business shipments -Computer person expiry dates of permits and because of a delay does Fuel Tax issuance. Requirement can -Good roadside commercial vehicle -Sometimes use Fleet be very frustrating enforcement Mover – OS/OW permits MC # 6 -For hire -Safety dept. obtains -Navigating through the -Typically, no delays -One stop shop to obtain all -Locally, Regionally credentials (1 person) bureaucracy to reach -If a delay, it’s usually for brakes out of credentials & Nationally Spends 30 hrs/week someone who can provide adjustment or insurance out of date -Electronic screening of vehicles -Medium -Mail-in applications an answer to a question -No significant losses to company established to reduce delays -No time sensitive -No automation -Shortage of qualified CVO during delays -Electronic filing of applications shipments drivers -Use of transponders MC # 7 -For hire -Accounting Staff -Renewal cycle time for IRP -Experience delays -Limit roadside inspections if -Locally & member obtains -Non-uniform/inconsistent -Avg. delay: 30-45 min carrier maintains a satisfactory Regionally credentials application of rules by -Excessive delays due to amount of rating -Large -Spends 8 hrs/week roadside enforcement units being checked -Once a year inspections -Very time sensitive -Obtains credentials in -Targeting Hazmat carriers, -Significant loss is money: $7500 per -Use of stickers to be valid for a person or by fax even if their Hazmat month certain time period -No automation shipments are 5% of all -Discriminatory roadside shipments selection of Hazmat carriers MC # 8 -For hire -One person obtains -General bureaucracy – -Experience delays -Mistrust of motives of -IRP needs to be more -Locally, Regionally credentials even for compliant carriers -Avg. delay: 30-45 min. government responsive & Nationally -Spends 4-6 hours per -No problems with IRP -Significant loss is: 20% of time, -ITS use with -CDL should be universal in all -Large day -Differences in Hazmat $300-500/week, and loss of business enforcement states -Very time sensitive -Obtains credentials in permits among states is -Cost -Specific location of stickers person and by fax redundant -No level playing field should be uniform -Walk-in applications -Only 2 open supplementals among carriers of -Programs to enhance operating -No automation allowed similar size efficiency --slows down process -Little confidence in -Better enforcement and -Inconsistency in Roadside enforcement practices of permitting standards enforcement practices government -National uniformity in processes MC # 9 -For hire -A tag agent obtains -Not many frustrations -Do not experience significant delays -Institutional conflicts -States should automate, -Locally, Regionally credentials for Ohio -If delayed, it does cost time and (turf wars) streamline and save & Nationally money, but no loss of business -Agencies need an -Cab-cards that are non-vehicle -Large -Enforcement is professional objective which saves specific -Sometimes time ALL stakeholders time -Intrastate authority based on sensitive and money calendar year only -Cost Note: This table represents a snapshot in time. Since it was completed, Ohio has continued to move forward with the implementation of CVISN. Consequently, some carrier concerns and barriers have already been addressed. Data Analysis
  • 50. Once consensus was reached concerning the issues and concerns relating to ITS/CVO, analysis of data took place. This involved procedural analysis to determine specific CVO problems from the agency and motor carrier standpoints in Ohio that can be addressed through ITS/CVO systems implementation. These problems are listed below. Commercial Vehicle Operations Problems in Ohio • The application process for some credentials is slow and time consuming. • An excessive amount of paperwork is involved in the credentialing process. • Delays in the credentialing process (from wrong paperwork to long lines) are sometimes time consuming and frustrating. • There are too many agencies involved in the credentialing process. • There are limited IRP application sites that become extremely crowded at certain times of the year because of limited IRP renewal dates. • Safety inspectors are inconsistent throughout Ohio. • Carrier selection for roadside safety inspections is not based solely on safety performance criteria. • There can be long delays at roadside inspections. • Enforcement practices during safety inspections are not entirely uniform or consistent. • Unnecessary delays during inspections are sometimes imposed on compliant carriers. Once the CVO problems were identified, a strategic analysis to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the CVO in Ohio and the opportunities for addressing these problems and potential threats was conducted. The S.W.O.T. analysis (Table A-3) allowed the vision elements of Ohio’s ITS/CVO program to be aligned to the opportunities threats and CVO problems in Ohio. The strategic analysis develops the organization strategic path towards realizing the vision elements.
  • 51. Table A-3. SWOT Analysis SWOT + - Strengths Weaknesses • • Internal Enforcement program Limited locations for IRP applications • IFTA process • Limited time frame for IRP registration • Permitting process • Inconsistency in safety enforcement • Program for safety and revenue • No electronic access for industry • Program for efficiency • Delays at registration • Considered fair by industry • Too much paperwork • Location of Ohio • Limited inter-agency interaction • Highway system in Ohio • Delays at roadside inspection sites • Technology use • Agency processes not fully automated • Expertise in related areas • Multiple agency dealings • Positive state/federal partnership • One time payment for many credentials • Potential for federal funds • Communication of changes to industry • Many roadside inspection on hazmat carriers Opportunities Threats • • External Increased federal funding Mistrust of regulators’ motivation • Higher use of technology • Lack of commitment • One-stop shopping • Cost • Paperless environment • Non-objective targeting criteria • Error free credentialing process • Lack of access to technology • Targeting high risk carriers • Privacy of information • Uniform system • Move from people to technology • Increased industry awareness • Non-uniform standards • Consistency in safety inspections • Safety mission compromised • Level playing field for industry • Lack of agency assistance • Voluntary compliance • Effective inspection program • Uniform HAZMAT surcharge • Reduced delays at inspection sites • Efficient use of resources
  • 52. Appendix B - Work Breakdown Structure WBS Task Organization Assigned to Completion Date 1.0 Program Administration 1.1 Business Plan PUCO Alan Martin 4/1/03 1.2 Top Level Design Document PUCO Alan Martin 4/1/03 1.3 Budget and Fiscal Management PUCO Alan Martin 9/30/03 1.4 Project Planning & Oversight PUCO Krish Krishnsamy 9/30/03 1.4.1 Project Plan PUCO Krish Krishnsamy 9/1/02 1.4.2 Monthly Project Meetings PUCO Krish 9/30/03 Krishnasamy 1.4.3 Quarterly Steering Committee PUCO Alan Martin 9/30/03 Meetings 1.4.4 State Agency Coordination PUCO Alan Martin 9/30/03 1.5 O&M Planning Project Leads 9/30/03 2.0 System Engineering & Integration 2.1 System Architecture 2.1.1 RFP for System Architect PUCO Project Leads 5/1/02 2.1.2 Architecture Vendor Selected PUCO Project Leads 8/1/02 2.1.3 Define Data Exchange Type ARCH VENDOR System Architect 11/1/02 2.1.3 Architecture Documented & ARCH VENDOR System Architect 11/1/02 Approved 2.1.4 Ensure Architecture Conformance ARCH VENDOR System Architect 9/30/03 2.2 Requirements Approved ARCH VENDOR System Architect 1/1/03 2.3 System Integration 2.3.1 RFP for System Integration PUCO Project Leads 8/1/02 2.3.2 System Integration Vendor Selected PUCO Project Leads 11/1/02 2.3.3 System Integration Requirements INTEG VENDOR System Integrator 1/1/03 Completed 2.3.4 System Integration Plan Completed INTEG VENDOR System Integrator 3/1/03 2.3.5 Integration Test Scenarios INTEG VENDOR System Integrator 6/1/03
  • 53. Completed 2.3.6 Interoperability Test Completed INTEG VENDOR System Integrator 9/30/03 2.3.7 System Integration Completed INTEG VENDOR System Integrator 9/30/03 2.3.8 Integration Vendor Evaluation PUCO Project Leads 12/01/03 Implementation 3.0 CI, CAT & CVIEW 3.1 RFP for Development PUCO Project Leads 6/1/02 3.2 Development Vendor Selected PUCO Project Leads 9/1/02 3.3 Project Plan DEV VENDOR Development 12/15/02 Vendor 3.4 Architecture DEV VENDOR Development 12/1/02 vendor 3.5 Requirements DEV VENDOR Development 12/1/02 vendor 3.6 Design & Code DEV VENDOR Development 5/1/03 vendor 3.7 Interoperability Test DEV VENDOR Development 9/1/03 vendor 3.8 System Test DEV VENDOR Development 7/1/03 vendor 3.9 System/User Documents DEV VENDOR Development 9/1/03 vendor 4.0 Safety 4.1 Project Management 4.1.1 Project Plan PUCO Krish 6/1/02 Krishnasamy 4.1.2 Project Management PUCO Krish 9/30/03 Krishnasamy 4.2 MCR & SSR 4.2.1 Requirements & Architecture PUCO Brian Barringer 5/1/02 4.2.2 Design & Code PUCO Brian Barringer 10/1/02 4.2.3 System Test PUCO Brian Barringer 12/01/02
  • 54. 4.3 Inspections & Forfeiture 4.3.1 Requirements & Architecture PUCO Brian Barringer 7/1/02 4.3.2 Design & Code PUCO Brian Barringer 1/1/03 4.3.3 System Test PUCO Brian Barringer 2/01/03 4.4 Hazmat Registration 4.4.1 Requirements & Architecture PUCO Brian Barringer 8/1/02 4.4.2 Design & Code PUCO Brian Barringer 3/1/03 4.4.3 System Test PUCO Brian Barringer 4/01/03 4.5 Compliance Reviews 4.5.1 Requirements & Architecture PUCO Brian Barringer 9/1/02 4.5.2 Design & Code PUCO Brian Barringer 5/1/03 4.5.3 System Test PUCO Brian Barringer 6/01/03 4.6 Safetynet 2000 Integration 4.6.1 Safetynet 2000 & Aspen Upgrade PUCO Bo bLeader 3/1/02 4.6.2 Roadside Inspectors Systems’ PUCO Bob Leader 5/1/02 Upgrade 4.6.3 Inspections, CRs, & Crash Data PUCO Bob Leader 81/02 Integration 4.6.4 Aspen, SAFER, CVIEW &CI PUCO Bob Leader 5/1/03 Integration Scenarios 4.6.5 Aspen, SAFER, CVIEW &CI PUCO Bob Leader 7/1/03 Integration 4.7 Safety System Test PUCO Brian Barringer 8/1/03 4.8 Safety Interface Test PUCO Bob Leader 9/1/03 4.9 Safety System System/User PUCO Brian Barringer 9/1/03 Documents 4.10 Safety System Delivery PUCO Bob Leader 10/1/03 5.0 Credentialing Systems 5.1 Project Management PUCO Penny Weaver 9/30/03 5.2 Integration Plan 5.2.1 International Registration Plan (IRP) BMV Tom Coady (ACS) 6/1/03 for Up-Front Initial Integration 5.2.2 International Fuel Tax Agreement TAX Dick Beckner 6/1/03
  • 55. (IFTA) for Up-Front Initial (ACS) Integration 5.2.3 Oversize / Overweight Permits Plan ODOT Jeff Honefanger 6/1/03 for Possible Future Integration 5.2.4 Fuel Use Tax (FUT) Permits Plan ODOT Jeff Honefanger 6/1/03 for Future Integration 5.2.5 Hazardous Materials Permits Plan PUCO Penny Weaver 6/1/03 for Future Integration 5.2.6 Single State Registration System PUCO Penny Weaver 6/1/03 (SSRS) Plan for Future Integration 5.3 Development to support Credential Interfaces 5.3.1 Architecture ARCH VENDOR System Architect 10/1/02 5.3.2 Requirements ARCH VENDOR System Architect 11/1/02 5.3.3 IRP 5.3.3.1 IRP design & Code BMV Tom Coady (ACS) 6/1/03 5.3.3.2 IRP System Test BMV Tom Coady (ACS) 8/1/03 5.3.3.3 IRP System & User Documents BMV Tom Coady (ACS) 8/1/03 5.3.3.4 IRP Interface/Integration Testing BMV Tom Coady (ACS) 9/1/03 5.3.3.5 IRP System Delivery BMV Tom Coady (ACS) 10/1/03 5.3.4 IFTA 5.3.4.1 IFTA design & Code TAX Dick Beckner 6/1/03 (ACS) 5.3.4.2 IFTA System Test TAX Dick Beckner 8/1/03 (ACS) 5.3.4.3 IFTA System & User Documents TAX Dick Beckner 8/1/03 (ACS) 5.3.4.4 IFTA Interface/Integration Testing TAX Dick Beckner 9/1/03 (ACS) 5.3.4.5 IFTA System Delivery TAX Dick Beckner 10/1/03 (ACS) 5.4 Credential Integration (CI. INTEG VENDOR System Integrator 10/1/03 CVIEW, CAT, IRP, IFTA, E- Screening)
  • 56. 6.0 Electronic Screening Systems 6.1 Project Planning 6.1.1 Project Plan OSP Paul Meddles 6/1/02 6.1.2 Project Management OSP Paul Meddles 9/30/03 6.2 Deployment of PrePass to 16 sites OSP Paul Meddles Completed 6.3 E-Screening Enrollment and (Inter/Intra) Snapshots to Roadside Operations 6.3.1 Interface/Integration Plan OSP Paul Meddles 7/1/03 6.3.2 Design & Code OSP Paul Meddles 6/1/03 6.3.3 System Test OSP Paul Meddles 8/1/03 6.3.4 System & User Documents OSP Paul Meddles 8/1/03 6.3.5 Interface/Integration Testing OSP Paul Meddles 9/1/03 6.3.6 System Delivery OSP Paul Meddles 10/1/03 7.0 Project Evaluation 7.1 Process Evaluations Project Leads 12/31/03 7.2 Benefit Analysis PUCO Alan Martin 1/31/04
  • 57. Appendix C – Organization Charts Appendix C1 - State of Ohio Organization Relating to Commercial Vehicle Operations Office of the Governor Department of Public Utilities Department of Department of Taxation Commission of Transportation Public Safety Ohio Division of Excise & Motor Bureau of Motor Transportation Engineering Fuel Tax Division Vehicles Department Policy Motor Carrier IRP Center Registration Office of Highway Division Management Ohio State Motor Carrier Highway Patrol Safety Division Special Hauling Office of Hazardous Permit Section Licensing and Office of Field Materials Division Commercial Operations Standards Data Administrative Management Offices Office of Division Technology & Info. Services
  • 58. Appendix C2 - Program / Project Organization PUCO O f f ic e o f t h e C h a ir m a n C V I S N E x e c u t iv e S p o n s o r A la n S c h r ib e r C V I S N S t e e r in g C o m m it t e e C V IS N P ro g ra m I n t e r -A g e n c y C o o r d in a t in g G r o u p C h a ir P ro g ram M an a g e r C h a ir C h r is P ir ik A la n M a r t in A la n M a r t in S y s t e m A r c h it e c t & V e n d o r S u p p o r t P r o je c t A d m in is t r a t o r /F a c ilit a t o r B r ia n B a r r in g e r K r is h K r is h n a s a m y S a f e t y P r o je c t s C r e d e n t ia ls P r o je c t s P r o je c t L e a d e r P r o je c t L e a d e r R o b ert L ea d er Penny W eaver E -S c r e e n in g P r o je c t s I n f o r m a t io n T e c h n o lo g y P r o je c t L e a d e r P ro g ra m S u p p o rt P a u l M e d d le s B r ia n B a r r in g e r
  • 59. Appendix C3 - Inter Agency Coordinating Group (Alternate members not listed) Chris Pirik, Chief of Staff Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Public Utilities Commission of Ohio 200 N High Street, Room 328 180 East Broad St., 12th Floor Columbus, OH 43215 Columbus, OH 43215 (614) 280-6863 Phone: 614-644-8955 Fax: 614-466-7366 keith.willoughby@fhwa.dot.gov Christine.Pirik@puc.state.oh.us Thomas P. Coady, Assistant Chief, Alan Martin, Federal Programs Manager Registration Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO) Bureau of Motor Vehicles 180 East Broad Street, 12th Floor Ohio Department of Public Safety Columbus OH 43215-3793 1970 West Broad St. Phone: 614-466-0785 Fax: 614-752-8349 Columbus, OH 43223 Alan.martin@puc.state.oh.us Phone: 614-752-7518 Fax: 614-752-7972 tcoady@dps.state.oh.us Brian Barringer Information Systems Division Jim Buckson, Mobility & Traffic Ops. Eng Public Utilities Commission of Ohio Federal Highway Administration 180 E. Broad St. 200 North High Street, Room 328 Columbus, OH 43215-3793 Columbus, Ohio 43215-2408 Phone: 614-466-0343 Fax: 614-752-8349 (614) 280-6846 Brian.barringer@puc.state.oh.us jim.buckson@fhwa.dot.gov Krish Krishnasamy Jeff Honefanger, Manager, Special Hauling Chief, Data Management Division Permits Public Utilities Commission of Ohio Ohio Department of Transportation 180 East Broad Street 1610 W. Broad St. Columbus OH 43215-3793 Columbus, OH 43223 Phone: 614-995-7084 Fax: 614-752-9274 Phone: 614-351-5520 Fax: 614-283-3501 Perumal.Krisnasamy@puc.state.oh.us Jeff.Honefanger@dot.state.oh.us Penelope A. Weaver George W. Saylor, P.E., ITS Coordinator Chief, Motor Carrier Registration Division Ohio Department of Transportation Public Utilities Commission of Ohio 1980 W. Broad St. 180 East Broad Street Columbus OH 43223 Columbus OH 43215-3793 Phone: 614-752-8099; Fax: 614-644-8199 Phone: 614-466-8098 Fax: 614-466-0333 George.Saylor@dot.state.oh.us Penelope.weaver@puc.state.oh.us Dean M. Gatton, Manager, Special Projects Richard O. Beckner Office of Technology & Information Services Administrator, Excise and Motor Fuel Tax Ohio Department of Public Safety Division 1970 W. Broad St. Ohio Department of Taxation Columbus OH 43223 30 E. Broad Street Phone: 614-752-7693 Fax: 614-466-8243 Columbus OH 43215 Dgatton@dps.state.oh.us Phone: 614-466-3794 Fax: 614-752-8644 Richard_beckner@tax.state.oh.us Staff Lt. Paul Meddles Ohio State Highway Patrol Patrick B. Muinch, State Director Ohio Department of Public Safety Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration 1970 W. Broad St. 200 N High Street, Room 328 Columbus OH 43223 Columbus, OH 43215 Phone: 614-466-4056 Fax: 614-752-0243 (614) 280-6870 Pmeddles@dps.state.oh.us patrick.muinch@fhwa.dot.gov Larry Woolum Keith Willoughby, State Programs Specialist
  • 60. Ohio Trucking Association 50 W. Broad St. Suite 1111 Columbus OH 43215 Phone: 614-221-5375 Fax: 614-221-3717 Larrywoolum@aol.com
  • 61. Appendix D – Project Schedules Appendix D1 – Project Wide Schedule RFP for Architecture Vendor for Distributed Architecture Selected Integration Integration CVISN Overall TLD/Business Project Plan Architecture Requirements Design, Code & Test Testing Plan Approved Approved Approved Approved Testing Completed Started Schedule Completed 4/1 5/1 8/1 9/1 11/1 1/1/03 6/1 7/1 10/1 System Testing Interface Completed, CI, WebCAT, RFP for Testing Requirements Design & Code Interface Development Development Completed Completed Completed Testing Started CVIEW Distributed Vendor Selected 6/1 9/1 12/1 5/1 7/1 9/1 2/1/02 3/1 4/1 5/1 6/1 7/1 8/1 9/1 10/1 11/1 12/1 1/1/03 2/1 3/1 4/1 5/1 6/1 7/1 8/1 9/1 10/1
  • 62. Appendix D2 – Integration Schedule Aspen 32, Aspen 32, Inspections, Initial SAFER, SAFER, SAFETYNET 2000 Safetynet 2000 Roadside Compliance Integrated CVIEW & CI CVIEW & CI and Aspen 32 Inspectors’ Reviews & Upload to Integration Integration Integration Upgrade Systems Crash Data MCMIS Scenarios Completed Completed Upgraded Integrated Completed Completed 3/1 5/1 8/1 9/1 5/1 7/1 System RFP for System System Integration System System CVISN System Integration Integration System Testing System Integration Integration Planning & Vendor Integration Plan Scenarios Integration Integration Requirements Testing Execution Selected Completed Completed Testing Started Completed Completed 11/1 1/1/03 3/1 6/1 7/1 10/1 8/1 2/1/02 3/1 4/1 5/1 6/1 7/1 8/1 9/1 10/1 11/1 12/1 1/1/03 2/1 3/1 4/1 5/1 6/1 7/1 8/1 9/1 10/1
  • 63. Appendix D3 – Safety, Credentialing and E-Screening Schedule Interface System System Testing Delivery Testing Completed Completed Completed (ITC) (SDC) (STC) Interface Project Plan Requirements & testing Completed Architecture Design & Code Started Credentialing Safety Completed Completed 6/1 9/1 5/1 7/1 8/1 9/1 10/1 Interface Project Plan Architecture Requirements Testing Completed Completed Completed Design & Code STC ITC SDC Started Completed 10/1 11/1 6/1 7/1 8/1 9/1 10/1 6/1 Interface E-Screening Project Plan Architecture Requirements Design & Code Testing Completed Completed Completed Completed Started STC ITC SDC 6/1 10/1 11/1 6/1 7/1 8/1 9/1 10/1 2/1/02 3/1 4/1 5/1 6/1 7/1 8/1 9/1 10/1 11/1 12/1 1/1/03 2/1 3/1 4/1 5/1 6/1 7/1 8/1 9/1 10/1
  • 64. Appendix E – Work Assignments System Relates To Person Assigned Agenc Category y ASPEN / Avalanche Roadside Inspections Bob Leader PUCO SA CAPRI Compliance Reviews Bob Leader PUCO SA Carrier Registration- Intrastate Carrier Penny Weaver PUCO CR Intra Registration CI Credentials Interface Brian Barringer PUCO CR Civil Forfeiture Inspection / CR Penalties John Canty PUCO SA CVIEW “Snapshot” Data Exchange Brian Barringer PUCO SA/ES Drivers Licenses CDL & Non-CDL Tom Coady BMV CR Fuel Tax-Intra Fuel Tax Ohio Only Dick Beckner TAX CR Haz Mat Permits Ohio Haz Mat Permits Penny Weaver PUCO CR IFTA Fuel Tax – Interstate Dick Beckner (Affiliated TAX CR Computer Systems (ACS)) IRP License Plates-Multi State Tom Coady (Affiliated BMV CR Computer Systems (ACS)) License Plates-Intra License Plates Ohio Only Tom Coady BMV CR OS/OW Oversize/Overweight Jeff Honefanger ODOT CR Permits Pre-Clearance Weigh Station Pre- Paul Meddles (Pre Pass) OSP ES Clearance SafetyNet Inspection/CR Data Bob Leader PUCO SA Exchange SSRS Interstate Carrier Penny Weaver PUCO CR Registration Categories SA = Safety Assurance CR = Credentialing ES = Electronic Screening
  • 65. Appendix F – Procurement Strategy Program Area Projects Items to be Procured Lead Procurement Agency Method Program-wide CVIEW Application Server PUCO RFP Database Server Database Software (TBD) CVIEW Application Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) Software Interface to PrePass E- screening system Contracting service to develop Ohio specific CVIEW software CI Web Server PUCO RFP CAT Interfaces to Legacy systems, including IRP, IFTA & OS/OW Contracting service to develop Ohio specific CVIEW software System Contracting services to define PUCO RFP Engineering, and enforce system architecture Architecture and write high level & Integration requirements Contracting services to plan, write test scenarios and execute system integration Safety Information All Projects None PUCO NA Exchange Electronic Screening All Projects Replacement servers for roadside OSP State operations Purchasing Authority Credentialing All Projects None PUCO NA Systems
  • 66. Appendix G – COACH Part 2, Management Checklists COACH2 Phase Planning & Incremental Development Checklist Commit Level (F/P/N) Intended Actions F 1. Sustain a system perspective -- a vision of the overall CVISN architecture and deployment strategy. F 2. Plan, develop, and release incrementally, such that at the end of each phase useful end-to-end functionality is delivered in a way that subsequent phases can build upon. F 3. Choose and format the elements of the phase plan such that they are naturally useful for presenting status. For example, the list of deliverables could also include columns for dates, current standing, and reasons for change. F 4. Employ the rolling wave planning technique, with more detail for the near-term tasks and progressively less detail for the far-term tasks. F 5. Involve the project staff in the phase planning process, for example in a team-oriented planning session. F 6. Review items on the issues list; resolve to the extent possible. F 7. Close open action items, to the extent possible. F 8. Review items on the decisions list -- as a reminder and to verify they are still relevant and correct. F 9. Set phase objectives. F 10. Flesh out the applicable lowest-level details of the Work Breakdown Structure. F 11. Derive phase requirements; refer to COACH Part 1 checklists and the Program Plan as starting points. Look for alternative design and development approaches. F 12. Itemize phase deliverables. F 13. Indicate which elements of the system design baseline are to be deployed; update presentation diagrams accordingly. F 14. Perform studies to determine whether to make, buy, or modify subsystem components. F 15. Develop a detailed schedule for the work to be accomplished during the current phase. Most effectively done by identifying and linking activities per the critical path method, utilizing a desktop scheduling tool. The output can be printed as both a Gantt (bar) chart and a PERT (network) chart. F 16. Identify named individuals who will perform the activities in the detailed schedule. F 17. Update project external dependencies, with their need-by date. F 18. Update the master program phases chart. F 19. Complete the detailed design for all components and interfaces to be developed or modified in the phase. Start with the top-level design and phase objectives. Use COACH Part 3 checklists as guidance, plus the Scope and Design Workshops. F 20. Define subsystem and component control and data interfaces. Utilize COACH Part 4 for functional allocation. F 21. Conduct technical reviews in order to catch problems as early as possible in the development life cycle. F 22. Maintain a strict version numbering system for all products. F 23. Maintain stakeholder commitment via visibility into progress by physical demonstrations of useful capability, and by regular management status reporting. F 24. Define system acceptance criteria; use COACH Part 5 checklists as guidance. F 25. Conduct operational acceptance tests at the end of each phase; specify re-work if necessary. F 26. Conduct a lessons learned session at the end of each phase (as part of planning the next phase).
  • 67. COACH2 Program/Project Planning Checklist Commit Level (F/P/N) Intended Actions F 1. Review state's ITS/CVO strategic plan and business plan. F 2. Define objectives for CVISN Program. F 3. Derive requirements for deployment projects. F 4. Establish project development standards, such as design margin as a function of development lifecycle. F 5. Define project-specific processes, such as required design reviews, or how to close an action item. F 6. Establish a system design baseline. (See the CVISN Guide to Top-Level Design.) F 7. Create a program Work Breakdown Structure. F 8. Delineate program deliverables, including support documentation and training. F 9. Establish a program organization structure, with clear roles and responsibilities. F 10. Assign each element of the work breakdown structure to an element of the program organization structure. F 11. Develop project-specific "partnering charters" covering four areas: mission statement; communication objectives (e.g. decision-making at lowest possible level); performance objectives (e.g. complete the project without litigation); issue resolution system (e.g. management levels and timeframes). P 12. Develop a flexible procurement strategy. Allocate sufficient calendar time for the required steps. F 13. Establish a top-level schedule divided into phases; ensure milestones are measurable. F 14. Outline high-level objectives for each phase; express in a 1-2 page phases chart that explains capabilities from a user's point of view. F 15. Set the stage for the transition to production use and support; such as database backup and restoration, and a user "help" desk. F 16. Identify project external dependencies, with their need-by date. F 17. Estimate cost and resource requirements first using summary top-down methods, such as historical analogy and manager's judgement. This will initiate the process and set targets. F 18. Estimate cost and resource requirements using bottoms-up detailed methods, such as resource-type quantities for each element of the WBS. This will get 'buy in" from the staff, and validate the top-down estimates. F 19. Determine potential funding sources and obtain funding commitments F 20. Identify both programmatic and technical issues and develop a resolution plan. F 21. Obtain approval, publish, and distribute program plan document. Include completed COACH Part 2 checklists as an appendix. F 22. Maintain on each project a Project Leader's notebook with up-to-date copies of essential key charts and diagrams. F 23. Maintain a Program Manager's notebook with up-to-date copies of essential key charts and diagrams. F 24. Once a year or more often, re-figure the estimate-to-completion.
  • 68. COACH2 Program/Project Management Checklist Commit Level (F/P/N) Intended Actions F 1. Establish program executive sponsorship. For example an agency head or chief information officer; or a group such as an executive-level steering committee. P 2. Empower a Program Manager, dedicated to the program at least 30% of the time on average. More time is needed in the startup phase, when a team is new, and if there are many simultaneous projects under the CVISN umbrella. (One state with 20 projects has a full-time Program Manager.) P 3. Engage a System Architect, dedicated to the program approximately 80% of the time on average. P 4. Engage a facilitator/scheduler/administrator, dedicated to the program approximately 50% of the time on average. F 5. When multiple state agencies are involved, establish an inter-agency coordinating council. F 6. Obtain an approved memorandum of agreement among all involved state agencies. F 7. Establish a state carrier advisory council. F 8. Recruit interstate, intrastate, and owner-operator carriers to participate in the program before production deployment (both motor carriers and motor coach companies). F 9. Where appropriate initiate separate deployment projects under the scope of the CVISN program. For example, deployments in disparate domains such as credentials administration vs. electronic screening are likely to be developed by different teams operating as distinct projects. F 10. Assign a Project Leader for each separate deployment project, dedicated to each project at least 30% of the time on average. More time is needed in the startup phase., F 11. Provide adequate training opportunities to project team members, such as attendance at FHWA's CVISN training courses and CVISN workshops. F 12. Ensure all team members acquire a broad and common understanding of CVISN activities, architecture, and design guidance -- for example, by reading the CVISN Guides, and noting lessons-learned by other states. F 13. Foster a sense of professional fellowship and teamwork. Likely to require teambuilding interventions such as a partnering workshop; and periodic face-to-face meetings of geographically dispersed teams. F 14. Adopt the strategy of incrementally developing and deploying products in 3-6 month phases, where each phase adds additional CVISN capabilities. This is called the “spiral” development model as opposed to the “linear” model. Refer to the CVISN Guide to Phase Planning & Tracking. F 15. Establish a configuration management process for controlling changes to the system baseline; this typically includes a Configuration Control Board. Utilize state's existing configuration control process wherever possible. F 16. Set up a program library; obtain needed references identified in the CVISN Guide to Program & Project Planning. F 17. Maintain a list of action items, decisions, and issues. (By definition action items require formal closure.) F 18. Delineate needs for external communications with stakeholders (including the state legislature), and with related projects. F 19. Conduct monthly team meetings and status assessments. F 20. Track progress versus schedule monthly; strategize accordingly. F 21. Conduct quarterly stakeholder progress reviews before a wider audience. F 22. Monitor actual costs and resource expenditures relative to estimates.
  • 69. Appendix H – CVISN Grant Agreement
  • 70. Appendix I - Acronyms AAMVA American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators AASHTO American Association of State Highway Transportation Officials AFF Application file format AHPS Automated Hauling Permit System ANS American National Standard ANSI American National Standards Institute APL The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory ASAP Automated Safety Assurance Program ASC Accredited Standards Committee ASPEN Inspection system name (Not an acronym) ASTM American Society for Testing and Materials ATA American Trucking Associations AVALANCHE Communications module for ASPEN (Not an acronym) AVC Automatic Vehicle Classification AVI Automatic Vehicle Identification CA Credentials Administration CAPE Commercial Accident Prevention and Evaluation CAPRI Compliance Analysis Performance Review Information CARS Credentials Administration Requirements Specifications CASE Computer Aided Software Engineering CAT Carrier Automated Transaction CDL Commercial Driver’s License CDLIS Commercial Driver’s License Information System CI Credentialing Interface CIA custom interface agreement CICS Customer Information Control System (IBM) CIS (alt. 1) Credential Input System CIS (alt. 2) Central Information Site CMVSA Commercial Motor Vehicle Safety Act COACH CVISN Operational and Architectural Compatibility Handbook CR Compliance Review CSFR Carrier Safety Fitness Rating CV Commercial Vehicle CVIE (Obsolete -- see CVIEW) CVIEW Commercial Vehicle Information Exchange Window CVIS Commercial Vehicle Information System CVISN Commercial Vehicle Information Systems and Networks CVO Commercial Vehicle Operations CVSA Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance DOT Department of Transportation DSRC Dedicated Short Range Communication DSTU Draft Standard for Trial Use DUNS Dun and Bradstreet EDI Electronic Data Interchange
  • 71. EFT Electronic Funds Transfer ETA Education and Technical Assistance ETC Electronic Toll Collection FFE Flat File Equivalent FHVUT Federal Heavy Vehicle Use Tax FHWA Federal Highway Administration FMCSR Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations FMIS Financial Management Information System FOC final operating capability FTA (alt. 1) Federation of Tax Administrators FTA (alt. 2) Federal Transit Administration FTP File Transfer Protocol GSN Global Services Network GUI Graphical User Interface HAZMAT Hazardous Material HELP Heavy Vehicle Electronic License Plate Program HTML Hypertext Markup Language HVUT Heavy Vehicle Use Tax
  • 72. IDT Intelligent Decision Technologies IEEE Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers IFTA International Fuel Tax Agreement IFTA/RPC International Fuel Tax Agreement/Regional Processing Center IG Implementation Guide (for EDI) IMS Information Management Systems INT Internet IOC initial operating capability IP Internet Protocol (in TCP/IP) IRP International Registration Plan ISS Inspection Selection System ITS Intelligent Transportation Systems (formerly IVHS) ITSA Intelligent Transportation Society of America JHU/APL The Johns Hopkins University / Applied Physics Laboratory LAN Local area network LM Legacy Modification LSI Legacy System Interface MAPS Multi-Jurisdictional Automated Preclearance System MCMIS Motor Carrier Management Information System MCSAP Motor Carrier Safety Assistance Program MF Mainframe MFTU Motor Fuel Tax Unit MVA Motor Vehicle Administration (means MD’s MVA) NCIC National Crime Information Center NDR National Driver Register NLETS National Law Enforcement Telecommunications System NMVTIS National Motor Vehicle Title Information System OCD Operational Concept Document ODBC Open Data Base Connectivity ODBC/SQL see ODBC and SQL OIR Office of Information Resources OMC Office of Motor Carriers OOS Out of Service OS/OW Oversize/Overweight PC personal computer PDPS Problem Driver Pointer System POP Post Office Protocol PRISM Performance and Registration Information Systems Management RES Roadside Electronic Screening ROC Roadside Operations Computer RPC Regional Processing Center
  • 73. RS Registration System RSPA Research and Special Program Administration SAFER Safety and Fitness Electronic Records SAFETYNET Inspection report storage system (Not an acronym) SafeVUE SAFER & CVIEW Visual User Environment SCE Selective Compliance and Enforcement SDM SAFER Data Mailbox SDO Standard Development Organization SHA State Highway Administration SMTP Simple Mail Transfer Protocol SMTP/POP Simple Mail Transfer Protocol/ Post Office Protocol SNA Systems Network Architecture SQL Structured Query Language SSN Social Security Number SSRS Single State Registration System STOLEN State On-line Enforcement System TA Temporary Authority (for IRP registration) TCP Transmission Control Protocol TCP/IP see TCP and IP TS Transaction Set UCR Unified Carrier Register USDOT United States Department of Transportation VAN Value-Added Network VIN Vehicle Identification Number VISTA Vehicle Information System for Tax Apportionment VISTA/RS VISTA Registration System VISTA/TS VISTA Tax System VMS Variable Message Sign WIM Weigh-In-Motion XML Extended Markup Language

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