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  • 1. School of Management, Division of Management CONTENTS CONTENTS...............................................................................................................i WELCOME TO THE MANAGEMENT COURSES’ 3rd Year PROGRAMME..........1 Welcome to year 3 of the MA in Management Programme. The third year is a key year in deciding the degree pathway which is best for you. Already you have accumulated a range of management skills and you have been given a flavour of the functional areas of business. Now you take a more strategic approach to management through the core modules in Business Policy and International Strategic Management at the same time as building upon the specialist areas of Marketing, HRM, Operations Management and Business Law. Your choice of divisional electives needs careful consideration in view of the area of investigation of your dissertation and your potential choice of electives in........................................................1 year 4..............................................................................................................1 How is third year different?.......................................................................................2 The End Product............................................................................................2 The Philosophy...............................................................................................2 The Modules...................................................................................................2 Aiming at Knowledge and Skills.....................................................................2 Preparation for Fourth Year...........................................................................2 LIST OF KEY DATES FOR 2000-2001....................................................................3 Term:...................................................................................................3 AUTUMN.............................................................................................3 Term:...................................................................................................3 SPRING...............................................................................................3 Term:...................................................................................................3 SUMMER.............................................................................................3 Other information......................................................................................................4 Communications.............................................................................................4 .................................................................................................................................4 Course structure.......................................................................................................4 PROGRESSION RULE.............................................................................................4 To progress to the fourth year, students must have passed 36 modules and achieve the standard of performance required for honours entry............................4 Electives....................................................................................................................6 Class terminology.....................................................................................................8 third YEAR LECTURE PROGRAMME 2000-2001...................................................8 Your Personal Timetable................................................................................9 31.3BP1 ........................................................................................................................ 10 Business Policy 1 ........................................................................................................................ 10 31.3BQ2 ........................................................................................................................ 13 Business Policy 2 ........................................................................................................................ 13 31.3RM3 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001 i
  • 2. School of Management, Division of Management ........................................................................................................................ 17 Research Methods ........................................................................................................................ 17 Week ............................................................................................................. 19 Date ............................................................................................................. 19 Topic ............................................................................................................. 19 Reading* ............................................................................................................. 19 Input ............................................................................................................. 19 31.3SM3 ........................................................................................................................ 21 International Strategic Management ........................................................................................................................ 21 31.3OP1 ........................................................................................................................ 23 Operations Management 2 ........................................................................................................................ 23 31.3EL1 ........................................................................................................................ 28 Employment Law ........................................................................................................................ 28 Prerequisites .................................................................................................. 30 Week 6 ............................................................................................................. 33 31.3MS2 ........................................................................................................................ 33 Marketing Strategy ........................................................................................................................ 33 31.3IM2 ........................................................................................................................ 37 International Marketing ii 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001
  • 3. School of Management, Division of Management ........................................................................................................................ 37 31.3MC3 ........................................................................................................................ 40 Marketing Cases ........................................................................................................................ 40 31.3WC3 ........................................................................................................................ 44 Working Conditions and Behaviour ........................................................................................................................ 44 Ergonomics .................................................................................................. 45 Lecture...............................................................................................................................................................45 31.3IN2 ........................................................................................................................ 45 Innovation Management ........................................................................................................................ 45 31.3PM1 ........................................................................................................................ 49 Project Management ........................................................................................................................ 49 Lectures, video presentations, guest speakers, 2 hr/wk, during weeks 1 to 8, compulsory, total 16 hours ......................................................................................................................................................................50 Tutorials, 1 hr/wk, during weeks 2 to 9, compulsory, total 8 hours...........................................................50 Computer workshops, 1 hr/wk, during weeks 1 to 8, compulsory, total 8 hours.......................................50 Student-scheduled group work, approx. 20 hours.......................................................................................50 Private study, approx. 48 hours....................................................................................................................50 31.2CM2 ........................................................................................................................ 56 Commercial Law 2 ........................................................................................................................ 56 31.2CN3 ........................................................................................................................ 58 Commercial Law 3 ........................................................................................................................ 58 31.3HS3 ........................................................................................................................ 60 Law of Health and Safety at Work ........................................................................................................................ 60 Week 6 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001 iii
  • 4. School of Management, Division of Management ............................................................................................................. 63 31.3IL3 ........................................................................................................................ 64 Information Technology Law ........................................................................................................................ 64 31.3DL2 ........................................................................................................................ 66 Discrimination Law ........................................................................................................................ 66 31.3ER2 ........................................................................................................................ 70 Employee Relations ........................................................................................................................ 70 iv 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001
  • 5. School of Management, Division of Management WELCOME TO THE MANAGEMENT COURSES’ 3RD YEAR PROGRAMME from the 3rd Year Manager Introduction Welcome to year 3 of the MA in Management Programme. The third year is a key year in deciding the degree pathway which is best for you. Already you have accumulated a range of management skills and you have been given a flavour of the functional areas of business. Now you take a more strategic approach to management through the core modules in Business Policy and International Strategic Management at the same time as building upon the specialist areas of Marketing, HRM, Operations Management and Business Law. Your choice of divisional electives needs careful consideration in view of the area of investigation of your dissertation and your potential choice of electives in year 4. Good luck. Susan Walker Third Year Manager (Management Degree). 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001 1
  • 6. School of Management, Division of Management HOW IS THIRD YEAR DIFFERENT? The End Product At the end of a successful third year, students may graduate with an ordinary degree, or go on to the fourth, honours year. So by the year's end, all the basic elements of a good business education will have been covered, and a fair range of basic business skills should have been experienced and mastered. The Philosophy The philosophy of the third year course is to round out the underpinning of disciplines from first and second year, where students start with widely varying backgrounds, and also to provide some opportunities for integration of these components. Furthermore, year 3 takes a more strategic perspective through its core modules whilst developing specialist functional skills through elective choices. The Modules The modules comprise a set of compulsory courses, a choice of divisional electives and a free choice of additional general electives. The core strategic management modules (Business Policy and International Strategic Management) integrates much of the specialisms taught in the degree. The Operations Management 2 and Employment Law modules round off the background to all of the functional specialist subjects. By term 2 therefore, students can make a more informed choice of divisional electives to plan their degree pathway. Aiming at Knowledge and Skills Our aim is to produce students who are well equipped to start work in the world of business, with a good broad knowledge base, some essential individual and group skills of many kinds, and the ability to go on learning and developing. You will often have to find material for yourself, and the skill of “learning to learn” is one of the hallmarks of higher education, and will remain valuable all your life. Preparation for Fourth Year The third year is also a preparation for the specialised work of the fourth Honours year. It therefore includes some elements of the work of fourth year: e.g. a first-hand look at primary sources and literature; an emphasis on student-led tutorials and seminars as well as lectures; and increasing use of group and team work. From the middle of the year onwards, students are directed towards possible topics and methods for their honours dissertation. It therefore is important that elective choices are made which can help to formulate a sound dissertation proposal. 2 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001
  • 7. School of Management, Division of Management Attendance at lectures and tutorials. Attendance at classes is not voluntary! We expect you to turn up regularly, and we keep records of tutorial attendance. If you are persistently absent, you may be disqualified from sitting examinations. If you find you're having problems, don't avoid them by hiding. Speak to your mentor! Contact People Third year manager: Co-ordinators of compulsory modules Business Policy 1 and 2: Dr Sarah Cooper International Strategic Management: K Thory Employment Law : Prof Vic Craig Operations Management 2: Dr Nigel Shaw LIST OF KEY DATES FOR 2000-2001 Friday, 29 September 2000 - Management Registration - Lecture Theatre III at 1410 - 1525 University Registration - James Watt II Centre at 1455 – 1610 Term: AUTUMN Monday, 2 October 2000 - First day of Autumn Term, the start of classes Friday, 8 December 2000 - Last day of Autumn Term Term: SPRING Monday, 8 January 2001 - First day of Spring Term, the start of classes Friday, 16 March 2001 - Last day of Spring Term Term: SUMMER Monday, 16 April 2001 - First day of Summer Term, the start of classes Friday, 22 June 2001 - Last day of Summer Term 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001 3
  • 8. School of Management, Division of Management OTHER INFORMATION Communications Important notices for third year students are placed on the notice-board next to G13 in the School of Management. You should also check your student mail box every day: this is the normal route for communications with individual students both from inside and outside the university. Important announcements are sometimes made in the compulsory classes. If you miss a lecture, please check that you gain all the information from it, including any announcements. You should acquaint yourself with the University Regulations, details available from Registration, Lord Balerno Building. COURSE STRUCTURE All students have to take the core modules of Business Policy 1, Business Policy 2 and International Strategic Management in addition to the two specialist modules in Employment Law and Operations Management 2. During the second and third terms, you begin the ‘junior honours’ part of the specialist degrees with what are called divisional electives. First term Second term Third term Business Policy 1 Business Policy 2 International Strategic 31.3BP1 31.3BQ2 Management 31.3SM3 Operations Management 2 Divisional Divisional Elective 31.3OP1 Elective (Directed Elective: Research Methods) Employment Law Divisional Divisional 31.3EL1 Elective Elective Elective Elective Elective PROGRESSION RULE To progress to the fourth year, students must have passed 36 modules and achieve the standard of performance required for honours entry. 4 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001
  • 9. School of Management, Division of Management COURSE STRUCTURE MA in Management - Outline Course Structure YEAR 1 Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Management 1 Management 2 Management 3 Micro-economics Macro-economics International Economics Introduction to Financial Introduction to Management Introduction to Finance Accounting Accounting Elective Elective Elective YEAR 2 Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Commercial Law 1 Organisational Behaviour Human Resource Management Fundamentals of Marketing 1 Fundamentals of Marketing 2 Operations Management 1 Statistics for Business 1 Quantitative Techniques for Quantitative Techniques for Business 1 Business 2 Elective Elective Elective YEAR 3 Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Business Policy 1 Business Policy 2 International Strategic Management Operations Management 2 Module from List A Module from List A Employment Law Module from List A Module from List A Elective Elective Elective YEAR 4 Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Dissertation 1 Dissertation 2 Dissertation 3 Module from List B Module from List C Module from List C Module from List B Module from List C Module from List C Module from List B Module from List C Module from List C List A : Third Year Divisional Electives Marketing Strategy Commercial Law 2 International Marketing Commercial Law 3 Marketing Cases Law of Health & Safety at Work Marketing and Consumer Law Information Technology and Law Reward Management and Motivation Discrimination Law Working Conditions and Behaviour Employee Relations Innovation Management Team Development and Facilitation Skills Project Management Research Methods List B : Fourth Year Modules Term 1 International Business Strategies Company Law (Shareholders and Directors) Business and Corporate Strategy Assessment & Development of Human Resources Marketing Research International Human Resource Management Retail Studies Stress and Work Law of Marketing and Retailing Purchasing Law of Human Resource Management List C : Fourth Year Modules Terms 2 & 3 Law of Human Resource Management Legal Aspects of European Union Company Law (Shareholders and Total Quality Management Directors) Marketing and Management in Small and Medium Sized Strategic Human Resource Management Enterprises Information Systems Management Entrepreneurship & Technology Venturing European Marketing Logistics & Supply Chain Management Marketing Communications Understanding Diversity Career Development and New Forms of Work Organisation 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001 5
  • 10. School of Management, Division of Management ELECTIVES A list of electives eligible for year 3 students is given below and should be considered carefully before making your choice. This is of particular importance when choosing divisional electives in that you will have to consider electives which may help you with your dissertation in year 4 and your preferred degree pathway. General Electives Each student should select ONE of the following each term. You need to ensure that you have passed the necessary prerequisite for a second or third year level elective module. 31.1BR1 Management and Business Reporting 31.1BS2 Management Information Systems 31.1BI3 Management and Business Uses of the Internet 32.1MS1 Moral & Social Philosophy 1 32.1MT2 Moral & Social Philosophy 2 32.1MU3 Moral & Social Philosophy 3 32.1EA1 British Economic Policy 1 32.1EB2 British Economic Policy 2 32.1EC3 British Economic Policy 3 31.3PM1 Project Management 31.2TD3 Team Development and Facilitation Skills 34.1FX1/2/3 French 1 (Post Standard Grade) 34.2FX1/2/3 French 2 (Post Higher Grade Intermediate) 34.1GX1/2/3 German 1 (ab initio) 34.2GX1/2/3 German 2 34.1SX1/2/3 Spanish 1 34.1AX1/2/3 Arabic 33.2FR1 Financial Reporting 33.2GA3 Group Accounting 332SE3 Social & Environmental Accounting 33.2MO2 Management Accounting in Organisations 33.2PT1 Portfolio Theory 33.2CF2 Corporate Finance 33.2RC3 Stucture & Regulation of Capital Markets 333AI3 Contemporary Issues in Accounting General Electives /cont. 6 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001
  • 11. School of Management, Division of Management 333AU2 Auditing 333MT1 Management Accounting Techniques and Decisions 333AN1 Accounting Information Systems 333DD2 Databases and Decisions 333SO3 Accounting Systems 333II1 International Financial Investment 333FD2 Financial Derivatives 333IM3 International Financial Markets 333IA1 International Corporate Financial Analysis 333CI2 Contemporary Issues in Corporate Finance 333CR3 Mergers & Acquisitions 30.1CS1 Study and IT Skills (Autumn Term) 30.1CP2 Communications and Presentation (Spring Term) 30.1PS3 Problem Solving Skills (Summer Term) Divisional Electives Each student should select TWO electives from Term 2 and TWO from Term 3. The choice is as follows: Term 2 31.3MS2 Marketing Strategy 31.3IM2 International Marketing 31.3ER2 Employee Relations 31.3DL2 Discrimination Law 31.2CM2 Commercial Law 2 31.3IN2 Innovation Management Term 3 31.3MC3 Marketing Cases 31.2CN3 Commercial Law 3 31.3HS3 Law of Health and Safety at Work 31.3IL3 Information Technology and Law 31.3WC3 Working Conditions and Behaviour 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001 7
  • 12. School of Management, Division of Management CLASS TERMINOLOGY All institutes have their jargon - education is no exception. Below we explain two important terms that are used throughout this guide. COURSE - refers to the degree for which you are studying MODULE - refers to a unit of study which spans a term. Modules may be linked, that is, they are conceptually progressive and examined at the end of the linked modules by a "synoptic" (or overall) exam, which covers issues dealt with in all modules. THIRD YEAR LECTURE PROGRAMME 2000-2001 NOTE: At the time of going to press the University Time-Table was not finalised. You are therefore provided with a blank time-table for you to use. It may also be necessary to alter class times or locations from time to time. Any such changes to the lecture programme will be posted on the 3rd year notice board. Please check it regularly. 8 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001
  • 13. School of Management, Division of Management Your Personal Timetable Term : MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY 9.15 10.15 11.15 12.15 13.15 14.15 15.15 16.15 17.15 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001 9
  • 14. School of Management, Division of Management 31.3BP1 Business Policy 1 Module Co-ordinator: Dr Sarah Cooper Introduction The vast majority of organisations, small and large, in the UK and other Western countries base their activities upon the principles and concepts of strategic management. Although the basic concepts first established in the 1960s still hold, both theory and practice have been in a constant state of evolution as the economic, industrial and competitive environments have changed over time. The purpose of this module is to give students an in-depth understanding of both the principles, concepts and theory of strategic management and the current and expected impact on organisations and management practice. The aim of the module is to allow students to develop knowledge and skills which will be of real and immediate value in future careers. This module is synoptically linked to Business Policy 2 (31.3BQ2) and International Strategic Management. Objectives Knowledge-based: • To develop an understanding of the development of strategic management theory • To provide an understanding of the key elements of the strategic management process and models of analysis • To allow students to develop an understanding of dynamics of the process. Skills-based: • To develop analytical skills in strategic analysis using models and case studies • To develop presentation skills. Teaching Methods Classes will consist of two formal lectures, a 'theme' class and a case workshop each week for eight weeks. Attendance at all classes is compulsory. Students will also be required to participate in a group-based project relating theory to practice. Each group will be required to make a formal presentation which will be reviewed and commented upon. Workshop Arrangements 10 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001
  • 15. School of Management, Division of Management Case workshops begin in Week 2 and students will be assigned to a workshop group in Week 1. Case studies will be assigned on the Tuesday prior to the workshop. The case studies will examine a "real-life" scenario. Students are expected to prepare cases prior to class and to participate actively in the analysis and discussion. Guidelines for case preparation will be given in Week 1. Assessment For students taking synoptically linked modules Business Policy 1 (31.3BP1), Business Policy 2 (31.3BQ2) and International Strategic Management (31.3SM3) there will be no assessment in Term 1. An exit qualification will be set FOR THOSE TAKING ONLY 31.3BP1. Group project progress presentations will receive class feedback and written feedback which could significantly affect the final outcomes. All students will be required to complete their group presentations. Prerequisites Management 1 (31.1MA1) and Management 2 (31.1MB2) are prerequisites for this module. Course Requirements Students are required to attend all classes and workshops. Reading Set text: Johnson, G. & Scholes, K (1999) Exploring Corporate Strategy: Text and Cases (5th edition), London, Prentice Hall Europe. Other Ambrosini, V. with Johnson, G. & Scholes, K. (1998) Exploring Techniques texts: of Analysis and Evaluation in Strategic Management, London, Prentice Hall Europe. Asch, D. & Bowman, C. (1987) Strategic Management, London, Macmillan Press Ltd. Bowman, C. (1990) The Essence of Strategic Management, London, Prentice Hall. Bowman, C. & Asch, D. (1987) Strategic Management, London, Macmillan. De Witt, B. & Meyer, R. (1998) Strategy: Process, Content, Context, London, ITP Thompson Business Press. Lynch, R. (1997) Corporate Strategy, London, Pitman. Mabey, C. & Mayon-White, B. (1993) Managing Change, London, Paul Chapman. Mintzberg, H., Quinn, J.B. & Goshal, S. (1998) The Strategy Process, 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001 11
  • 16. School of Management, Division of Management London, Prentice Hall. Morden, A. (1993) Business Strategy and Planning: Text and Cases, London, McGraw Hill. . Whittington, R. (1993) What is Strategy and Does It Matter?, London, Routledge. Supplementary reading: The Financial Times, The Economist Class Outline Introduction - Class summary; assessment; timetable requirements; workshops; project. Why understanding strategy is important (even for 3rd year undergraduates) Theme 1 Corporate Strategy - an introduction Theme 2 Defining your perceived Market/Industry Johnson & Scholes, Ch. 1 segment(s) Theme 3 The External Environment Johnson & Scholes, Ch. 3 Theme 4 Structural Analysis of Industries Johnson & Scholes, Ch. 3 Theme 5 Internal Analysis Johnson & Scholes, Ch. 4 Theme 6 Stakeholder Expectations Johnson & Scholes, Ch. 5 Theme 7 Strategic Options Johnson & Scholes, Ch. 6 Theme 8 Strategy Implementation Johnson & Scholes, Ch. 10 Presentations 12 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001
  • 17. School of Management, Division of Management 31.3BQ2 Business Policy 2 Module Co-ordinator: Dr Sarah Cooper Introduction Business Policy 1 examined the broad strategic management process, models of analysis and the dynamic nature of the process. The second Business Policy module, following on from the content of the first module, examines what is arguably the most difficult task in strategic management, implementation. The implementation of any strategy, whether straightforward or radical, is likely to involve changes in organisational structure, the use and allocation of resources and the ways in which people work. Successfully achieving these changes can be a formidable task involving managers at all levels within an organisation. This module gives students the opportunity to examine specific aspects of strategy implementation and their applicability to different organisations such as new ventures, not for profit organisations and the public sector. Objectives Knowledge-based: 1. To examine issues relating to strategy implementation, specifically: • The relationship between strategy and structure • Achieving change within organisations. 2. To examine the concept and practice of strategic management in relation to not-for- profit organisations and new ventures. Skills-based: 1. To develop analytical and decision-making abilities using models and case studies 2. To develop presentation and report writing skills. Teaching Methods Classes will consist of two formal lectures, a 'theme' class and a case workshop each week for eight weeks. Attendance at all classes is compulsory. Students will also be required to participate in the group-based project (continued from Term 1) relating theory to practice. Each group will be required to make a formal presentation and complete a written assignment, based on the project, both of which will be assessed. 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001 13
  • 18. School of Management, Division of Management Workshop Arrangements Case workshops begin in Week 2. Students will normally be required to remain in the same workshop group to which they were assigned in Term 1, and will only be allowed to change if there is a timetable clash, in which case they should see the Module Co-ordinator in Week 1 to be assigned to another group. Case studies will be distributed during the week prior to that in which they are to be discussed, allowing at least a week for preparation. The case studies will examine a "real-life" scenario relating to the content of the previous week's lectures. Students are expected to prepare cases prior to class and to participate actively in the analysis and discussion. Assessment Students taking both Business Policy 1 and 2 are required to participate in a group project which will be assessed in Term 2. The mark from the project will account for 30% of the overall synoptic mark. A synoptic examination in Term 2 on the work of both modules will account for the remaining 70%. Students will be required to complete all elements of assessed work. Prerequisites Students are required to have taken Business Policy 1 (31.3BP1) before being allowed to take this class. Course Requirements Students are required to attend all classes and workshops. Students are required to complete all elements of assessment. Reading Set text: Johnson, G. & Scholes, K. (1999) Exploring Corporate Strategy: Text and Cases (5th edition), London, Prentice Hall Europe. 14 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001
  • 19. School of Management, Division of Management Other Ambrosini, V. with Johnson, G. & Scholes, K. (1998) Exploring Techniques of texts: Analysis and Evaluation in Strategic Management, London, Prentice Hall Europe. Asch, D. & Bowman, C. (1987) Strategic Management, London, Macmillan Press Ltd. Balogun, J. and Hailey, V.H. with Johnson, G. & Scholes, K. (1999) Exploring Corporate Change, London, Prentice Hall Europe. Bowman, C. (1990) The Essence of Strategic Management, London, Prentice Hall. Bowman, C. & Asch, D. (1987) Strategic Management, London, Macmillan. De Witt, B. & Meyer, R. (1998) Strategy: Process, Content, Context, London, ITP Thompson Business Press. Drucker, P. (1990) Managing the Non-Profit Organization, London, Butterworth-Heinemann. Lynch, R. (1997) Corporate Strategy, London, Pitman. Mintzberg, H., Quinn, J.B. & Goshal, S. (1998) The Strategy Process, London, Prentice Hall. Morden, A. (1993) Business Strategy and Planning: Text and Cases, London, McGraw-Hill. Deakins, D. (1999) Entrepreneurship and Small Firms, London, McGraw-Hill. Thompson, J.L. (1993) Strategic Management: Awareness and Change, London, Chapman & Hall. . Whittington, R. (1993) What is Strategy and Does It Matter?, London, Routledge. Supplementary reading: The Financial Times, The Economist and the news/business pages of any national newspaper 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001 15
  • 20. School of Management, Division of Management Class Outline Introduction - Class summary; assessment; timetable requirements; workshops; project. Theme 1 Culture and Strategy Johnson & Scholes, Chs. 2, 5 Theme 2 Social Responsibility and Business Ethics Johnson & Scholes, Ch. 5 Theme 3 Competitive Positioning Johnson & Scholes, Ch. 4 Theme 4 Strategy Evaluation Johnson & Scholes, Ch. 8 Theme 5 Strategy and Structure Johnson & Scholes, Ch. 9 Bowman & Asch, Ch. 11 Morden, Ch. 21 Theme 6 Strategic Alliances Theme 7 Strategic Change Johnson & Scholes, Ch. 11 Bowman & Asch, Ch. 10 Balogun et al. Theme 8 Strategy and the Not-for-profit Organisation Bowman & Asch, Ch. 15 Theme 9 Strategy and the Small Business Deakins, Ch. 1,2,3. 16 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001
  • 21. School of Management, Division of Management 31.3RM3 Research Methods Module Co-ordinator: Dr Nigel Shaw Introduction Research in its many guises is fundamental to the operation of most organisations. Organisations base a large part of their decision making on research undertaken on different aspects of their business, such as market reports and consumer surveys. Whatever career you choose, it is highly probable that at some point you will be required to conduct research and prepare reports on specific topics; therefore knowing how to undertake a significant piece of research work is an important skill to develop. Those of you who go on to Honours will have a chance to show off your newly acquired research skills when you undertake your dissertation. Objectives The purpose of this module is to provide you with the knowledge and skills you require to conduct a sizeable piece of research. Knowledge-based: To select and develop a subject to investigate To obtain relevant information To access and evaluate literature To select an appropriate methodology To develop an understanding of the differences and similarities between qualitative and quantitative research To know how to analyse, interpret and write-up research results. Skills-based: By the end of the module you should be able to examine a research problem, develop suitable research questions on which to focus your investigation, devise a suitable methodology for conducting the study and be able to provide a framework for presenting the material in report form, in other words be able to write a research proposal. By the end of the module, you should be 'armed' with a broad range of knowledge and skills which you should then be able to 'fire' selectively at whatever problem you are required to investigate. Don't worry, it is not as daunting as it sounds! 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001 17
  • 22. School of Management, Division of Management Teaching Methods The module will run for 6 weeks and comprise 3 hours per week of 'formal' class time. The material will be presented through a variety of lectures and practical sessions given by active research staff from the department and by those in some of the support services in the university. Some of the sessions will be taught as workshops with considerable emphasis on experiential learning. Tutorial Arrangements There are no formal tutorials for this module. Assessment This is based 100% on the module assignment. Prerequisites You will be required to have completed successfully 31.2QT2 (Quantitative Techniques, 2nd year). Course Requirements Students are expected to attend all the formal sessions of the class and undertake all coursework. Essential Reading White, B 2000 Dissertation Skills for Business and Management Students, Cassells Other Useful Texts Bell, J 1987 Doing Your Research Project, Open University Press Berry, R 1994 The Research Project: How to Write It, London, Routledge Bryman, A (ed) 1988 Doing Research in Organisations, London, Routledge Easterby-Smith, M, 1991 Management Research: An Introduction, Sage, London et al 18 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001
  • 23. School of Management, Division of Management Gill, J & Johnson, P 1998 Research Methods in Business & Management, Sage, London Holborn, G 1993 Legal Research Guide, Butterworths Howard K & Sharpe, 1996 The Management of a Student Research Project, Aldershot, JA Gower, (2nd Edition) Hussey, J & Hussey, 1997 Business Research, London, Macmillan Business R Jankowicz, AD 1992 Business Research Projects for Students, London, Chapman & Hall Luck, M 1999 Your Student Research Project, Gower McKie, S 1994 Legal Research: How to Find and Understand the Law, Cavendish Oppenheim, AN 1966 Questionnaire Design and Attitude Measurement, London, Heinemann Remenyi, D, et al 1997 Research Methods for Managers, London, PCP Saunders, MNL, et al 1997 Research Methods for Business Students, Pitman Class Outline Week Date Topic Reading* Input 1 1. Introduction; What is a dissertation? Chapter 1 WNS/LFB 2. Deciding Topic & Identifying Advisor Chapter 2 Students 3. Topic Parameters Chapter 2 WNS 2 4. University holiday 5. Searching the literature Chapter 7 GMcD/AM 6. Carrying out a Literature Search Chapter 7 Students 3 7. Analysing the Literature Chapter 7 LFB 8. Data Collection Methods Chap.4&5 LFB/BC/PD 9. Practical Research Design Chapter 3 LFB/WNS 4 10. Writing a Research Proposal Chapter 6 WNS 11. Gathering Data Students 12. How to Analyse Data LFB/BC/PD 5 13. Analysing Your Data Students 14. Presenting Data LFB/BC/PD 15. Making Sense of Data & Evaluating Results Chapter 8 LFB 6 16. University Holiday 17. Linking Data to the Literature Students 18. Drawing Conclusions; Role of Chapters Advisor 9, 10 & 11 WNS 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001 19
  • 24. School of Management, Division of Management Location of Classes The class meets at the following times and venues: Mondays Thursdays To be confirmed Thursdays Assignment The module assignment has to be handed in by 4.00pm the Monday of the seventh week of term three, 2001 to the Coursework Office, Room 1.62, first floor, School of Management. Late assignments may have marks deducted. Key to Lecturers and Contact Points LFB - Dr Lynne Baxter, Room 1.43, School of Management Tel: ext: 3853, email: l.f.baxter@hw.ac.uk BC - Mr Bryan Clark, Room 1.33, School of Management Tel: ext: 3842, email: b.clark@hw.ac.uk PD - Dr Penny Dick, Room EF6, Esme Fairbairn Building Tel: ext: 8143 (Not on email as yet) GM - Ms Gill McDonald, The Library Tel: ext: 3584, email: g.a.mcdonald@hw.ac.uk AM - Dr Arnold Myers, The Library Tel: ext: 3579, email: a.j.myers@hw.ac.uk WNS - Dr Nigel Shaw, Room 1.40, School of Management Tel: ext: 3852, email: w.n.shaw@hw.ac.uk Should you wish to speak to any of the lecturers outside of class hours, it is easiest to contact them either by email or telephone to arrange a suitable time to meet. 20 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001
  • 25. School of Management, Division of Management 31.3SM3 International Strategic Management Module Co-ordinator: Kathryn Thory Introduction Multinational companies play a significant role in the trade among nations, and in the process face immense challenges. This module discusses some of these challenges and the ways in which they cope with them. The module also discusses the reasons why some companies go international, what factors might interfere with the conduct of their business and trade across borders, and what role global and regional organisations play to enhance free international trade among nations and firms. Objectives To introduce the global environments in which international firms operate and the threats and opportunities that such firms have to deal with. Teaching Methods Lectures, tutorials and workshops. Assessment The module will be assessed by a combination of project/case study coursework (30%) and a module examination (70%). Pre-requisites 31.1MA1, 31.1MB2; linked modules 31.3BP1 and 31.2BQ2. Course Requirements Students are required to attend all classes and workshops. 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001 21
  • 26. School of Management, Division of Management Reading Books: Beamish, P W, Killing, J P, LeCraw, D J and Morrison, A, 1994, International Management: Text and Cases. Homewood, Ill.: Irwin. Second edition. Czinkota, M R, Ronkainen, I A and Moffett, M H, 1999, International Business. Dryden. Fifth edition. Daniels, J D and Radebaugh, L H, 1998, International Business - Environment and Operations. Addison-Wesley. Eighth edition. Professional and Academic Journals and Periodicals: Financial Times The Economist Journal of International Business Studies Class Outline Firms and international business Major global institutions which regulate international business Major regional institutions which regulate international business Major challenges to international business: political risk Major challenges to international business: barriers to free trade Institutional variations across nations: taxation, accounting and legal practices Doing business with others, business protocol, business ethics 22 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001
  • 27. School of Management, Division of Management 31.3OP1 Operations Management 2 Class Co-ordinator: Dr Nigel Shaw Introduction What will tomorrow's company look like? How will it function? Operations management concerns the human, system, and process requirements of service and manufacturing companies from small-scale to global businesses. The key to success, however, does not depend on having all the solutions to hand but rather in having a firm grasp of the principles of operations management from which the right solutions can be found. There has been a tendency in recent decades to give efficiency priority over innovation. Now this is changing and innovation is becoming the driving principle for deciding on organisational forms. This module outlines some of the fundamental principles and techniques in operations management and aims to generate a selective and questioning framework for providing real solutions to organisational problems. Objectives The module is designed to help you explore and understand key operational planning and control issues in operations and to develop mechanisms for generating appropriate solutions to problems. . Knowledge-based objectives • To show the nature of the relationship between business strategy, technology strategy, and operations strategy in organisations. • To generate an awareness of the interaction between operating systems and their environments. • To develop an appreciation of planning and control concepts in operations management and their importance for business success. • To recognise and understand the role of the human factor in operations management. Skill-based objectives • To develop the student's capability for solving real problems using both an holistic "systems" assessment of overall business activities, followed by a "reductionist" analysis of the key components of a problem; this will be achieved using case studies and virtual tours. • You will also be required to carry out an assignment in groups. This will draw on many aspects of the module syllabus and provide learning opportunities in team building and project management. Teaching Methods 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001 23
  • 28. School of Management, Division of Management Classes will consist of 3 formal one-hour lectures for eight weeks. You will also attend one tutorial per week for seven weeks. Tutorial Arrangements You will be provided with a case study or similar in advance of each tutorial. The purpose of the tutorial is to allow you to improve your understanding of a relevant module topic, and to undertake some reading around the topic. You will also be given the opportunity to develop your presentation skills. You will be expected to give a presentation in tutorial, either individually, or within a group, related to a case study. Attendance at tutorials will be taken. The information may be used in decisions about module progression. Assessment Assignment 30%. End of module examination 70%. Course Requirements To take this module, you require a pass in Operations Management 1 [312OP3]. You will be expected to prepare in advance for tutorials and carry out some reading before each class. Essential Reading Slack, N et al 1998 Operations Management (2nd ed), Pitman Other Useful Texts Becheno, J & Elliot, B R 1997 Operations Management, Blackwell Coyle, J.,Bardi, E J & 1994 Transportation, 4th ed, West Publishing Cavinato, J L Coyle, J.,Bardi, E J & 1996 Management of Business Logistics,6th ed, West Langley, J Publishing Galloway, R.L 1998 Principles of Operations Management, Pitman, 2nd Ed Galloway, R.L 1996 Operations Management, The Basics, International Thomson Other Useful Texts / contd Harris, D & Walters, D 1992 Retail Operations Management, Prentice Hall 24 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001
  • 29. School of Management, Division of Management Heizer, J & Render, B 1999 Operations Management, Prentice Hall, 5th Ed Hill, T 1987 Small Business Production/Operations Management, MacMillan Hill, T 2000 Operations Management, McMillan Business Hope, C & Muhlemann, A 1997 Service Operations Management, Prentice Hall Johnson, B 1998 Managing Operations, Butterworth/Heinemann Leask, A & Yeoman, I 1999 Heritage Visitor Attractions, An Operations Management Respective, Cassell Murdick, R.G. et al 1990 Service Operations Management, Allyn & Bacon Naylor, J 1996 Operations Management, Pitman Shafer, S.M., & Meredith, 1998 The Management of Operations, Wiley J.R Tomes, A & Hayes, M 1993 Operations Management, Prentice Hall Vonderembse, M.A. & 1991 Operations Mangement, West White, G.P Waller, D.L 1999 Operations Management, A Supply Chain Approach, ITP Waters, D 1999 Operations Management, Addison-Wesley Wright, J.N 1999 The Management of Service Operations, Cassell References Slack, N [editor] 1999 Encyclopaedic Dictionary of Operations Management, Blackwell 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001 25
  • 30. School of Management, Division of Management Class Outline Week Date Topic Reading Lecturer [Slack et al] * 1 1 1. Introduction to module / Process Types 123-128 WNS 2. Facilities layout and flow 215-246 WNS 3. Performance improvement 319-329 WNS 2 4. Performance improvement 677-698 WNS 5. Performance improvement 841-845 WNS 6. Job Design 312-319 WNS 336-345 Tutorial 1 TBA 3 7. Ergonomics 330-336 WNS 8. The time factor & work measurement 329-300 WNS 832-840 9. Job evaluation & payment WNS Tutorial 2 TBA 4 10. Supply chain management 177-185 WNS 11. Supply chain management 473-505 WNS 12. Just in time 547-582 TBA Tutorial 3 TBA 5 13. Materials requirements planning 511-542 TBA 14. Planning & scheduling 353-382 TBA 15. Inventory management 431-467 TBA Tutorial 4 TBA 6 16. Logistics WA 495-505 TBA 17. Distribution WA 505-517 TBA 18. Transport WA 517-535 TBA Tutorial 5 TBA 7 19. Reliability & safety 718-738 TBA 20. Maintenance 738-753 TBA 21. Project management 588-626 TBA Tutorial 6 TBA 8 22. Quality 633-669 WNS 23. Total quality management 760-787 WNS 24. The Operations Challenge Review 795-818 WNS Tutorial 7 Revision TBA - To be advised 1 * Except for reading Waller (1999), denoted “WA” 26 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001
  • 31. School of Management, Division of Management Location of Classes The class meets at the following times and venues: Tuesday Thursday To be confirmed Friday Assignment The assignment has to be handed in by 4pm on the Thursday of the fifth week of term one, 2001 to the Coursework Office, Room 1.62, first floor, School of Management. Late assignments may have marks deducted. Key to Lecturer & Contact Point WNS - Dr W. Nigel Shaw room 1.40, School of Management ext 3852, email W.N.Shaw@hw.ac.uk Results Results will be posted on the Examination notice board, ground floor School of Management. 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001 27
  • 32. School of Management, Division of Management 31.3EL1 Employment Law Module Co-ordinator: Prof V Craig Introduction This module builds on the general study of the essential principles of business law undertaken in Commercial Law I (31.2CL1) by introducing the specialities of the contract of employment and the relationship between the contract of employment and statutory employment rights. Employment law has developed over the last 10-15 years to such an extent that it now impacts on every aspect of Human Resource Management and Industrial Relations and it is now dangerous if not impossible to embark on decision making in these fields without a firm understanding of the legal parameters within which a decision has to be taken. An examination of these parameters may create opportunities as well as restrictions. Where the behavioural scientist sees issues in terms of, for example, change, standards and motivation the employment lawyer considers them in terms of contractual variations, breach of contract statutory restrictions on employment and unfair dismissal. Accordingly this Module links well with other modules in the fields of Human Resource Management eg. Employee Relations (31.3ER2). Also this Module is designed to link with other law electives (Discrimination Law 31.3.DL2, and Law of Health and Safety at Work 31.3HS3). To become more efficient a business needs to reorganise work patterns so that workers are engaged more on multi-task teams with flexible working hours. The role of the employment lawyer is to ensure that these changes may be made without their financial advantages being cancelled out by costly tribunal and court cases brought by workers who are treated unfairly, in breach of their contracts or contrary to statutory rules. Thus a simple change in working practices may if not done within the law result in claims for damages for breach of contract, equal pay, unfair dismissal applications and an employer infringing the Working Time Regulations and the National Minimum Wage Regulations. Equally the same objective may be obtained but without these claims. The purpose of the Module is to make students aware of the risks and how to avoid them. Objectives The objectives are to make you aware of the legal provisions which apply to:- (a) the nature of the contract of employment and how it is distinguished from other contracts for doing work. (b) the specialities of certain public sector employments (civil servants, police) and the position of directors, partners and apprentices; employment pro hac vice. (c) the creation of the contract of employment and its relationship with the statutory Written Statement, the requirements of the Written Statement and its legal status. (d) collective agreements - their legal enforceability and their incorporation into the contract of employment. 28 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001
  • 33. School of Management, Division of Management (e) the implied terms of the contract - obedience, fidelity, care, competence, safety, mutual respect, support; mobility clauses and restrictive covenants. (f) hours of work and statutory time-off rights. (g) termination of the contract of employment and remedies therefor - notice, frustration, (constructive dismissal), insolvency, winding-up. (h) discrimination: sex, race and disability discrimination. (i) unfair dismissal: the concept of dismissal, the reasons for dismissal; the special provisions (union membership, pregnancy, assertion of rights, public interest dismissals, health and safety; remedies). (j) Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) Regulations 1981 (TUPE). On completion of the module you will be able to appreciate:- (a) the differences between the contract of employment and other types of working relationships. (b) how the contract of employment may be validly created and its relationship with the statutory Written Statement and collective agreements. (c) the extent to which the common law and statute imply terms into the contract of employment and how statute entitles an employee to time-off work for trade union duties/activities and protects an employee against deductions from wages. (d) the grounds on which the contract of employment can be terminated and the remedies for breaking of the contract. (e) how the law protects who are the victims of discrimination. (f) the remedies for unfair dismissal and to which classes of employee they are available. (g) the protection afforded to employees who work in businesses which are sold or who work for contractors in the service industry, their entitlement to have their contracts of employment transferred to the new owner or contractor. 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001 29
  • 34. School of Management, Division of Management Teaching Methods There will be 24 lectures (and one tutorial per week during weeks 2-8 inclusive). For each tutorial meeting you will receive, approximately a week in advance, a work-sheet which will contain case studies/problem questions/decided cases for discussion. Tutorial Arrangements Each student is allocated to a tutorial group that will meet weekly. Students are expected to prepare for tutorials in advance and make presentations. Assessment There will be a 2 hour Modular Exam in the 10th week of the Autumn term. Prerequisites Commercial Law 1 (31.1CL1). Course Requirements Attendance at lectures, tutorials and completion of assessments/examinations. Reading There are three recommended texts of which several copies are in the University Library Craig, V., 1996 'Employment Law in Scotland', (T & T Clark) 2nd ed. Miller, K Mackay, M R 1998 ‘Employment Law’ (W Green & Son Ltd). Simon, S N.M. Selwyn 1999 'Selwyn's Employment Law', (Butterworths) 12th ed. or latest. 30 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001
  • 35. School of Management, Division of Management Other texts to which reference may be made are: Smith IT & 'Industrial Law', (Butterworths). Wood JC Pitt, G. 'Employment Law', (Sweet & Maxwell). Pitt,G. 'Cases & Materials in Employment Law', (Pitman Publishing). Anderman, S.A. 'Labour Law', (Butterworths). For other relevant texts students should scan the library data base. NB In all cases the most recent editions of the above texts should be used. Encyclopaedias on Labour Law held on 3 hour loan in the Heriot-Watt University Library include:- (1) Harvey on Industrial Relations (2) Sweet & Maxwell's Encyclopaedia of Labour Relations (3) The Stair Memorial Encyclopaedia of the Law of Scotland (Vol.9) (2nd Issue). The following specialist reports are held by HWU Library and reference should be made to them as required. (i) Industrial Relations Law Reports (ii) Industrial Case Reports (iii) Industrial Relations Review and Reports (Legal Information Bulletin) (iv) Industrial Law Journal (v) Incomes Data Services, Brief (vi) Current Law Annotated Statutes. Class Papers: These are distributed to all members of the class to supplement lectures and tutorial materials. 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001 31
  • 36. School of Management, Division of Management Class Outline Week 1: Lecture One: Introduction to contract and employment law; why do business graduates need to know about employment law? Lecture Two: Why is the contract of employment important and how do we know whether we have created a contract of employment? The indicia of the Contract of Employment. Lecture Three: Distinguishing “employees” from the “workers” and “independent contractors”; the multiple and variable test. Reading Craig and Miller - paras. 1.1-1.10, 2.1-2.3, 2.4(d), 3.63. Week 2: Lecture One: Agency workers; homeworkers; contracted out workers and who is liable for their negligence; directors, partners, apprentices; special attributes of public sector employment. Lecture Two: The formation of the contract of employment. Does it have to be written? Can it be entirely verbal? Can it be created simply by a course of conduct? What are the common law rules and what is the effect of the Requirements of Writing (Scotland) Act 1995. Lecture Three: The statutory written statement. Why does legislation require that employees receive a written statement of their terms of employment? What are its contents and legal status. Reading Craig & Miller - paras. 2.4(a)-(c); 2.5-2.11. Week 3: Lecture One: Collective agreements. Who can create them? What are they and what is their legal status and practical influence on terms and conditions of employment. Lecture Two: Express and implied incorporation of collective agreements; the advantages and disadvantages of incorporation; what terms are capable of incorporation? recognition of trade unions and personal contracts. Lecture Three: The trade union as an agent for its members, arbitration and custom. Reading Craig & Miller - paras. 2.14-2.16. Week 4: Lecture One: Express and implied terms - fact and law; obedience, careful performance and competence. Lecture Two: Fidelity and restrictive covenants; rendering employee support; trust and confidence. Lecture Three: Employee’s safety; place of work and mobility clauses; hours of work and time off rights. Reading Craig & Miller - paras. 2.12-2.13; 3.26; 3.31-3.56. Week 5: Lecture One: Termination of the contract by notice, frustration, rescission, insolvency, dissolution, winding up and liquidation. 32 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001
  • 37. School of Management, Division of Management Lecture Two: Wrongful dismissal and remedies. Lecture Three: Remedies for breach of contract - damages, interdict, declarator and judicial review. Reading Craig & Miller - paras. 2.56-3.63; 4.1-4.10. Week 6 Lecture One The concept of dismissal and the reasons for a fair dismissal - conduct, capability, redundancy, breach of statute and some other substantial reason. Lecture Two: Pre-dismissal procedures and the effect of Polkey v A E Dayton Services Ltd; warnings, consultation; alternative employment; admissible evidence; reasonable investigation; reasonable grounds for belief; pending trial for alleged offences. Lecture Three: Special cases of unfair dismissal - union membership and activities, industrial action and lock-outs, health and safety complaints, assertion of rights, pregnancy. Reading Craig & Miller - Chapter 5, paras. 5.1,5.2; 5.14-5.52. Week 7 Lecture One: Remedies for unfair dismissal in the ordinary and special cases: reinstatement, re-engagement and compensation; interim relief and special awards.; exclusions and qualifying service. Lecture Two: Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) Regulations 1981; the meaning of undertaking. Lecture Three: The effect of the Regulations - the transference of contracts and related rights and duties to the new owner; the protection of unfair dismissal and dismissal for economic technical or organisational reasons. Reading Craig & Miller Chapter 5, paras. 5.3-5.13; 5.55-5.70; 5.71-5.91. Week 8 Lecture One: Equal Pay: the different entitlements (like work, work rated equivalent, work of equal value and Art 141); genuine material factor defence; exclusions; indirect pay discrimination. Lecture Two Where does the law intervene? Sex and racial discrimination; direct and indirect discrimination; Genuine Occupational Qualifications; unlawful acts by employers; remedies for discrimination. Lecture Three Disability discrimination: what is a disability; less favourable treatment for a reason which relates to a disability; justification for less favourable treatment; making reasonable adjustments; unlawful acts by employers: remedies. Reading Craig and Miller Chapter 7 and Mackay and Simon Chapter 3. 31.3MS2 Marketing Strategy Module Co-ordinators: Hugh Leask / Chris Dodd 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001 33
  • 38. School of Management, Division of Management Introduction The module aims to give the student an understanding of marketing management and its applications within strategic marketing management. The intention is that the student should be able to plan the marketing element of management and to solve the problems facing the marketing manager at both local and international level. Objectives The module will concentrate on covering strategic planning methods within marketing perspective. It aims to develop the student’s understanding of marketing theory into a strategic marketing approach for both product and service marketing. Knowledge-based: The module will examine: • Strategic marketing management • Marketing strategy and competitive forces • Marketing strategy planning and strategic choice • Measuring market strategy performance • Marketing ethics and social responsibility Skills-based: The student will develop further understanding of techniques needed for strategic marketing such as competitive analysis, product positioning and assessing market performance. In addition, group presentation will develop interpersonal communication and teamwork. Teaching Methods Classes will consist of one one-hour lecture and one two-hour group work period held weekly for eight weeks per term. During the course class members will be placed in working groups and will be required to present their findings to the other class members. 34 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001
  • 39. School of Management, Division of Management Tutorial Arrangements All members of the class will attend one tutorial every week. There will be a mixed programme of marketing case studies and discussions. Assessment The module will be assessed by a combination of coursework (30%) and a module examination (70%). Pre-Requisites 312FM1 and 312FN2. Reading Recommended purchase: Wilson, R.M.S., 1997 ‘Strategic marketing management’, 2nd ed. Gilligan, C. & Butterworth Heinemann. Pearson, D. Recommended background reading: Baker, M.J. (ed.) 1999 ‘The marketing book’, 5th ed. Butterworth Heinemann. Class Outline (together with recommended weekly reading) Week 1 Introduction to strategic marketing management Administration and introduction to project. Strategic marketing management issues: stakeholders and customers. Wilson, R.M.S., 1997 ‘Strategic marketing management’, Gilligan, C. & Butterworth Heinemann, 2nd Ed, Ch. 2. Pearson, D. 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001 35
  • 40. School of Management, Division of Management Week 2 Marketing strategy and competitive forces Marketing strategy and competition. Competitor analysis. Wilson, R.M.S., 1997 ‘Strategic marketing management’, Gilligan, C. & Butterworth Heinemann, Ch. 4. Pearson, D. Week 3 Marketing strategy and the consumer Customer analysis. Products and markets. Wilson, R.M.S., 1997 ‘Strategic marketing management’, Gilligan, C. & Butterworth Heinemann, Ch. 5, 8. Pearson, D. Week 4/5 Strategy formulation Market objectives. The marketing effort for products and markets. Strategic choice decidision making. Wilson, R.M.S., 1997 ‘Strategic marketing management’, Gilligan, C. & Butterworth Heinemann, Ch. 6, 7, 9, 12, Pearson, D. 13, 14. Week 6/7 Marketing strategy implementation and control Implementation of strategic marketing. Methods of control within strategic marketing. Wilson, R.M.S., 1997 ‘Strategic marketing management’, Gilligan, C. & Butterworth Heinemann, Ch. 18, 19, 20. Pearson, D. Week 8 Marketing ethics Marketing ethics. Marketing & consumerism. Reading material in the library and hand-outs. 36 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001
  • 41. School of Management, Division of Management 31.3IM2 International Marketing Module Co-ordinator and Lecturer: Professor John Fernie / TBA Introduction The aim of this module is to encourage students to be aware of the potential benefits of involvement in international marketing. The module sets out to show the challenges that international marketing may pose and to provide an indication as to how these challenges can be faced. The module will enable students to assess marketing opportunities, devise appropriate market entry strategies and develop marketing plans for international markets. Objectives Knowledge-based: • to develop an understanding of the principles of international marketing • to understand the global environment within which manufacturing and service businesses operate • to demonstrate alternative international market entry strategies • to formulate an international marketing strategy • to develop marketing plans for international markets. Skills-based: • to develop analytical skills using case studies and statistical data to improve international marketing methods • to develop personal presentation skills. Teaching methods Classes will involve a mixture of lectures, case studies, videos and group discussions. Class contact time is 4 hours per week; 3 hours of lectures/formal tuition and a one hour tutorial. Assessment The module will be assessed by a combination of coursework (30%) and a module examination (70%). 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001 37
  • 42. School of Management, Division of Management Prerequisites Fundamentals of Marketing 1 (312FM1) and Fundamentals of Marketing 2 (312FN2) are the prerequisites for this module. Course requirements Students are required to attend all classes and tutorials. Reading It is recommended that the following text is purchased for the module: Cateora, P.R, Graham, J.L. and 2000 International Marketing, European Edition, Ghauri, P.N. McGraw-Hill. Recommended background reading Czinkota, M.R., Ronkainene, I.A. & 1996 ‘International business’, 4th. ed., Dryden Moffett, M.H. Press, Fort Worth. Douglas, S.P. & Craig, C. S. 1995 ‘Global marketing strategy’, McGraw-Hill. Haliburton, C. & Hunerberg, R. 1993 ‘European marketing: readings and cases’, Addison-Wesley. Jeannet, J. & Hennessey, H.D. 1997 ‘Global marketing strategies’, 4th. ed., Houghton Mifflin, Boston, Mass., USA. Mooij, M. de 1997 Global marketing and advertising: understanding cultural paradoxes’, Sage. Paliwoda, S.J. & Thomas, M. 1998 ‘International marketing,’ 3rd. ed., Butterworth-Heinemann, Oxford. Paliwoda, S.J. & Ryans, J.K. (ed.) 1995 ‘International marketing reader,’ Routledge. Terpstra, V. & Sarathy, R. 1997 ‘International marketing’, 7th. ed., Dryden Press, Fort Worth, USA. 38 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001
  • 43. School of Management, Division of Management Class outline Week 1 Introduction: Basic Principles in International Marketing a) Why companies go international. The stages of globalisation (Ohmae, Porter, Cateora). b) The evolution of the global corporation; the decline of US MNE’s and the rise of Japanese and NICs MNEs. c) The gurus and internationalisation. Cateora, Graham and Ghauri, chapters 1, 2 and 10. Weeks 2 and 3 The Global Environment a) Understanding different cultures and business customs. Ethics and corporate responsibility in international marketing b) Political changes - evaluating market opportunities and threats; assessing and minimising political and financial risk. c) The legal dimension - international conventions to national laws. Cateora , Graham and Ghauri, chapters 3-7 and 20. Week 4 Researching Markets for Entry Stratagies a) The research process - problems in acquiring ‘good’ data, developing multinational information systems. b) Alternative entry strategies. Cateora , Graham and Ghauri, chapters 8 and 11. Weeks 5 - 8 Global Marketing Mix Management a) Product planning - global brands, standardised or customised marketing, new product development strategies. b) The promotion mix - global advertising and the communication process, sales promotion, personal selling in global markets. c) Pricing policies - cost factors, transfer pricing, differential pricing, “grey” markets. d) Logistics and distribution planning - channel considerations, manufacturer-retailer relations and their impact upon distribution strategies, supply chain trade-offs. Cateora, Graham and Ghauri, chapters 12-18. 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001 39
  • 44. School of Management, Division of Management 31.3MC3 Marketing Cases Module Co-ordinator: TBA Introduction This module should serve to enhance students diagnostic abilities by focusing on strategic marketing cases and cases which explore the marketing mix. It should also provide a firm basis for those who wish to take the Chartered Institute of Marketing case examination. Objectives The course aims to build on earlier modules to ensure that students can face up to real practical marketing situations. Particular attention will be paid to the ability to frame and analyse strategic marketing problems. A second objective is to introduce a critical dimension by questioning the mechanical application of strategic tools and by exploring the use of the “warfare” metaphor as a means of understanding marketing strategy. Teaching Methods As the aim is to encourage practical and critical thinking, the course draws upon a range of teaching methods. The overall tone should be thought of as one of class discussion rather than lectures (although the extent to which this can be met will depend on student numbers). Class discussions of topics will take place focusing around group case presentations, discussions and debates, details of which are set out below. Tutorial Arrangements All members of the class will attend one tutorial every week. This will allow for a more detailed discussion of issues discussed in class sesssions. In particular, tutorials will be used to ensure that groups have acquired the necessary practical marketing skills of assessing market size, share and other issues with respect to marketing intelligence. Assessment The module will be assessed by a combination of project/case study coursework (30%) and a module examination (70%). Course Requirements 31.2FM1 and 31.2FN2 40 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001
  • 45. School of Management, Division of Management Reading Recommended Purchase Pearson, D & Fiifield, P. (1998) The CIM Diploma Case Book 1997-8, Butterworth Heinemann. Recommended Background Reading Baker, M.J. (ed.) (1999) The Marketing Book, Butterworth Heinemann. Class Outline (together with recommended reading) Week 1: Introduction to the Course Fuji Bank Case: Round Table Week 2: Revision of basic analytic approach to marketing strategy analysis Boeing Case Reading Students should read their way progressively through the first 5 chapters of the book edited by Michael Baker. Additional reading is indicated for each week. Duro, Robert & Bjorn (1988) The Basic Principles of Marketing Warfare, Sandstom Chichester: J Wiley. Levinson, Jay Conrad (1993) Guerilla Marketing: How to Make Big Profits from a Small Business, London: Plaktus. Michaelson, Gerald A. (1987) Winning the Marketing War, Lanham MD, London: Abt Books. Week 3: Marketing in Practice Discussion “In the right consultant’s hands an understanding of the marketing strategy process and the application of strategic marketing tools can be invaluable. In the wrong hands, a mechanistic application of the marketing strategy process to real situations and a naive and simplistic application of the tools, may lead to outcomes which are misleading or even downright dangerous.” Reading 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001 41
  • 46. School of Management, Division of Management Brownlie, Douglas (1985) Models. Journal of Marketing Management, 1, 157-194. Constable, John (1986) Sense? Paper presented to MBS seminar series, Spring, Manchester, England. Genus, Audley (1995) Flexible Strategic Management. Chapman Hall. Reid, David (1990) Where Planning Fails in Practice. Long Range Planning, 23:2: pp. 85-93. van Rossum (1984) “Is the Theory of Life Cycles Pure Humbug?” Financial Times, Thursday 23rd August: 14. Week 4: War Talk Debate The Motion: “This House Believes that a Marketing Warfare Approach is the Best Means Available for Achieving Long Term Growth and Profitability.” References Davidson, H. (1975) Offensive marketing: Or how to make your competitors followers, Penguin Business, (esp. parts two and four). Duro, R. (1989) Winning the marketing war: a practical guide to competitive advantage, John Wiley and Sons. Garsombke D. (1988) Marketing dons the mantle of militarism. In: Organizational Dynamics, Summer 1988, 46-56. Johnson, G & Scholes K. (1988) Exploring corporate strategy. 2nd edition. Prentice Hall, esp. Chapter Two pp 24-47. Kotler, P. and R. Singh, Marketing warfare in the 1980's. The Journal of Business Strategy. McDonald, M.B. (1990) Marketing plans: How to prepare them: How to use them. Second Edition. Heinemann Professional Publishing 120-128. Porter, M. (1979) How competitive forces shape strategy. Harvard Business Review, March-April 1979, 137-145. Ries A, (1988) The mind is the ultimate battlefield. The Journal of Business Strategy, July/August 4-7. 42 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001
  • 47. School of Management, Division of Management Ries, A. and Trout J. (1986) Marketing warfare. McGraw-Hill. Week 5: Round Table: Dealing with CIM Cases Week 6: Revision of Concepts C.I.M. Case Presentations Reading Recommended purchase:: Baker, M.J. (ed.) 1999 ‘The Marketing Book’, Butterworth Heinemann. Recommended background reading: Pearson, D & 1998 The CIM Diploma Case Study Book 1997-1998, Fifield, P. Butterworth Heinemann. Purchase if taking CIM Examination. 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001 43
  • 48. School of Management, Division of Management 31.3WC3 Working Conditions and Behaviour Module Co-ordinator: TBA Introduction The environments and physical conditions in which people work have been studied and researched by occupational psychologists, ergonomists, and human factors specialists of various kinds. The purpose of this module is to review this research and knowledge, and to give students a wide knowledge of the variety of working conditions that can be encountered, the ways this can affect safety, productivity and morale, and countermeasures that can be taken to control bad effects. Objectives Knowledge-based: • To develop an understanding of working conditions and their effects on human welfare and behaviour. • To understand the basic underlying mechanisms in human biology and psychology • To develop awareness of appropriate counter-measures for bad working conditions Teaching methods The class has three formal lectures and one tutorial a week for eight weeks. Assessment A project essay, weighted 30% An end of module examination, weighted 70% Prerequisites 312.OB2 Course Requirements Students are required to attend all classes and tutorials 44 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001
  • 49. School of Management, Division of Management Reading Wickens, C.D., 1998 An introduction to human factors engineering. Gordon, S.E. & Liu Y. New York, Addison Wesley Longman Arnold, J., Cooper, C.L. 1998 Work psychology: understanding human behaviour in the & Robertson, I.T. workplace. London, Pitman Landy, F.J. 1989 Psychology of work behaviour. Pacific Grove: Brooks/Cole Edholm, O.G. 1967 The biology of work. London, Weidenfeld and Nicolson Dipboye, R.L., Smith, 1994 Understanding indusrial and organizational psychology. Fort C.S. & Howell, W.C. Worth, Harcourt Brace Murrell, K.F.H. 1969 Ergonomics. London, Chapman and Hall Oborne, D. 1996 Ergonomics Supplementary reading Journals in library: Ergonomics, Work and Stress, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Occupational and Organisational Psychology Class Outline Lecture 1 Overview of the area. History of studies of working conditions 2 The Hawthorne experiments: lighting, breaks, and other things 3 Mechanisms of sight and the eye: illusions. Colour vision. Night vision. 4 Modern views of lighting: levels, glare, contrast. Discrimination 5 Sound, noise and music. Loudness, pitch. The mechanisms of the ear. 6 Hearing loss. Pain. Measures to control noise. Communication systems. Alarms 7 Music: studies of music at work. Problems of measuring effects. 8 Heat and cold. Measurements. Types of work. Dangers. Remedies. 9 Hours of work: overtime and long hours. Effects on health. Annual hours. Legal controls. 10 Hours of work: shiftwork. Shiftwork design and planning. 11 Hours of work: shiftwork: effects on health, well being and output. 12 Hours of work: flexible working hours. 13 Accidents at work: statistics : sources and uses. 14 Accidents at work: planning safe systems of work. Human error. 15 Accidents at work: prevention methods 16 Muscular work and fatigue 17 Industrial injuries: lifting and back pain. RSI 18 Pollution at work: atmospheric conditions. 19 Information displays 20 Controls 21 Usability studies 22 Measuring stress at work 23 Revision 24 Revision 31.3IN2 Innovation Management Module Co-ordinator: Dr Lynne Baxter 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001 45
  • 50. School of Management, Division of Management Introduction Innovation is the term given to the process of doing something new in organisations. Clearly this can be approached from different angles, and the course is designed to do this in a comprehensive and practical way. The types and contexts of innovations are considered with theory being illustrated with many examples from both service and manufacturing industry. A feature of the course is that student learning will be facilitated by the use of an integral case organisation which exemplifies all the aspects explored in the topic list. Objectives The module is designed to help you explore and understand core ideas in the theory and gain practical skills to help you problem solve in organisations you will work in: Knowledge based objectives • To understand basic concepts of innovation management • To understand creative problem solving techniques • To be aware of new product development models • To become familiar with innovation process management • To see the interconnection between industry, organisation and product innovation adoption cycles • To be aware of the cost implications of innovation Skills based objectives • To be able to use individual and group creativity techniques • To be ablive to critically evaluate an organisation’s product development process Teaching Methods Classes will consist of 3 formal one-hour lectures for eight weeks. You will also attend one workshop a week for seven weeks. 46 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001
  • 51. School of Management, Division of Management Workshop Arrangements You will be provided with a case study or similar in advance of each workshop. The purpose of the workshop is to allow you to improve your understanding of a relevant module topic, and to undertake some reading around the topic. You will also be given the opportunity to develop your presentation skills. You will be expected to give a presentation in tutorial, either individually, or within a group, related to the case study. Assessment Assignment 30%. End of module examination 70%. Course Requirements You will be expected to prepare in advance for tutorials and carry out some reading before each class. Reading The recommended Texts are: Trott, P. (1998) Innovation and New Product Development, London, Financial Times Publishing. Utterback, J. (1996) Mastering the Dynamics of Innovation, Boston, Harvard Business School. Supplementary texts Drucker (1985) Innovation and Entrepreneurship, London, Butterworth-Heinemann. Ford, D. and M. Saren (1996) Technology Strategy for Business, London, Thomson International Business Press. Freeman, C and Soete, L (1997) The economics of industrial innovation, 3rd edition, London, Pinter. McLoughlin, I and Harris, M. (eds) (1997) Innovation, Organizational Change and Technology, London, Thomson International Business Press. Spence, W.R. (1994) Innovation, London, Chapman & Hall. Tidd, J. (1997) Managing Innovation, Chichester, Wiley. An additional Reading List will be handed out at the beginning of the course. 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001 47
  • 52. School of Management, Division of Management Class Outline 1. Defining Innovation and Module Introduction Trott, Ch.1 2. How creative are you? 3. Guest Speaker 4. Idea Generation Techniques (1) Rickards, Ch.6 5. Idea Generation Techniques (2) 6. Knowledge Management (1) 7. Knowledge Management (2) Trott, Ch. 3 8. Introducing Product Innovation 9. Product Life Cycles and the Financial Aspects of Innovation 10. New Product Development models Utterback, Ch.3 11. Process Innovation (1) 12. Process Innovation (2) 13. Resources and reusability Utterback, Ch.9 14. Prototyping and Maintenance 15. Complex product systems 16. Case studies in product and process innovation 17. Innovation and macro-economic development Trott, Ch.10 18. Innovation and business strategies 19. Innovation, organisational structures and human resources Trott, Ch.9 20. Innovation, finance and R&D 21. Innovation and technology transfer 22. Inter-firm networks and collaborative arrangements Trott, Ch.8 23. Entrepreneurship, small firms and innovation 24. Module Summary 48 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001
  • 53. School of Management, Division of Management 31.3PM1 Project Management Module Co-ordinator: Dr Paul Gardiner Note: This document is regularly updated. The latest version can be viewed at: http://www.som.hw.ac.uk/buspdg/313PM1/Guide.htm This version dated: 20 July 2000. Introduction Project management is an interdisciplinary subject area with wide industrial and commercial application. The skills to manage projects successfully are required by more and more employers, reflecting the continuing rise of project management as a preferred method of management and control. The purpose of this module is to give you an in-depth understanding of the principles, concepts and theory of project management. A pass in this module will equip you with an increased knowledge of project management skills and serve as a foundation for better management of and contribution to future projects. The aim of this module is to allow you to develop knowledge and skills that will be of real and immediate value in future careers. Note: Class size is strictly limited to 120 students. Priority will be given to students who turn up to classes regularly. Objectives Knowledge-based • To develop an understanding of the concept of projects and project management. • To provide students with a life-cycle model of project management. • To increase knowledge and understanding in a range of disciplines that are important to managing projects successfully. • To increase students’ knowledge and understanding of hard and soft project management tools and methods. Skills-based • To be able to use a range of project management tools and methods. • To be able to present an analysis of a project management case study • To take part in a team-based project management assignment. • To use and contribute to a class WEB Discussion Board. • To use a WEB-based multiple choice question tool to improve learning throughout the module and to help prepare for the end of module assessment. Communication 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001 49
  • 54. School of Management, Division of Management All class announcements will be posted on the module WebBoard. It is your responsibility to check the module WebBoard regularly for important information. Written communication with individual students will be by email. Please ensure that you provide a valid email address at the start of the module. It is your responsibility to check your emails regularly and to ensure that your disc space quota has not reached its limit. Teaching Methods The module requires the standard 100 hours of student effort, which is divided between: • Lectures, video presentations, guest speakers, 2 hr/wk, during weeks 1 to 8, compulsory, total 16 hours Lectures, are used to supplement the student’s own reading to explain the more difficult aspects of project management theory contained in the syllabus. You will regularly be provided with directed reading and exercises to do throughout the module. Video presentations and guest speakers bring a taste of real life drama to the theory. Attendance at lectures is compulsory. • Tutorials, 1 hr/wk, during weeks 2 to 9, compulsory, total 8 hours Tutorials are used to discuss a case study, a video or to practice doing some problem solving exercises. During tutorials students will be expected to engage in class discussion and give short presentations. • Computer workshops, 1 hr/wk, during weeks 1 to 8, compulsory, total 8 hours There is a one hour computer workshop each week. This will be used to develop skills using a project management software package. • Student-scheduled group work, approx. 20 hours Each student will take part in a team-based project assignment. Projects will be undertaken by students in groups of five. Students are required to meet and work in their project teams and on individual tasks agreed in their project teams. • Private study, approx. 48 hours Includes reading, preparation for tutorials, individual tasks for the project assignment, use of WebBoard and WebTest and module revision. Learning Skills Support As well as the teaching methods mentioned above, the module also has a WEB-based tutorial support system comprising: email, WebBoard discussion and WebTest multiple choice questions (MCQs). Each lecture is supported with a topic guide that describes the objectives of the lecture, the detailed reading required, and preparation required for tutorials. Assessment Assessment is by examination (70%), team-based assignment (10%), computer assignment (10%) and continuously assessed coursework (10%). 50 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001
  • 55. School of Management, Division of Management • Examination (70%) There is a 2 hour end of module examination paper. The paper has two sections: Section 1 (35%) comprises 48 multiple choice questions. Section 2 (35%) comprises an essay question based on a case study (no choice of question), case distributed one week before the commencement of the exam. You should bring your own annotated copy of the case you have prepared in advance into the examination room. You must attach your annotated copy of the case to your examination script. • Team assignment (10%) There are two elements to the assessment of the team assignment: Project team deliverable (6%). Individual contribution to teamwork by peer assessment (4%). • Computer assignment (10%) Based on a case study and use of a project management software package. • Continuously assessed coursework (10%) Weekly multiple choice class tests on the PC Caledonia network (8%) and other miscellaneous coursework, e.g. tutorial preparation notes (4%). Timetable, coursework requirements, submission instructions and deadlines See http://www.som.hw.ac.uk/buspdg/313PM1/Datasheet.htm for the latest information on all of these items. Prerequisites None. Course Attendance Requirements Students are required to attend all classes. Attendance is monitored and absences from classes will result in an attendance debt. Marks are deducted at the end of the module for any outstanding attendance debt at a rate of 2% per hour missed. Additional coursework may be done to reduce attendance debt. The main purpose of additional coursework is to enable students who miss classes for unavoidable reasons (e.g. illness, bereavement, interviews, late registration, etc) the opportunity to catch up on work missed during their absence without attracting an attendance debt. It is your responsibility to keep track of which sessions you have missed and what additional coursework you need to do. For details of additional coursework see: http://www.som.hw.ac.uk/buspdg/313PM1/Datasheet.htm Late additional coursework will receive a zero mark. Unsatisfactory additional coursework, or doing the wrong piece of additional coursework, will also receive a zero mark. No re- submission of additional coursework is allowed. 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001 51
  • 56. School of Management, Division of Management Late submission of the assignments will receive a penalty of 3% per day taken off the assignment mark (as marked out of 100%). Reading Set text: Gardiner, P.D. 1999 Project Management, Financial Times Management, London. [Available for a small charge from the SOM coursework office, room 1.62] Reading list: Association for 2000 Project Management Body of Knowledge (4th edition), Project ISBN I-903494-00-I, APM, High Wycombe, UK. Management A useful well-referenced guide, introducing all the important topics to successful project management (63pp). Project 1996 A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge, Management Project Management Institute, Upper Darby, USA. Institute [Available free in pdf format for viewing, downloading and Standards printing at http://www.pmi.org/] Committee US equivalent of the above; well illustrated, structured and explained (176pp). Harold Kerzner 1998 Project Management: A systems approach to planning, scheduling, and controlling (6th edition), Wiley, New York. An acknowledged leader in the field; very detailed (1170pp). Albert Lester 2000 Project Planning and Control (3rd edition), Butterworth Heineman, Oxford. A well explained book for the serious student (333pp). Liz MacLachlan 1996 Making Project Management Work for You, Library Association Publishing, London. A highly practical introduction to project management - an excellent first read (86pp). Geoff Reiss 1995 Project Management Demystified (2nd edition), E & FN Spon, London. An easy-to-read book, dynamically balanced between practice and theory (220pp). Sam Elbeik and 1998 Project Skills, Butterworth Heineman, Oxford. Mark Thomas A useful guide to managing projects and leading project teams (197pp). Wendy Briner, 1996 Project Leadership (2nd edition), Gower, Aldershot, UK. Colin Hastings A well written account of some useful tools and and Michael techniques of project leadership (160pp) Geddes CCTA 1998 Managing Successful Projects with PRINCE 2, The Stationery Office, London. 52 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001
  • 57. School of Management, Division of Management A versatile and well structured project management methodology, extensively used in the UK (341pp). Project Management Novels An excellent way to learn about the principles of project management - in a story. Mackenzie Kyle 1998 Making it Happen: A non-technical guide to project management, Wiley, New York. (247pp) Tom DeMarco 1997 The Deadline, Dorset House Publishing, New York. (310pp) Ralph Kliem 1993 The Noah project, Gower, Aldershot, UK. (130pp) and Irwin Ludin Syllabus and Learning Objectives TOPIC 1: Projects, project management, project initiation and definition Projects versus ongoing operations. Project life cycle. Fast tracking. Programme management. Feedback. Project stakeholders. Managing stakeholder expectations. Classifying projects. Project conception and initiation. Project scoping. Planning; organising; controlling; leading. The project manager. The project team. At the end of this topic you should be able to: • identify the main features of a project • distinguish between projects and other operations • describe the different phases of a typical project life cycle • categorise projects using a simple classification system • discuss the differences between a project and a programme • recognise the value and importance of feedback in a project • identify the typical stakeholders in a project • outline the four principal management activities in project management • explain the rationale commonly used for starting a new project • describe what is meant by project scoping • understand the purpose and value of a project charter and feasibility study • discuss the tradeoffs in a project between: scope, cost and time. TOPIC 2: Project breakdown structures and project organisation structures Chunking. The work breakdown structure (WBS). The organisation breakdown structure (OBS). Control accounts. Responsibility charts. Organisation structures and their implications. Functional structure. Product/project structure. Matrix structure. At the end of this topic you should be able to: • discuss the concept of chunking in project management; • explain the purpose of a breakdown structure; • describe three breakdown structures used in project management; • comment on the impact of organisation design in project management; • summarise the role of the project manager TOPIC 3: Project scheduling, smoothing, levelling and crashing 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001 53
  • 58. School of Management, Division of Management Scheduling and networks. Creating a project network. Estimating activity durations. Analysing networks. Critical path. Gantt charts. Resource smoothing. Project crashing. At the end of this topic you should be able to: • describe the purpose of scheduling in project management; • estimate the duration of activities using a variety of methods; • construct project networks for projects of your own; • analyse a network to find the project duration, activity floats and critical path; • draw Gantt charts and comment on their value for project control; • distinguish between resource smoothing and resource levelling; • use simple techniques to help optimise a schedule; • discuss the main features of project management software. TOPIC 4: Teambuilding and leadership Team selection and building in projects. The kick-off meeting. Team life cycle. Belbin’s team roles. Conflict management. Effective teams. Leadership styles. The project manager. At the end of this topic you should be able to: • discuss the importance of teambuilding in a project • advise on the selection of a project manager and team • describe the four pillars to effective teamwork • apply a variety of conflict resolution styles in a project • explain the role of leadership in project management • describe a model of situation adaptable leadership skills TOPIC 5: Project quality, risk management and contingency planning Quality management. Quality standards. Quality, grade and reliability. The cost of quality. Statistical quality control (SQC). Risk and risk management. Risk assessment. Risk control. Contingency planning. At the end of this topic you should be able to: • discuss the importance of quality to project management; • describe three important quality management processes; • explain how to determine the total cost of quality; • list and briefly describe eight simple tools used in statistical process control. • explain the importance of risk and how it can be managed effectively • explain the purpose and use of risk information sheets and a risk register • describe the role of contingency planning in project management 54 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001
  • 59. School of Management, Division of Management TOPIC 6: Project budgeting Building blocks of a budget. Approaches to budgeting. Resource planning. Cost estimating. Cash flow. Presenting a budget. At the end of this topic you should be able to: • explain the importance of project budgeting; • list and explain the activities associated with project budgeting; • construct a cost breakdown structure (CBS) from a knowledge of the WBS and OBS; • describe the main techniques used in cost estimating; • construct a time-phased project budget from a knowledge of the project schedule, cost estimates, and the CBS; • draw S-curves to graphically illustrate project cash flows; • explain the differences between top-down, bottom-up and iterative budgeting. TOPIC 7: Project monitoring and control Monitoring and control systems. Change management and control. Milestone monitoring. Earned value analysis and C/SCS. Project closure. At the end of this topic you should be able to: • explain the difference between monitoring and control; • name the three most important variables to measure in project control; • select an appropriate project control system for a given project; • describe a process for change management in a project; • describe two different methods of project control; • discuss the importance and benefits of project closure. TOPIC 8: Contractual relationships Project procurement. Types of contract. How to select a contract. Incentive contracting. Key decisions. Typical project delivery methods. At the end of this topic you should be able to: • discuss the various procurement choices to be made in project management • describe the main parts of a procurement plan • understand the differences between common contract types • select the appropriate contract to use in a range of situations • define what is meant by incentive contracting 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001 55
  • 60. School of Management, Division of Management 31.2CM2 Commercial Law 2 Module Co-ordinator: Linda Macpherson Introduction The complexity of some forms of business organisation means that legal regulation is necessary to protect both those involved in the organisation and those who have dealings with it. The purpose of this module is to introduce students to the law relating to the formation, operation and dissolution of different kinds of business entity. This module is synoptically linked to Commercial Law 3, 31.2CN3. Objectives After completing this module, you should be able to: 1. Show an awareness of the basic principles of the law of agency and understand the way in which the agency relationship operates within partnerships and companies. 2. Understand the basic structure and provisions of common law and legislation relating to modern business organisations and be aware of the manner in which the law is applied in the context of normal business activities. 3. Extract legal principles from relevant statutes and case law and apply them to resolve legal problems. 4. Understand the background to and reasons for developments in the law relating to business entities. Teaching Methods The module consists of three formal lectures each week for eight weeks. Each student will also be allocated to a tutorial group which will meet weekly from weeks 2-9 inclusive. Attendance at tutorials is compulsory. Tutorial work will be provided in advance and students are expected to be prepared to contribute to tutorial discussions. Assessment For students taking synoptically linked modules 31.2CM2 and 31.2CN3 there will be a two hour examination on the work of the term in the tenth week of the Spring Term. This will count for 30% of the final assessment. There will also be a three hour examination at the end of the Summer Term. This will cover material from 31.2CM2 and 31.2CN3 and will count for 70% of the final assessment. Reading 56 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001
  • 61. School of Management, Division of Management There is no prescribed textbook, but the following are recommended basic texts: Marshall, Enid A, ‘Scots Mercantile Law’, 3rd Edition, 1997, W.Green/Sweet & Maxwell. Keenan, D and Bisacre, J, ‘Company Law for Students’ (with Scottish Supplement), 11th Edition, 1999, Pitman Publishing. A more comprehensive list will be distributed at the first lecture. Class Outline Week 1 Law of agency: constitution of the agency relationship, different kinds of agent, authority of an agent, rights and duties of an agent, third party rights, termination of agency. Week 2 Law of partnership: definition of partnership, formation of partnership, partners and the agency relationship, rights and duties of partners, dissolution of partnerships. Week 3 Company law: introduction to incorporation, types of company, formation and registration of companies. Week 4 Company law: the legal consequences of incorporation, the ‘veil’ of incorporation, piercing the corporate veil. Week 5 Company law: the corporate constitution, the memorandum and articles of association, the nature of capital and shares. Week 6 Company law: issue and transfer of shares, capital maintenance, company meetings and resolutions. Week 7 Company law: appointment of directors, powers and duties of directors, removal of directors. Week 8 Company law: minority protection, exceptions to the rule in Foss v Harbottle, fraud on the minority, unfairly prejudicial conduct, just and equitable winding up. 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001 57
  • 62. School of Management, Division of Management 31.2CN3 Commercial Law 3 Module Co-ordinator: Linda Macpherson Introduction When an individual or a business is no longer able to pay its debts, formal insolvency and bankruptcy procedures may be invoked, with legal consequences for both debtors and creditors. The purpose of this module is to introduce students to the law relating to personal and corporate insolvency. This module is synoptically linked to Commercial Law 2, 31.2CM2. Objectives After completing this module, students should be able to: 1. Understand the basic legal procedures associated with personal bankruptcy and corporate insolvency. 2. Show an understanding of the rationale behind recent developments in insolvency law. 3. Extract general principles from specific cases and apply these to resolve legal problems. 4. Show an awareness of the way in which insolvency law links with other legal areas. Teaching Methods The module consists of three formal lectures each week for six weeks. Each student will also be allocated to a tutorial group which will meet weekly from weeks 2-7 inclusive. Attendance at tutorials is compulsory. Tutorial work will be provided in advance and students are expected to be prepared to contribute to tutorial discussions. Assessment There will be a three hour examination on the work of this module and that of 31.2CM2 at the end of the Summer Term. This examination counts for 70% of the final assessment for the two linked modules. Reading 58 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001
  • 63. School of Management, Division of Management There is no prescribed textbook, but the following texts are recommended: Marshall, Enid A, ‘Scots Mercantile Law’, 3rd Edition, 1997, W. Green/Sweet & Maxwell. Keenan, D and Bisacre, J, ‘Company Law for Students’ (with Scottish Supplement), 11th Edition, 1999, Pitman Publishing. Class Outline Week 1 Introduction to corporate insolvency; the Insolvency Act 1986, insolvency practitioners, floating charges, receivership. Week 2 Company voluntary arrangements, administration orders, voluntary winding up. Week 3 Winding up by the court: petitions, realisation of assets, fraudulent and wrongful trading, application of assets, amalgamations and reconstructions. Week 4 Personal bankruptcy: apparent insolvency, petitions for sequestration, administration of bankruptcy. Week 5 Vesting of the sequestrated estate, sequestration and diligence, gratuitous alienations and unfair preferences. Week 6 Management of the bankrupt’s estate, claims from creditors, distribution of estate, discharge of debtor, trust deeds for creditors. 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001 59
  • 64. School of Management, Division of Management 31.3HS3 Law of Health and Safety at Work Module Co-ordinator: Prof V Craig Introduction While this module links to other modules particularly Employment Law and Discrimination Law and Organisational Behaviour it is designed for students in all faculties who have a general understanding of legal principles. Very few business or engineering operations can take place without their activities being subject to regulation by the law of health and safety. Executives and others whose health is affected by work related stress will have claims against the employer; employers who fail to observe the Manual Handling Regulations or the Display Screen Equipment Regulations will not only leave themselves open to claims but will also commit offences; employers who discipline or dismiss employees who complain about the standards of health and safety at their workplace will be open to tribunal claims for compensation and re- instatement. This Module is designed to deal with these and other health and safety responsibilities of business and their managers and employees as well as the requirements and roles of Safety Committees and Safety Representatives. Objectives The objectives are to make you aware of:- (a) the sources of health and safety law including European Directives and their significance; (b) the roles of the common law and statute (c) the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 and selected regulations (Manual Handling Regulations, Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations, Display Screen Equipment Regulations; Working Time Regulations). On completion of the module you will be have a knowledge of the general principles of the law of Health and Safety at Work, how it impacts on the work environment and to be able to apply your knowledge to minimise liability and solve case studies and problems. Teaching Methods There will be 24 lectures (and one tutorial per week during weeks 2-8 inclusive). For each tutorial meeting you will receive, approximately a week in advance, a work-sheet which will contain case studies/problem questions/decided cases for discussion. 60 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001
  • 65. School of Management, Division of Management Tutorial Arrangements Each student is allocated to a tutorial group that will meet weekly. Students are expected to prepare for tutorials in advance and make presentations. Assessment There will be a 2 hour Modular Exam in the 10th week of the Spring term. Course Requirements Attendance at lectures, tutorials and completion of assessments/examinations. Reading The recommended text Craig, V., 2000 'Introduction to Health and Safety Law’ (2nd edn.) Miller, K Other texts to which reference may be made are: Smith IT & 'Industrial Law', (Butterworths) Wood JC Sweet & Maxwell's Encyclopaedia of Health and Safety Law For other relevant texts students should scan the library data base. The following specialist reports are held by HWU Library and reference should be made to them as required. (i) Industrial Relations Law Reports (ii) Industrial Case Reports (iii) Industrial Relations Review and Reports (Legal Information Bulletin) (iv) Industrial Law Journal Class Papers: These are distributed to all members of the class to supplement lectures and tutorial materials. 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001 61
  • 66. School of Management, Division of Management Class Outline Week 1: Lecture One: How is health and safety at work regulated? Where do we find the law regarding health and safety at work? How does it impact on business? Lecture Two: The common law; what it offers and what are its disadvantages; how has the common law developed to deal with contemporary problems of the workplace. Lecture Three: The statutory regime: Codes of Practice; committees and representatives; general duties; the criminal law; the European influence; proactive risk assessment. Week 2: Lecture One: The common law: the doctrine of common employment and the employer’s non- delegable duty. Lecture Two: The scope of the employer’s duty: employees, workers and the self employed. Lecture Three: The employer’s duty of reasonable care; standard of care, foreseeability and causation. Week 3: Lecture One: Plant, equipment, materials and competent staff; Employers’ Liability (Defective Equipment) Act 1969 and Product Liability. Lecture Two: Repetitive strain injury; nervous shock and psychological injury at work; stress related illness. Lecture Three: Contributory negligence; volenti non fit injuria. Week 4: Lecture One: Compulsory insurance; vicarious liability under common law and statute. Lecture Two: Remedies for common law (contract and delict) and breach of statutory duty; constructive dismissal. Lecture Three: Damages (solatium, patrimonial loss and expenses); provisional and interim damages; prescription and limitation. 62 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001
  • 67. School of Management, Division of Management Week 5: Lecture One: Unfair dismissal and health and safety at work; dismissal for breach of safety rules and in compliance with Health and Safety recommendation. Health and Safety Representatives and Representatives of Workplace Health and Safety; their status and protection against dismissal and detrimental treatment. Special health and safety protection under Employment Rights Act 1996 s. 100 and Public Interest Disclosure Act 1998. Lecture Two: The Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 and its enforcement; the duties of employers, employees and others. Inspectors powers and Improvement and Prohibition Notices. Lecture Three: The European Framework Directive and its “daughter” Directives; the effect of European Directives. The Health and Safety at Work Management Regulations 1999. Week 6 Lecture One Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992; Provision and Use of Equipment at Work Regulations 1992; Personal Protection Equipment at Work Regulations 1992. Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992; Health and Safety (Display Screen Equipment) Regulations 1992. Lecture Two: Miscellaneous other regulations: Health and Safety Information for Employees Regulations 1989; Control of Industrial Major Accident Hazards Regulations 1984; RIDDOR, COSHH; EWR. Lecture Three: Working Time Regulations 1998. 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001 63
  • 68. School of Management, Division of Management 31.3IL3 Information Technology Law Module Co-ordinator: Linda Macpherson Introduction The purpose of this course is to give students an understanding of the basic legal principles that regulate the use of information technology. An understanding of these legal principles can enable those involved in the information technology industry and those who use computers in their business or private life to avoid potentially costly legal problems. Objectives After completing this module, students should be able to: 1. Understand the structure and main principles of the areas of the law that affect the use of computer technology. 2. Appreciate the application of this law in the context of computer based activities. 3. Apply legal principles to solve practical problems. 4. Understand the background to and reasons for legal developments in the areas of law relating to information technology. Teaching Methods The module consists of three formal lectures each week for six weeks. Each student will also be allocated to a tutorial group, which will meet every two weeks. Attendance at tutorials is compulsory. Tutorial work will be provided in advance and students are expected to be prepared to contribute to tutorial discussions. Assessment There will be a two hour examination at the end of the Summer Term. Reading There is no prescribed textbook, but the following provide useful reading: Bainbridge, D, ‘Introduction to Computer Law’, 4th Edition, 2000, Longman. Bainbridge, D, ‘Intellectual Property Law’, 4th Edition, 1998, Pitman Publishing. Lloyd, I J, ‘Information Technology Law’ 2nd Edition, 1997, Butterworths. Class Outline 64 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001
  • 69. School of Management, Division of Management Week 1 Data Protection: rights to privacy, scope of the Data Protection Act 1998, the Data Protection Commissioner, Data Protection Principles. Week 2 Data Protection: subject access rights, transborder data flows. Computers and Crime: computer fraud, damage to data, the Computer Misuse Act 1990, computers and pornography. Week 3 Intellectual Property Rights: patent procedure, patentable subject matter, patents and software, patent infringement. Week 4 Copyright: nature of copyright, protectable subject matter, infringement, permitted acts, copyright and computer programs, copyright and databases. Week 5 Copyright and the Internet, protection of semi-conductor chip designs, trade marks and the Internet. Week 6 Contractual liability for defective software, non-contractual liability for negligence, liability for on-line information and defamation. 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001 65
  • 70. School of Management, Division of Management 31.3DL2 Discrimination Law Module Co-ordinator: Susan Walker Introduction It is only relatively recently that issues of discrimination and equality have been seen as important yet they are now central to much of social policy. No political party can afford to ignore these areas. Many of the developments, certainly in relation to sex discrimination, have resulted from the UK’s membership of the European union. The Sex Discrimination Act and The Equal Pay Act are intended to ensure equality for men and women (although the extent to which they achieve this aim is arguable). The Race Relations Act covers discrimination on grounds of race, colour or ethnicity. More recent legislation includes the Disability Discrimination Act 1995. There are recurrent attempts to secure protection against discrimination on ground of age, sexual orientation and religion which remain outwith existing legislation. Employers who do not have a good working knowledge of the principles of the anti- discrimination statutes are in real danger of having to pay compensation, the amount of which is unlimited. This could relate to claims by employees or job applicants or to claims by customers as the Acts are not restricted to employment. The aim of the module is therefore to equip managers, whether in human resource management or otherwise involved in the provision of services, to develop knowledge which will be vital in their future careers. Objectives To consider the background to the anti-discrimination legislation and the increasingly important role of Europe. To understand the legal principles which apply to :- - sex and race discrimination generally, with reference to selection procedures and the specific problems that can occur - equal pay legislation,domestic and European - protection of pregnant employees including refusal to employ, dismissal, maternity leave, maternity pay and suspension on maternity grounds - disability discrimination - discrimination outwith employment To consider the possible future developments in this area. Teaching Methods Classes will consist of 2 formal lectures and a tutorial. Attendance at all classes is compulsory. Students will be allocated a case to research from case reports available in the library and will be asked to report back to the tutorial. Tutorial Arrangements 66 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001
  • 71. School of Management, Division of Management Tutorials will begin in week 2. Students will be allocated the case to research the week before. Students are expected to give a summary of the facts of the case, explain the legal principles involved and consider how the individual case adds to our knowledge of the subject. Assessment There will be a 2 hour examination in week 10 of the spring term. Course Requirements Attendance at lectures and tutorials. Reading Recommended Text: Townshend-Smith R.J 1998 Discrimination Law: Text, Cases and Materials Other texts to which reference may be made are: N.M.Selwyn 1998 Selwyn’s Law of Employment Craig V, Miller K 1996 Employment Law in Scotland Pitt 1997 Employment Law Encyclopaedias on Labour Law held on 3 hour loan in the Heriot-Watt Library include:- (1) Harvey on Industrial Relations (2) Sweet & Maxwell’s Encyclopaedia of Labour relations (3) The Stair Memorial Encyclopaedia of the Law of Scotland(Vol 9) The following specialist reports are held by HWU Library (1) Industrial Relations Law Reports (IRLR) (2) Industrial Case Reports (ICR) (3) Industrial Relations Review and Reports (4) Industrial Law Journal (5) Incomes Data Services, Brief (IDS Brief) (6) Current Law Annotated Statute 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001 67
  • 72. School of Management, Division of Management Class Outline Week 1 Lecture 1/2 The background to anti-discrimination legislation. General principles of the legislation, its aims and sources. An overview of the areas of legal intervention. Reading Townshend Smith, Chapter 1 Week 2 Lecture 3/4 The types of discrimination covered by SDA and RRA with particular reference to direct discrimination. The Equal Treatment Directive. Particular problems occurring eg harassment and dress codes. The defence of Genuine Occupational Qualification.Exclusions and exemptions. Who is covered? The treatment of transsexuals and homosexuals. The concept of a “racial roup”. Victimisation. Remedies. Reading Townshend-Smith, Chapters 5, 6, 8 and 10 Week 3 Lecture 5/6 Focus on the concept of indirect discrimination which is also covered by the legislation.ie conditions which apply equally to all but have a disproportionate impact on one sex or race. The defence which is open to employers of justification. Remedies. Reading Townshend-Smith, Chapter 9 Week 4 Lecture 7/8 Equal Pay: the Equal Pay Act and Article 119: contractual terms and conditions; like work, work rated as equivalent and work of equal value; genuine material factors and objective reasons for unequal pay. Retirement and pensions. Reading Townshend-Smith, Chapters 12-13 Week 5 Lecture 9/10 The protection of pregnant workers and women who are breastfeeding; less favourable treatment constitutes direct discrimination; EU Directive92/85; automatically unfair dismissal; the right to return to work, maternity pay and suspension from work on medical grounds. Reading Townshend-Smith, Chapter 7 Week 6 Lecture 11/12 Disability Discrimination Act 1995. The concept of “disability”. Comparison with SDA and RRA. The duty to make “reasonable adjustments”. Possible to justify discrimination. Reading Townshend-Smith, Chapter 16 68 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001
  • 73. School of Management, Division of Management Week 7 Lecture 13/14 Discrimination outwith employment: education,provision of goods and services,housing and other areas. An examination of the provisions of the SDA , RRA and DDA. Special problem areas.Enforcement. Reading Townshend-Smith, Chapters 11 and 16 Week 8 Lecture 15/16 The way ahead for anti-discrimination law. New Regulations for part- time workers. Affirmative action? Potential new protected groups eg age, homosexuals, religion. The Human Rights Act. Developments in Europe. Reading Townshend-Smith, Chapters 15 and 17 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001 69
  • 74. School of Management, Division of Management 31.3ER2 Employee Relations Module Co-ordinator: Dr Ed Barratt Objectives Formally defined, the topic of employee relations is concerned with the process of control over the employment relationship, the organisation of work and relations between employers and their employees. This module will introduce students to frameworks for analysing employee relations, ‘best practice’ thinking in the field and will explore recent developments in practice. The focus will be key employee relations processes (including collective bargaining, employee involvement, discipline and grievance), the key participants and their aims (management, employees, trade unions) and the relevant legal framework, aiming to acquaint students with the current state of theory, research and practice in the field. Skills Development Students will develop an understanding of the key skills involved in negotiation and the handling of disciplinary problems and grievances. Teaching Methods 3 hours of lectures each week. Assessment One three hour examination. Course Requirements Students will be required to undertake specified reading prior to each lecture (reading list to be supplied). Pre-Requisites Students should have passed the second year modules in Organisational Behaviour and Human Resource Management. 70 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001
  • 75. School of Management, Division of Management Course Outline 1. Employee relations strategies; models of the employment relationship 2. Trade unions - objectives, structure and membership 3. Collective employment law 4. Industrial conflict 5. Collective bargaining 6. Negotiation 7. Employee involvement 8. Grievance and discipline. 3rd Year Module Handbook 2000-2001 71