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MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
MA Marketing Management
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MA Marketing Management

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  • 1. Westminster Business School MA Marketing Management Course Handbook 2006 - 7 1
  • 2. CONTENTS Welcome from Professor Len Shackleton, Dean of Westminster Business School 3 Introduction 4 1. Description 5 2. Course Philosophy and Learning Outcomes 7 3. Equal Opportunities 11 4. Admissions 11 5. Assessment of Modules 11 6. Pro forma Course Regulations for Postgraduate Courses, 180 Credit Tariff 12 7. Useful Contacts 14 APPENDIX: 16 Module syllabuses 2
  • 3. Professor J R (‘Len’) Shackleton Dean, Westminster Business School Welcome to the new academic year at Westminster Business School. This large and diverse School now has over 4000 students from all over the world studying a wide range of business subjects at both undergraduate and postgraduate level. Although it is thoroughly modern and outward-looking, WBS draws on a tradition of management teaching at this University which goes back for around eighty years. We know a great deal about students and their needs – whether home or overseas, full-time or part-time. But we can always learn more, and you can help us. We are constantly striving to improve our provision for all our students, and to increase their employability in a rapidly changing job market. Our staff – over 140 permanent academic staff plus a large number of administrative and support staff – are here to help you to achieve your ambitions and goals. Please make full use of all the facilities which the School makes available. Let me and my colleagues know what you think of our work, make suggestions for improvement, and come to us with any problems before they begin to impact on your studies. I wish you all the very best in your studies. Len Shackleton shackll@wmin.ac.uk 3
  • 4. Introduction Welcome to the MA Marketing Management (MAMM) course at Westminster Business School. The purpose of this handbook is to give you some of the key information that you will need whilst studying the MAMM course at WBS including a description of the course, details of the course structure and the main University regulations that apply. The course website, which should be checked regularly for current information, is on the University Blackboard system. Further information can be also found from the following sources: • the MAMM course website and your module websites on the University Blackboard system, which should be checked regularly for announcements • the University website and intranet at www.wmin.ac.uk • the Postgraduate Office • the Postgraduate Tutorial and Advice Office • the MAMM Course Leader • the relevant Module Leader for enquiries about a particular module you are studying • Westminster Business School Postgraduate Handbook of General Information • Essential Westminster 2006 – 7 issued by the University • the Handbook of Academic Regulations 2006 issued by the University • The Academic Registrar’s homepage on the University website at www.wmin.ac.uk/academicregistrars Frank Auton Course Leader, MA Marketing Management autonf@wmin.ac.uk 0207 911 5000 ext. 3145 Room C286 4
  • 5. 1 Course Description 1.1 Course Title The full title of the course is “Master of Arts in Marketing Management.” The course is also referred to as the MA Marketing Management, or MAMM for short. 1.2 Course Aims and Objectives The principal aim of the course is to enable you, and hence the organisations you will work for, to improve your managerial effectiveness in the field of marketing. This will be achieved by providing you as a student with a sound education in the theory and application of strategic marketing management incorporating current marketing thinking and equipping you with the key concepts and tools necessary for strategic marketing planning. Special emphasis is laid on enhancing your analytical and creative skills that are crucial for sound decision making, imaginative problem solving and developing marketing strategies in a fast changing, global business environment.. The course attracts people already employed in marketing across the business, voluntary and governmental sectors who wish to develop a more strategic approach to marketing management than they may encounter in day to day practice. It is also aimed at those wishing to move into marketing from a more limited base of relevant studies and experience. 1.3 Rationale for the Course The course is a Master's Degree which requires one year of full-time study, or two years part time. It combines a thorough grounding in the theory and concepts of marketing while also focusing on practical application in the real world. For several years the course has successfully delivered advanced, comprehensive, specialist education in marketing for both UK based and international students. Its popularity has reflected a continuing and growing demand for education in this subject area which is critical both to the success of organisations and to the careers of the individuals working in them. It operates on modular principles, in accordance with the University’s Modular Framework, offering a career-oriented programme whilst maintaining a high degree of academic rigour as testified by the External Examiners. A career in marketing management requires proficiency in a number of diverse business disciplines. Familiarity with the language of marketing and the fundamental concepts of finance are essential not only for an aspiring business manager, but also for students who will need to cope with subsequent modules in the MAMM. Entrance to the course is therefore limited to those candidates who can demonstrate the appropriate prior learning or experience, as detailed in the WBS Postgraduate Handbook of General Information page 32. 5
  • 6. 1.4 Course Structure The course consists of eight modules, seven of which are Core Modules and one of which is an Option Module chosen from three: MA Marketing Management modules: Core Modules Credits Status 1 Buyer Behaviour 20 Core (taught) 2 Marketing Research 20 Core (taught) 3 Product & Pricing Management 20 Core (taught) 4 Marketing Channel Management 20 Core (taught) and Strategy 5 Marketing Communications 20 Core (taught) 6 Strategic Marketing 20 Core (taught) 7 Dissertation 40 Core(non- taught) Option Modules, one from Credits Status 8.1 Designing Global Marketing 20 Option (taught) Strategies 8.2 Services Marketing 20 Option (taught) 8.3 Direct Marketing 20 Option (taught) The course has two intakes each year in September and January, in both full time and part time modes. 6
  • 7. Indicative course structure full-time mode, September start: Semester 1 Semester 2 Buyer Behaviour Marketing Communications Marketing Research Option Product & Pricing Management Strategic Marketing Marketing Channel Management Dissertation and Strategy Modules may not necessarily follow this actual sequence in the course timetable Indicative course structure part time mode September start: Year 1: Semester 1 Semester 2 Buyer Behaviour Product & Pricing Management Marketing Research Marketing Channel Management and Strategy Year 2: Semester 1 Semester 2 Marketing Communications Strategic Marketing Option Dissertation Modules may not necessarily follow this actual sequence in the course timetable 7
  • 8. 1.5 Induction Before the course begins, there will be a Course Induction programme of events which all students should attend. The Induction will usually include: • A meeting with the Dean of Westminster Business School • A meeting with the Course Leader • An introduction to the campus library • An introduction to the campus computer facilities. • A meeting with the International Student Advisor where appropriate. • Information about tutorial support. 1.6 Teaching and Learning Strategies A variety of teaching methods are used to enable students to master the key concepts of marketing and to achieve a deeper understanding of these. The teaching approach is based on a combination of structured lectures backed by seminar sessions. The lecturing style is participative and seminar sessions frequently include case study analysis and discussion, the use of practical examples and references to the student’s personal experience. Students are also expected to spend an appropriate amount of time in private study. The theoretical concepts of marketing have always been closely developed in line with the professional practice and it is important that students are aware of the interrelationship between these. Not only does this engage them in the necessity for critical analysis but it also allows them to discern which concepts and strategies are relevant in practice to their working environment. 1.7 Specialisms and Pathways Students on the MA Marketing Management course have the opportunity of choosing one Option Module from the following: • Designing Global Marketing Strategies • Services Marketing • Direct Marketing. 2 Course Philosophy and Learning Outcomes The course has been designed to give instruction at the highest relevant level in the main disciplines of marketing. The four main elements of the original ‘marketing mix’ are covered in three core modules, Product and Pricing Management, Marketing Channel Management and Marketing Communications. As well as foundation, core 8
  • 9. concepts the latest thinking and developments including the implications of e-marketing will be addressed and developed within each module as appropriate. The Buyer Behaviour module provides students with the concepts and frameworks that enable marketers to understand the reasons behind the behaviour of customers in the marketplace and how this affects the development of a marketing strategy. Marketing Research is the means by which marketing managers acquire information about many factors including the business environment and marketplace in which they are operating as a basis for making marketing decisions and marketing planning. Students are made aware of research methodologies and the opportunities afforded by and limitations of various marketing research techniques. In the Strategic Marketing module students develop their ability to apply the knowledge gained from the other taught modules in making decisions and developing strategic marketing plans in complex the marketing situations that increasingly occur in real world practice. The Dissertation module requires students to undertake a substantial research based academic project on a marketing related topic of their own choice and interest with the advice and support of a Dissertation Supervisor. By the end of the course students will have gained a thorough and well rounded knowledge of key marketing concepts and acquired research, analytical and problem solving skills which will enable them to improve their own personal effectiveness as marketing managers and also add value to the organisations in which they work. 3 Equal Opportunities The University of Westminster is an Equal Opportunities institution and is fully committed to facilitating access to the course from all sections of the community. 4 Admissions 4.1 Admissions Requirements In order to be admitted onto the course, students will normally need to hold one of the following sets of qualifications: UK Honours degree class 2:2 or above or overseas equivalent with a substantial marketing content, or: UK Honours degree class 2:2 or above in any subject or overseas equivalent and the Diploma of the Chartered Institute of Marketing or overseas equivalent, or: UK Honours degree class 2:2 or above or overseas equivalent plus Principles of Marketing and Principles of Finance for Marketing from the Postgraduate Certificate in Marketing course, or: UK Honours degree class 2:2 or above or overseas equivalent plus significant relevant work experience. Such candidates will already be familiar with the language and 9
  • 10. fundamental concepts and techniques of marketing. Students whose first language is not English will normally be expected to have passed IELTS or equivalent with a minimum score of 6.5 in all areas. 4.2 Selection Procedures The majority of students accepted onto the course can normally be offered places on the basis of the formal documentation they send in to the University Admissions office with their application. Some students’ entry requirements may need to be discussed, especially if their knowledge and experience of the marketing function is unclear. This will be done by personal interview, phone and/or email as appropriate depending on circumstances. 5. Assessment of Modules Assessment Requirements: Exam: Coursework: Buyer Behaviour 70% 30% Marketing Research 50% 50% Product & Pricing Management 70% 30% Marketing Channel Management 70% 30% and Strategy Marketing Communications 70% 30% Strategic Marketing 70% 30% Option modules 70% 30% Dissertation 100% All modules, with the exception of the Dissertation, are assessed by means of both coursework and an end of semester exam according to the weightings shown above. The Market Research module has a slightly different assessment weighting because students are asked to explore a topic in greater depth for the in-course assignment than in the other modules. Exams are currently used on postgraduate degree modules as a method of assessing individual students on their knowledge and analytical skills in such a way that an external organisation can be sure of their standard of ability in an English language environment. At the same time, in course assessments, which include project work, preparation of reports and presentations, encourage students to develop their abilities to study and explore particular issues and learning outcomes in greater depth often in a multi cultural group in a way that exams cannot. The merits of different assessment methods are regularly under discussion and review within the University and may be 10
  • 11. subject to change. 6. Pro Forma Standard Course Regulations for Postgraduate Courses, MA, MSc, MBA or LLM, 180 Credit Tariff (updated for 2006/07) The MA Marketing Management and its intermediate awards operate in accordance with the University's Handbook of Academic Regulations, including the Modular Framework for Postgraduate Courses and the Framework for Higher Education Qualification in England, Wales and Northern Ireland published by the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA). All students should make sure that they have and keep for reference a copy of the current edition of the general University handbook called Essential Westminster 2005/06 and the Handbook of Academic Regulations 2005. The following course specific requirements should be read in conjunction with the Modular Framework for Postgraduate Courses and Sections 11 to 19 of the Handbook of Academic Regulations. The full texts of all academic regulations may be read on-line at the Academic Registrar’s homepage at: www.wmin.ac.uk/academicregistrars A glossary of the most commonly used regulatory terms is provided in Appendix 1. 6.1 Requirements for Award of the MA Marketing Management, Postgraduate Diploma in Marketing Management and Postgraduate Certificate in Marketing Management In order to qualify for the award of MA Marketing Management, a student must have: a) passed modules worth at least 180 credits (as described in the requirements set down in s.1.2 below); b) attempted (see definitions in appendix 1) modules worth no more than 240 credits (under this regulation a first attempt of any module will count as an attempt, and a reattempt of any module that a student has failed will count as a further, separate attempt. Reassessment (referral) following failure at the first attempt will not count as a further separate attempt. 6.1.2 Module Requirements for the Award of MA Marketing Management Students are also bound by the validated award specific regulations for their course. 11
  • 12. Core modules to the value of 160 credits must be passed as follows: Code Module title Core/ option Credit value 4MAM7A3 Product & Pricing Management Core 20 4MAM7A4 Buyer Behaviour Core 20 4MAM7A5 Marketing Research Core 20 4MAM7A6 Marketing Channel Management Core 20 and Strategy 4MAM7A2 Marketing Communications Core 20 i 4MAM7B2 Strategic Marketing Core 20 ii 4MAM7A8 Dissertation Core 40 and one Option Module to the value of 20 credits selected from the following: Code Module title Core/ Option Credit Value 4MAM7B1 Designing Global Marketing Strategies Option 20 4MAM7A9 Services Marketing Option 20 4MMC7A4 Direct Marketing Option 20 6.1.3 Intermediate Awards Students who are unable or do not wish to complete the MA Marketing Management, may be eligible to claim an intermediate award as described below. If a student plans (for whatever reason) to leave the course they are registered for and so wants to claim an intermediate award, they must notify the relevant Campus Office in writing. The University will then confer any intermediate award at the next available opportunity. A student shall not normally be allowed to claim more than one award within the same postgraduate route/course. Postgraduate Diploma in Marketing Management To qualify for the award of Postgraduate Diploma in Marketing Management a student must have passed modules from those listed in section 1.2 above worth at least 120 credits. Postgraduate Certificate in Marketing Management 12
  • 13. To qualify for the award of Postgraduate Certificate in Marketing Management a student must have passed modules from those listed in section 1.2 above worth at least 60 credits. 6.2 Awards with Merit or Distinction Award with Merit The University may award a Masters Degree, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate with Merit to a student where an average of between 60% and 69% has been achieved in all modules which count towards the award. Award with Distinction The University may award a Masters Degree, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate with Distinction to a student where an average of at least 70% has been achieved in all modules which count towards the award. 6.3 Maximum Period of Registration The University normally expects a student to complete their award within the following maximum periods of registration (in years) including any period of suspension of studies. Full-time Study Part-time Study Masters degrees 4 5 PG Dip 2 4 PG Cert 1 2 6.4 Exclusion from a programme of study on academic grounds In certain circumstances, usually where students have failed a significant proportion of modules attempted, a student may be excluded from their course. Please refer to the Modular Framework for Postgraduate Courses published in the Handbook of Academic Regulations 2005 for further details. 13
  • 14. 7. Useful Contacts Course Leader Frank Auton autonf@wmin.ac.uk 0207911 5000 ext. 3145 Room C286 Module Module Name Module Leade Email address Telephone Code extension 4MAM7A3 Product & Pricing Clive Helm helmc@wmin.ac.uk 3497 Management 4MAM7A1 Buyer Behaviour Frank Auton autonf@wmin.ac.uk 3145 4MAM7A5 Marketing Donna Mai d.l.mai@wmin.ac.uk 3003 Research 4MAM7A6 Marketing Channe Zena Lutrin lutrinz@wmin.ac.uk 3329 Management & Strategy 4MAM7A2 Marketing Tony Byng/ byngt@wmin.ac.uk 3041 Communication Trevor Wright 4MAM7B2 Strategic Ilya Girson girsoni@wmin.ac.uk 3037 Marketing 4MAM7A8 Dissertation Donna Mai d.l.mai@wmin.ac.uk 3003 4MAM7B1 Designing Global Anna Anna.zacharewicz Marketing Zacharewicz Strategies @dial.pipex.com 4MAM7A9 Services Tony Byng byngt@wmin.ac.uk 3041 Management 4MMC7A4 Direct marketing Tony Byng byngt@wmin.ac.uk 3041 Dean of Westminster Business School: Professor Len Shackleton 5075 shackll@wmin.ac.uk Director of Postgraduate Studies at Westminster Business School Kevin Allison 3489 allisok@wmin.ac.uk 14
  • 15. Head of Department, Marketing and Business Strategy Dr Jaafar El-Murad 3208 muradj@wmin.ac.uk 8. Some Useful Sources of Information Useful web sites: www.cim.co.uk Chartered Institute of Marketing www.marketing-society.org The Marketing Society www.theidm.com The Institute of Direct Marketing www.dma.org The Direct Marketing Association www.marketresearch.org.uk The Market Research Society www.mad.co.uk Marketing Week magazine online www.marketing.haynet.com Marketing magazine online www.brandchannel.com Brandchannel from the Interbrand consultancy www.ft.com The Financial Times online www.thetimes.co.uk The Times online www.bbc.co.uk The BBC website www.itv.co.uk The Independent Television website 15
  • 16. MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS Full Module Title: Short Module Title: Marketing Communications Module Code: 4MAM7A2 Module Level: 7 Academic Credit Weighting: 20 credits School: Westminster Business School Department: Marketing and Business Strategy Length: One semester Module Leader: Trevor Wright Ext Email Site: Marylebone Host Course: MA Marketing Management Status: Core for MA Marketing Management Relevant Course titles/pathways: MA Marketing Management, PGCM Subject Board: PG Marketing Pre-Requisites: Marketing Principles, Financial Aspects of Marketing Co-Requisites: None Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination Special Features: None Access Restrictions: None. Summary of Module Content: An assessment of marketing communications by: ♦ Models of integration ♦ Role of communications in marketing planning and decision making ♦ Contribution of communications to branding ♦ Ethics and controls ♦ Organisation ♦ Communication processes ♦ Campaign planning ♦ Research ♦ Global communications ♦ Electronic, digital and inter-active Module Aims: ♦ To critically introduce students to the concepts and components of Marketing Communications ♦ Within the context of examining the main marketing communication theories and frameworks, to concentrate on the non-personal marketing communication tools of Advertising, Public Relations, Sales & Promotion and Direct Marketing ♦ To develop a comprehensive review and critical knowledge of the means by which the various elements of communications activity can be integrated ♦ To provide a framework for the assessment of the role of marketing communications and the inter- relationship between the goals of the client and the agency. 16
  • 17. ♦ Analyse the theoretical and practical tenets to the managerial contexts likely to be faced by students taking the unit ♦ Review full student participation and discussion as a basis for a critically reinforcing learning outcomes Learning Outcomes: By the end of the module students should be able to: ♦ Critically review communication theory and how it applies to the development of the marketing communication process and demonstrate this understanding by assessing marketing communication problems and questions during seminar work ♦ Define and analyse the meaning of Integrated Marketing Communications (IMC) in the context of the four non-personal marketing communication tools, both strategically and tactically, and use this interpretation to help assess case study problems ♦ Analyse and assess specific Integrated Marketing Communication strategies developed and managed by firms marketing products and services domestically and internationally by presenting solutions to case study problems and assessed group work ♦ Evaluate, compare and contrast selected individual components of the communications mix in case studies and assessed group work ♦ Collect and interpret marketing information relevant to the development of a marketing communications plan. Then utilise this information to develop, create and propose a complete Marketing Communications strategy and set of tools as part of an assessed group project ♦ Write and present to a professional standard a report that combines marketing information and recommended communications strategy ♦ Analyse the nature of marketing communications as a concept and a process Indicative Module Content: ♦ Introduction to marketing communications and the models of integration ♦ The role of marketing communications in the marketing process and branding ♦ The communication process - theories and models of how marketing communication works ♦ Advertising and its role in the marketing communication mix. Advertising and society: ethics and controls. Agencies and their organisation. Outside suppliers. The role of trade bodies. ♦ Public Relations and its role in the marketing communication mix. Public Relations and society: ethics and regulations. Public Relations and its organisation. Outside suppliers. The role of trade bodies. ♦ Sales Promotion and its role in the marketing communication mix. Sales promotion and society: ethics and regulations. Sales Promotion and its organisation. Outside suppliers. The role of trade bodies. ♦ Direct Marketing and its role in the marketing communication mix. Direct Marketing and society: ethics and regulations. Direct Marketing and its organisation. Outside suppliers. The role of trade bodies. ♦ Campaign planning. The client brief ♦ Campaign planning. The integrated agency response. ♦ The problems and opportunities in global marketing communications ♦ Marketing communications and electronic, interactive and digital media Teaching and Learning Methods: Students will have 3 hours per week contact time for 12 weeks. This time will be devoted to a mixture of multi- media lectures, interactive seminars and workshops to develop the competencies articulated in the learning outcomes. 17
  • 18. Assessment Methods and Weightings: 1. Coursework Worth 30% of total module marks, coursework will assess the following competencies: Information retrieval, critical assessment, evaluation and teamwork. ♦ Evidence of competence in task activities undertaken ♦ Development of critical assessment and evaluation by completing a group assessed project, contributing to seminar discussions and providing feedback on the unit and it’s delivery ♦ Understanding of the role and purpose of the task activities undertaken ♦ Further practise in information retrieval and marketing research by conducting the group task ♦ Further develop the ability to work as part of a team and take on team-based responsibilities as a part of a group for seminar work and as part of a project team for the group assignment ♦ Reflection of the process by which the development of competence has occurred 2. Examination An unseen end-of-module examination, for the remaining 70% of marks, will enable students to demonstrate their knowledge of theoretical and practical processes, frameworks and issues and construction of perspectives. Students will show: ♦ Knowledge of processes and approaches relevant to marketing communications issues and practices ♦ Ability to draw on issues from case studies and personal experience ♦ Critical evaluation and synthesis of different strands of theory and practices ♦ Construction and development of a coherent line of argument taking into account points of view from a variety of perspectives ♦ Structure, expression, and presentation appropriate to postgraduate study ♦ Communications strategy diagnosis and the ability to consider communications issues in an integrated way Sources General +*George & Michael Belch (2001), Advertising & Promotion 5th Ed, Irwin McGraw Hill +De Pelsmacher et al (2001), Marketing Communications, Financial Times/Prentice Hall +Philip Kitchen (1999), Marketing Communications: Principles & Practice, International Thompson Publications +Chris Fill (1998), Marketing Communications, 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall +Picton & Broderick (2001), Integrated Marketing Communications, Financial Times/Prentice Hall +*Terence Shimp (2001), Advertising, Promotion and Supplemental Aspects of Integrated Marketing Communications 5th Ed, The Dryden Press FitzGerald & Arnott (2000), Marketing Communications Classics, Business Press Thomson Learning (An international collection of classic and contemporary academic journal papers) Advertising *William F. Arens (1999), Contemporary Advertising, International/7th edition, Irwin/McGraw Hill *Wells, Burnett, Moriarty (1998), Advertising Principles & Practice 5th Ed, Prentice Hall Sales Promotion +Julian Cummins (1998), Sales Promotion - How to Create and Implement Campaigns 3rd Ed, Kogan Page Gerard Tellis (1998), Advertising and Sales Promotion Strategy, Addison-Wesley 18
  • 19. Direct Marketing +McCorkell G. (1997), Direct and Database Marketing, Kogan Page McDonald William (1998), Direct Marketing – An Integrated Approach, McGraw Hill +Sargeant & West (2001), Direct and Interactive Marketing, Oxford University Press (OUP) +Tapp Alan (1998), Principles of Direct & Database Marketing, Financial Times – Pitman Publishing N.B see Institute of Direct Marketing’s website www.theidm.com (the education programme) PR +Frank Jefkins & D.Yadin (1998), Public Relations, Financial Times – Pitman Publishing KEY: * Good comprehensive US textbooks. Choose one whose style you like + Worth buying one of these Academic, Trade Journals and Directories: British Rate and Data (BRAD) Admap Broadcast Harvard Business Review Campaign Marketing International Journal of Advertising Marketing Week Journal of Advertising Media Week Journal of Advertising Research PR Week Journal of Marketing Communications Journal of the Market Research Society Journals on-line http://www.wmin.ac.uk/library/datab.html this is the WBS library link to online journals. You will find links to WARC, the World Advertising Research Centre, MAD, and many others. See also: www.adage.com/ www.campaignlive.com/ www.ft.com/ www.ipc.co.uk www.marketing-week.co www.marketing.haynet.com/ J.Wilmhurst & Adrian Mackay(1999), The Fundamentals of Advertising 2nd Ed, Butterworth Heineman (A good practical intro. for those new to the subject) www.marketingtoday.com/ Other useful and informative Web sites and resources: www.abc.org.uk ABC, Audit Bureau of Circulations www.adbusters.org/campaigns/index.html Adbusters – spoof ads 19
  • 20. www.adassoc.org.uk Advertising Association www.asa.org.uk Advertising Standards Authority http://bizednet.bris.ac.uk Business education resources / links www.cim.co.uk Chartered Institute of Marketing www.dataprotection.gov.uk/dprhome.htm Details of latest data protection laws www.dma.org.uk Direct Marketing Association www.itc.org.uk Independent Television Commission www.theidm.com Institute of Direct Marketing www.ipr.press.net/ Institute of Public Relations www.isp.org.uk/ Institute of Sales Promotion www.rajar.co.uk Radio Joint Audience Research Ltd www.marketresearch.org.uk Market Research Society www.emerald-library.com Emerald library and journal resources http://advertising.utexas.edu/world/ Useful University of Texas site www.corporate-id.com/html/index.htm Corporate lists Key Media sites http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/business/default.htmBBC Business magazine/ info www.carltonplc.co.uk Carlton communications www.mediainfo.com Directory of newspapers on the net www.dds.nl~kidon/papers.html Links to papers worldwide www.newslink.org Links to the media worldwide www.itv.co.uk Independent TV www.rtguide.beeb.com Guide to over 200 TV channels 20
  • 21. ACTIVITY: S = Seminar W= Workshop I Indiv Assgmt G Gr Assgmt Pr Prest/tn T = In Class STATUS : P = practiced T = taught A = assessed MODULE: MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS CODE: 4MAM7A2 MODULE LEADER: Trevor Wright SEM 1 2005/6… TABLE 1: HIGHER EDUCATION SKILLS LEARNIN SKILL G INFORMAT GROUP RESOUR ION PROBLEM WORKING CES SELF EVALUATION MGT AUTONOMY COMMUNICATION SOLVING Use a range of learning resources Reflect on own/ others' functiong Idenf/defintn of problem essentls Management of own learning Ability to learn independently Application of methods/tools Creative and innov thinking AREA Team and group working Info & data retrvl incl ICT Task-centred working Respond to feedback Conflict management Research techniques Professional working Business awareness Supportive of others Oral communication Time management Refln on pers devt Research strategy Challenge opinion Decision making Critical analysis Action Planning Self awareness Self motivation Report writing Presentation Leadership Self critical Use of ICT Consulting NegotItion Debating LEARNIN G OUTCOM ES Understand S SP G G G G G G G G G GP G S S EA G G GP G G G GP S SSPSP G S communicatio G P P SP P P P P P P P P P A P A A A P P G P P n theory and P A A G G A G how it applies A A A A to the development of the marketing communicatio n process Define and S SP G G G G G G G G G GP G S S EA G G GP G G G GP S SSPSP G S interpret the G P P SP P P P P P P P P P A P A A A P P G P P meaning of P A A G G A G IMC in the A A A A context of the four non- personal marketing communicatio n tools Analyse and S SPS SPS S S S S S SP S S S EA S S SP S S S STSTS T T assess IMC P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P G S strategies E E E G EA E P developed A A A EA P G and managed E by firms A Evaluate, S S P S S S PS S S S S S S P S S S EA S S SP S S S STSTS T T compare and P G P P G P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P G S contrast G A G G A E E E G EA E P selected A A A A A A EA P G individual E components A of the communicatio ns mix 21
  • 22. G ES ns as a Collect, ns plan. process marketing SKILL information Understand interpret and development OUTCOM LEARNIN communicatio communicatio concept and a use marketing AREA of a marketing relevant to the the nature of P S A P S G Team and group working Leadership NegotItion GROUP Conflict management WORKING Task-centred working P SPS Use a range of learning resources A A G Research techniques CES RESOUR LEARNIN Professional working Self awareness Self motivation Refln on pers devt P P P P Critical analysis Challenge opinion P P P SP P P P P P P Respond to feedback SELF EVALUATION Reflect on own/ others' functiong 22 Info & data retrvl incl ICT A A E E P P SPS S S S S S SP S S Creative and innov thinking A E P S ION MGT A A P P P SP G G G G G G G G G GP G S S G G Business awareness INFORMAT Research strategy EA EA Ability to learn independently Management of own learning Time management P P A P Self critical AUTONOMY S S SP Supportive of others Report writing Oral communication P P S S A A A Presentation Use of ICT Debating COMMUNICATION Consulting A P P G Application of methods/tools EA P P P P S STSTS G EA Idenf/defintn of problem essentls T P E G Action Planning SOLVING PROBLEM T A E P S A P P G G GP G G G GP S SSPSP G S G G Decision making
  • 23. MODULE: MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS CODE: 4MAM7A2 MODULE LEADER Trevor Wright SEM 1 2005/6… TABLE 2: CAREER MANAGEMENT SKILLS AREA Exploring and Creating Opportunities Coping with Uncertainty Political Awareness SKILL Action Planning Self Awareness Networking LEARNING OUTCOMES Understand GP GP GST GST GST GST communication P P P P theory and how it applies to the development of the marketing communication process Define and GP GP GST GST GST GST interpret the P P P P meaning of IMC in the context of the four non-personal marketing communication tools Analyse and STP SP STP STP STP STP assess IMC strategies developed and managed by firms Evaluate, compare G P GP GST GST GST GST and contrast P P P P selected individual components of the communications mix Collect, interpret GP GP GST GST GST GST and use marketing P P P P information relevant to the development of a marketing communications plan. Understand the GP GP GST GST GST GST nature of marketing P P P P communications as a concept and a process 23
  • 24. Full Module Title: 1.1.1.1 PRODUCT AND PRICING MANAGEMENT Short Module Title: Product and Pricing Management Module Code: 4MAM7A3 Module Level: 7 Academic Credit Weighting: 20 credits School: Westminster Business School Department: Marketing and Business Strategy Length: One semester Module Leader: Clive Helm Ext: Email: 3497 helmc@wmin.aco.uk Site: Marylebone Host Course: MA Marketing Management Status: Core for MA Marketing Management Relevant Course titles/pathways: MA Marketing Management, PGCM Subject Board: PG Marketing Pre-Requisites: Marketing Principles, Financial Aspects of Marketing Co-Requisites: None Assessment: 30% coursework, 70% examination Special Features: None Access Restrictions: None. 1. Summary of Module Content: This module looks at the management of two of the four ‘Ps’ of the marketing mix, product and pricing, and their relationship to the marketing management process and other factors in achieving business objectives. It introduces and examines various approaches and concepts that can be applied to the development of strategies for managing and pricing products in a strategic context. 2. Module Aims: This module aims to: Give the student an in-depth critical understanding of the issues and considerations in the management and pricing of products, Illustrate the role of product and pricing management in achieving strategic business goals, Demonstrate the link between product and pricing management, their relationship to other elements in the marketing mix, and the marketing management process. 3. Learning Outcomes: By the end of the module students should be able to: 24
  • 25. 1. Have an in-depth critical understanding of the nature of products and how different types of product can be classified by marketers. 2. Review the strategic importance for organisations of managing products. 3. Analyse and apply various key concepts and tools to the product planning and management process. 4. Analyse the new product development process 5. Critically evaluate the differences between the marketing of goods and services. 6. Analyse the importance of branding and the issues involved in managing brands in an international context. 7. Critically review the different methods of pricing and how appropriate pricing strategies can be developed for different marketing situations. 4. Indicative Module Content: The module will cover 1. Product Concepts: The nature of products; product management in the context of business strategy; the relationship of product management to the marketing concept, the marketing management process and other elements in the marketing mix. 2. Key Product Management Concepts and Tools: The product life cycle model and its implications and application; product portfolio decisions, the BCG matrix and other product management tools, their uses and limitations. 3. The New Product Development Process: The importance of innovation; the stages in the NPD process and their financial and risk implications; test marketing and commercialisation; the role of marketing research. 4. Branding: The role and strategic importance of branding in different product categories; branding, differentiation and added value; the growing importance of brand equity 5. Service Based Product Marketing: The importance of service industries; differences and linkages between goods and services; implications for the marketing of services and organisational issues in successful service delivery. 6. Product Management in an International Context: The growing internationalisation of many consumer industries and markets; barriers to internationalisation of product strategies; key implications for the marketing of products and brands across different markets; the growth of international and global brands. 7. Pricing Strategies: 8. The strategic importance and role of pricing; pricing objectives and their relationship with overall business objectives; key considerations in developing a pricing strategy including cost, demand and competitive factors. Pricing for new products, tactical approaches to pricing, other strategic pricing considerations. 25
  • 26. Teaching and Learning Methods: The module is delivered by a series of lectures and seminars. The seminars, usually based on case studies, are designed to link to and reinforce the material covered in the lectures, giving students the opportunity to explore and evaluate the concepts and ideas covered. The case study approach helps develop students’ ability to analyse a situation and critically consider alternative approaches to future strategy. Students will usually work in groups and are expected to contribute to seminar discussions and other activities in terms of their own study and work experience. 5. Assessment Rationale: Assessment is by one written piece of coursework (30%), and an end of module written exam (70%). 6. Assessment Criteria: i. Competence Assessment Assignment: ii. Examination 7. Assessment Methods and Weightings: Coursework: 30% of module assessment. Examination: 70% of module assessment. Sources The main recommended text is the relevant chapters from: Kotler P. ‘Marketing Management’ 10e Prentice Hall 1999 Other Recommended Reading Baker & Hart (1998), ‘Product Strategy and Management’ Prentice Hall Urban & Hauser (1993), ‘Design and Marketing of New Products’ 2e Prentice Hall Keller (1998), ‘Strategic Brand Management’ Prentice Hall De Chernatony & McDonald (1998), ‘Creating Powerful Brands’ 2e Butterworth Heinemann Lovelock, Vandermerwe & Lewis (1996), ‘Services Marketing, a European Perspective’ Prentice Hall Trott (1998), ‘Innovation Management and New Product Development’ Financial Times, Pitman Publishing Kochan ed. (1996), ‘The World’s Greatest Brands’ Macmillan Business Ind (1997), ‘The Corporate Brand’ Macmillan Business Sloman (1994), ‘Economics’ Prentice Hall Atkinson, Livesey & Milward eds. (1998), ‘Applied Economics’ Macmillan 26
  • 27. ACTIVITY: S = Seminar W= Workshop I Indiv Assgmt G Gr Assgmt Pr Prest/tn T = In Class STATUS : P = practiced T = taught A = assessed MODULE: PRODUCT AND PRICING MANAGEMENT CODE: 4MAM7A3 MODULE LEADER SEM 1 2005/6:CLIVE HELM TABLE 1: HIGHER EDUCATION SKILLS LEARNIN SKILL G INFORMAT GROUP RESOUR ION PROBLEM WORKING CES SELF EVALUATION MGT AUTONOMY COMMUNICATION SOLVING Use a range of learning resources Reflect on own/ others' functiong Idenf/defintn of problem essentls Management of own learning Ability to learn independently Application of methods/tools Creative and innov thinking AREA Team and group working Info & data retrvl incl ICT Task-centred working Respond to feedback Conflict management Research techniques Professional working Business awareness Supportive of others Oral communication Time management Refln on pers devt Research strategy Challenge opinion Decision making Critical analysis Action Planning Self awareness Self motivation Report writing Presentation Leadership Self critical Use of ICT Consulting NegotItion Debating LEARNIN G OUTCOME S Understand the S G S S SG S S SG S S S SG S S S SG S G G S S G S G SG SG S nature of G P G G PT G G PA G A G G G G PA G G PA G P PA PA G S PA P products and PA P A PA P PT PA P P PT G A PA G P PA G A different types A A A A A P P PA of product A classifications A Understand the S G S S SG S S SG S S SG S S S SG S G G S S G S G SG SG S strategic G P G G PT G G PA G G G G G PA G G PA G P PA PA G S PA P importance of PA P A PA P PT PA P P PT G A PA G P PA G A product A A A A A P P PA management in A achieving A business goals S G S S SG S S SG G S S S SG S S S SG S G S G S S G S G SG SG S Apply key G P G G PT G G PA PA G G G G G G PA G G G PA G P PA PA G S PA P concepts and PA P A PA P PT PA P P PT G A PA PA G P PA G tools to the A A A A A A P P PA product A management A process S G S S SG S S SG G S S S SG S S S SG S G S G S S G S G SG SG S G P G G PT G G PA PA G G G G G G PA G G G PA G P PA PA G S PA P Understand PA P A PA P PT PA P P PT G A PA PA G P PA G and apply the A A A A A A P P PA new product A development A process Review and S G S S SG S S SG G S S S SG S S S SG S G S G S S G S G SG SG S develop G P G G PT G G PA PA G G G G G G PA G G G PA G P PA PA G S PA P appropriate PA P A PA P PT PA P P PT G A PA PA G P PA G A pricing A A A A A P P PA strategies for A different A marketing situations 27
  • 28. ACTIVITY: S = Seminar W= Workshop I Indiv Assgmt G Gr Assgmt Pr Prest/tn T = In Class Tes STATUS : P = practiced T = taught A = assessed MODULE: PRODUCT AND PRICING MANAGEMENT CODE:4MAM7A3 MODULE LEADER SEM 1 2005/6: CLIVE HELM TABLE 2: CAREER MANAGEMENT SKILLS AREA Exploring and Creating Opportunities Coping with Uncertainty Political Awareness SKILL Action Planning Self Awareness Self Promotion Skill Networking tF did f S lf C l T D LEARNING OUTCOMES Understand the nature of products and different types SG SG SG SG of product SG P P P P classifications PA Understand the strategic importance of SG SG SG product P P P management in SG achieving business SG P goals PA Apply key concepts and tools to the product SG SG SG SG management SG P P P P process PA I Understand and apply the new product SG SG SG development SG P P P process SG P PA Review and develop appropriate pricing SG SG SG strategies for SG P P P different marketing SG P situations PA 28
  • 29. FULL MODULE TITLE: BUYER BEHAVIOUR SHORT MODLE TITLE: BUYER BEHAVIOUR MODULE CODE: 4MAM7A4 MODULE LEVEL: 7 ACADEMIC CREDIT WEIGHTING: 20 SCHOOL: WESTMINSTER BUSINESS SCHOOL DEPARTMENT; MARKETING & BUSINESS STRATEGY LENGTH: 1 SEMESTER MODULE LEADER: FRANK AUTON EXT 3145 autonf@wmin.ac.uk SITE: MARYLEBONE CAMPUS HOST COURSE: STATUS: MARKETING CLUSTER/CORE MODULE RELEVANT COURSE TITLES/PATHWAYS: SUBJECT BOARD: MARKETING PRE- REQUISITES: Students planning to take Buyer Behaviour 4MAM7A4, may find it useful before the start of the semester to read chapters one and two of the following text book: Peter J.P., Olson J.C. and Grunert K.G. (1999) Consumer Behaviour and Marketing Strategy, European Edition McGraw Hill. CO-REQUISITES: NONE ASSESSMENT: 30% COURSEWORK / 70% EXAMINATION SPECIAL FEATURES: NONE ACCESS RESTRICTIONS: NONE SUMMARY OF MODULE CONTENT: It is a widely accepted principle of business that to be more profitable and survive an organisation must understand and stay close to its customers to provide products and services they will purchase. Many companies today have recognised the importance of customers and use sophisticated approaches to understand buyer behaviour which form the basis of marketing strategies. Therefore an understanding of the theory of buyer behaviour and its application to business and marketing is a vital element of a business education. The Buyer Behaviour module aims at giving the student an understanding of factors influencing customer behaviour in both business to business and consumer level which can be used in the development of more effective marketing strategies. MODULE AIMS: To enable students to understand and analyse the key theories, models and factors which influence buyer behaviour and apply them to the development of marketing strategies and the marketing mix within an international context. LEARNING OUTCOMES: On the successful completion of the module, the student should be able to: • Knowledge of Buyer Behaviour: Analyse the role of buyer behaviour in marketing strategy formulation for both consumer and business to business markets in an international context. • Understanding of Major Models of Buyer Behaviour: Understand the major models of buyer and organisational decision making 29
  • 30. processes, the key theories about constructs and variables in the model, and their relationships which introduce variations into the process. • Application of Buyer Behaviour Theories and Models to Business: Analyse and apply these behavioural constructs to strategic and tactical marketing decisions in an international context in the areas of segmentation, positioning and the development of the marketing mix. • Marketing Ethics: Have an ethical sensitivity regarding the social legitimacy of consumer influence and consumer response to corporate activity. • Group working: Interact effectively within a team, recognise, support or be proactive in leadership in a professional context and manage conflict. • Learning Resources: Manage own learning with minimum of guidance using the full range of resources available for the discipline and can work professionally within the discipline. • Self Evaluation: Confidently apply own criteria of judgement and can challenge received opinion and reflect on action. Can seek and make use of feedback. • Information Management: Select and manage information, competently undertake reasonably straight-forward research tasks with minimum guidance. • Autonomy: Take responsibility for own work and can criticise it. • Communication: Engage effectively in discussion and debate in small and large groups in a professional manner and produce detailed and coherent written material. • Problem Solving: Is confident and flexible in identifying and defining complex problems and the application of appropriate knowledge, tools/ methods to their solution. INDICATIVE SYLLABUS CONTENT: SYNOPSIS OF CONTENT: 1. Introduction Introduction to a framework for understanding consumers: The Wheel of Consumer Analysis. 2. Analysis of Factors Influencing Buyer Behaviour: • Affects and Cognitions: o Consumers' product knowledge and involvement o Exposure, attention and comprehension o Attitudes and intentions o Consumer decision making. • Behaviour: o Classical and operant conditioning, vi carious learning • The Environment: o Reference groups and family influences o Culture, subculture and social class. 30
  • 31. 3. Strategic Applications Of Buyer Behaviour To Marketing • Segmentation and positioning strategy • Development of the marketing mix. 4. Consumer Education and Protection • Ethics in Marketing. TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS: The module is taught over a series of twelve lectures structured around a common linking model – the Wheel of Consumer Analysis. Each lecture is followed with a linked seminar which takes the subject matter and explores its relevance to the business world by the use of case studies and current business examples. The lecture and seminar programme is laid out for students in their module handbook with core and suggested reading specified for each week of the course. Active learning is encouraged in both lectures and seminars through participation, high interactivity, group work case studies, videos and work with current material from the press and journals. ASSESSMENT RATIONALE: To be able to use the theory of buyer behaviour it is necessary to be able to understand the range of theories and models available, to be able to apply them to real life business world market or brands and to be able to use them to develop appropriate marketing strategy. ASSESSMENT CRITERIA: Students must demonstrate their ability to understand buyer behaviour theories developed in the course. They must be able to apply these theories to specific brand or market examples and to develop appropriate and meaningful marketing strategy recommendations. ASSESSMENT METHODS AND WEIGHTING: Coursework The module includes one piece of group coursework. This requires the formation of a team, who then have to choose a market or product and conduct some preliminary secondary market research. This should identify an unanswered question which is then addressed through the design and implementation of primary consumer research into the area. The data and consumer insight is then applied to selected available consumer behaviour theories and models. Following analysis appropriate marketing strategy recommendations are made. Group coursework is chosen because this is the closest analogy to working in the business world to enable students to appreciate the dynamics of team work and shared objectives and to apply consumer behaviour theory to a real business issue and explore the relevance of the theory at first hand. The group coursework is valued at 30% of the total module marks. Examination A single closed book examination is conducted which requires the answering of three questions from 31
  • 32. six in a 21/4 hour examination. The six questions cover the range of indicated module content. Successful completion of the exam will require a demonstration of the basic theories and models of consumer behaviour, the ability to apply these theories to a particular business issue specified in the question and the development of appropriate marketing recommendations. The examination is valued at 70% of the total module marks. SOURCES: ESSENTIAL READING: • Peter J.P., Olson J.C. and Grunert K.G. (1999) Consumer Behaviour and Marketing Strategy, European Edition McGraw Hill. FURTHER READING: •Hoyer W and MacInnis D (2000) Consumer Behaviour, 2nd Edition Houghton Mifflin. •Gerrit Antonides, W. Fred van Raijj. (1998) A European Perspective on Consumer Behaviour, Wiley. • Solomon M, Bamossy G and Askegaard S 2nd Edition 2002 Consumer Behaviour: A European Perspective, Prentice Hall Europe. • Gordon Foxall, Ronald E. Goldsmith & Stephen Brown. Consumer Psychology for Marketing. 2nd Edition, Thomson Business Press • Michael Soloman, Consumer Behaviour, International Edition 2002 5th Edition, Prentice Hall. • Arnould, Price & Zinkman. Consumers. 2nd Edition 2003, McGraw Hill. • John Mowen, Michael Minor. Consumer Behaviour. • Naomi Klein. No Logo. 2001 Paperback edition, Flamingo – Harper Collins. • Malcolm Gladwell. The Tipping Point, 2000, Little, Brown & Company. • Eric Schlossler. Fast Food Nation. 2002. Penguin Books • Peter Russell. The Brain Book. 1979. Routledge & Paul. • Allan & Barbara Pease. Why Men don’t Listen and Women Can’t Read Maps. 2001. Orion. PERIODICAL REFERENCES: • Journal of Marketing Management • Journal of Marketing • Journal of Marketing Communication • Journal of Marketing Research (AMA) • Journal of the Market Research Society • Journal of Advertising Research • European Journal of Marketing • Admap • Marketing • Marketing Week • Campaign WWW.REFERENCES: • www.warc.com • www.mad.co.uk 32
  • 33. Full Module Title: MARKETING RESEARCH Short Module Title: Marketing Research Module Code: 4MAM7A5 Module Level: 7 Academic Credit Weighting: 20 credits School: Westminster Business School Department: Marketing and Business Strategy Length: One semester Module Leader: Donna Mai Ext: 3003 E-mail d.l.mai@wmin.ac.uk Site: Marylebone Host Course: MA Marketing Management Status: Core for MA Marketing Management Relevant Course titles/pathways: MA Marketing Management Subject Board: PG Marketing Pre-Requisites: Marketing Principles, Financial Aspects of Marketing Co-Requisites: None Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination Special Features: None Access Restrictions: None Summary of Module Content: In order to achieve its objectives, an organisation must understand and stay close to its customers, to provide goods and services in such a way, time, and place and at such a price that they will purchase them. Companies today use sophisticated approaches to understand the markets in which they operate, and to understand their customers and their consumers. This knowledge forms the basis of marketing strategies. This module develops competency in the main qualitative and quantitative methods for data collection, measurement, sampling, analysis and presentation of results. Successful students may proceed to a career in marketing management, where their research needs will be provided by specialist agencies under their management and supervision. Alternatively they may themselves choose to specialise in marketing research through further study or training. Module Aims: This module introduces students to the analytical and creative aspects of Marketing Research, providing a comprehensive overview of the research process and methods that underpin marketing activities in a variety of business situations. Learning Outcomes: By the end of the module students should be able to: 1. Have a comprehensive critical understanding of the role, possibilities and limitations of marketing research and marketing information systems in the formulation and implementation of marketing strategy; 2. Draw up a research plan and present a research proposal; 33
  • 34. 3. Make critical use of both primary and secondary sources of data; 4. Design and undertake research projects by applying appropriate research methods 5. Use statistical software to facilitate quantitative data analysis 6. Interpret marketing research results and write a professional marketing research report. Indicative Module Content: The module will cover the following topic areas: 1. The Role of Marketing Research. 2. Marketing Research Processes and Methods 3. Secondary Research 4. Primary Research: Qualitative and Quantitative 5. Survey Design 6. Sampling methods 7. Data Analysis and Introduction to SPSS. 8. Descriptive Statistics; Univariate and Bivariate Analysis. 9. Introduction to multivariate concepts. 10. Preparation of a Marketing Research Report Teaching and Learning Methods: The three hours each week will be a mixture of lectures, seminars and informal group discussions. Where relevant SPSS will be used for data analysis. Students will be expected to contribute fully to class activities and to draw on their own work and educational experience to enrich the module. Assessment Rationale: The assessment consists of 50% coursework and 50% written examination. The coursework consists of a marketing research project, in which students are to apply the methods and methodology that they learn from the module to a real marketing situation. They will be required to identify and define their own marketing research problem(s), and should apply a combination of different methods to collect data in order to answer the research question. Students may be given the option of carrying out this marketing research project on their own, or in a group. Two reports will be required: a Secondary Research Report and a Primary Research Report, worth 15% and 35% of the module marks, respectively. The unseen exam will assess students’ mastery and appropriate choice of research techniques. Sources Essential Reading SPSS (2000) SPSS 10 Guide to Data Analysis, SPSS Plus one of: Malhotra, N. K. & Birks, D. F. (2000) Marketing Research: An Applied Orientation – European Ed., London: Prentice-Hall International 34
  • 35. Burns, A.C. and Bush, R.F. (1998) Marketing Research – 2nd ed., New Jersey: Prentice Hall. Crask, M. Fox, R.J, Stout, R.G. (1995) Marketing Research: Principles & Applications, New Jersey: Prentice Hall. Malhotra, N.K. (1999) Marketing Research: An applied orientation – 3rd ed., New Jersey: Prentice Hall. Procter, T. (2000) Essentials of Marketing Research – 2nd ed., London: Prentice Hall. Tull, D.S. and Hawkins, D.I. (1993) Marketing Research: Measurement & Method, New York: Macmillan Publishing. Preliminary Study. Students planning to take Marketing Research may find it useful, before the start of the semester, to read the first few chapters of one of the recommended texts. Skills Specification: January 2004 35
  • 36. ACTIVITY: S = Seminar W= Workshop I Indiv Assgmt G Gr Assgmt Pr Prest/tn T = In Class STATUS : P = practiced T = taught A = assessed MODULE: MARKETING RESEARCH CODE: 4MAM7A5 MODULE LEADER SEM 1 2005/6: DONNA MAI TABLE 1: HIGHER EDUCATION SKILLS LEARNIN SKILL G INFORMAT GROUP RESOUR ION PROBLEM WORKING CES SELF EVALUATION MGT AUTONOMY COMMUNICATION SOLVING Use a range of learning resources Reflect on own/ others' functiong Idenf/defintn of problem essentls Management of own learning Ability to learn independently Application of methods/tools Creative and innov thinking AREA Team and group working Info & data retrvl incl ICT Task-centred working Respond to feedback Conflict management Research techniques Professional working Business awareness Supportive of others Oral communication Time management Refln on pers devt Research strategy Challenge opinion Decision making Critical analysis Action Planning Self awareness Self motivation Report writing Presentation Leadership Self critical Use of ICT Consulting NegotItion Debating LEARNIN G OUTCOM ES Marketing S S S S SG IG IG IG IG IG IG IG IG IGP IG IG I IGP IG IG IG GP G Research G G G G PA PT P PT IG P P PA P PA A T PA G PA PA P A P Proposal PA PA PA PA A T A P P P T G IG IG A A T A S ST ST IG IG A P PA PA SP SP Theories and IG IG IG IG IG IG IG IG IGP IG IG I IGP IG IG IG GP G Marketing PT P PT IG P P PA P PA A T PA G PA PA P A P Research IG A T A P P P T G IG IG Methods TP SP A A T A S ST ST IG IG S SP SP SP A A P PA PA SP SP Application of IG IG IG IG IG IG IG IG IGP IG S IG I IGP IG IG IG GP G Methods and PT P PT IG P P PA P PA A T P PA G PA PA P A P designing A T A P P P T Marketing IG A A T A G IG IG Research TP SP A S ST ST IG IG S SP SP SP A P PA PA SP SP IG IG IG IG IG IG IG IG IGP IG IG I IGP IG IG IG GP G PT P PT P P PA P PA A S PA G PA PA P A P IG A T A T P T G IG IG Data Analysis TP SP A P T A S ST ST IG IG S SP SP SP A A A P PA PA SP SP Marketing IG IG IG IG IG IG IG IG IGP IG IG I IGP IG IG IG GP Research PT P PT P P PA P PA A S PA G PA PA P A G Report & A T A T P P Presentation IG A P T S G G G IG IG SP SP A A T PT PS IGP S ST ST IG IG A SP SP SP A A A TA A P PA PA SP SP 36
  • 37. ACTIVITY: S = Seminar W= Workshop I Indiv Assgmt G Gr Assgmt Pr Prest/tn T = In Class Tes STATUS : P = practiced T = taught A = assessed MODULE: MARKETING RESEARCH CODE: 4MAM7A5 MODULE LEADER SEM 1 2005/6: DONNA MAI TABLE 2: CAREER MANAGEMENT SKILLS AREA Exploring and Creating Opportunities Coping with Uncertainty Political Awareness SKILL Action Planning Self Awareness Self Promotion Skill Networking tF did f S lf C l T D LEARNING OUTCOMES Marketing TPA Research Proposal IGP IGPA IGPA IGPA Theories and TPA Marketing Research Methods IGTP IGTPA IGTPA A Application of TPA Methods and designing Marketing Research IGPA IGPA IGP Data Analysis TPA IGP IGP IGP Marketing TPA Research Report & Presentation IGTP IGTPA IGTPA A 37
  • 38. Full Module Title: MARKETING CHANNEL MANAGEMENT AND STRATEGY Short Module Title: Marketing Channels Module Code: 4MAM7A6 Module Level: 7 Academic Credit Weighting: 20 credits School: Westminster Business School Department: Marketing and Business Strategy Length: One semester Module Leader: Zena Lutrin Ext: 3329 Email: lutrinz@wmin.ac.uk Site: Marylebone Host Course: MA Marketing Management Status: Core for MA Marketing Management Relevant Course titles/pathways: MA in Marketing Management, PGCM Subject Board: PG Marketing Pre-Requisites: Marketing Principles, Financial Aspects of Marketing Co-Requisites: None Assessment: 30% coursework, 70% examination Special Features: None Access Restrictions: None • Summary of Module Content: This module is dedicated to distribution, one of the four principal dimensions of the marketing mix. Marketing concerns the identification, anticipation and satisfaction of customers’ needs and wants, profitably. Without a distribution strategy, or, more correctly, a marketing channel strategy, the firm is not optimising the way it satisfies customers needs, which are to have the right product, at the right time, at the right price and in the right place. The speed of organisational and technological change brings new challenges to all areas of the business: marketing channel management is no exception. These new challenges and opportunities will be fully explored within this module. • Module Aims: To enable students to devise strategies and management approaches for developing a firm’s marketing channels consistent with and supporting the firm’s overall marketing objectives. • Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module the student should be able to: • Identify and analyse marketing channel problems; 38
  • 39. • Demonstrate that they have acquired the conceptual tools needed to analyse the channel strategy needs of suppliers of goods and services in relation to their differing products and markets (both business-to-consumer and business-to-business); • Critically recommend marketing channel alternatives which are consistent with the overall aims and objectives of the firm; • Develop realistic implementation plans for a preferred marketing channel option(s); • Evaluate the practical implications of any marketing channel decision taken by a marketing management team; • Critically review the relation between distribution objectives and strategy and the broader marketing objectives and strategy; and • Possess a 'practical' knowledge of problem solving in the distribution context, achieved through analysing cases and appropriate articles from marketing literature. • Indicative Syllabus Content: The module will cover • Key theoretical concepts associated with the structure and operations of marketing channels; • Discussion of key institutions and agencies making up marketing channels, in particular retailers, transport companies, warehouse and distribution centres; • Channel management, including leadership, conflicts and their resolution, legal issues; • The impact of information technology on marketing channels, including the Internet • Teaching and Learning Methods: The three hours each week will be split into a number of activities including lectures, seminars and group discussions. Seminars will apply the theory in the context of case studies and students' own experience. Each student is expected to read and to be prepared to discuss all text and case material assigned to each class period. • Assessment Rationale: Achievement of the learning outcomes will be assessed by means of a group assignment, to be carried out in groups of 4-5 students, and an end of semester unseen examination, which will be “open-book” and based on a choice of 3 out of 5 questions, each having its own context or short scenario which will be given in the question. Assessment Criteria: Coursework Assessment Criteria: • Knowledge and understanding of distribution theory • Ability to use theory to analyse and evaluate problems • Ability to make judgements about application of theory in an operational context • Integration of practical understanding of a market and marketing theories • Structure and clarity of communication and presentation of answers to questions • Evidence of good planning and management of group tasks 39
  • 40. Exam Assessment Criteria • Knowledge and understanding of the theory underpinning marketing management exhibited through the selection and use of relevant theoretical material to answer the question asked • Ability to analyse e-commerce situations shown by insight into the market situation and the application of appropriate theory • The ability to evaluate situations, consider alternatives in relation to appropriate criteria and make management recommendations • Well-structured and coherent presentation, geared to answer the question asked • Sources Essential Reading: Coughlan, Anderson, Stern and El-Ansary (6th ed 2001) Marketing Channels, Prentice Hall Pelton, Strutton and Lumpkin (2nd, international ed 2002) Marketing Channels a relationship approach, McGraw Hill. 1. Rosenbloom, B (6th ed 1999) Marketing Channels Dryden Press Supplementary Reading: Periodicals: Journal of Marketing Journal of Marketing Management European Journal of Marketing International Journal of Retail and Distribution Management International Journal of Physical Distribution and Logistics Management Harvard Business Review Sloan Management Review Marketing Business mww.temp.ox.ac.uk/marketspace www.nielsen-netratings.com www.internet.com www.nua.com www.idc.com Aaker, David A (1998) Strategic Market Management, Wiley Chaffey, Mayer, Johnston, Ellis-Chadwick, (2000) Internet Marketing, Prentice Hall Chen, Stephen, (2001) Strategic Management of e-Business, Wiley Gilbert, D (1999) Retail Marketing Management, Financial Times Prentice Hall Palmer, Adrian (3rd ed 2001) Principles of Services Marketing, McGraw Hill Adcock, Bradfield, Halborg and Ross (3rd ed 1998) Marketing Principles and Practice Financial Times Pitman Publishing Kotler, Armstrong, Saunders and Wong (2nd European ed 1999) Principles of Marketing Prentice Hall Europe 40
  • 41. • Preliminary Study Students planning to take 4MAMM09 may find it useful before the start of the semester to read the first few chapters of Coughlan, Anderson, Stern and El-Ansary (6th ed 2001) Marketing Channels, Prentice Hall Date of initial Validation: 2000 Date of CASG approved modification July 2002 41
  • 42. Full Module Title: STRATEGIC MARKETING Short Module Title: Strategic Marketing Module Code: 4MAM7B2 Module Level: 7 Academic Credit Weighting: 20 credits School: Westminster Business School Department: Marketing and Business Strategy Length: One semester Module Leader: Ilya Girson Ext: 3037 E-mail: girsoni@wmin.ac.uk Site: Marylebone Host Course: MA Marketing Management Status: Core for MA Marketing Management Relevant Course titles/pathways: MA Marketing Management Subject Board: PG Marketing Pre-Requisites: Students registering for this module will normally have passed three other core modules of the MA Marketing Management Co-Requisites: None Assessment: 30% coursework, 70% examination Special Features: None Access Restrictions: None. Summary of Module Content: Managers of modern businesses are presented with ever-growing challenges. This module aims to provide students with an understanding of the discipline of strategic marketing management both as a philosophy and as a set of methods that can guide managers in the decisions they must make. Module Aims: The module will present an accessible account of strategic marketing management to be applied as the basis for active learning about what strategic ideas have to offer and as a source of ideas when facing practical strategic marketing management challenges. Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module the student should be able to: 1. Identify and evaluate strategic marketing problems 2. Critically formulate marketing alternatives that are consistent with the overall objectives of the firm 3. Develop realistic implementation plans for a preferred strategic marketing option 4. Evaluate the practical implications of any marketing decision taken by a management team 5. Explore major issues related to the organisation & control of marketing programmes 6. Analyse marketing issues faced by the marketing manager in an international environment 7. Interpret factors affecting marketing decision making in the new millennium. 42
  • 43. Indicative Module Content: The module will consist of four sections: Contextualising Strategy – Roots of Strategic Thinking: (1) Introduction: Marketing as a managerial orientation (Major marketing concepts and essential features. The customer-led organisation. Development of contemporary marketing thought.); what is marketing strategy? (2) Corporate purpose and aspirations (Marketing & Corporate Strategy. Major definitions; relationship between marketing and corporate strategy.) Generation and analysis of the main strategic marketing alternatives. Understanding Strategic Choice – Value-Based Strategic Management: (3) Generation and analysis of the main strategic marketing alternatives (Strategic Marketing Planning. Development of the marketing plan; the planning process; planning & control systems; implementation; performance evaluation.) (4) The role of the corporate centre – matching capabilities and competences (5) Basis of competitive advantage (Segmentation, Targeting and Positioning. Major definitions and concepts. Bases for Segmentation. Development of focused STP strategies.) Developing Strategic Options – Innovation as the Core of Business: (6) Understanding the market – a stakeholder perspective (7) Industry context (Competitor Analysis. Definition of competitive area. The notion of competitive advantage. Competitive advantage matrix.) (8) Strategic options in differing contexts – growing, maturing and declining industries. (9) Global marketing strategies. (Globalisation of marketing activities. Level of international involvement. Environmental forces in international markets. Regional trade alliances. Differing modes of international expansion. International market entry. The influence of national cultures on marketing decision-making.) Directions for Strategy Development - Growth or Expansion?: (10) Making strategy work - Implementation of marketing strategies. (Main issues, problem diagnosis, reasons for failure. Levels of implementation. Strategy implementation and marketing mix. Organising for marketing.) (11) Marketing in the New Millennium. (The changing business environment, markets and organisations. Areas of growth. Future trends – “greening business”, ethics, changes in consumer behavioural patterns, influence of new technologies on the strategic decision making, bespoke marketing.) (12) Review: Strategic management as a philosophy; a ‘tool-kit’: set of analysis methods; and understanding the framework for supporting decision-making. Teaching and Learning Methods: A theoretical underpinning will be provided to ensure that the major learning objectives will be met through a combination of lectures, facilitated discussions and group presentations. Case study material will be used to assist students to apply theoretical frameworks to practical situations. Assessment Rationale: Assessment will be by coursework (30% of final grade) and end-of-module examination (70% of final grade). There are two coursework elements: (i) The first is an individual essay of 1,800 words, for which students are required to analyse a contemporary issue in marketing. This accounts for 15% of the final mark. (ii) The second assignment, also worth 15% of the final mark, will be based on a major case study. After syndicate analysis of the case study students will be required to produce a group report and a group presentation. 43
  • 44. The case study and the questions will be normally provided during the first two teaching weeks of the module. The end-of-module examination (three hours) will be based on a case study, which will be distributed to students usually two weeks prior to the examination. Unseen questions will require students to analyse and evaluate in depth major strategic marketing issues, and to suggest alternative options. Sources Essential Reading as at June 2001: one of: Kotler, P. (2000) Marketing Management , 10e Pearson Baker M J, (2000), Marketing Strategy & Management, (3e), Macmillan Business Doyle P, (1998), Marketing Management and Strategy, (2e), Prentice Hall Europe, 1998 Lambin, J-J, (1997), Strategic Marketing Management, McGraw-Hill McDonald M, (1998), Marketing Plans: How to prepare them, how to use them, (4e), Butterworth- Heinemann Supplementary Reading: Paliwoda S & Thomas M, (1998), International Marketing, Butterworth-Heinemann, (3e) Periodicals: Journal of Marketing Journal of Marketing Management European Journal of Marketing Harvard Business Review Sloan Management Review Marketing Business Preliminary Study. Students planning to take Strategic Marketing may find it useful, before the start of the semester, to read the first few chapters of any one of the first three above-mentioned books. 44
  • 45. ACTIVITY: S = Seminar W= Workshop I Indiv Assgmt G Gr Assgmt Pr Prest/tn T = In Class Test E Exam STATUS : P = practiced T = taught A = assessed MODULE: STRATEGIC MARKETING CODE: 4MAM7B2 MODULE LEADER , 2005/6, Ilya Girson TABLE 1: HIGHER EDUCATION SKILLS LEARNIN SKILL G INFORMAT GROUP RESOUR ION PROBLEM WORKING CES SELF EVALUATION MGT AUTONOMY COMMUNICATION SOLVING Use a range of learning resources Reflect on own/ others' functiong Idenf/defintn of problem essentls Management of own learning Ability to learn independently Application of methods/tools Creative and innov thinking AREA Team and group working Info & data retrvl incl ICT Task-centred working Respond to feedback Conflict management Research techniques Professional working Business awareness Supportive of others Oral communication Time management Refln on pers devt Research strategy Challenge opinion Decision making Critical analysis Action Planning Self awareness Self motivation Report writing Presentation Leadership Self critical Use of ICT Consulting NegotItion Debating LEARNIN G OUTCOM ES Critically S GA I I SP G SP G S S GP I IG S G S G S S S G G GIGI appraise G A A TA A G G A PA TA TA A A TP I G strategic PA T P P A A marketing A A frameworks Identify major marketing issues and plan a S strategic S G S IG S response G GA TP SP G G T G IG PA GS GI G GT G G I G I P A IA IA TA SP A A P GP A S P A S A S A TA A PA Analyse strategic S situation of S G S IG S GT GT GI GI the firm G TP SP G T G G PA GS GI G A A A A A GA A TA G SP A A P GP A S P A S A S Articulate the practical implications of your S decision G SG G S IG S making on the TP TP TP SP G T G G PA GS GI S G GS GT GI GI firm A A TA G SP A A P GP A S P A A S TA A A A Evaluate the impact of external SG SP S IG G S environment GT G I TA G G S PA I G G GT G I G I on marketing A P P TP G A T G GP G GS A S A TA A A PA strategies A SP A P A S P S 45
  • 46. ACTIVITY: S = Seminar W= Workshop I Indiv Assgmt G Gr Assgmt Pr Prest/tn T = In Class Test E Exam STATUS : P = practiced T = taught A = assessed MODULE: STRATEGIC MARKETING CODE: 4MAM7B2 MODULE LEADER 2005/6, Ilya Girson TABLE 2: CAREER MANAGEMENT SKILLS AREA Exploring and Creating Opportunities Coping with Uncertainty Political Awareness SKILL Action Planning Self Awareness Self Promotion Skill Networking tF did f S lf C l T D LEARNING OUTCOMES Critically appraise strategic marketing SG I SG I frameworks SGP P P SGP GP S GP Identify major SG I SG I marketing issues P P and plan a strategic response SGP GP SGP S GP Analyse strategic SG I SGIP situation of the firm P SGP GP SGP S GP Articulate the SGIP practical SG I implications of your P decision making on SGP S the firm SGP GP GP Evaluate the impact of external SG I SG I environment on P P marketing strategies GP SGP SGP S GP 46
  • 47. TITLE: Dissertation, MA Marketing Management SHORT TITLE: Project MAMM CODE: 4MAM7A8 SCHOOL: Westminster Business School, Marylebone Campus DEPARTMENT: Marketing and Business Strategy MODULE LEADER: Dr. Donna Mai ASSESSMENT WEIGHTING: 100% coursework – 25% Proposal and 75% Final submission LEVEL: 7 CREDITS: 40 DURATION: 12 months STATUS: Core PREREQUISITES: Passes in three other core modules prior to submission MODULE DESCRIPTION: This module requires students to complete a problem-oriented research project that conforms to the academic requirements and format of presentation. The methodology should be adequately designed, explained and implemented. If the case study approach is thought to be appropriate to achieve the research objective, students should make sure that such cases are representative of the population or industry. MODULE AIMS & OBJECTIVES: 47
  • 48. This module focuses on enabling students to undertake a substantial piece of academic work based on a methodical approach to refer relevant information into a logical and coherent dissertation. LEARNING OUTCOMES: Students completing the module should be able: To conceptualise and formulate a marketing problem To apply theories, concepts and techniques learned on the course To demonstrate the capacity for independent action and competent presentation of results To complete and present a piece of academic work that conforms to the requirements SYNOPSIS OF CONTENT: 1. What is a dissertation? 2. Research Process 3. Research Methods 4. How to write a research proposal 5. How to write a dissertation TEACHING / LEARNING STRATEGY: Preparation of the project for a first time submission always spans 12 months over the relevant year of study (FT year, or the 2nd year for PT). The year includes the summer after the last semester of study (September entrants) or the summer before the last semester of study (February entrants, 2nd year in the case of PT). A number of workshops on research methods will be provided, during which students will be given help in identifying and delineating the research area, literature review, the choice of research methodology and design, project management, implementation and control. Each student will then be allocated a suitable member of teaching staff as dissertation supervisor according to his/her research interest. Students will, therefore, need to submit a Brief of Research Interest in the early stage of the module. The allocation of a supervisor will normally take place two weeks after the submission of the Brief of Research Interest. Students are then required to deliver a satisfactory dissertation proposal (25%) before they proceed to the dissertation. Supervisors and students will be issued with detailed guidelines to ensure consistency of treatment between students. For the dissertation, students should initiate a study on a business-related issue in depth, and apply the learning acquired on the taught modules of the course to the problem definition, analysis, and appropriate resolution of that issue. Through the supervised experience, students should undertake the research 48
  • 49. independently and demonstrate the ability in project organisation and delivery. ASSESSMENT STRATEGY: The assessment consists of two elements: the research proposal (25%) and dissertation (75%). The proposal will be assessed based on the quality of the problem definition, research methodology, and the implementation planning. The structure of the proposal must be in accordance with the module requirement. The writing of the background literature review should follow the general academic style and the methodology must be elaborated and clearly discussed in order to demonstrate students’ understanding of research methods. The module leader will highlight the fundamental problems in a failed proposal so the student can modify the proposal and proceed to the preparation of the dissertation. Students who need to resubmit their proposals will be advised by the Post-Graduate Office once the results are formally announced. In a dissertation, the student must demonstrate his/her ability to: 1. Identify a business problem/issue worthy of investigation and capable of investigation within the resources and time available. 2. Design a methodology of enquiry appropriate to the investigation 3. Execute the study in line with the methodology selected (possibly involving further development of the methodology). 4. Convey the relevance of the concepts and principles covered in the course to the problem(s) under investigation. 5. Integrate the concepts and principles above in a way that is both practical and analytical. 6. Evaluate the data collected, and assess its practical and wider implications and the relationships between these and the theoretical aspects. 7. Present findings in a systematic and coherent way, in the form of a written report. The dissertation itself will not exceed a maximum length of 15,000 words. The word count does not include abstract, tables, figures, references and appendices. In the case of borderline decisions, the examiners have the right to request a viva examination. Referral: 1. Limited additional supervision, normally with original supervisor, plus markers’ comments on original submission 2. No right of repeat of SRMP 3. Low (reassessment) or no fee 4. Short resubmission date, at end of following semester (if referred in Sept → end of January; if referred in Feb → end of June) 5. Resubmission does not count towards maximum number of credit attempts allowed 6. Marks on resubmitted projects are capped at 50 %. Retake: 1. Full supervision for a second time, generally with new supervisor, plus markers’ comments on original submission 2. Right to repeat SRMP 49
  • 50. 3. Higher (repeat tuition + reassessment) fee 4. Long resubmission date (normally 12 months later) 5. Retake does count towards maximum number of credit attempts allowed 6. Marks on retaken projects are capped at 50 %. Under either retake or referral only one reassessment of the project is allowed under University regulations. The distinction between referral and retake as above is explained in the Course Handbook READING LIST: • Essential Reading Rudestam, K.E. and Newton, R.R. (2001) Surviving Your Dissertation: A comprehensive guide to content and process – 2nd ed., Sage. Fisher, C. (2004) Researching and Writing a Dissertation for Business Students, FT-Prentice Hall. • Further Reading Aaker, D., Kumar, V., and Day, G. (20003) Marketing Research - 8th ed., John Willey & Sons. Allison, B. (1993) A Guide to Dissertation Preparation - 4th ed., Ariad Associates. Allison, B., Owen, A., Rothwell, A., O’Sullivan, T., Saunders, C., and Rice, J. (1996) Research Skills for Students, London: Kogan Page Ltd. Bell, J. (1987) Doing Your Research Project: A guide for first-time researchers, Open University Press Berry, S. (1994) Handbook for Research for Dissertations and other Projects, University of Brighton. Brannen, J. (1992) Mixing Methods: Qualitative and Quantitative Research, Avebury. Coakes, S.J. and Steed, L.G.(2003) SPSS Analysis without Anguish Version 11.0, Wiley Greenfield, T. (Ed) (1996) Research Methods: Guidance for Postgraduates, London: Arnold. Hair, J.F, Anderson, R.E., Tatham, R.L., and Black, W.C. (1998) Multivariate Data Analysis – 5th ed., Prentice Hall. Howard, K. and Sharp, J. (1994) The Management of a Student Research Project, Gower Murray, R. (2002) How to Write a Thesis, Buckingham: Open University Press Tull, D.S. and Hawkins, D.I. (1993) Marketing Research: Measurement and Methods - 6th ed., New York: Macmillan 50
  • 51. PRELIMINARY STUDY This is a core module for MA Marketing Management. Students may find it useful to conduct broad reading on research methods or marketing research. Statistics and SPSS or other statistical software can facilitate studies that involve quantitative data analysis. Date of Initial Validation: Dates of CASG Approved Modifications: Date of re-validation/review: May, 2001 Updated with Skills Specification: July, 2004 51
  • 52. ACTIVITY: S = Seminar W= Workshop I Indiv Assgmt G Gr Assgmt Pr Prest/tn T = In Class Tes STATUS : P = practiced T = taught A = assessed MODULE: DISSERTATION CODE: 4MAM7A8 MODULE LEADER: DONNA MAI TABLE 1: HIGHER EDUCATION SKILLS LEARNIN SKILL G INFORMAT GROUP RESOUR ION PROBLEM WORKING CES SELF EVALUATION MGT AUTONOMY COMMUNICATION SOLVING Use a range of learning resources Reflect on own/ others' functiong Idenf/defintn of problem essentls Management of own learning Ability to learn independently Application of methods/tools Creative and innov thinking AREA Team and group working Info & data retrvl incl ICT Task-centred working Respond to feedback Conflict management Research techniques Professional working Business awareness Supportive of others Oral communication Time management Refln on pers devt Research strategy Challenge opinion Decision making Critical analysis Action Planning Self awareness Self motivation Report writing Presentation Leadership Self critical Use of ICT Consulting NegotItion Debating LEARNIN G OUTCOM ES Research WP W W WP P P P P P P P W P P P P W P Brief P P P P W P WP P P Research W W WP P P P W W PA WP W P P W PA PA PA PA W P P Proposal WP PA P A PA PA P P P A P WP WP A A A A A A A PA P Project W W WP P P P W W PA WP W P P W PA PA PA PA W P P Design & PA P A PA PA P P P A Implementatio A A A n WP P WP WP A A A A PA P Dissertation W W WP P P P W W PA WP W P P W PA PA PA PA W P P Writing WP PA P A PA PA P P P A P WP WP A A A A A A A PA P 52
  • 53. ACTIVITY: S = Seminar W= Workshop I Indiv Assgmt G Gr Assgmt Pr Prest/tn T = In Class Tes STATUS : P = practiced T = taught A = assessed MODULE: DISSERTATION CODE: 4MAM7A8 MODULE LEADER: DONNA MAI TABLE 1: HIGHER EDUCATION SKILLS AREA Exploring and Creating Opportunities Coping with Uncertainty Political Awareness SKILL Action Planning Self Awareness Self Promotion Skill Networking tF did f S lf C l T D LEARNING OUTCOMES Research Brief P PA P Research Proposal P PA P Project Design & Implementation P PA PA Dissertation Writing PA PA PA 53
  • 54. Module Title: SERVICES MARKETING Short Module Title: Services Marketing Module Code: 4MAM7A9 Module Level: 7 Academic Credit Weighting: 20 School: Westminster Business School Department: Marketing and Business Strategy Length: One Semester Module Leader: Tony Byng: Ext:3041 Email:byngt@wmin.ac.uk Site: Marylebone Campus Host Course: MA Marketing Management Status: Elective Subject Board: MA Marketing Pre-requisites: Students attempting this module will normally have successfully completed Principles of Marketing and Financial Aspects of Marketing, or similar Assessment: 30% Assessment. 70% Exam o Summary of Module content The module addresses the distinct marketing management and operations needs and problems of service organisations in a European, international and global context. Over-arching themes are services management in the EU, international strategy and competitive advantage, the ever-growing role of services in manufacturing businesses, and the Internet and e-commerce. This module examines the problems and opportunities in marketing decision-making in a service environment. The module first examines the specifics of developing a service product, places the management of services in a marketing context and finally examines the architecture required by a firm (IT, human resources, culture) to ensure that the marketing of services functions successfully. o Module Aims The module addresses the distinct marketing management and operations needs and problems of service organisations in a European, international and global context. The aim is to develop students' abilities to devise strategies and management approaches for developing a firm’s service offerings as well as the service elements of the marketing of tangible products (such as customer service). o Learning Outcomes On successful completion of this module the student should be able to: • Identify and analyse the critical success factors pertaining specifically to services management and marketing and recommend and/or and implement appropriate solutions; • Review service strategies within the context of overall corporate systems and structures; • Critically develop comprehensive marketing strategies for services based on the traditional 7P’s of services marketing and the key service objectives known as the three R’s: referrals, retention and related sales. o Indicative syllabus content 54
  • 55. The module will cover • Customers: consumer behaviour, customer involvement in the service process, the management of service encounters • Service delivery: location and layout, balancing supply and demand, managing queues and reservations, service recovery • Value creation: positioning, service creation, pricing, promotion • Strategic Issues: human resources, IT and organisational issues o Teaching and learning methods The three hours of contact time per week will be split into a number of activities, including lectures, seminars and group discussions. Seminars will apply the theory in the context of case studies and students’ own experience. Each student is expected to read and to be prepared to discuss all text and case material assigned to each class period. o Assessment Methods and Weightings Assessment will consist of a group assignment, to be carried out in groups of 4-5 students, and an end of semester examination, which will take the form of a case study. o Sources Lovelock, C (2001), Services Marketing, 4e, Pearson, London. Heskett J et al (1997), The Service Profit Chain, Free Press Journals Journal of Services Marketing Preliminary study Students planning to take 4MAMM25 may find it useful, before the start of the semester, to read the first few chapters of Lovelock, C (2001). 55
  • 56. 56
  • 57. ACTIVITY: S = Seminar W= Workshop I Indiv Assgmt G Gr Assgmt Pr Prest/tn T = STATUS : P = practiced T = taught A = assessed MODULE: Services Marketing CODE: 4MAM7A9 MODULE LEADER SEM 1 2005/6… TABLE 1: HIGHER EDUCATION SKILLS LEARNI SKILL NG INFORMA GROUP RESOU TION COMMUNICATI PROBLEM WORKING RCES SELF EVALUATION MGT AUTONOMY ON SOLVING Use a range of learning resources Reflect on own/ others' functiong Idenf/defintn of problem essentls Management of own learning Ability to learn independently Application of methods/tools Creative and innov thinking AREA Team and group working Info & data retrvl incl ICT Task-centred working Respond to feedback Conflict management Research techniques Professional working Business awareness Supportive of others Oral communication Time management Refln on pers devt Research strategy Challenge opinion Decision making Critical analysis Action Planning Self awareness Self motivation Report writing Presentation Leadership Self critical Use of ICT Consulting NegotItion Debating LEARNI NG OUTCO MES Identify and S S S S S S S S S S S S S T S S S S S S S S S S analyse the G G G G G G G G G G G G G E G G G G G G G G G G critical P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P PT P P P P P success T T T T T T T T T T T T A T P T T T T factors A A A A A A A A A A A A A T A A A A pertaining A specifically to services manageme nt and marketing, based on the gaps model. Recommen S S S S S S S S S S S S S T S S S S S S S S S S d and/or G G G G G G G G G G G G G E G G G G G G G G G G implement P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P PT P P P P P appropriate T T T T T T T T T T T T A T P T T T T solutions to A A A A A A A A A A A A A T A A A A close those A gaps. Review S S S S S S S S S S S S S T S S S S S S S S S S service G G G G G G G G G G G G G E G G G G G G G G G G strategies P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P PT P P P P P within the T T T T T T T T T T T T A T P T T T T context of A A A A A A A A A A A A A T A A A A overall A corporate systems and structures. Critically S S S S S S S S S S S S S T S S S S S S S S S S develop G G G G G G G G G G G G G E G G G G G G G G G G comprehens P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P PT P P P P P ive T T T T T T T T T T T T A T P T T T T marketing A A A A A A A A A A A A A T A A A A strategies A for services based on
  • 58. NG Ps of MES services SKILL the seven marketing OUTCO LEARNI AREA Team and group working Leadership NegotItion Conflict management GROUP WORKING Task-centred working Use a range of learning resources Research techniques NG RESOU LEARNI Professional working Self awareness Self motivation Refln on pers devt Critical analysis Challenge opinion Respond to feedback RCES SELF EVALUATION Reflect on own/ others' functiong Info & data retrvl incl ICT Creative and innov thinking MGT TION Business awareness Research strategy INFORMA Ability to learn independently Management of own learning Time management Self critical AUTONOMY Supportive of others Report writing Oral communication Presentation ON Use of ICT Debating Consulting Application of methods/tools Idenf/defintn of problem essentls Action Planning SOLVING COMMUNICATI PROBLEM Decision making 2 2
  • 59. 3 MODULE: Services Marketing CODE: 4MAM7A9 MODULE LEADER SEM 1 2005/6… TABLE 2: CAREER MANAGEMENT SKILLS AREA Exploring and Creating Opportunities Coping with Uncertainty Political Awareness SKILL Action Planning Self Awareness Networking LEARNIN G OUTCOM ES Identify and GP GP G S TG S T GS GS analyse the P P TP TP critical success factors pertaining specifically to services management and marketing, based on the gaps model. Recommend GP GP G S TG S T GS GS and/or P P TP TP implement appropriate solutions to close those gaps. Review service G P GP G S TG S T GS GS strategies within P P TP TP the context of overall corporate systems and structures. Critically develop G P GP G S TG S T GS GS comprehensive P P TP TP marketing strategies for services based on the seven Ps of services marketing 3
  • 60. 4 Module Title: DESIGNING GLOBAL MARKETING STRATEGIES Short Module Title Designing Global Marketing Strategies Module Code: 4MAM7B1 Module Level: 7 Academic Credit Weighting: 20 School: Westminster Business School Department: Marketing and Business Strategy Length: One Semester Module Leader: Anna Zacharewicz Ext: Email: zachara@wmin.ac.uk Site: Marylebone Campus Host Course: MA Marketing Management Status: Elective Subject Board: PG Marketing Pre-requisites: Students attempting this module will normally have successfully completed Principles of Marketing and Financial Aspects of Marketing, or similar. Assessment: 30% Assessment 70% Exam Summary of Module content This module prepares students to be able to identify and implement appropriate global marketing strategies within a fast changing global arena. The continuing globalisation of world markets has resulted in domestic and foreign markets becoming increasingly integrated and competitive. Firms are emerging as global competitors and this has necessitated changes in their marketing strategies to successfully meet this challenge. Businesses of all shapes and sizes (including in the not-for-profit sector) are subject to strong global competitive forces and managers of the future will need to have the skills and expertise to be able to establish and sustain a secure place within the ever-turbulent world market. No organisation is immune and companies that already have brand portfolios will have to ensure their global position as many new companies enter this exciting world of market spaces by understanding the emergent trends in global marketing. Module Aims This module aims to provide students with a coherent framework for bringing together relevant theory and practice in order to develop a strategic approach to global marketing. In particular, it aims to give students an understanding of the global environment and its impact on marketing strategy formulation, of the principle issues found on the agenda of International Marketing managers, and to enable them to design and evaluate strategies for global markets. Learning outcomes On successful completion of this module the student should have acquired: 1. A critical understanding of current issues in relation to specific functional areas of international marketing management in a global firm and be able to assess their impact on global operations, 2. The ability to analyse the organisational aspects of global product management (including service products) in various types of companies with a view to developing suitable global marketing frameworks for them, 4
  • 61. 5 3. A critical evaluation of the elements of the global marketing mix and by understanding the relationship with other corporate functions be able to apply them to practical situations, 4. The ability to review the fundamentals of planning, implementation and control of global marketing management with an ability to develop a framework for global marketing plans, 5. A critical assessment of various models, concepts, and theories used in global marketing and the ability to apply these, 6. A considered exploration of emergent global marketing trends and the ability to contextualise these within a global marketing perspective. Synopsis of content The module will consist of three sections: 1. Setting the scene globally: a series of three or four sessions will cover the global marketing environment, globalisation, and cross-cultural management issues; 2. Developing global strategies: a series of four or five sessions will outline: designing entry strategies; finding market spaces; globalising all levels of the brand; integrating innovation into a global arena; servicing global marketing – internal and external dimensions; tools for managing global processes – technology & Internet marketing, integrating supply chains, relationship marketing; 3. Securing a global position: a series of three or four sessions will cover designing frameworks for global marketing plans, knowledge management, and an exploration of emergent trends. Teaching and Learning Methods The programme will consist of: • Lectures, which will present the main issues • Discussions, based on readings to reinforce the lectures • Seminars / Case Studies, to demonstrate the application of theory to practice and to provide opportunities for students to develop their skills of analysis and decision- making It is anticipated that a range of audio-visual materials will be used to support the sessions. Additionally, it is envisaged that speakers will also be able to provide some input on to the programme. Assessment Methods and Weightings Assessment will consist of an in-course assessment, worth 30% of total module marks, and an end-of-module examination for the remaining 70% of marks. Sources Keegan, W and Schlegelmilch, B (2001), Global Marketing Management, Pearson, England Doole, I and Lowe, R (1999), International Marketing Strategy, Thomson, London 5
  • 62. 6 Jain, S (2001), International Marketing, 6e, Thomson, Cincinnati Hennessey, J (2001), Global Marketing Strategies, 5e, Houghton Mifflin, Boston Preliminary study Students planning to take ‘Designing Global Marketing Strategies’ may find it useful, before the start of the semester, to review their marketing concepts by reading through a core text on marketing, such as Kotler, P. (2000) Marketing Management, 10e Pearson, or to start reading one of the indicated texts. 6
  • 63. 7 i Students registering for Strategic Marketing will normally have previously passed 3 other core modules of the MA Marketing Management ii Students will not normally be permitted to register for the Dissertation module unless they have previously passed three other core modules of the MA Marketing Management 7

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