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    • IBM3713 International Management 2/2009 ASSUMPTION UNIVERSITY MARTIN DE TOURS SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT OF INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT SYLLABUS 2/2009 Course Title IBM3713 International Management IBM2702 International Business Management Prerequisite IBM3711 Comparative Management Lecturer; A.Yanida Siamwalla Office Location; SR340 E-mail address yadasiam@gmail.com International Management is concerned with management of assets and operations beyond the borders of one’s home country. This course focuses Course Description on managers’ fundamental responsibilities for planning, organizing, leading and controlling firms’ activities across cultures. C To provide students with an integrative learning to understand that globalization intertwined into international business environments g To enable students to explore international environments and the Course Objectives impacts of international managers practices and strategies i To help students develop the analytical and decision-making skills needed to formulate and implement successful strategies to help firm achieve competitiveness in global markets Cullen J.B. & Parboteeah, K.P. (2008). Multinational Management A Required Textbook Strategic Approach (4th Ed.). Ohio: Thomson South Western. Ball D.A., Frantz P. L., Geringer J.M. & Minor M.S. (2004). International Business: The Challenge of Global Competition. Boston: McGraw-Hill. Czinkota M. R., Ronkainen I. A., & Moffett M. H. (2002). International Business (6th Ed.). Ohio: Thomson South Western. References Shenkar O. & Luo Y. (2004). International Business. New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons. Wild J. J., Wild K. L. & Han J. C. Y. (2003). International Business (2nd Ed.). New Jersey: Prentice Hall. REQUIREMENTS/MARK ALLOCATION: Class Participation and In-Class Assignments 5% Group Case Discussion and Presentation 20% Group Project and Presentation 15% Mid-Term Examination* 25% Comprehensive Final Examination* 35% TOTAL 100% * The students will not be admitted to the quizzes, mid-term exam, and final exam later than 10 minutes after quizzes and exams start. CLASS PARTICIPATION AND IN-CLASS ASSIGNMENTS (5%) In order to get five percent of class participation, students should come to class on a regular basis and contribute to class discussions. Students should show evidence of adequate preparation (i.e., having read and understood the assigned materials). Additionally, the students should contribute to the learning of the class through appropriate, relevant comments that relate to and build on what others are saying 1
    • IBM3713 International Management 2/2009 GROUP CASE DISCUSSION AND PRESENTATION (20%) Students will form a team of 6 members who are in the same section. Cases will be assigned to each team and will be professionally presented and discussed in depth. Each group will be assigned the group number and the set of cases accordingly. Everyone in the class is expected to be familiar with all cases assigned in class, and be ready to discuss relevant issues found in the cases. This means that teams not presenting are also required to address all case discussion questions, share your ideas, and provide constructive comments on the presentations given by other teams. Each team is evaluated based on its ability to generate more interesting discussions, and its contribution towards other students’ learning and understanding of the course materials. PREPARATION OF THE TYPE-WRITTEN CASE DISCUSSION* Each team is required to hand in a type-written case discussion (5-page, double-spaced, 1-inch margins on all sides, 12-point font Times News Roman or equivalent). Your case write-up should include, but not limit to the following items: 1. Situation Analysis. Apply relevant tools (e.g., SWOT, PEST, and Five Forces Analyses) to briefly describe general environmental, industry, competitor, and internal analyses based on the information from the case. 2. Case Discussion Questions. Address all questions raised at the end of each case. Justify your answers based on the information from the case and try to apply the concepts and frameworks studied in the class to clarify the issues and support your position. In addressing and discussing each of the issues, you need to show your thorough understanding of the international management concepts and frameworks covered in the course. * The cases assigned in this course are designed to familiarize students with international management issues and to help students to gain better understanding of international management concepts and frameworks. They are NOT designed for case study approach in which students are required to analyze the problems strategically and propose specific recommendation and action plans. CASE PRESENTATION GUIDELINES 1. Time allotted: 15 minutes presentation for each agency; 15 minutes for Q & A. 2. Use PowerPoint and other visual aids 3. Each member must take part in the oral presentation and will be evaluated based on the following five criteria a. Content: ideas (novelty, clarity), value of content, logic/reasoning, justification b. Presentation style: personal appearance (posture, expression), speaking (articulation, projection), energy, interest, audience contact c. Organization: opening and concluding remarks, flow of ideas, teamwork d. Mechanics: grammar, gestures, pace of speech e. Use of media: linking media with speaking, linking media with other media (if applicable), knowledgeable handling of media, general appearance of media materials (legibility, layout) 4. Be prepared to handle questions and constructive criticism. GROUP PROJECT AND PRESENTATION (15%) You are required to form a group of 6 individuals to work on a term project, dealing specifically with the development of a comprehensive international strategic plan for a multinational corporation planning to expand internationally. This plan will cover several issues encountered by a multinational company, such as the analysis and selection of international markets, the evaluation and selection of entry modes, the formulation and implementation of international strategy and structure, and international human resource management. The detailed outline and project written guideline will be distributed by your instructor in class by the end of the third week. 2
    • IBM3713 International Management 2/2009 TERMINATION OF ONE OR MORE TEAM MEMBERS To terminate one or more of your team members, all other team members must agree with the termination and submit a signed statement describing why your team member(s) has been terminated to your instructor and to the individual being dismissed. Individuals who are dismissed from their group have two choices: 1) complete a project and any other group work on their own, or 2) join another group in the class. Termination letters should first be presented to the instructor and should be professionally written. GROUP PROJECT PRESENTATION GUIDELINES 1. Time allotted: 20 minutes presentation for each agency; 10 minutes for Q & A. 2. Use PowerPoint and other visual aids 3. Each member must take part in the oral presentation and will be evaluated based on the following five criteria a. Content: ideas (novelty, clarity), value of content, logic/reasoning, justification b. Presentation style: personal appearance (posture, expression), speaking (articulation, projection), energy, interest, audience contact c. Organization: opening and concluding remarks, flow of ideas, teamwork d. Mechanics: grammar, gestures, pace of speech e. Use of media: linking media with speaking, linking media with other media (if applicable), knowledgeable handling of media, general appearance of media materials (legibility, layout) 4. Be prepared to handle questions and constructive criticism. EXAMINATIONS (60%) To minimize grading disparity between groups of students taking the regular set examination papers and those missing the test and requesting a make-up examination, no make-up examinations will be offered regardless of students’ reasons. It is each students primary responsibility to ascertain the subject’s examination schedule with the Registrar’s Office, prepare for the examination from the beginning of the semester, take good care of their health before the examination date, and arrange their business trips and meetings for continuing program sections. Furthermore, on the examination day, as a precaution, always give extra time on the road so as to avoid traffic and accidents. CLASS MANAGEMENT POLICIES C Students have to strictly follow the dress code and attendance policy of the University. S Any sort of class disturbance such as walking in and out between lectures, use of mobile phones, socializing with classmates after class has begun are strictly prohibited. p Section surfing is not permitted under any circumstances. Students must attend the registered section. r Plagiarism is not tolerated and will result in “F” grade for the course. STUDENT GRADE INQUIRIES: Every student enrolled in a course has the right to review his/her performance scores and examinations. Any student who would like to make a grade inquiry must fill out a petition form signed by A. Radha S., IBM chairperson or the respective course lecturer, and submit it to the Martin de Tours School of Management (CL 27 at Suvarnabhumi Campus or Blg. D. 6th Floor at Huamark Campus) within 14 days after the semester grades have been announced. 3
    • IBM3713 International Management 2/2009 TENTATIVE CLASS SCHEDULE Session Topics Covered Introduction; Style of Referencing; Discussion of Term Project; Group Formation 1 Chapter 1: Multinational Management in a Changing World Chapter 2: Culture and Multinational Management 2 Chapters 3: The Institutional Context of Multinational Management Chapter 5: Strategic Management in the Multinational Company: Content and 3 Formulation Presentation – STS Manufacturing in China: Mark Hanson Returns from Vacation 4 page 181-190 Presentation – McDonald’s in India page 191-218 Presentation –Harley-Davidson and the International Market for Luxury Goods 5 page 247-257 Chapter 6: Multinational and Participation Strategies: content and formulation Presentation – Transition at Whirlpool-Tatramat: From Joint Venture to Acquisition page 297-307 6 Chapter 7: Small Businesses and International Entrepreneurship: overcoming barriers and finding opportunities Presentation – Skoda Auto (The Czech Carmaker) page 351-361 7 Presentation – The Fleet Sheet page 362-372 Presentation –Airview Mapping, Inc. page 338-350 8 Chapter 8: Organizational Designs for Multinational Companies 9 Term Project Presentation (only Internal and External Environmental Analysis Part) 10 Review for mid-term examination MIDTERM EXAMINATION (Chapter 1, 2, 3, 5, 6 , 7 8) Date: 5th January, 2010; Time: 15:00-17:00 Chapter 9: International Strategic Alliances: Design and Management 11 Chapter 10: Multinational E-Commerce: Strategies and Structures Chapter 11: International Human Resource Management 12 Chapter 12: HRM in the Local Context: Knowing when and how to adapt Presentation – PBS (B): The ABB PBS Joint Venture in Operation page450-454 13 Presentation – Management Appraisal at Attock Refinery Limited page606-622 14 Chapter 14: Motivation in Multinational Companies Presentation – Chiba International, Inc. page 725-732 15 Chapter 15: Leadership and Management Behavior in Multinational Companies COMPREHENSIVE FINAL EXAMINATION Date: 24th February, 2010; Time: 13:00-16:00 Note: This class schedule is subject to modification. Please re-check the exam time and dates again at the Registrar Office. Group 1 Group 2 Group 3 Group 4 Group 5 STS McDonald STS McDonald Skoda Auto Manufacturing Manufacturing Harley-Davidson Whirlpool- Harley-Davidson Whirlpool- Airview Mapping Tatramat Tatramat Airview Fleet Sheet Skoda Auto Fleet Sheet Attock Refinery Mapping Attock Refinery ABB PBS Chiba ABB PBS Chiba International International 4
    • IBM3713 International Management 2/2009 Martin de Tours School of Management Vision and Mission Vision: To be the leading international business school in the ASEAN region providing high quality business education to enable graduates to make invaluable contributions to organization and society. Mission: To shape our students into independent-minded graduates who are well-versed in business, able to communicate effectively, tech savvy, innovative, and ethical to successfully face global challenges. AU Dress Code Requirement DRESS CODE REGULATIONS FOR CLASS Students are required to wear proper attire in their classroom. Students wearing the following items will not be allowed to check their class attendance: i Trousers and skirts made of jeans, corduroy, or velvet materials, or made in “jeans design.” T Shirts / blouses in which the edges are not tucked inside trousers or skirts. S Slippers. DRESS CODE REGULATIONS FOR EXAMINATIONS Students are obligated to wear the University’s full uniform as stipulated in the University’s dress code regulations to take examinations. Failure to comply with the regulation will result in students not being allowed to appear for examinations, and subsequently, the student receiving “0” marks for the examination. To be eligible to appear for exams, students are required to: T Wear full uniform: Male students must wear black or dark blue trousers, white button/collared shirt, black shoes, University neck-tie, and belt buckle. s Female students must wear black or dark blue skirt, white button/collared shirt, clack shoes, and University buttons, pin, and belt buckle. This is to inform all AU students that during the University’s office hours (08.00 – 17.00) of any regular semester, students on the University’s premise, irrespective of their reasons, are obligated to strictly observe the University’s dress code, i.e. tucking their shirts or blouses in their trousers or skirts respectively, and not wearing slippers and trousers or skirts made from jeans, corduroy and velvet. Violating the dress code will subject the students to the following terms of punishment. 1. Violating the code in the classroom will result in: V Confiscation of students’ ID cards and submission of the cards to the Office of Vice President for Students’ Affairs for record and punitive actions purposes; P Deduction of their “classroom conduct” marks allotted by their lecturers, if any, submission of their names to the Office of Vice President for Students’ Affairs, and compulsory acknowledgement of their dress code violation by their parents at the Student Affairs’ Disciplinary Unit (also see details No. 4); Their dismissal from the class together with the deletion of their class attendance for that particular class. 2. Not observing the code in front of the classroom will subject the students in the premise to: t Verbal warning from lecturers and/or security guards, or V Confiscation of students’ ID cards and submission of the cards to the Office of Vice President for Students’ Affairs for record and other disciplinary actions purposes (also see details No.4). 5
    • IBM3713 International Management 2/2009 3. Breaching the dress code on “campus”, including the “CL plaza”, will result in confiscation of students’ ID cards and submission of the cards to the Office of Vice President for Students’ Affairs for record and disciplinary actions purposes (also see details No.4). 4. Students with 2-violation records will be required to bring their parents for a compulsory acknowledgement of their dress code violation at the Student Affairs’ Disciplinary Unit. Failure to comply with the requirement will result in the students being debarred from the enrollment in the following semester. e Please note that all AU students are obligated to carry the University’s student ID cards at all times while on the campus’s premise, hence failure to comply with the requirement, irrespective of their reasons, will subject the students to a fine of up to 200 baht. 2 Please note that before the commencement of the first lesson in the semester, lecturers are obligated to inform students in their classes of the necessity in observing the dress code as well as the aforementioned punishments that will be rendered to students defying the code. Office of Vice President for Academic Affairs EXAM TIME CONFLICT To minimize grading disparity between groups of students taking the regular set examination papers and those missing the test and requesting a make-up examination, no make-up examinations will be offered regardless of students’ reasons. It is each students primary responsibility to ascertain the subject’s examination schedule with the Registrar’s Office, prepare for the examination from the beginning of the semester, take good care of their health before the examination date, and arrange their business trips and meetings for continuing program sections. Furthermore, on the examination day, as a precaution, always give extra time on the road so as to avoid traffic and accidents. MINIMUM PASSING REQUIREMENT To ensure the students have acquired sufficient understanding of XXXX concepts and its applications, it is essential that their performance in both mid-term and final examinations results in scores of 50% or higher from a total of 45 marks. This minimum score also serves as the minimum to earn a letter grade of “C”. To minimize the effect of subjectivity when assigning participation and project marks on the student’s final grade – i.e. one lecturer being somewhat different from the others in assessing student’s ability to answer or participate in class discussions – a grade of “C” would only be assigned on the basis of students’ performance in mid-term and final examinations. Their efforts in class discussions, participation and/or quizzes would reflect their overall performance and hence determine whether they deserve a better grade, i.e. “A” or “B”. CLASS ATTENDANCE In compliance with the University’s policy on class attendance, the ABAC School of Management requires all students enrolling in courses offered by the School, to obtain a minimum of 80% class attendance to be eligible to sit and take the final examination. The 20% absence is the maximum number of allowable absences. It is inclusive for all excuses, i.e., sickness, personal and family matters, business trips, and other personal reasons. It is therefore, the student’s primary responsibility to determine the necessity and ascertain the number of times of their absences. For a 3-credit hour subject, with one-and-a-half hour, students are allowed to miss the class 6 times, and with 3 hours class, they can be absent 3 times. It is always desirable for students to reserve at least 2 allowable absences for some unanticipated situations, i.e. sickness or business trips that might result in their absences. Generally speaking, as they have paid tuition fees for 45-hour class (for 3-credit hour subject), students should not be missing any classes in order to obtain maximum value for what they have paid for. It is always arguable whether class attendance has any correlation with passing or failing a subject. Nonetheless, it is the student’s effective time management and discipline to attend 6
    • IBM3713 International Management 2/2009 classes that enable them to meet minimum attendance requirements and thus appear for the final examination. It is not up to the students to decide whether a lecture is too simple and hence, not necessary to attend. On the contrary, it is the students’ primary duty to provide feedback to the concerned Department Chairperson regarding the perceived poor performance of their lecturers, i.e. not being punctual, not preparing well for class, not using English in class, and being too critical for class evaluation at the end of the semester. Automatic Withdrawal Without Students’ Consent The Dean, Department Chairperson, and Lecturer of this subject are empowered to withdraw or withhold correction of the final examination papers from students lacking class attendance requirements without the students’ consent. Submission of Class Attendance Reports The School of Management requires all full-time and part-time lecturers to submit their class attendance reports weekly. As such, all the alterations of class attendance records – should there be any errors in the record – it must be made with the concerned lecturer before the report is submitted to the School of Management. Once the report is submitted, the record is finalized and will not be changed. Three Warnings To give students adequate warning regarding their absences, Lecturers are suggested to give students three warnings on their 3rd, 5th, and 6th absence – in case their class is one-and-a-half hours and two warnings on their 2nd and 3rd absence – if the lecture is a 3 hour class. Please keep in mind that this is not the mandatory policy of the School of Management, hence students are obligated to regularly check with their lecturers on the number of their absences. Class attendance can only be checked for the section the student is registered in: Students are not allowed to ask lecturers to check their attendance in sections other than the one they have enrolled in. Nonetheless, to give students an opportunity to catch-up classes that they have missed or to review certain topics they did not understand, students are permitted to audit lectures in other sections, given that the lecturer of the section grants permission. Please keep in mind that the permission of the Lecturer to audit his/her lecture in other sections does not imply that students can receive class attendance in those sections – there is no such thing as ‘make-up class attendance.’ LATE WITHDRAWAL February 1st, 2010:- Last day to withdraw with “W” is the examination date. Students who would like to drop the subject on the subject’s final examination date SHOULD NOT enter the examination room and request for their late-withdrawal permission from the Dean or Department Chairperson and submit the request to the Office of the Registrar within three days after the date of the final examination. 7
    • IBM3713 International Management Project Guideline 2/2009 Group Project Guideline The purposes of this term project are three-fold. Firstly, the project is designed to give students an opportunity to develop a complete analysis of international environment and competitive landscape in global arena for a multinational company planning to expand internationally. Secondly, it aims to help students understand key international management issues encountered by a multinational company, such as the analysis and selection of international markets, the evaluation and selection of entry modes, the formulation and implementation of international strategy and structure, and international human resource management. Finally, the project provides students an opportunity to develop a comprehensive international management plan for a multinational company’s overseas expansion. Instruction Choose one industry from the following list, search for a company from http://www.thaitrade.com/AboutDEP/AboutWebSite/thailandcompany. Then evaluate at least three of the following countries, and prepare a complete international management plan (based on the structure provided below) to present to the CEO of the firm. Industry List Country List Furniture Australia Gifts and Decorative Items Middle East Pet and Farming Products Canada Machinery/Equipment Russia Bag/Footware/Leather Products South Africa Watch/Clock France Gems and Jewelry Germany Food Japan The structure below is merely a suggestion since product and industry characteristics may dictate different formats. 1. Table of Contents. 2. Executive Summary. This summary is written with the firm's CEO in mind. It must encapsulate in one page the purpose of your study, major conclusions, and recommended courses of action. 3. Corporate Background. In this section briefly profile the firm, its history and the nature of the product or service you are offering. a. Defining the business (1) Which industry or industries is the firm operating in? • Define the company’s industry (2) Who are the customers? • Identify and segment target customers (3) Where does the company serve? • Define the company’s geographic scope (4) What needs are being satisfied by the company’s goods or services? • Define the company’s core products/services b. Identifying the company’s competitive advantages (1) What are the company’s distinctive competencies? • What resources does the company have? • What capabilities does the company possess? (2) Which generic strategy is currently used by the company? • Based on the value-chain analysis 1
    • IBM3713 International Management Project Guideline 2/2009 4. Situation Analysis. I. Country Analysis and Attractiveness Assessment – study of the market factors, macro-economic, political, social, technological and demographic trends that determine the attractiveness for your product and company in at least 3 potential markets/countries. Rank the countries based on their attractiveness and conclude with a specific recommendation of a country in which a firm should introduce the product. a. PEST Analysis II. Industry and Competitive Analyses- presentation of an objective view of the industry in a country your product will be marketed. It introduces management to key players in the industry, technologies, processes, markets, and critical developments. This takes into consideration both a global and regional perspectives. a. Analysis of an industry in which the company competes - Follow Porter’s Five Forces Model b. Analysis of key competitors—both global and domestic players in the selected markets • Detailed analysis of the competitors in the industry. This should include an audit of at least two key competitors in the selected market/country. III. Company Situation- It describes the key elements that characterize the company, its history, past and present performance, markets served, products offered, international experience, present situation, etc. This is a relatively detailed study of the company’s operation, strategies, and financial performance. a. Analysis of SWOT 5. International Strategic Plans a. International strategies - Which international strategy is recommended--multidomestic, transnational, international, or regional strategy? b. Participation strategies - A table indicating the various market entry options, including advantages and disadvantages of each entry mode would be useful. c. Organizational structure - Which organizational structure is recommended? d. International human resource management strategy - Identify the policy used by the company—ethnocentric, polycentric, regiocentric, or global. - Will you need an expatriate manager? Are the local nationals trained to do the work you need them to do? 6. Conclusions and Recommendations 7. References Please refer to American Psychology Association (APA) Publication Manual (5th Edition) for citation and referencing style. 8. Appendices a. Additional and necessary information used for your analyses must be provided in this section. 2
    • IBM3713 International Management Project Guideline 2/2009 Style and content issues a) Maximum length: 25 pages. i. All reports should be on plain white A-4 paper. ii. The table of contents and appendices are not included in the limit. b) Format: i. Double-spaced text with 1-inch margins on all sides. ii. 12 point font Times New Roman or equivalent. iii. Follow APA 5th edition for general guidelines c) Cover page: i. Names of team members only on the front cover. ii. Stapled, no fancy binding or covers d) Style i. Professional ii. High visual quality iii. Quality visual support –- diagrams, charts, tables, pictures, photos Submission of your project You are required to submit your project both in the forms of hard copy (paper report and PowerPoint Printout) and soft copy (MS Word and MS PowerPoint files) according to the deadline set by your instructor. Here are some additional thoughts on key project activities: Country Analysis and Attractiveness Assessment - Start by putting together a brief overview of the country with the purpose of introducing them to management. Place special emphasis on traits that have an impact on your product’s long term prospects. Next, collect data to identify and evaluate the potential market opportunity for the service/product in that country. Then use the following screening "filters" to select your target country: a. The first screening is conducted at the country level, and consists of indicators relating to the general business environment, for example, GDP, population size, rate of inflation GDP growth, political risk, etc. The specific indicators should be tailored to the product selected as well as the company's objectives. Data on these indicators can be obtained from secondary data sources such as the World Bank Development Report, Economist.com and CIA The World Factbook, etc. b. The second screening addresses the socio, cultural, and political environment. The purpose is to assess the “fit” of the product/service with the society. The information must be more than a collection of facts and anecdotes. You must be able to present an analysis of how values, beliefs and other aspects of the culture have an impact on market behavior. In order to obtain this information you must utilize secondary as well as primary sources, i.e. interviewing students on campus, peoples from the country you are assigned to, visiting ethnic stores, conducting focus groups, watching films, etc. c. Examine the strategic ‘fit’ between the company and the markets, and the company’s ability to leverage its capabilities in the new markets. Recommend the country with the best ‘fit’, and develop a convincing justification. Important Notice Plagiarism (i.e., copying someone’s work or copying word-by-word from the websites or other sources without proper citations) is NOT tolerated and will result in an ‘F’ grade for the course. Late submission of your project is subject to 50% mark deduction from your project score. 3