CALIFORNIA STATE POLYTECHNIC UNIVERSITY POMONA

                                  ACADEMIC SENATE

DATE:         July 26, ...
California State Polytechnic University Pomona
                                  Expanded Course Outline

Department Name:...
IV.   Text and References:

      Text Decision: by individual instructor

      This course must rely heavily on cases an...
VII.    Expanded Description of the Course and Instructional Methods:

        A.     Expanded Description of the Course:
...
SECTION B

Week                                        Theme/Topic
 #
 1   Course introduction
          Syllabus review
...
6     Cost management
           Target costing
           Kaizen costing
           Life-cycle costing
           Sug...
Goal                                       Class Contact Hours*
Capacity to lead in organizational situations.            ...
California State Polytechnic University, Pomona
                            Expanded Course Outline

       Department Nam...
Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:

      1.   Demonstrate understanding of the foundation of int...
V.     Special or Unique Student Materials:

       Internet access


VII.   Special or Unique University Facilities:

   ...
Internal Control Evaluation Project and Presentation: 20%
Participation: 20%




                                   11
SECTION B

    Week #                               Theme/Topic
1            The Engagement
               • Management’s ...
7                      Testing and Evaluating Activity Level Controls
                          • Assessing the Effectiven...
and informal business situations and using technology-based
tools to assist in the presentation and communication of
infor...
California State Polytechnic University, Pomona
                            Expanded Course Outline

       Department Nam...
V.     Special or Unique Student Materials:

       Internet access

VIII. Special or Unique University Facilities:

     ...
Week #                                         Theme/Topic
1                      Regulation of Financial Information
    ...
problems, and expedite business processes.
Demonstrate awareness of ethical responsibility to business              20
pro...
California State Polytechnic University Pomona
                                 Expanded Course Outline

Department Name: ...
IV.    Text and References:
       (Textbook Decision: By Instructor)

       This course should rely heavily on current j...
Several sessions are devoted to management control issues. By this, we mean
             “the process by which managers in...
o Land Securities Group plc
                o Machinery International
                o Standard International Inc.
3   In...
6    Management control issues (1 of 3)
        • Management Control Systems
        • Evolution of Control Measures
     ...
SECTION C: MASTER’S LEVEL GENERAL MANAGEMENT (AACSB STANDARDS)


                            Goal                         ...
California State Polytechnic University, Pomona
                            Expanded Course Outline

       Department Nam...
B.      Instructional Methods:

               On-the-job training

VIII. Methods of Evaluating Outcomes:

       Recommen...
problems, and expedite business processes.
Demonstrate awareness of ethical responsibility to business      No class conta...
California State Polytechnic University, Pomona
                            Expanded Course Outline

Department Name: Acco...
(Textbook Decision: By Instructor)

       Current accounting professional publications: e.g., Journal of Accountancy, etc...
XI.     Special or Unique University Facilities:


   ___Computer Lab               ___Computer Connection          ___“Sm...
SECTION B

Week                              Theme/Topic
  #
1      Review and discussion of Planning frameworks in accoun...
10      Synthesis of various frameworks in accounting
           • Project Case Presentations and discussions



         ...
Functional Areas. Respond strategically to the dynamic         3
nature of business to apply the fundamental concepts,
the...
California State Polytechnic University, Pomona
                             Expanded Course Outline

        Department N...
the managers of the organization, as well as the public.

IV.        Text and References:

           Textbook Decision: T...
VIII. Methods of Evaluating Outcomes:

         Recommended Evaluation Tools:

       Individual Paper: _20%      Tests & ...
• Communication among employees and volunteers
7                      Written Report of Findings
                         ...
Demonstrate awareness of ethical responsibility to business              30
professions and society.

Management-Specific ...
California State Polytechnic University, Pomona
                         Expanded Course Outline

       Department Name: ...
Internet access

XIII. Special or Unique University Facilities:

        Internet access

VII.    Expanded Description of ...
Week #                                  Theme/Topic
1                  The Extent and Nature of Corporate Fraud
          ...
unpredictable environments.                                         20
Information technical skills as evidenced by an abi...
California State Polytechnic University, Pomona
                           Expanded Course Outline

      Department Name:...
IV.    Text and References:
       (Textbook Decision: By Department of Accounting Tax Course Coordinator)

             K...
Group Paper: ___%             Quizzes ___%             Team Project ___%
    Individual Presentation ___   Peer Evaluation...
•   Subtopic 1 Use of Flow Through Entities
                          •   Subtopic 2 Liquidations
                        ...
Functional Areas. Respond strategically to the dynamic
nature of business to apply the fundamental concepts,          15
t...
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  1. 1. CALIFORNIA STATE POLYTECHNIC UNIVERSITY POMONA ACADEMIC SENATE DATE: July 26, 2006 TO: Academic Programs FROM: Academic Senate Executive Committee SUBJECT: Academic Senate Referral 1. CLASSIFICATION: AP-001-067 2. TITLE: Master of Science in Accountancy 3. BACKGROUND: This proposal has the support of the Accounting Department faculty, Dean of the College of Business Administration, and the Graduate Council. An accounting emphasis has been offered under the MBA program for many years and the Department is interested in upgrading the emphasis to a full degree program. 4. RECOMMENDED RESOURCES: Glenda Brock, , Bob Hurt, Faculty of the Accounting Department; David Klock, Dean of the College of Business Administration; Claudia Pinter-Lucke; Donald Hoyt, AVP Research and Graduate Studies, College of Business Graduate Coordinator 5. REVIEW AND RECOMMEND: Review and recommend as appropriate. 6. DATE REQUIRED: November 1, 2006 1
  2. 2. California State Polytechnic University Pomona Expanded Course Outline Department Name: Accounting Prepared By: Nas Ahadiat, Bob Hurt & Anwar Salimi Course Title: Management Accounting Seminar Course Number: ACC 608 Date Prepared: October 13, 2005 Date Approved By Graduate Studies Committee: _________ SECTION A I. Catalog Description: ACC 608 Management Accounting Seminar (4 Units) Strategic management accounting and control issues, including cost determination and analysis, activity-based systems, budgeting, transfer pricing, performance evaluation, cost management and ethics. 4 lecture / discussion. Prerequisite: GBA 511 or equivalent. II. Required Background or Experience: A. Prerequisites: GBA 511 or equivalent B. Prerequisites Justification: Students need a basic understanding of accounting to succeed in this course. They will be extending and applying their knowledge in management accounting related contexts. III. Expected Outcomes: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Analyze current and classic issues in management accounting. 2. Respond effectively to unstructured problems and situations in the discipline. 3. Conduct original applied research focused on management accounting. 2
  3. 3. IV. Text and References: Text Decision: by individual instructor This course must rely heavily on cases and professional readings. Suitable periodicals include (but are not limited to): • Strategic Finance • Accounting, Management and Information Technologies • Management Accounting • Harvard Business Review • Accounting Review • Journal of Accountancy • CFO: Magazine for Senior Financial Executives For instructors wishing to incorporate a textbook, we suggest the following: • Management Control Systems by Anthony and Govindarajan. McGraw-Hill / Irwin. • Management Control Systems by Merchant and Van der Stede. Prentice-Hall. • Readings in Management Accounting by Young. Prentice-Hall. • Cost Management by Hilton, Maher & Selto. McGraw-Hill / Irwin. • Cost Management: A Strategic Emphasis by Blocher, Chen and Lin. McGraw-Hill / Irwin. V. Special or Unique Student Materials: None. VI. Special or Unique University Facilities: • Smart classroom • VCR • Moveable classroom furniture 3
  4. 4. VII. Expanded Description of the Course and Instructional Methods: A. Expanded Description of the Course: This course examines a broad set of management accounting and cost control issues through an applied, interdisciplinary lens. It incorporates real- life, unstructured problems, representative of those students would expect to encounter in their professional careers. Case analysis and original applied research are required elements of instruction. The topics considered in this course are interdisciplinary by nature, with the principal focus being on accounting. Concepts and ideas from other business disciplines, particularly management, may also be relevant. Students should be required to think critically as they analyze cases, participate in class discussions and conduct original applied research focused on their current employment environment. B. Instructional Methods: • Case analysis • Original applied research • Class discussion VIII. Methods of Evaluating Outcomes: Evaluation Tools: Individual Papers: 45% Tests & Exams ___% Individual Projects ___% Group Paper: ___% Quizzes ___% Team Projects ___% Individual Presentations ___% Peer Evaluation ___% Outside/Expert Evaluations ___% Group Presentation ___% Participation 45% Other: Highest of other two 10% 4
  5. 5. SECTION B Week Theme/Topic # 1 Course introduction  Syllabus review  Introduction to management control  Review of necessary accounting concepts o Financial statement purpose and structure o Costing systems o Cost-volume-profit analysis o Variance analysis 2 Activity-based systems  Activity-based costing  Activity-based management  Suggested cases (Harvard Business School Press) o ABM at Stream International o Indianapolis: Activity-Based Costing of City Services 3 Performance evaluation systems  Responsibility accounting  Balanced scorecard  Suggested cases (Harvard Business School Press) o Polaroid: Managing Environmental Responsibilities and Their Costs o Chadwick Inc.: The Balanced Scorecard o Boston Lyric Opera 4 Budgeting and variance analysis  Analysis of budgeting systems  Master budget  Interpretation of cost variances  Suggested cases (Harvard Business School Press) o Borealis o HCC Industries o Seattle Public Schools o Software Associates o Midwest Ice Cream 5 Student research proposals Working individually or with a partner, students should develop an original, applied research proposal addressing some management accounting related issue they’re currently facing. The proposal should include a well-developed research question, a discussion of its organizational context and an explanation of its importance. 5
  6. 6. 6 Cost management  Target costing  Kaizen costing  Life-cycle costing  Suggested cases (Harvard Business School Press) o Anagene Inc. o Olympus Optical Company Ltd. o San Francisco Giants 7 Cost Allocation  Purpose of allocation  Customer profitability  Sales variance  Suggested cases (Harvard Business School Press)  Bridgeton Industries: Automotive Component & Fabrication Plant  Kanthal (A and B)  Kansas City Zephyrs Baseball Club Inc. 8 Management control systems  Frameworks  Decentralization vs. centralization  Performance measurement  Suggested cases (Harvard Business School Press) o Airtex Aviation o Tots R Us 9 Transfer pricing  Organizational context  Common systems  Behavioral issues  Suggested cases (Harvard Business School Press) o Birch Paper Company o Sub-Micron Devices Inc. o Transfer Pricing at Timken 10 Student research discussion Working in small groups, students should discuss their original research papers. SECTION C: MASTER’S LEVEL GENERAL MANAGEMENT (AACSB STANDARDS) 6
  7. 7. Goal Class Contact Hours* Capacity to lead in organizational situations. 0 Capacity to apply knowledge in new and unfamiliar circumstances through a conceptual understanding of relevant disciplines. 40 Capacity to adapt and innovate to solve problems, to cope with unforeseen events, and to manage in unpredictable environments. 40 Information technical skills as evidenced by an ability to use current information technology to convey information, solve problems, and expedite business processes. 8 Demonstrate awareness of ethical responsibility to business professions and society. 20 Management-Specific Learning Goals Goal Class Contact Hours* Communicate. Effectively communicate, at the professional level, in both oral and written formats in a variety of formal and informal business situations and using technology-based tools to assist in the presentation and communication of information. 40 Relationships. Develop the relationships between business and its environments including stakeholders, competitors, industries, regulators, the technology and global environment, and society at large to formulate business strategy and represent it in the 28 form of business plans, explicitly incorporating ethics. Analyze. Analyze complex situations in a dynamic environment from a wide variety of perspectives; creatively identify a range of alternative responses; and assess the relative merits of each based on complex objective functions using appropriate techniques and 32 tools. Functional Areas. Respond strategically to the dynamic nature of business to apply the fundamental concepts, theories and practices of the major functional areas of business; have a strong basis for further independent learning in the functional areas; and to be 40 able to work effectively with functional specialists. Teams & Leadership. Develop and cultivate leadership skills, interpersonal skills and social competence necessary for individual and team effectiveness in complex 40 organizations. *Explanation of class contact hours: these hours are being collected as part of an AACSB requirement and will be used to assess our graduate program. 7
  8. 8. California State Polytechnic University, Pomona Expanded Course Outline Department Name: Accounting Prepared By: Rose Marie Martin Course Title: Internal Control and Corporate Governance Course Number: ACC 610 Date Prepared: 11-29-05 Date Approved By Graduate Studies Committee: __________ SECTION A I. Catalog Description: ACC 610 Internal Control and Corporate Governance (4) Presents the foundation of internal control theory accepted and promulgated by auditors and accountants. Supplemented by management implementation to achieve effective corporate governance. Includes best practices from preeminent companies that serve as benchmarks and models for evaluating and strengthening corporate governance. Seminar course with problem solving and case studies. III. Required Background or Experience: A. Prerequisites: Unconditional standing. B. Prerequisites Justification: Unconditional standing assures that the student has background knowledge of basic accounting concepts which is needed to understand the course materials. III. Expected Outcomes: 8
  9. 9. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to: 1. Demonstrate understanding of the foundation of internal control theory, i.e. COSO, COBIT. 2. Identify significant control objectives, both at the entity and activity control level. 3. Construct professional documentation to report and analyze the internal control environment using recommended auditor techniques. 4. Judge strengths and weaknesses within corporate business processes, from the auditor perspective. 5. Recognize red flags that signal the need for prompt investigation and action. 6. Produce a report of recommendations for management implementation, include specific suggestions tailored to an analysis of the corporate culture. 7. Appraise the manager’s role and responsibility for internal control systems. Explain how effective internal control improves corporate governance and profitability and empowers top company management (CEO, CFO). 8. Apply best practices from preeminent companies to case analysis. IV. Text and References: (Textbook Decision: By Instructor) Suggested texts: Sarbanes-Oxley and the Board of Directors : Techniques and Best Practices for Corporate Governance by Scott Green (July 15, 2005) How to Comply with Sarbanes-Oxley Section 404: Assessing the Effectiveness of Internal Control by Michael Ramos (2004) Corporate Governance : The McGraw-Hill Executive MBA Series by John L. Colley, et al (June 20, 2003) What Is Corporate Governance? (The Mcgraw-Hill What Is) by John L. Colley, et al (December 6, 2004) The Recurrent Crisis in Corporate Governance by Ira Millstein, Paul W. MacAvoy (September 15, 2004) A good resource for cases is www.itgovernance.org. This site has some excellent cases that are real and focus not only on IT issues but corporate infrastructure. 9
  10. 10. V. Special or Unique Student Materials: Internet access VII. Special or Unique University Facilities: Internet access VII. Expanded Description of the Course and Instructional Methods: A. Expanded Description of the Course: The course will begin with the foundation of internal control theory, (i.e. COSO, COBIT), that has been promulgated by accounting practitioners and professional managers. Students will then learn to identify significant control objectives, (both at the entity and activity control level), and to judge strengths and weaknesses within corporate business processes. The course will view internal control from both the auditor and management perspective. The management viewpoint includes the manager’s role and responsibility for internal control systems, and explains how effective internal control improves corporate governance and profitability and empowers top company management (CEO, CFO). The auditor perspective will include the recognition of red flags that signal the need for prompt investigation and action, the construction of professional documentation to report and analyze the internal control environment, and culminate with a report of recommendations for management implementation. This report will include specific suggestions tailored to an analysis of the corporate culture. Best practices from preeminent companies will be applied to case analysis. B. Instructional Methods: Seminar/discussion, problem solving and cases. Project and cases involving the analysis and reporting of internal control strengths and weaknesses, and recommendations for cure. This report should include specific suggestions for management implementation, tailored to an analysis of the corporate culture. VIII. Methods of Evaluating Outcomes: Recommended Evaluation Tools: Case Studies: 40% Final Exam: 20% 10
  11. 11. Internal Control Evaluation Project and Presentation: 20% Participation: 20% 11
  12. 12. SECTION B Week # Theme/Topic 1 The Engagement • Management’s Required Assessment of the Entity’s Internal Control • The Independent Auditor’s Reporting Responsibilities • A Structured Comprehensive Approach for Evaluating Internal Control 2 Internal Control Criteria • The Need for Control Criteria • The COSO Internal Control Integrated Framework • Controls over Information Technology Systems • Disclosure Controls and Procedures • Business Process Activities 3 Project Planning • The Objective of Planning • Information Sources • Structuring the Project Team • Coordinating with the Independent Auditors • Documenting Your Planning Decisions 4 Identifying Significant Control Objectives • Entity Level Control Objectives Presumed to be Significant • System Wide Monitoring • Identifying Significant Activity Level Control Objectives • Coordinating with the Independent Auditors • Map to the COSO framework 5 Documentation of Significant Controls • Documentation: What It Is… And is Not • Assessing the Adequacy of Existing Documentation • Documentation of Entity Level Control Policies and Procedures • Documenting Activity Level Controls • Coordinating with the Independent Auditors • Documentation Example 6 Testing and Evaluating Entity Level Controls • Internal Control Reliability Model • Overall Objective of Testing Entity Level Controls • Testing Techniques • Evaluating the Effectiveness of Entity Level Controls • Documenting Test Results • Survey tools • Example Inquiries of Management • Coordinating with the Independent Auditors • Guidance for Designing a Computer General Controls Review 12
  13. 13. 7 Testing and Evaluating Activity Level Controls • Assessing the Effectiveness of Design • Operating Effectiveness • Evaluating Test Results • Documentation of Test Procedures and Results • Coordinating with the Independent Auditors • Example Inquiries • Example Control Activities 8 Reporting • Annual and Quarterly Reporting Requirements • Expanded Reporting on Management’s Responsibilities for Internal Control • Coordinating with the Independent Auditors and Legal Counsel • Example Disclosures of a Material Weakness • Example Reports on Management’s Responsibilities for Reporting and Internal Control 9 Project Presentations 10 Exam SECTION C SECTION C: MASTER’S LEVEL GENERAL MANAGMENT (AACSB STANDARDS) Goal Class Contact Hours* Capacity to lead in organizational situations. 25 Capacity to apply knowledge in new and unfamiliar 25 circumstances through a conceptual understanding of relevant disciplines. Capacity to adapt and innovate to solve problems, to cope 30 with unforeseen events, and to manage in unpredictable environments. Information technical skills as evidenced by an ability to use 10 current information technology to convey information, solve problems, and expedite business processes. Demonstrate awareness of ethical responsibility to business 20 professions and society. Management-Specific Learning Goals Goal Class Contact Hours* Communicate. Effectively communicate, at the professional 30 level, in both oral and written formats in a variety of formal 13
  14. 14. and informal business situations and using technology-based tools to assist in the presentation and communication of information. Relationships. Develop the relationships between business 40 and its environments including stakeholders, competitors, industries, regulators, the technology and global environment, and society at large to formulate business strategy and represent it in the form of business plans, explicitly incorporating ethics. Analyze. Analyze complex situations in a dynamic 25 environment from a wide variety of perspectives; creatively identify a range of alternative responses; and assess the relative merits of each based on complex objective functions using appropriate techniques and tools. Functional Areas. Respond strategically to the dynamic 20 nature of business to apply the fundamental concepts, theories and practices of the major functional areas of business; have a strong basis for further independent learning in the functional areas; and to be able to work effectively with functional specialists. Teams & Leadership. Develop and cultivate leadership 10 skills, interpersonal skills and social competence necessary for individual and team effectiveness in complex organizations. *Explanation of class contact hours: these hours are being collected as part of an AACSB requirement and will be used to assess our graduate program. Revised 4/12/04 14
  15. 15. California State Polytechnic University, Pomona Expanded Course Outline Department Name: Accounting Prepared By: Vicki Peden Course Title: Assurance and Regulation in Accounting Course Number: ACC 620 Date Prepared: October 10, 2005 Date Approved By Graduate Studies Committee: __________ SECTION A I. Catalog Description: ACC 620 - Assurance and Regulation in Accounting (4) A managerial perspective on accounting assurance and regulatory requirements for all types of businesses. Emphasis on financial statement audits, public company requirements, other governmental regulation and internal auditing. Seminar course with problem solving and case studies. IV. Required Background or Experience: A. Prerequisites: Unconditional Standing B. Prerequisites Justification: Unconditional standing assures that the student has background knowledge of basic accounting concepts which is needed to understand the course materials. III. Expected Outcomes: Students will be able to identify and discuss the assurance and regulatory requirements they may encounter as professional accounting managers. Students will be able to prepare for these requirements and manage available resources to satisfy these requirements. Students will identify and discuss the ethical implications of these requirements. Students will apply and evaluate the implications of assurance and regulation to a particular type of business through a business project. IV. Text and References: (Textbook Decision: By Instructor) Contemporary Auditing: Real Issues and Cases, Knapp, ISBN 032418834x The Securities and Exchange Commission: Background Issues and Bibliography. Wilder, ISBN 1590333624 Current Auditing/Assurance textbook. Selected articles from current periodicals. 15
  16. 16. V. Special or Unique Student Materials: Internet access VIII. Special or Unique University Facilities: Internet access VII. Expanded Description of the Course and Instructional Methods: A. Expanded Description of the Course: The course will address the types of assurance, regulations and other requirements that professional accounting managers may encounter. It will include the basics of financial statement auditing, the impact of the audit process on the organization, the additional reporting requirements for public companies, the uses of the internal audit function, requirements for not-for-profit entities and a survey of regulatory requirements for various industries. Ethical implications of audits and regulation are highlighted throughout the course. B. Instructional Methods: Seminar/discussion, problem solving and cases. Project on regulatory and other requirements for specific industries relevant to student interest. VIII. Methods of Evaluating Outcomes: Recommended Evaluation Tools: Case studies: 40% Final Exam 20% Industry Regulation Project and Presentation: 20% Participation 20% SECTION B 16
  17. 17. Week # Theme/Topic 1 Regulation of Financial Information • Introduction • Sources of Regulation 2 Financial Statement Auditing • Impact on Organizations • Opinions and Liability 3 Financial Statement Auditing • Ethics • Planning and Materiality 4 Financial Statement Auditing • Transaction Cycle Approach • Completing the Audit 5 Public Company Requirements • Securities and Exchange Commission • History and Requirements 6 Public Company Requirements • Sarbanes Oxley Act • Public Company Accounting Oversight Board 7 Internal Auditing • Management Objectives • Types of Engagements 8 Not-For-Profit Regulation • Government Agencies • IRS 9 Special Industry Regulation • Sources of Industry Regulation • Heavily Regulated Industries 10 Student Project Presentations SECTION C SECTION C: MASTER’S LEVEL GENERAL MANAGMENT (AACSB STANDARDS) Goal Class Contact Hours* Capacity to lead in organizational situations. 25 Capacity to apply knowledge in new and unfamiliar 25 circumstances through a conceptual understanding of relevant disciplines. Capacity to adapt and innovate to solve problems, to cope 30 with unforeseen events, and to manage in unpredictable environments. Information technical skills as evidenced by an ability to use 10 current information technology to convey information, solve 17
  18. 18. problems, and expedite business processes. Demonstrate awareness of ethical responsibility to business 20 professions and society. Management-Specific Learning Goals Goal Class Contact Hours* Communicate. Effectively communicate, at the professional 30 level, in both oral and written formats in a variety of formal and informal business situations and using technology-based tools to assist in the presentation and communication of information. Relationships. Develop the relationships between business 40 and its environments including stakeholders, competitors, industries, regulators, the technology and global environment, and society at large to formulate business strategy and represent it in the form of business plans, explicitly incorporating ethics. Analyze. Analyze complex situations in a dynamic 25 environment from a wide variety of perspectives; creatively identify a range of alternative responses; and assess the relative merits of each based on complex objective functions using appropriate techniques and tools. Functional Areas. Respond strategically to the dynamic 20 nature of business to apply the fundamental concepts, theories and practices of the major functional areas of business; have a strong basis for further independent learning in the functional areas; and to be able to work effectively with functional specialists. Teams & Leadership. Develop and cultivate leadership 10 skills, interpersonal skills and social competence necessary for individual and team effectiveness in complex organizations. *Explanation of class contact hours: these hours are being collected as part of an AACSB requirement and will be used to assess our graduate program. Revised 4/12/04 18
  19. 19. California State Polytechnic University Pomona Expanded Course Outline Department Name: Accounting Course Title: International Accounting Issues Prepared By: Bob Hurt & Anwar Salimi Course Number: ACC 630 Date Prepared: October 13, 2005 Date Approved By Graduate Studies Committee: __________ SECTION A I. Catalog Description: ACC 630 International Accounting Issues (4) Exploration of international accounting issues from interdisciplinary, managerial perspectives. Comparative accounting across national borders. Harmonization and evaluation of international accounting standards. Foreign exchange. Mergers, acquisitions and business valuation. Ethics. Management control issues in international contexts. 4 lecture/problem-solving. Prerequisite: unconditional standing V. Required Background or Experience: a. Prerequisites: Unconditional standing b. Prerequisite justification: Unconditional standing assures that the student has background knowledge of basic accounting concepts which is needed to understand the course materials. III. Expected Outcomes: Upon completion of this course, students should be able to: a. Explain the process of international accounting standard setting. b. Summarize and evaluate selected international accounting standards. c. Discuss and demonstrate foreign exchange principles, including hedging. d. Evaluate international considerations in mergers, acquisitions and business valuation projects. e. Develop practical, viable solutions to management control issues in international enterprises. f. Respond to ethical issues in international accounting. 19
  20. 20. IV. Text and References: (Textbook Decision: By Instructor) This course should rely heavily on current journal articles and cases in the field. Recognizing, however, that some instructors may want to include a traditional textbook, we offer the following suggestions: a. Texts i. International Accounting by Choi and Meek. Prentice-Hall. ii. International Accounting: A User Perspective by Saudagaran. South- Western. iii. International Accounting and Multinational Enterprises by Radebaugh and Gray. Wiley. b. Journals i. International Journal of Accounting ii. International Journal of Digital Accounting Research iii. Journal of International Accounting Research iv. Journal of International Accounting, Auditing and Taxation V. Special or Unique Student Materials: • None IX. Special or Unique University Facilities: • Smart classroom • Moveable classroom furniture VII. Expanded Description of the Course and Instructional Methods: A. Expanded Description of the Course: This course examines common issues in international accounting from an interdisciplinary managerial perspective. While it will include some background in technical areas (such as foreign currency translation and IASC standards), the primary focus should be on developing viable solutions to common accounting problems in international contexts. The course must incorporate case discussions and original research as primary methods of instruction. 20
  21. 21. Several sessions are devoted to management control issues. By this, we mean “the process by which managers influence members of the organization to implement the organization’s strategies efficiently and effectively.” (Anthony, R., D. Hawkins and K. Merchant. Accounting: Text and Cases (11th edition). Irwin / McGraw-Hill, 2004.) Management control issues are broad and interdisciplinary by nature, crossing the boundaries of traditional academic disciplines such as management, information systems and finance. B. Instructional Methods: • Lecture / discussion • Collaborative learning • Original research VIII. Methods of Evaluating Outcomes: Evaluation Tools: Individual Paper: 30% Tests & Exams __% Individual Project ___% Group Paper: __% Quizzes ___% Team Project __% Individual Presentation ___ Peer Evaluation ___% Outside/Expert Evaluations % ___% Group Presentation 30% Participation 30% Other: Highest of other three___10% SECTION B Week # Theme/Topic 1 Introduction to course • Syllabus review • Overview of international accounting issues, standards and standard setting processes 2 International accounting standards: concepts • IASC and related organizations • Politics of standard setting • Critique process for international accounting standards • Suggested cases (Harvard Business School Press) o The IAS 39 Carve-Out 21
  22. 22. o Land Securities Group plc o Machinery International o Standard International Inc. 3 International accounting standards: details Working in groups, students should select a current IAS pronouncement. They should prepare an oral presentation which discusses the content of the standard, proposes alternatives to it, compares it to any related US GAAP and evaluates the costs and benefits of the standard. 4 Foreign exchange concepts and transactions • Floating exchange rate determinants • Foreign currency risks • Hedging • Suggested cases (Harvard Business School Press) o Advising on Currency Risk at ICICI Bank o Foreign Exchange Hedging Strategies at General Motors o Hedging Currency Risks at AIFS o Exchange Rate Policy at the Monetary Authority of Singapore o The Euro-Dollar Decision o Dozier Industries 5 International Business Combinations and Consolidations • Consolidated Financial Statements • Valuation of international enterprises • Suggested cases (Harvard Business School Press) o Nestle and Alcon o The Royal Bank of Scotland: Masters of Integration 22
  23. 23. 6 Management control issues (1 of 3) • Management Control Systems • Evolution of Control Measures • Internal Control • Suggested cases (James Schweikart: International Accounting: A Case Approach) o Implex Corporation o WhyCave International o EuroMachine Company 7 Management control issues (2 of 3) • Financing considerations in international ventures • Global expansion of existing organizations • Government regulation and intervention • Suggested cases (Harvard Business School Press) o Aluminum Bahrain (Alba) o Shurgard Self-Storage: Expansion to Europe o Stakeholder Analysis: Enron and the Dabhol Power Project in India o Capital Controls in Chile in the 1990s 8 Management control issues (3 of 3) • Performance evaluation and budgeting • Transfer pricing and taxation • Suggested cases (James Schweikart: International Accounting: A Case Approach) o The Ameripill Company o Global Enterprises 9 Ethics • Ethical decision making frameworks • Interaction of national culture and ethics • Suggested cases (Harvard Business School Press) o International Rivers Network and the Bujagali Dam Project o Becton Dickinson: Ethics and Business Practices o Divesting the Zambian Mining Industry 10 Country reports Working individually or in groups, students should select a focus country of interest to them. They should analyze the country’s historical, social and political environment, as well as the status of its economy and markets. The culmination of their work should be a written and / or oral report to the class. 23
  24. 24. SECTION C: MASTER’S LEVEL GENERAL MANAGEMENT (AACSB STANDARDS) Goal Class Contact Hours* Capacity to lead in organizational situations. 0 Capacity to apply knowledge in new and unfamiliar circumstances through a conceptual understanding of relevant disciplines. 40 Capacity to adapt and innovate to solve problems, to cope with unforeseen events, and to manage in unpredictable environments. 40 Information technical skills as evidenced by an ability to use current information technology to convey information, solve problems, and expedite business processes. 8 Demonstrate awareness of ethical responsibility to business professions and society. 4 Management-Specific Learning Goals Goal Class Contact Hours* Communicate. Effectively communicate, at the professional level, in both oral and written formats in a variety of formal and informal business situations and using technology-based tools to assist in the presentation and communication of information. 40 Relationships. Develop the relationships between business and its environments including stakeholders, competitors, industries, regulators, the technology and global environment, and society at large to formulate business strategy and represent it in the 32 form of business plans, explicitly incorporating ethics. Analyze. Analyze complex situations in a dynamic environment from a wide variety of perspectives; creatively identify a range of alternative responses; and assess the relative merits of each based on complex objective functions using appropriate techniques and 36 tools. Functional Areas. Respond strategically to the dynamic nature of business to apply the fundamental concepts, theories and practices of the major functional areas of business; have a strong basis for further independent learning in the functional areas; and to be 40 able to work effectively with functional specialists. Teams & Leadership. Develop and cultivate leadership skills, interpersonal skills and social competence necessary for individual and team effectiveness in complex 40 organizations. *Explanation of class contact hours: these hours are being collected as part of an AACSB requirement and will be used to assess our graduate program. 24
  25. 25. California State Polytechnic University, Pomona Expanded Course Outline Department Name: Accounting Course Title: Internship in Accounting Prepared By: Vicki Peden Course Number: ACC 650 Date Prepared: October 19, 2005 Date Approved By Graduate Studies Committee: __________ SECTION A I. Catalog Description: ACC 650 - Internship in Accounting (4). On-the-job training in accounting involving new masters-level learning experiences. Prerequisite: permission of the Director of the Accounting Graduate Program. VI. Required Background or Experience: A. Prerequisites: Permission of the Director of the Accounting Graduate Program. B. Prerequisites Justification: Needed to insure that the on-the-job training will give student the appropriate professional experience. III. Expected Outcomes: Demonstrate and apply concepts from accounting courses. Analyze business situations and create solutions. Experience the intricacies of the professional accounting environment. IV. Text and References: (Textbook Decision: By Instructor) None. V. Special or Unique Student Materials: None X. Special or Unique University Facilities: None VII. Expanded Description of the Course and Instructional Methods: A. Expanded Description of the Course: Students obtain field experience working in the accounting profession as an intern with a company and/or organization. Work may be in a variety of accounting areas such as: public, corporate, governmental / not-for-profit, taxation, systems or international. 25
  26. 26. B. Instructional Methods: On-the-job training VIII. Methods of Evaluating Outcomes: Recommended Evaluation Tools: Internship Journal: 45% Employer Evaluation: 35% Oral Presentation 15% Professional Demeanor: 5% SECTION B Week # Theme/Topic 1 On-the-job training 2 On-the-job training 3 On-the-job training 4 On-the-job training 5 On-the-job training 6 On-the-job training 7 On-the-job training 8 On-the-job training 9 On-the-job training 10 On-the-job training SECTION C SECTION C: MASTER’S LEVEL GENERAL MANAGMENT (AACSB STANDARDS) Goal Class Contact Hours* Capacity to lead in organizational situations. Capacity to apply knowledge in new and unfamiliar No class contact hours circumstances through a conceptual understanding of relevant disciplines. Capacity to adapt and innovate to solve problems, to cope No class contact hours with unforeseen events, and to manage in unpredictable environments. Information technical skills as evidenced by an ability to use No class contact hours current information technology to convey information, solve 26
  27. 27. problems, and expedite business processes. Demonstrate awareness of ethical responsibility to business No class contact hours professions and society. Management-Specific Learning Goals Goal Class Contact Hours* Communicate. Effectively communicate, at the professional No class contact hours level, in both oral and written formats in a variety of formal and informal business situations and using technology-based tools to assist in the presentation and communication of information. Relationships. Develop the relationships between business No class contact hours and its environments including stakeholders, competitors, industries, regulators, the technology and global environment, and society at large to formulate business strategy and represent it in the form of business plans, explicitly incorporating ethics. Analyze. Analyze complex situations in a dynamic No class contact hours environment from a wide variety of perspectives; creatively identify a range of alternative responses; and assess the relative merits of each based on complex objective functions using appropriate techniques and tools. Functional Areas. Respond strategically to the dynamic No class contact hours nature of business to apply the fundamental concepts, theories and practices of the major functional areas of business; have a strong basis for further independent learning in the functional areas; and to be able to work effectively with functional specialists. Teams & Leadership. Develop and cultivate leadership No class contact hours skills, interpersonal skills and social competence necessary for individual and team effectiveness in complex organizations. *Explanation of class contact hours: these hours are being collected as part of an AACSB requirement and will be used to assess our graduate program. Revised 4/12/04 27
  28. 28. California State Polytechnic University, Pomona Expanded Course Outline Department Name: Accounting Course Title: Contemporary Accounting Issues Prepared By: Hassan Hefzi, Ashok Natarajan, and Hong Pak Course Number: ACC 660X Date Prepared: 11/10/2005 Date Approved By Graduate Studies Committee: __________ SECTION A I. Catalog Description: ACC 660 Contemporary Accounting Issues (4) Study and analysis of contemporary accounting issues and practices. Emphasis on the integration of accounting knowledge in financial and managerial accounting, tax, accounting information systems, and auditing. Enhances analytical research, judgmental and communication skills of students. 4 seminars, case analysis VII. Required Background or Experience: A. Prerequisites: Successful completion of all other required courses in the Masters’ program. B. Prerequisites Justification: Since this is a capstone course, drawing on the knowledge from all the subject areas in the program, the student is required to have completed all core coursework before enrolling for this course. III. Expected Outcomes: On successfully completing this course, the student is expected to: • discuss and critique contemporary accounting theories • identify and evaluate comprehensively contemporary accounting issues • predict potential directions of accounting regulation and theory • integrate different subject areas in accounting • evaluate and respond to unstructured problems similar to those encountered in the profession IV. Text and References: 28
  29. 29. (Textbook Decision: By Instructor) Current accounting professional publications: e.g., Journal of Accountancy, etc. Current Business periodicals: e.g., Wall Street Journal, Fortune, BusinessWeek, Forbes, etc. Case studies from various sources, such as Harvard Business School Cases, Ivey School Cases, Darden Case Collection, and the Journal of Accounting Case Research and the Journal of Accounting Education Current Exposure Drafts from the FASB, Reports of the Emerging Issues Task Force, and other official accounting pronouncements from the FASB, the SEC, the AICPA, and the IASB. Textbooks on Accounting theory, such as: Financial Accounting Theory, Third Edition, by William R. Scott, Prentice Hall Financial Accounting Theory and Analysis: Text Readings and Cases, Eighth Edition, by Richard G. Schroeder, Myrtle W. Clark, Jack M. Cathey, John Wiley & Sons Accounting Theory, by Ahmed Riahi-Belkaoui , Thomson Learning; 5th edition Accounting Theory: Contemporary Accounting Issues, by Thomas G. Evans, South- Western College Pub; 1st edition Financial Accounting Theory: Issues and Controversies, by Stephen A. Zeff (Editor) , Mcgraw-Hill College; 3rd edition V. Special or Unique Student Materials: ___Zip Disk _X__Calculator ___Camera ___Laptop ___Floppy ___Graph ___Video _X__Computer Disk Paper Camera _X__CD-Rom __X_Writing ___Videotape ___Other Pad ???? 29
  30. 30. XI. Special or Unique University Facilities: ___Computer Lab ___Computer Connection ___“Smart” Classroom (one workstation) ___File Server _X__White Board/Markers _X__Overhead Screen _X__Computer Projector ___VCR ___Microphone ___Laser Pointer ___Printer ___Moveable Classroom Furniture _X__Internet Connection ___Laptop Ports ___Other ____________ ???? VII. Expanded Description of the Course and Instructional Methods: A. Expanded Description of the Course: The basic objectives of this course are to enable the student to understand contemporary accounting issues and practices, to examine the basis of contemporary accounting theory, and to consider potential future directions in accounting practice and regulation. The course emphasizes the integration of accounting knowledge covered in the masters program including financial accounting and valuation, advanced managerial accounting, tax, accounting information systems, and auditing. Articles from professional accounting publications and business periodicals are used as a basis for reviewing contemporary accounting issues. The course utilizes a seminar framework to discuss integrative instructional case studies from the various accounting subject areas. B. Instructional Methods: ___Lecture __X_Cases ___Individualized Instruction ___Lecture/Discussion ___Open Lab ___Cooperative Learning _X__Seminar ___Videotapes ___Distance Learning __X_Collaborative Learning ____Other VIII. Methods of Evaluating Outcomes: Recommended Evaluation Tools: Individual Paper: _15% Tests & Exams _40% Individual Project ___% Group Paper: _15% Quizzes ___% Team Project ___% Individual Presentation ___ Peer Evaluation ___% Outside/Expert Evaluations % ___% Group Presentation ___% Participation _30% Other: ________ ___% 30
  31. 31. SECTION B Week Theme/Topic # 1 Review and discussion of Planning frameworks in accounting • Business Analysis and Valuation • Contemporary issues • Case discussion and presentation 2 Review and discussion of Planning frameworks in accounting • Business Analysis and Valuation (continued) • Contemporary issues • Case discussion and presentation 3 Review and discussion of Planning frameworks in accounting • International Accounting Issues • Contemporary issues • Case discussion and presentation 4 Review and discussion of Operational frameworks in accounting • Assurance issues • Contemporary issues • Case discussion and presentation 5 Review and discussion of Operational frameworks in accounting • Internal Control issues • Contemporary issues • Case discussion and presentation 6 Review and discussion of Operational frameworks in accounting • Internal Control issues (continued) • Contemporary issues • Case discussion and presentation 7 Review and discussion of Evaluation frameworks in accounting • Managerial and Cost accounting issues • Contemporary issues • Case discussion and presentation 8 Review and discussion of other frameworks in accounting • Performance Appraisal and compensation, mergers and acquisitions, and other accounting issues • Contemporary issues • Case discussion and presentation 9 Synthesis of various frameworks in accounting • Project Case Presentations and discussions 31
  32. 32. 10 Synthesis of various frameworks in accounting • Project Case Presentations and discussions SECTION C SECTION C: MASTER’S LEVEL GENERAL MANAGMENT (AACSB STANDARDS) Goal Class Contact Hours* Capacity to lead in organizational situations. 6 Capacity to apply knowledge in new and unfamiliar 40 circumstances through a conceptual understanding of relevant disciplines. Capacity to adapt and innovate to solve problems, to cope 40 with unforeseen events, and to manage in unpredictable environments. Information technical skills as evidenced by an ability to use 3 current information technology to convey information, solve problems, and expedite business processes. Demonstrate awareness of ethical responsibility to business 40 professions and society. Management-Specific Learning Goals Goal Class Contact Hours* Communicate. Effectively communicate, at the professional 40 level, in both oral and written formats in a variety of formal and informal business situations and using technology-based tools to assist in the presentation and communication of information. Relationships. Develop the relationships between business 6 and its environments including stakeholders, competitors, industries, regulators, the technology and global environment, and society at large to formulate business strategy and represent it in the form of business plans, explicitly incorporating ethics. Analyze. Analyze complex situations in a dynamic 40 environment from a wide variety of perspectives; creatively identify a range of alternative responses; and assess the relative merits of each based on complex objective functions using appropriate techniques and tools. 32
  33. 33. Functional Areas. Respond strategically to the dynamic 3 nature of business to apply the fundamental concepts, theories and practices of the major functional areas of business; have a strong basis for further independent learning in the functional areas; and to be able to work effectively with functional specialists. Teams & Leadership. Develop and cultivate leadership 3 skills, interpersonal skills and social competence necessary for individual and team effectiveness in complex organizations. Revised 4/12/04 33
  34. 34. California State Polytechnic University, Pomona Expanded Course Outline Department Name: Accounting Course Title: Management Control in Not-For-Profit Organizations Prepared By: Glenda Brock Course Number: ACC 670 Date Prepared: 10-14-05 Date Approved By Graduate Studies Committee: __________ SECTION A I. Catalog Description: ACC 670 Management Control in Not-for-Profit Organizations (4) – Application of the processes of budgeting, planning, and controlling in governmental, hospital, and educational institutions as well as charitable foundations. Case studies and a service component with an appropriate entity. Prerequisites: Unconditional Standing. VIII. Required Background or Experience: A. Prerequisites: Unconditional Standing a. Prerequisites Justification: Unconditional standing assures that the student has background knowledge of basic accounting concepts, which is needed to understand the course materials. III. Expected Outcomes: A. Students should be able to analyze the strengths and weaknesses in a not-for- profit (NFP) organization. B. Students should be able to compare the mission and strategic plans of a NFP organization to their actual operations. C. Students should be able to identify potential problems and propose solutions. D. Students should be able to review proposed budgets, calculate the variances from the actual budgets, and interpret the variances. E. Students compare the operations of various government and not-for-profit organizations to the organization under review. F. Students should be able to communicate results of the review, oral and written, to 34
  35. 35. the managers of the organization, as well as the public. IV. Text and References: Textbook Decision: Textbook should cover the current standards, concepts, and practices of government and not-for-profit entities. Example: Management Control in Nonprofit Organizations by Robert N Anthony and David W. Young. Selected current articles from the library databases including CCH and RIA. Governmental Accounting Standards Board V. Special or Unique Student Materials Students must provide a computer with internet access. Tape recorder. XII. Special or Unique University Facilities: Smart Classroom White board and marker Overhead projector for computer and transparencies or equivalent Internet Connection Moveable classroom furniture VII. Expanded Description of the Course and Instructional Methods: A. Expanded Description of the Course: The course will address the types of not-for-profit organizations including the organizational structure, mission, and strategic plans. Budget processes and financial reports will be examined and contrasted to other similar organizations. Speakers will provide specific information about different types of not-for-profit entities. Small groups will select community partner projects to examine and evaluate resulting in a report with proposed improvements. Oral and written reports will be presented to the Not-for-Profit managers, fellow students, and other interested parties. B. Instructional Methods: Group discussions and presentations of results of case studies. Speakers will provide specific information about particular not-for-profit entities. Students will research using Cal Poly library databases and write an individual paper. A community service project with community partners where students will evaluate the organization’s structure, mission, and strategic plans. The students will also review operations. A comprehensive report will be presented orally and in a written format. 35
  36. 36. VIII. Methods of Evaluating Outcomes: Recommended Evaluation Tools: Individual Paper: _20% Tests & Exams ___% Individual Project ___% Group Paper: ___% Quizzes ___% Team Project _50% Individual Presentation ___ Peer Evaluation _5_% Outside/Expert Evaluations % __5% Group Presentation ___% Participation __20% Other: ________ ___% SECTION B Week # Theme/Topic 1 The Management Control Environment • Organization structure and relationships • Information – types, costs, and output • Efficiency and effectiveness. • Ethical implications 2 The Management Control Process • Strategic planning • Budget preparation • Control system 3 Case Study (ies) of various nonprofits • Analysis • Decisions • Solutions 4 Selection of Project • Characteristics of nonprofit organization • Tax and legal considerations • Constraints on Goals and Strategies • Sources of financial support • Governance • Political influences 5 Review of Organization • Organizational structure • Financial statement analysis • Internal and external influences • Comparisons of similar organizations 6 Understanding culture and ethical implications • Learning cultural environment • Human resources environment • Ethical expectations 36
  37. 37. • Communication among employees and volunteers 7 Written Report of Findings • Review of organization • Improvement needed for budget control and strategic planning • Improvements needed for internal controls • Improvements needed for financial reporting • Improvements needed for communication • 8 Implementation of suggestions • Ethical issues. • Human resources issues • External and internal communication • Financial projections • Reporting requirements 9 Classroom reporting for projects • Each student group presents project to community partners and class • Community partners present analysis of the student projects • Discussion of projects implementation 10 Assessment of project by students and professor • Each student presents assessment of learning outcomes of project • Professor presents assessment of each project • Current Issues in the industry is discussed for improvements in project. • Future improvements developed through assessment and discussion. SECTION C SECTION C: MASTER’S LEVEL GENERAL MANAGMENT (AACSB STANDARDS) Goal Class Contact Hours* Capacity to lead in organizational situations. 20 Capacity to apply knowledge in new and unfamiliar 30 circumstances through a conceptual understanding of relevant disciplines. Capacity to adapt and innovate to solve problems, to cope 35 with unforeseen events, and to manage in unpredictable environments. Information technical skills as evidenced by an ability to use 15 current information technology to convey information, solve problems, and expedite business processes. 37
  38. 38. Demonstrate awareness of ethical responsibility to business 30 professions and society. Management-Specific Learning Goals Goal Class Contact Hours* Communicate. Effectively communicate, at the professional 30 level, in both oral and written formats in a variety of formal and informal business situations and using technology-based tools to assist in the presentation and communication of information. Relationships. Develop the relationships between business 30 and its environments including stakeholders, competitors, industries, regulators, the technology and global environment, and society at large to formulate business strategy and represent it in the form of business plans, explicitly incorporating ethics. Analyze. Analyze complex situations in a dynamic 30 environment from a wide variety of perspectives; creatively identify a range of alternative responses; and assess the relative merits of each based on complex objective functions using appropriate techniques and tools. Functional Areas. Respond strategically to the dynamic 35 nature of business to apply the fundamental concepts, theories and practices of the major functional areas of business; have a strong basis for further independent learning in the functional areas; and to be able to work effectively with functional specialists. Teams & Leadership. Develop and cultivate leadership 35 skills, interpersonal skills and social competence necessary for individual and team effectiveness in complex organizations. *Explanation of class contact hours: these hours are being collected as part of an AACSB requirement and will be used to assess our graduate program. Revised 4/12/04 38
  39. 39. California State Polytechnic University, Pomona Expanded Course Outline Department Name: Accounting Course Title: Fraud and Forensic Accounting Prepared By: Vicki Peden Course Number: ACC 680 Date Prepared: October 17, 2005 Date Approved By Graduate Studies Committee: __________ SECTION A I. Catalog Description: ACC 680 - Fraud and Forensic Accounting (4) A managerial perspective on fraud within an organization. Emphasis on fraud prevention and detection methods. Survey of the management support resources available in the field of forensic accounting. Case study and analysis of financial statement frauds. IX. Required Background or Experience: A. Prerequisites: Unconditional Standing B. Prerequisites Justification: Unconditional standing assures that the student has background knowledge of basic accounting concepts which is needed to understand the course materials. III. Expected Outcomes: Students will recognize and assess fraud exposure within organizations. Students will obtain skills to create corporate environments conducive to preventing and detecting fraud and manage resources to reduce fraud in the organization. Students will identify ways in which forensic accounting resources can assist corporate management in preventing, detecting and prosecuting fraud. IV. Text and References: (Textbook Decision: By Instructor) The Financial Number Game: Detecting Creative Accounting Practices, Mulford and Comiskey 0-471-37008-8 Financial Shenanigans, Schilit, 0-07-138626-2 Forensic and Investigative Accounting, Crumbley, Heitger and Smith, 0-8080-1001-8 Selected articles from current periodicals. V. Special or Unique Student Materials: 39
  40. 40. Internet access XIII. Special or Unique University Facilities: Internet access VII. Expanded Description of the Course and Instructional Methods: A. Expanded Description of the Course: Exploration of the various aspects of fraud that must be addressed by professional accounting managers. Examination of the basics of fraud prevention, investigation and detection. Extensive analysis of management fraud with an emphasis on fraudulent financial statements. Ethical implications of fraud on the individual, organization and society are highlighted throughout the course. B. Instructional Methods: Seminar/discussion, problem solving and cases. Individual project on prevention and detection of fraud in an actual organization VIII. Methods of Evaluating Outcomes: Recommended Evaluation Tools: Case Analysis 35% Final Exam 20% Ethics Project: 10% Participation 15% Fraud Project and Presentation 20% SECTION B 40
  41. 41. Week # Theme/Topic 1 The Extent and Nature of Corporate Fraud • Ethical and Social Implications • Legal and Political Implications 2 Management Fraud • Controls and Management • Corporate Environment 3 Earnings Management • Incentives • Techniques 4 Fraudulent Financial Reporting • Manipulating Financial Information • Revenue recognition 5 Fraudulent Financial Reporting • Expenses • Liabilities 6 Employee Fraud • Types of Fraud • Symptoms of Fraud 7 Employee Fraud • Prevention • Detection 8 Forensic Accounting Resources • Investigative Methods • Data Techniques 9 Forensic Accounting Resources • Money Laundering • Litigation Support 10 Student Presentations SECTION C SECTION C: MASTER’S LEVEL GENERAL MANAGMENT (AACSB STANDARDS) Goal Class Contact Hours* Capacity to lead in organizational situations. 20 Capacity to apply knowledge in new and unfamiliar circumstances through a conceptual understanding of relevant disciplines. 25 Capacity to adapt and innovate to solve problems, to cope with unforeseen events, and to manage in 41
  42. 42. unpredictable environments. 20 Information technical skills as evidenced by an ability to use current information technology to convey information, solve problems, and expedite business processes. 15 Demonstrate awareness of ethical responsibility to business professions and society. 10 Management-Specific Learning Goals Goal Class Contact Hours* Communicate. Effectively communicate, at the professional level, in both oral and written formats in a variety of formal and informal business situations and using technology-based tools to assist in the presentation and communication of information. 30 Relationships. Develop the relationships between business and its environments including stakeholders, competitors, industries, regulators, the technology and global environment, and society at large to formulate business strategy and represent it in the form of business plans, explicitly incorporating ethics. 15 Analyze. Analyze complex situations in a dynamic environment from a wide variety of perspectives; creatively identify a range of alternative responses; and assess the relative merits of each based on complex objective functions using appropriate techniques and tools. 30 Functional Areas. Respond strategically to the dynamic nature of business to apply the fundamental concepts, theories and practices of the major functional areas of business; have a strong basis for further independent learning in the functional areas; and to be able to work effectively with functional specialists. 25 Teams & Leadership. Develop and cultivate leadership skills, interpersonal skills and social competence necessary for individual and team effectiveness in complex organizations. 10 *Explanation of class contact hours: these hours are being collected as part of an AACSB requirement and will be used to assess our graduate program. Revised 4/12/04 42
  43. 43. California State Polytechnic University, Pomona Expanded Course Outline Department Name: Accounting Course Title: Strategic Tax Planning Prepared By: J. Karayan Course Number: ACC 690 Date Prepared: November 10, 2005 Date Approved By Graduate Studies Committee: __________ SECTION A I. Catalog Description: ACC 690 Strategic Tax Planning (4 Units). A hands-on course for Masters of Accountancy students on how to factor taxes into strategic decision-making. 4 seminar-discussions. X. Required Background or Experience: A. Prerequisites: Unconditional standing B. Prerequisites Justification: Unconditional standing assures that the student has background knowledge of basic accounting concepts which is needed to understand the course materials. XI. Expected Outcomes: Upon completion of the course, the student should be able to: Appraise the impact of taxes on decisions in the various functional areas of an organization (e.g., marketing, human resources, finance, accounting, production, or operations management) Identify how strategic tax decisions made by senior management impact decision-making throughout organizations. Analyze how taxes affect organizational growth, retrenchment, and survival (e.g., starting and financing ventures, product development, motivating employees, market penetration in different states and countries, capital budgeting, mergers, acquisitions, restructuring, special state and local tax incentives, or site selection). 43
  44. 44. IV. Text and References: (Textbook Decision: By Department of Accounting Tax Course Coordinator) Karayan, et al., Strategic Corporate Tax Planning (latest edition) Swenson, et al., State & Local Tax Planning (latest edition) V. Special or Unique Student Materials: Web access. XIV. Special or Unique University Facilities: University Library Web-accessible tax databases. VII. Expanded Description of the Course and Instructional Methods: A. Expanded Description of the Course: B. Cases, projects, and assigned readings are utilized to focus on the impact of regulatory costs on organizational strategic decision-making. Following the goals for tax education change developed by the American Taxation Association and the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, topics are organized organically around bundles of issues arising during phases of organizational life-cycles, such as formation, growth, and retrenchment. Topics include starting and financing ventures, product development, motivating employees, market penetration, capital budgeting, mergers, acquisitions, restructuring, special state and local tax incentives, and site selection B. Instructional Methods: Cases, projects, and readings in a distance learning environment. VIII. Methods of Evaluating Outcomes: Written cases, written projects, and written on-campus final exam. Recommended Evaluation Tools: Individual Papers: _40__% Tests & Exams ___% Individual Projects _20__% 44
  45. 45. Group Paper: ___% Quizzes ___% Team Project ___% Individual Presentation ___ Peer Evaluation ___% Outside/Expert Evaluations % ___% Group Presentation ___% Participation ___% Final Exam __40 ___% SECTION B Week # Theme/Topic 1 Theme/Topics Overview • Subtopic 1 Type of Taxes • Subtopic 2 Importance of State and Local Tax Planning • Subtopic 3 Principles of Taxation • Subtopic 4 Sources of Tax Rules 2 Theme/Topics General Tax Strategies • Subtopic SAVANT Framework • Subtopic Non-tax Limitations 3 Theme/Topics Choosing an Optimal Legal Entity • Subtopic 1 The Cast • Subtopic 2 Multiple Entities 4 Theme/Topics Financing Ventures • Subtopic 1 Internal Financing • Subtopic 2 External Financing 5 Theme/Topics Product Development • Subtopic 1 Research and Development Costs • Subtopic 2 Risk Spreading • Subtopic 3 Web Site Development 6 Theme/Topics Motivating Employees • Subtopic 1 Non-executive Compensation • Subtopic 2 Executive Compensation • Subtopic 3 Stock-like Compensation 7 Theme/Topics Non-Income Taxes • Subtopic 1 Sales-type Taxes • Subtopic 2 Property Taxes • Subtopic 3 Payroll Taxes 8 Theme/Topics Mergers, Acquisitions, & Restructuring • Subtopic 1 Financial Engineering • Subtopic 2 Operational Restructuring • Subtopic 3 Divestitures 9 Theme/Topics Mergers, Acquisitions, & Restructuring • Subtopic 1 Acquisitions • Subtopic 2 Mergers • Subtopic 3 Leveraged Buyouts 10 Theme/Topics Mergers, Acquisitions, & Restructuring 45
  46. 46. • Subtopic 1 Use of Flow Through Entities • Subtopic 2 Liquidations • Subtopic 3 ESOPs SECTION C SECTION C: MASTER’S LEVEL GENERAL MANAGMENT (AACSB STANDARDS) Goal Class Contact Hours* Capacity to lead in organizational situations. 5 Capacity to apply knowledge in new and unfamiliar circumstances through a conceptual understanding of 20 relevant disciplines. Capacity to adapt and innovate to solve problems, to cope 20 with unforeseen events, and to manage in unpredictable environments. Information technical skills as evidenced by an ability to use 5 current information technology to convey information, solve problems, and expedite business processes. Demonstrate awareness of ethical responsibility to business 1 professions and society. Management-Specific Learning Goals Goal Class Contact Hours* Communicate. Effectively communicate, at the professional level, in both oral and written formats in a variety of formal and informal business situations and using technology-based 10 tools to assist in the presentation and communication of information. Relationships. Develop the relationships between business and its environments including stakeholders, competitors, industries, regulators, the technology and global 20 environment, and society at large to formulate business strategy and represent it in the form of business plans, explicitly incorporating ethics. Analyze. Analyze complex situations in a dynamic environment from a wide variety of perspectives; creatively 20 identify a range of alternative responses; and assess the relative merits of each based on complex objective functions using appropriate techniques and tools. 46
  47. 47. Functional Areas. Respond strategically to the dynamic nature of business to apply the fundamental concepts, 15 theories and practices of the major functional areas of business; have a strong basis for further independent learning in the functional areas; and to be able to work effectively with functional specialists. Teams & Leadership. Develop and cultivate leadership skills, interpersonal skills and social competence necessary for individual and team effectiveness in complex organizations. *Explanation of class contact hours: these hours are being collected as part of an AACSB requirement and will be used to assess our graduate program. Revised 4/12/04 47

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