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  • 1. Strategic Plan <ul><li>2002-2006 </li></ul>
  • 2. Foreword 2002-2006 Strategic Plan Tech Prep Inc. is a regional public-private collaborative focused on increasing the effectiveness of education by using private-sector counsel in leveraging synergies among separate public schools, colleges, and universities. The Tech Prep Initiative was commissioned in 1991 as a vehicle for the establishment of local partnerships among Business, Education and Government. Recognizing the benefit of such a collaborative effort, Representative Jim Solis and Senator Eddie Lucio, Jr ., cosponsored HB2401, which continues to emphasize private-sector leadership in the development and delivery of workforce-enhancing systems. The Board of Directors and stakeholders of Tech Prep are committed to success in forming partnerships that leverage regional resources in achieving a higher level of preparedness for our workforce. The Directors hold the strategic planning process to be the backbone of the development and delivery of the programs that will bring Tech Prep’s vision to reality. This document defines the direction and frames the operational plan for Tech Prep. Today’s economic engine is fueled by continued technology improvements and evolutionary job skill requirements. The resources needed to maintain workforce readiness are growing at a significant rate. The synergy realized from forming regional partnerships for development and delivery of workforce enhancement provides for optimal use of our resources. As you review the following strategic plan, you will find an underlying theme of regional collaboration. Collaboration is no longer a luxury; it is a necessity in the competitive job-creation business. With the clear definition of vision, mission and initiatives, Tech Prep Inc. can drive for results as the regional multi-disciplined partnership for implementation of education and training initiatives. In conclusion, this strategic plan is submitted as a declaration of our vision and objectives. Please feel free to contact staff or Directors for any further information you may desire. This plan was adopted by Tech Prep Inc.’s Board of Directors on July 31, 2001, as evidenced by the signatures of Tech Prep Inc.’s Executive Committee, below. Adrian A. Arriaga, CCIM, CEA Ray Elledge J. Gilbert Leal,Ph.D. Cesar Maldonado, P.E. Moose Miller Janice H. Mumford Sam O. Olivarez Arnold Pedraza Ed Tamayo Stephen M. Vassberg Perry A. Vaughn Linda Wade, Ph.D.
  • 3. Table of Contents 2002-2006 Strategic Plan <ul><li>I. Introduction Page 4 </li></ul><ul><li>Vision Page 10 </li></ul><ul><li>Current Environment Page 12 </li></ul><ul><li>III. Mission Page 14 </li></ul><ul><li>IV. Solution Providers Page 16 </li></ul><ul><li>V. Strategic Initiatives Page 18 </li></ul><ul><li>VI. Performance Metrics Page 26 </li></ul><ul><li>VII. Operational Issues Page 28 </li></ul><ul><li>VIII. Board Operations Page 34 </li></ul><ul><li>Acknowledgments Page 36 </li></ul><ul><li>Stakeholders Page 37 </li></ul><ul><li>Board of Directors Page 38 </li></ul><ul><li>Data Sources Page 40 </li></ul>
  • 4. I. Introduction Introduction 2002-2006 Strategic Plan <ul><li>Partnership focused on </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Providing business input into educational programs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Analyzing labor market trends and business needs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Leveraging resources and increasing the effectiveness of education and training </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Regional Non-profit 501(c)(3) corporation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Authorized to operate in Cameron, Hidalgo & Willacy Counties plus Rio Grande City in Starr County </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Stakeholders: 31 independent school districts, 7 colleges and universities, 2 local Workforce Development Boards, 1 local labor union, 1 regional education service center, professional organizations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Directorate composed of private and public sector with leadership resting in private sector </li></ul></ul>
  • 5. I. Introduction Introduction 2002-2006 Strategic Plan Tech Prep Inc. is an intermediary organization bringing regional educators and employers together to address workforce education and training needs. Collaboration on a regional basis provides access to a broader base of resources and reduces duplication, therefore delivering highly effective educational initiatives at the lowest cost. Tech Prep Inc.’s Labor Market Report provides labor market information for students, parents, educators, and the businesses of the Rio Grande Valley. Joint Tech Prep/ISD-developed career pathways define curricula designed to encourage students’ selection of majors emphasizing academics and postsecondary education. The network formed by Tech Prep Inc.’s counselors and campus-based support teams enhances the effectiveness of curriculum delivery. Tech Prep Inc.’s mobile Manufacturing Technologies Laboratory (MTL) showcases the math and science foundation of manufacturing-related careers. Tech Prep Inc.-led parent, educator and employer outreach, work-based learning opportunities, and student recognition complement the regional initiatives. Tech Prep Inc. is a regional public-private collaborative focused on increasing the effectiveness of education by leveraging synergies among separate public schools, colleges, and universities. Control of the organization is vested in its stakeholders , 85 percent of which are school districts, colleges, universities, and professional associations representing educators. The balance of 15 percent of the stakeholders include local workforce development boards and other organizations. Stakeholders of Tech Prep Inc.
  • 6. I. Introduction Background 2002-2006 Strategic Plan <ul><li>Evolved from the Education sub-committee to the Rio Grande Valley Quality Workforce Development (circa 1991) </li></ul><ul><li>Enabled through collaboration among Texas Education Agency, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, and Texas Workforce Commission (formerly Texas Department of Commerce) </li></ul><ul><li>Incorporated in 1992 as a Nonprofit Corporation with Stakeholders consisting of Regional ISDs and Colleges </li></ul><ul><li>Reaffirmed and expanded through: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Federal Carl D. Perkins Vocational-Technical Education Act of 1998 Federal National School-to-Work Opportunities Act of 1994 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Texas Tech-Prep Act of 1999 (HB2401) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Texas School-to-Careers/Workforce Commission Acts of 1993 (SB642) and 1995 (HB1863) </li></ul></ul>
  • 7. I. Introduction Background 2002-2006 Strategic Plan The Tech Prep Initiative was commissioned in 1991 as a vehicle for the establishment of EDUCATIONAL PARTNERSHIPS among Business, Education and Government. The intent was to have these local PARTNERSHIPS drive the development of curriculum for an enhanced Quality Work Force. Tech Prep of the Rio Grande Valley, Inc., was chartered as a non-profit corporation with the region’s ISDs, colleges, and select governmental entities holding equity in the corporation. The magnitude of the commitment by the share-holders to meeting employers’ workforce-development needs was exemplified by their agreement to grant the majority leadership of the directorate to the business sector . A major challenge of the fledgling Tech Prep Inc. Directorate was to solidify the regional bond which had been only loosely knit at inception. The mobile Manufacturing Technologies Laboratory (MTL) and its technology-based curriculum served as a quick and significant victory , bringing momentum to Tech Prep Inc. and its regional alliance. Tech Prep Inc.’s work has been greatly enhanced by the leadership provided by U.S. Senator Phil Gramm , who ensured that the federal Act emphasized the importance of private-sector leadership in Tech Prep, and Texas’ Senator Eddie Lucio, Jr ., and Representative Jim Solis , who cosponsored HB2401. A decade later Tech Prep Inc.’s strength continues to be its regional broad-based partnership approach to workforce and economic development . Tech Prep Inc. Board of Directors
  • 8. I. Introduction Accomplishments 2002-2006 Strategic Plan <ul><li>Major Accomplishments </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1992 – Consortium created nonprofit corporation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1993 – First Tech Prep curriculum developed (grades 9-14) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1994 – Mobile Manufacturing Technologies Laboratory (MTL) services </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1995 – MTL subscriptions and expansion of MTL exposure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1996 – Startup of support team (S-TEAM) network </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1997 - Publication of Labor Market Information report that became state model; creation of Counselors’ Network </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1998 – Creation of Dr. Lauro F. Cavazos Tech Prep scholarship fund </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1999 – Completion of Network of Support Teams (S-Teams) in K through College Tech Prep programs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2000 – Commission of Tech Prep Texas Scholars </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2001 – Memorandums of Understanding with Workforce Boards, CBIRD, and EnterTech </li></ul></ul>
  • 9. I. Introduction Accomplishments 2002-2006 Strategic Plan In his State of the State address (January 2001), Governor Rick Perry stated that Texas “must build a seamless system of K through 16 education .&quot; Texas’ House Economic Development Committee has issued a report stating that the “ economic benefits for Texas from [Tech Prep] are evident and will continue to show prosperity for the state and its participants. ” Tech Prep Inc. is working with its partners to create a seamless K-16 system in the Valley. Due to demonstrated successes in improving regional performance , Tech Prep Inc. has consistently realized an increase in participation from community, students, educators, and business. State reports reflect that the number of secondary Tech Prep students in the region has grown from 60 in 1994-95 to 8,407 in 1999-2000, and these students’ academic performance is impressive , exceeding the performance of all other groups of secondary students. Over 2,800 Rio Grande Valley high school seniors graduated as Tech Prep Texas Scholars in May 2000. The Dr. Lauro F. Cavazos Tech Prep Scholarship competition is in its fourth year, and STCC, TSTC, and Texas Southmost College—all of which offer Tech Prep opportunities for students—have begun hosting annual Senior Day events focusing on Tech-Prep programs. Tech Prep Inc.’s “regional catalyst” approach to bringing educators and employers together is evidencing success , contributing to increased involvement of regional leaders from all sectors. Former U.S. Secretary of Education Dr. Lauro F. Cavazos with 1998 scholarship recipient David Leal and Board Chair Ed Tamayo
  • 10. III. Vision Vision 2002-2006 Strategic Plan Enhance economic development of the Rio Grande Valley by being the definitive catalyst for regional partnerships to fulfill employers’ demand for a prepared workforce that can compete in an evolutionary, knowledge-based economy.
  • 11. III. Vision Vision 2002-2006 Strategic Plan The illustration below uses lifesaver shapes to depict the community segments essential for economic development . When held as separate entities, all are working toward a common goal but in isolation of each other. Leaders have only a small awareness and sense of responsibility for the global goal. Success is measured by localized metrics and not by metrics linked to the universal goal. This fosters short-term thinking and serves to perpetuate today’s problems to tomorrow. When joined , the segments become true lifesavers , forming an interdependent and interactive environment in which a “systems” approach to workforce and economic development can be effected. The challenges of developing a knowledge-based and transferable workforce will only be met with breakthrough improvements; that is, working beyond the capabilities and capacities of our current processes and methods. Trying harder, working faster, and caring more but using the same methods will not bring the performance requisite of the challenge. Tech Prep Inc. is the intersection of the three segments. Tech Prep Inc. is the regional, multi-disciplined partnership which will provide a forum for the area’s top talent to access the best resources for revolutionary and evolutionary success in workforce development. This is Tech Prep Inc.
  • 12. II. Current Environment 2002-2006 Strategic Plan Critical Challenges <ul><li>There is a shortage of high school and college graduates in the Valley. </li></ul><ul><li>Most graduates of Valley schools do not attain the problem-solving skills, communication skills and workplace ethics demanded in today’s evolving high-tech workplace. </li></ul><ul><li>Most of the Valley’s high school graduates lack the technical skills required for entry-level positions in the rapidly changing, technologically advanced workplace. </li></ul><ul><li>Many technology-dependent industries are rapidly growing in the Valley but the educational infrastructure (resources and processes) needed to sustain this industrial growth is fragmented and incomplete. </li></ul><ul><li>There is a need for regional coordination of efforts to address the Valley’s workforce shortage (i.e, education infrastructure) to decrease costs and increase potential for success. </li></ul>
  • 13. II. Current Environment 2002-2006 Strategic Plan Critical Challenges In fall 2000 , Tech Prep Inc. hosted a series of employer focus groups in partnership with economic development organizations, chambers of commerce, and local workforce development boards as part of the work to create a regional labor market report. Participating employers’ comments reflected that despite the progress that has been made, increases in labor availability have not kept pace with growing job demand . The Rio Grande Valley needs more education and training resources—physical plants, instructors, outreach programs for students, parents, and adults in the workforce--than it currently has. Coordinating efforts regionally reduces costs and enhances effectiveness . The labor market study on which Tech Prep Inc. and others collaborated is an example. If all organizations conducted separate studies, findings would be similar, but costs would be increased and regional impact would be diminished. Regional collaboration is crucial for success in addressing the Valley’s critical challenges. In November 2000, Texas’ House Committee on Economic Development , chaired by Rep. Jim Solis of the Rio Grande Valley, issued a report stating: “ Jobs today are becoming more technology driven and require more skills . High Technology industries are projected to add 101,000 jobs to the Texas economy over the next 5 years. In 1999, .. 69% of employers reported shortages of skilled workers, versus 27% in 1993. There is no quick, easy solution to address the lack of skilled workers current employers are encountering. Workforce development is the most significant economic development issue facing our state today. A highly skilled workforce will strengthen and continue the state’s economic growth .” Univision Channel 48 Anchor Marianela Aguirre with McAllen ISD student Esther Gonzalez working on a Spanish translation--February 2001
  • 14. III. Mission Mission 2002-2006 Strategic Plan Form working partnerships that leverage regional resources to provide reality-based learning for achieving a higher level of competence in the Valley’s workforce .
  • 15. III. Mission Mission 2002-2006 Strategic Plan Tech Prep Inc.’s vision and mission are derived from input of stakeholders gathered through public forums. The resources required to accomplish the mission are many and varied – including, but not limited to, human resources, technology, curriculum, equipment, funding, and implementation of collaborative projects. The Mission Statement shown on the facing page translates to forming partnerships to provide technology-rooted and reality-based learning to achieve a higher level of student readiness for success in post-secondary education and ultimately success in the workforce . Specific objectives that produce measurable outcomes must be employed in pursuit of the mission. These metrics can then be used to evaluate the impact on the critical challenges thus providing navigation for our journey toward completion of our mission. The critical needs of the labor market are not new, and Tech Prep Inc. along with other existing organizations is working cooperatively in providing solutions to the market’s demands. Therefore, prior to establishing a plan which is best suited for Tech Prep Inc.’s role in the region, it is paramount that all stakeholders recognize and understand the current solution providers and how Tech Prep Inc. rates in comparison. RGV Senior (Grade 12) Graduation Rates
  • 16. IV. Solution Providers Comparative Profiles 2002-2006 Strategic Plan This chart depicts four major solution providers in the Rio Grande Valley. These providers work with the region’s school districts, colleges, universities, and other organizations in addressing workforce education and training issues. Each solution provider plays a unique role in the overall system, with Tech Prep Inc. serving as the catalyst bringing the partners together to address regional needs. Workforce board budgets below reflect youth funds only; the Region One ESC budget shown is the service center’s general operating budget, which is spent for many purposes—not just workforce education. *These figures are reflective of funding levels in the year 2000-2001. <ul><li>39 school districts in seven counties </li></ul><ul><li>Administrative and campus channels to reach students </li></ul><ul><li>Cameron Works: Cameron County </li></ul><ul><li>WorkFORCE Solutions: Hidalgo & Willacy Counties </li></ul><ul><li>Direct case management for student customers” </li></ul><ul><li>Regional system (four counties. 31 ISDs, 7 Post-Secondary Institutions, etc.) </li></ul><ul><li>Administrative and campus channels to reach students </li></ul>Delivery Education Govern-ment and Business Partnership Business/ Education/ Govern-ment Partnership Ownership <ul><li>Comprehensive staff development </li></ul><ul><li>High-stakes accountability </li></ul><ul><li>Broad-based partnerships (local, state, national) </li></ul><ul><li>Emphasis on inclusion of all students </li></ul><ul><li>Integration of academics and work-related skills </li></ul><ul><li>Employer connections </li></ul><ul><li>Access to Workforce Center Services / Resource Room/LMI </li></ul><ul><li>Availability of Support Services* </li></ul><ul><li>Availability of Training Funds* </li></ul><ul><li>Availability of Incentives/Wages* </li></ul><ul><li>Youth have access to Menu of Services (10 WIA Elements) from CWI Contractors </li></ul><ul><li>*For WIA Eligible Youth </li></ul><ul><li>Broad-based stakeholders (school districts, colleges, universities, employers, others) </li></ul><ul><li>Connectivity of employers, public schools, colleges, and universities to focus on employers’ input into education and training programs </li></ul><ul><li>Emphasis on career counseling for all students </li></ul><ul><li>Major emphasis on career development through integration of academics and work-related skills </li></ul><ul><li>Targets universal population of students </li></ul><ul><li>Increased flexibility due to interagency relationships </li></ul>Advantages <ul><li>Early childhood, K-12 students, adult learners </li></ul><ul><li>All programs </li></ul><ul><li>Improving academic skills </li></ul><ul><li>TEA support and compliance </li></ul>$ 30 Region One Education Service Center <ul><li>Grade 8-14 at-risk students </li></ul><ul><li>Dropouts </li></ul><ul><li>Improving academic skills </li></ul><ul><li>Work readiness </li></ul><ul><li>Satisfy immediate employer needs </li></ul>$12.9 Cameron Works, Inc. and WorkFORCE Solutions Workforce Boards) <ul><li>K-16 students </li></ul><ul><li>Career development </li></ul><ul><li>Improving academic and work-related skills </li></ul><ul><li>Linking school and work based learning </li></ul><ul><li>Employer leadership </li></ul>$1.1 Tech Prep Inc. Strategic Focus Funds* ($MM) Entity
  • 17. IV. Solution Providers 2002-2006 Strategic Plan Comparative Profiles Tech Prep Inc. works with its stakeholders (school districts, colleges and universities) and its key strategic partners to accomplish one regional vision . Key partners include the Region One Education Service Center plus Cameron Works, Inc., and WorkFORCE Solutions (workforce development boards). All of Tech Prep Inc.’s partners have budgets that are far greater that Tech Prep Inc.’s budget. Implementation of Tech Prep Inc.’s strategic initiatives requires collaboration, coordination, and cooperation among the stakeholders and all partners . Although the activities and operations of all partners are crucial to implementation of the overall regional system , each partner has a unique mission and is required to serve unique populations of students. Through its regional communication strategies, Tech Prep Inc. draws the other partners together into a regional system. Regional collaboration utilizes each partner’s strengths, leverages funds and enhances the impact of multiple initiatives . Tech Prep Inc. is the catalyst bringing all partners together to encourage students to prepare for the future and to acquire the academic and work-related skills necessary for success in postsecondary education, success in the workplace, and success in life.
  • 18. V. Strategic Initiatives Goal 1.0 2002-2006 Strategic Plan <ul><li>Form Working Partnerships That Leverage Regional Resources </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1.1 Increase articulation agreements (high school-college/college-university) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1.2 Market to students, parents, educators, and employers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1.3 Develop/implement memoranda of understanding with other organizations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1.4 Increase business input and support for reality-based learning </li></ul></ul>
  • 19. V. Strategic Initiatives Objectives 1.0 2002-2006 Strategic Plan 1. Form Working Partnerships That Leverage Regional Resources <ul><li>1.1 Increase articulation agreements (high school-college/college-university) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Articulation agreements document partnerships among educational institutions to offer lifelong learning opportunities for Tech Prep students (Performance metric: Number of implemented agreements and institutional and student participation) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>1.2 Market to students, parents, educators, and employers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Participation is proportional to the visibility of Tech Prep Inc.’s programs (Performance metric: Participation of parents, employers, educators, and students; webpage hits; newsletters and other written materials distributed; various media coverage) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>1.3 Develop/implement memoranda of understanding with other organizations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Collaborative contracts with colleges and school districts document split-funded projects that are already underway. Developing and implementing memoranda of understanding (MOUs) with other organizations will ultimately provide a portion of the funding to accomplish the goals in this strategic plan. (Performance metric: increase in split-funded projects) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>1.4 Increase business input and support for reality-based learning </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Employers’ needs are at the heart of the system, providing crucial information for program planning and implementation (Performance metric: Number of labor market reports disseminated; participation of employers in various activities; correlation of program offerings with targeted occupations) </li></ul></ul>
  • 20. V. Strategic Initiatives Goal 2.0 2002-2006 Strategic Plan <ul><li>2.0 Provide Reality-Based Learning </li></ul><ul><ul><li>2.1 Provide staff development for educators and outreach for educators and parents </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2.2 Provide job-shadowing and internships for educators and students </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2.3 Provide cooperative education and apprenticeships for students </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2.4 Provide career fairs, field trips, classroom employer talks, and employer-endorsed work-based curriculum </li></ul></ul>
  • 21. V. Strategic Initiatives Objectives 2.0 2002-2006 Strategic Plan 2.0 Provide reality-based learning <ul><li>2.1 Provide staff development for educators and outreach for educators and parents </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Staff development empowers teachers and counselors; educator and parent outreach informs parents and encourages student participation (Performance metrics: Participation in staff development sessions; participation in S-TEAM and counselors’ networks; types/quantities of resources distributed; educational leader contacts; parent contacts). </li></ul></ul><ul><li>2.2 Provide job shadowing and internships for educators and students </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Observing employers and employees in actual workplaces for short periods of time (job shadowing) and/or spending a short time as an employee in an actual workplace—with or without compensation-- enriches instructional content and helps make learning more relevant to students’ lives. (Performance metric:Participation of students, employers, and educators.) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>2.3 Provide cooperative education and apprenticeships for students </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Learning an occupation through a structured program of academic instruction and actual work is the most appropriate way to prepare students for some jobs. (Performance metric: Participation of students, employers, and educators.) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>2.4 Provide career fairs, field trips, classroom employer talks, and employer-endorsed work-based curriculum </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Activities that showcase employers’ viewpoint enrich classroom content and make learning more relevant for students. (Performance metric: Participation of employers, educators, and students in various activities.) </li></ul></ul>
  • 22. V. Strategic Initiatives Goal 3.0 2002-2006 Strategic Plan <ul><li>Increase Academic Competence </li></ul><ul><ul><li>3.1 Improve academic indicators for secondary students (TAKS, SAT/ACT, attendance, dropouts, graduation, etc.) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3.2 Increase Tech Prep Texas Scholar graduates </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3.3 Increase Tech Prep secondary and post-secondary students in the Rio Grande Valley </li></ul></ul>
  • 23. V. Strategic Initiatives Objectives 3.0 2002-2006 Strategic Plan <ul><li>Increase academic competence </li></ul><ul><li>3.1 Improve academic indicators for secondary students (TAKS, SAT/ACT, attendance, dropouts, graduation, etc.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Academic competence is foundational to acquisition of the academic skills to succeed in postsecondary education and the workplace. (Performance metric: Standardized test scores and other measures reported to state agencies, with results reported to Tech Prep Inc.) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>3.2 Increase Tech Prep Texas Scholar graduates </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Tech Prep Texas Scholar graduates have completed the Recommended or Distinguished Achievement high school graduation plan plus college-level courses in high school. This academic foundation equips students with the skills to succeed in postsecondary education and the workplace. (Performance metric: Number of Tech Prep Texas Scholar graduates and scholarships distributed.) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>3.3 Increase Tech Prep secondary and post-secondary students in the Rio Grande Valley </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Tech Prep programs are designed to address the Rio Grande Valley’s targeted occupations, which are this region’s high-skill, high-wage jobs. Increasing the number of students involved and the number of graduates of these programs will enhance the pool of workers available to employers. (Performance metric: Number of secondary and postsecondary Tech Prep students; number of secondary and postsecondary graduates of Tech Prep programs.) </li></ul></ul>
  • 24. V. Strategic Initiatives Focus on Critical Challenges 2002-2006 Strategic Plan 5. Need for Regional Coordination of Workforce Education and Training 4. Inadequate Educational Infrastructure for Sustaining Industrial Growth 3. Insufficient Technical Skills for High-Tech Workplaces 2. Inadequate Academic & Problem-Solving Skills 1. Shortage of Graduates Critical Challenges (p. 12) Strategic Initiatives (Mission Statement--p. 14) X X X X X Increase academic competence X X X X X Provide reality-based learning X X X X X Form working partnerships that leverage regional resources
  • 25. V. Strategic Initiatives Focus on Critical Challenges 2002-2006 Strategic Plan The facing chart illustrates the intersection of the tasks arising from Tech Prep Inc.’s Mission and the focus on critical challenges for the region. There is a strong match between the area’s needs and Tech Prep Inc.’s strengths. Employers have expressed the desire to have a pool of applicants who are competent in reading, writing, performing arithmetic and mathematical operations, listening and speaking. Meeting this need is a challenge since only 47% of the Valley’s residents have a high-school diploma (versus 72% for the state) and only 14% have some college training (versus 25% state and national averages). Tech Prep Inc.’s goals are designed to address critical challenges and provide the Valley’s employers with a larger group of qualified applicants. Tech Prep Inc. is a catalyst bringing educators and employers together to address the region’s issues. Outcomes to date are encouraging . State evaluation reports for the Rio Grande Valley reflect that Tech Prep students are scoring better than their peers on standardized tests and have better attendance rates, dropout rates, and graduation rates than non-Tech Prep students. Tech Prep students (64% statewide) are entering college and university programs at higher rates than non-Tech Prep students; and the number of Tech Prep students in the region is increasing . Tech Prep Inc.’s strategic initiatives are reduced to specific objectives on pages 18-23. Follow-Up: % RGV Graduates Pursuing Higher Education
  • 26. VI. Performance Metrics Metrics 2002-2006 Strategic Plan 9% increase 9% increase 9% increase 9% increase 15% increase 3.3 Number of secondary and postsecondary Tech Prep students; number of secondary graduates of Tech Prep programs 9% increase 9% increase 9% increase 9% increase 2% increase 3.2 Number of Tech Prep Texas Scholar graduates and scholarships distributed Improvement on measures Improvement on measures Improvement on measures Improvement on measures Improvement on measures 3.1 Standardized tests scores & other measures reported to Tech Prep Inc. by the state 5% increase 5% increase 5% increase 5% increase 200% increase 2.4 Student/employer/educator participation in career fairs, field trips, classroom employer talks, and employer-endorsed work-based curriculum 5% increase 5% increase 4% increase 5% increase 20% increase 2.3 Student/employer participation in cooperative education and apprenticeships 5% increase 5% increase 5% increase 5% increase 204% increase 2.2 Student/employer/educator participation in job shadowing and internships 3% increase 3% increase 4% increase 3% increase 3% increase 2.1 Participation in staff development & in S-TEAM and Counselors’ Networks; resources distributed; contacts 5% increase 5% increase 5% increase 5% increase 5% increase 1.4 Number of labor market reports disseminated; participation of employers in various activities; correlation of program offerings with targeted occupations 6% increase 6% increase 5% increase 82% increase 244% increase 1.3 Increase in split-funded projects 5% increase 5% increase 5% increase 5% increase 5% increase 1.2 Participation of parents and students; webpage hits; newsletters and other written materials distributed; various media coverage. 0.6% increase 0.6% increase 0.6% increase 0.4% increase 0.4% increase 1.1 Number of implemented agreements and institutional participation 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 Objective
  • 27. VI. Performance Metrics Metrics 2002-2006 Strategic Plan Some of the performance metrics listed above are activity measures (e.g., number of webpage hits) and others are outcome measures (e.g., standardized test scores and other measures reported to Tech Prep Inc. by state agencies). Performance goals have been set according to the projected level of achievement in each area. Tech Prep Inc.’s board must observe these measures for positive trends as the total number of students in the population group increases. The intent of all performance metrics is to provide the Board with objective measures that can be used to evaluate effectiveness of programs and to make necessary adjustments as the organization moves forward toward accomplishment of its mission Some activities are measured locally, and a significant amount of local data is already being captured through systems that have been set in place. Some performance metrics are dependent on receipt of data from state agencies, and state data collection is ongoing. Performance measures reported by the state are reported in percentages for large population groups. % RGV High School Graduates Completing College-Preparatory Plans, 1999-2000
  • 28. VII. Operational Issues Current Services and Outflows 2002-2006 Strategic Plan REVENUES EXPENSES
  • 29. VII. Operational Issues Current Services and Outflows 2002-2006 Strategic Plan Tech Prep Inc.’s budget is limited —only a fraction of that available to other solution providers. Much of Tech Prep Inc.’s work is done through its staff , who set up and facilitate employer-educator forums and provide technical assistance, staff development, and resources for educators implementing programs. Outsourcing some services to contractors with special expertise reduces costs and enhances potential for success. As expected, then, a large portion of Tech Prep Inc.’s budget goes to staff salaries and contracting with outside resources to market Tech Prep Inc.’s programs and encourage participation in the “change initiatives” advocated by Tech Prep Inc. There are many federal and state initiatives targeting workforce development and workforce education in the Valley, creating a proliferation of projects that have the potential to compete for the time and attention of educators, students, and parents. Aligning projects and leveraging funds through partnerships with other organizations increases both the total funding available for Tech Prep Inc.’s initiatives and the potential for success . With School-to-Careers funds ending soon, Tech Prep Inc. must secure adequate funding to provide necessary services , including staffing patterns and subcontracts to support the regional system. This funding will be found both through funds coming directly to Tech Prep Inc. and through partnerships with other organizations. Funding for Tech Prep Inc.
  • 30. VII. Operational Issues Organization 2002-2006 Strategic Plan Position currently approved Projected need NOTE: The above chart represents functions and does not represent current (funded) staffing.
  • 31. VII. Operational Issues Organization 2002-2006 Strategic Plan The organizational chart on the facing page is a functional organization chart and is not representative of current staffing patterns. Staff members play multiple roles, according to the duties assigned to their positions. Marketing and Sales includes direct marketing to students--facilitated by Tech Prep Inc.’s articulated credit-tracking system, student and parent presentations, and superintendent and educational leader contacts, plus Tech Prep Inc.’s webpage, newsletters, forums, and media events. This function also involves direct contacts leading to student enrollment in Tech Prep programs and is accomplished through contacts by staff and contractors, as well as by educators from schools, colleges, and universities. Curriculum and Business Development involves recruiting employers and working with employers to involve them in the system, gather their opinions, and form partnerships for the reality-based components of the Tech Prep system. This function involves utilizing employers’ input and educators’ expertise to develop and implement articulation agreements and contextual, reality-based instructional methodologies, as well as the counseling and advisement strategies necessary to inform parents and encourage student participation. Staff development to support reality-based learning is a crucial component of this system.
  • 32. VII. Operational Issues Fiscal Issues 2002-2006 Strategic Plan
  • 33. VII. Operational Issues Fiscal Issues 2002-2006 Strategic Plan The successes Tech Prep Inc. has experienced to date are encouraging for the Rio Grande Valley, as well as for Texas as a whole. Tech Prep Inc. has funded its initiatives with a combination of Tech Prep and School-to-Careers funds, leveraged with funds contributed by school districts, colleges, foundations, and the private sector. With School-to-Careers funds ending soon, Tech Prep Inc. must secure adequate funding to maintain services , including staffing patterns and subcontracts necessary to support the regional system. To secure the necessary funds for continued forward momentum, Tech Prep Inc. must address funding issues through the strategies identified below. Tech Prep Inc. should enter into fee-for-service contracts as appropriate opportunities are available and should also begin immediately to solicit grant funding from federal, state, local, and private foundation grant sources. Secure funding through fee-for-service contracts and through federal, state, local, and private foundation grants, plus matching funds from local employers Tech Prep Inc. needs local discretionary funds to underwrite Tech Prep Texas Scholars and scholarships, both valuable marketing tools, to support local S-TEAMs, and to pay for grant-writing services to secure funding from multiple sources. Conduct a local fund-raising campaign to fund scholarships, Tech Prep Texas Scholars, and S-TEAMs and to provide funds for grant-writing services Tech Prep Inc.’s experience as a subcontractor of the Texas Workforce Commission and its memoranda of understanding with local workforce boards have positioned the organization to manage youth funds for local boards. There are eligibility restrictions on students who can be served with these funds, and those funds can be leveraged with other funding streams. Become a subcontractor of, or split-fund projects with, local workforce development boards Comments Strategy
  • 34. VIII. Board Operations 2002-2006 Strategic Plan Structure
  • 35. VIII. Board Operations 2002-2006 Strategic Plan <ul><li>Tech Prep Inc. Board of Directors is elected by, and accountable to, Tech Prep Inc.’s stakeholders. The Board has set up an operational structure that is serving well to facilitate regional communication. Several committees (Marketing and Awards, Partnerships, Curriculum/Work-Based Learning, Professional Development, Universities/Colleges) are open to membership of interested community representatives, yet chaired by Board members to maintain accountability by the Board. Working committees are as follows: </li></ul><ul><li>Curriculum/Work-Based Learning —facilitates curriculum development and implementation </li></ul><ul><li>Executive Committee --provides leadership for Board; authorized to act for Board if necessary; leads annual review of strategic plan and monitors progress </li></ul><ul><li>Finance and Bylaws —reviews/recommends financial reports and budget recommendations; reviews/recommends modifications to corporate Bylaws </li></ul><ul><li>Marketing and Awards —develops marketing campaigns; oversees Tech Prep Texas Scholars and scholarship awards </li></ul><ul><li>Nominations —recommends directors, associates, and officers for election/appointment </li></ul><ul><li>Partnerships —monitors progress on MOUs; leads resource development; develops labor market report in collaboration with chambers of commerce, economic development organizations, and workforce boards </li></ul><ul><li>Professional Development —manages S-TEAM & counselors’ networks, MTL program, and related activities </li></ul><ul><li>Technology Initiatives —leads development of e-learning and e-training initiatives, including, but not limited to, work with Tech Prep Inc.’s webpage and Internet </li></ul><ul><li>Universities and Colleges —works to recruit, identify, and retain students in postsecondary institutions and to promote collaboration among institutions of higher education in the region </li></ul>Structure
  • 36. IX. Acknowledgments 2002-2006 Strategic Plan <ul><li>It is important to thank the individuals whose commitment and hard work have led Tech Prep Inc. through its first ten years in the Valley. Those individuals include: </li></ul><ul><li>U.S. Senator Phil Gramm , who ensured that the federal Perkins Act included language about private-sector leadership for Tech Prep </li></ul><ul><li>State Senator Eddie Lucio, Jr., and Representative Jim Solis , who sponsored the Texas Tech-Prep Act and the other members of the Rio Grande Valley legislative delegation who worked for passage of that bill </li></ul><ul><li>Cameron Works, Inc. , WorkFORCE Solutions , the South Texas Workforce Development Board , the Cross-Border Institute for Regional Development (CBIRD ), and The EnterTech Project —all of which are organizations with which Tech Prep Inc. has already developed memoranda of understanding </li></ul><ul><li>The chambers of commerce , economic development organizations , and employers and employer organizations that provide support for Tech Prep Inc.’s initiatives as they work for the economic development of this region </li></ul><ul><li>The independent school districts , colleges and universities , Region One Education Service Center , the South Texas Career and Technology Administrators and Supervisors Association , and other educational partners who implement programs and initiatives </li></ul><ul><li>Tech Prep Inc.’s stakeholders and the visionary leaders who serve on Tech Prep Inc.’s Board of Directors and working committees. </li></ul>
  • 37. X. Stakeholders 2002-2006 Strategic Plan Tech Prep Inc.’s stakeholders are its voting members, who are named below: Stakeholders COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES (cont.) Texas A&M University Corpus Christi--Weslaco Extension Texas State Technical College The University of Texas at Brownsville The University of Texas-Pan American WORKFORCE BOARDS Cameron Works, Inc. Lower Rio Grande Workforce Development Board dba WorkFORCE Solutions OTHERS Area II, Southern, Business Prof. of America, Secondary Cameron County Bar Association Cameron County Legal Secretaries Association Communication Workers of America Local 6229 Motivation, Education & Training (MET) Region One Education Service Center South Texas Assn of CATE Admin & Sup Teach for America--Rio Grande Valley Texas Business Ed Assn, District One Texas Workforce Commission INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICTS Brownsville ISD Donna ISD Edcouch-Elsa ISD Edinburg CISD Harlingen CISD Hidalgo ISD La Feria ISD La Joya ISD La Villa ISD Lasara ISD Los Fresnos CISD Lyford CISD McAllen ISD Mercedes ISD Mission CISD Monte Alto ISD PSJA ISD Point Isabel ISD Progreso ISD Raymondville ISD Rio Grande City ISD Rio Hondo ISD San Benito CISD San Perlita ISD Santa Maria ISD Santa Rosa ISD Sharyland ISD South Texas ISD Valley View ISD Webb CISD Weslaco ISD COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES South Texas Community College Texas Southmost College Texas A&M University College Station--Colonias Program
  • 38. XI. Board of Directors 2002-2006 Strategic Plan The members of Tech Prep Inc.’s Board of Directors are named below: BOARD OF DIRECTORS DIRECTORS ROGERIO V. ARREDONDO, CATE Director, Brownsville ISD JOSE CALVILLO, JR., Community Volunteer, Weslaco (former CATE Director, Weslaco ISD, Weslaco) MARILYN A. DEL BOSQUE GILBERT, Manager of Key Accounts, Brownsville Public Utilities Board MARIA NUEZ HALL, Agent, Allstate Insurance Co., Brownsville JOSE G. MARTIN, Ph.D., Provost & Vice President of Academic Affairs, UTB/TSC, Brownsville NORBERTO (BETO) SALINAS, Mayor of Mission and President, Salinas & Flores Land Developers, Mission CELESTE SANCHEZ, Asst. Supt, San Benito CISD JON M. SCHILL, VP/Gen. Manager, RioVision, Inc., Weslaco SANTIAGO SILVA, Ph.D., VP for Student Services & Development, South Texas Community College, McAllen ANTONIO ZAVALETA, PH.D., Vice President for External Affairs, University of Texas at Brownsville/Texas Southmost College (continued on next page) EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE ED TAMAYO, Executive Vice President, First National Bank of San Benito-Harlingen—President and Board Chair ADRIAN A. ARRIAGA, CCIM, CEA, Broker/Owner, AAA Real Estate & Investments, McAllen—Vice President STEPHEN M. VASSBERG, Associate Dean, Economic Development/Industrial Training, TSTC, Harlingen--Treasurer RAY ELLEDGE, Management Consultant, Harlingen J. GILBERT LEAL, PH.D., President, TSTC, Harlingen CESAR MALDONADO, P.E., VP of Manufacturing Systems,Assa Abloy Door Group, Harlingen MOOSE MILLER, CEO, Moose Miller Enterprises, Harlingen JANICE H. MUMFORD, Community Volunteer, McAllen (former Asst. Supt. of Curric. & Instruction, McAllen ISD) SAM O. OLIVAREZ, Pres., Barrera’s Supply Co., Inc., Mission ARNOLD PEDRAZA, Dir. for E-Business Solutions; TWIN Wireless Internet, McAllen PERRY A. VAUGHN, Executive Director, RGV Chapter, Associated General Contractors of America, Inc., Harlingen LINDA WADE, Ph.D., Superintendent, Harlingen CISD
  • 39. XI. Board of Directors 2002-2006 Strategic Plan The members of Tech Prep Inc.’s Board of Directors are named below: BOARD OF DIRECTORS (cont.) SCOTT OWINGS, Assistant Superintendent of Curriculum and Instruction, McAllen ISD MARK RAINEY, PHR, Assistant Administrator, Human Resources, South Texas Health Systems (McAllen Medical Center, Edinburg Regional Medical Center, UHS Rehabilitation Pavilion), Edinburg CAROL RAUSCH-BRADEN, Assistant to the President, The University of Texas-Pan American HILARIO (LARRY) RINCONES, Associate Director for Service Provider and Resident Organizations, College of Architecture, Center for Housing and Urban Development, Texas A&M University-College Station, Weslaco RON TUPPER, M.S., Director, South Texas Center for Rural Public Health, Texas A&M University Health Science Center LUCY G. YBARRA, Career and Technology Education Director, Mission CISD ASSOCIATE MEMBERS EDUARDO A. CAMPIRANO, Assistant General Manager, Brownsville Public Utilities Board, Brownsville ROSA G. (ROSIE) CAVAZOS, District Director, Office of U.S. Congressman Rubén Hinojosa, McAllen CHARLES CHAMPION, JR., Special Projects Officer, Brownsville ISD - Career and Technology Dept. MONIKA GALVAN, Student, Texas State Technical College NATALIA GUERRA, Student, Mission High School JENNIE HARPOLD, Tech Prep Advisor, STCC, McAllen ANITA G. LOZANO, Jones Galligan Key & Lozano, LLP, Attorneys at Law, Weslaco CHRIS MARTINEZ; President, Communication Workers of America Local 6229 SCOTT MCVITTIE, PH.D., Acting Tech Prep Director, UTB/TSC
  • 40. XII. Data Sources 2002-2006 Strategic Plan <ul><li>Pages 9 and 31–Secondary student enrollment data: Closing the Gaps: How Tech-Prep Programs Have Increased Participation and Success in Texas Schools—A Five-Year Study (Statewide Tech-Prep Evaluation, Region 5 Education Service Center, Feb. 2001). </li></ul><ul><li>Page 9—Governor Rick Perry’s State of the State address (available online through the Texas Governor’s website) </li></ul><ul><li>Page 11—Report of the House Economic Development Committee (available online through the Texas Legislature’s website). </li></ul><ul><li>Page 15—RGV student graduation rates: Regional Profile provided as supplemental report to Closing the Gaps report. </li></ul><ul><li>Page 16—Information for the Region One Education Service Center, Cameron Works, Inc., and WorkFORCE Solutions was provided by those organizations. </li></ul><ul><li>Page 25—RGV literacy levels—University of Texas-Pan American, Data and Information Systems Center, citing U.S. Census figures, 1990 Census; graduates pursuing higher education, Regional Profile provided as supplemental report to Closing the Gaps report; state higher education participation data: Closing the Gaps report. </li></ul><ul><li>Page 27—RGV high school graduates completing college-preparatory plans: Regional Profile provided as supplemental report to Closing the Gaps report. </li></ul><ul><li>Page 29—Tech Prep implementation funds and School-to-Careers implementation funds are reported separately. “Other” funds includes special grants (Counselors’ Network, TEA School-to-Careers funds, School-to-Work AP funds), MTL subscriptions, foundation grants, and donations supporting CEOs’ events and scholarships. Figures for 2002-2003 are projections based on current funding sources. </li></ul>

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