CUP Report Tuesday 2 February 2010
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CUP Report Tuesday 2 February 2010 CUP Report Tuesday 2 February 2010 Document Transcript

  • CUP: February 2, 2010 Report to the Senate from Committee on Undergraduate Programs Chair: Laura Reissner First Reading: February 2, 2010 Subjects: 1. Department of Health, Physical Education & Recreation: a. Create a new course: RE 482 New and Portable Media in Interpretation (3 cr.) b. Revise the bulletin description for RE 382 Interpretation II: Self- Guided Media c. Revise the Outdoor Recreation Leadership and Management major by: i. Removing the following courses from the major: 1. RE 294 Field Work (A, B, C and/or D) (3 cr.) 2. MKT 230 Introduction to Marketing (4 cr.) ii. Adding the following courses to the major: 1. RE 482 New and Portable Media in Interpretation (3 cr.) 2. MKT 430 Services Marketing (4 cr.) d. Revise the Interpretation and Outdoor Education minor by: i. Removing the following courses from the minor: 1. RE 155 Outdoor Living Skills (2 cr.) 2. RE 371 Protected Area management (3 cr.) ii. Adding the following course to the minor: 1. RE 482 New and Portable Media in Interpretation (3 cr.) 2. Clinical Sciences Department/ Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences: a. Create a new course: SL 370 Observation in Speech, Language, and Hearing Science (2 cr.) b. Add the following courses to the Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences major: i. SL 370 Observation in Speech, Language, and Hearing Science (2 cr.) ii. SL 465 Methods of Treatment (4 cr.) c. Revise the prerequisites for the following courses: i. SL 200 Phonetics (4 cr.) ii. SL 220 Speech and Voice Science (4 cr.) iii. SL 351 Introduction to Audiology (4 cr.) iv. SL 355 Language Development (4 cr.) v. SL 459 Cognitive Neuroscience (4 cr.) vi. SL 464 Methods of Diagnosis (4 cr.) d. Revise the bulletin description for the following courses: CUP report to the Senate, February 2, 2010 Page1 of 22
  • CUP: February 2, 2010 i. SL 356 Language Disorders (4 cr.) ii. SL 357 Fluency Disorders (4 cr.) e. Revise the bulletin description and prerequisites for the following courses: i. SL 359 Introduction to Neurogenics (4 cr.) ii. SL 400 Phonological Disorders (4 cr.) iii. SL 460 Cognition and Aging (4 cr.) iv. SL 465 Methods of Treatment (4 cr.) 3. Departments of History and Modern Languages and Literatures a. Create a new course: HS/GR 311 (X) Central European Culture and Civilization (4 cr.) 4. Department of Technology and Occupational Sciences: a. Create the following new courses: i. HM 220 Hospitality Management Corporate Communication (Disney) (3 cr.) ii. HM 221 Disney Experiential Learning (3 cr.) iii. HM 222 Advanced Studies in Hospitality Management (Disney) (3 cr.) iv. HM 223 Hospitality Personnel Management (Disney) (3 cr.) v. HM 224 Organizational Leadership for the Hospitality Industry (Disney) (3 cr.) vi. HM 225 Hospitality Management Corporate Analysis (Disney) (3 cr.) vii. HM 226 Marketing You: Personal and Career Development (Disney) (3 cr.) viii. HM 227 Hospitality Management Creativity & Innovation (Disney) (3 cr.) Recommendations: 1. Department of Health, Physical Education & Recreation: a. Create a new course: RE 482 New and Portable Media in Interpretation (3 cr.) Proposed Bulletin Description: RE 482 New and Portable Media in Interpretation 3 cr. (2-0-2) Prerequisites: Senior standing and RE 381 Planning, design and production of multimedia interpretive programs for use on portable media devices (e.g., iPods, smart phones, and tablet PC’s). Course includes the exploration of the use of locative media and object-based media in parks, museums and visitor centers. Abbreviation: New Media in Interp CUP report to the Senate, February 2, 2010 Page2 of 22
  • CUP: February 2, 2010 Rationale: RE 482 New and Portable Media in Interpretation is a logical enhancement of RE 382 (Self-guided Media). Adding 482 would permit students to focus more accurately on written self-guided interpretation (i.e., brochures, booklets, newsletters, signs and exhibits) in RE 382 while RE 482 would focus on new media or purely digital publication in interpretation (i.e. audio and video podcasts, digital magazines and movies). Currently, students are overloaded trying to learn both print design and digital media design in RE 382. A distinct course for digital, or new media, is needed to provide students with proficiency in all media aspects of interpretation. b. Revise the bulletin description for RE 382 Interpretation II: Self- Guided Media Rationale: The creation of RE 482 allows RE 382 to focus on interpretive series including publications, exhibits, signs, self-guided tours and trails. See Appendix A for complete bulletin changes related to this proposal. c. Revise the Outdoor Recreation Leadership and Management major by: i. Removing the following courses from the major: 1. RE 294 Field Work (A, B, C and/or D) (3 cr.) Rationale: Field experiences are still important in the curriculum but will be accommodated through portfolio requirements already in place in the Professional Development seminars (RE 191, RE 291 and RE 391) and in the Professional Assessment Seminar (RE 491) in order to make room for the new RE 482 course. 2. MKT 230 Introduction to Marketing (4 cr.) Rationale: The majority of agencies in the profession are service agencies. MKT 430 provides marketing strategies that are specifically targeted for the service industry. It is a better fit than MKT 230. ii. Adding the following courses to the major: 1. RE 482 New and Portable Media in Interpretation (3 cr.) Rationale: RE 482 New and Portable Media in Interpretation is a logical enhancement of RE 382 (Self-guided Media). Adding 482 would permit the department to focus more accurately on written self-guided interpretation (i.e., brochures, booklets, newsletters, signs and exhibits) in RE 382 while RE 482 would focus on new media or purely digital publication in interpretation (i.e. audio and video podcasts, digital magazines and movies). A distinct course for digital, or new media, is needed to provide students with proficiency in all media aspects of interpretation. 2. MKT 430 Services Marketing (4 cr.) Rationale: The majority of agencies in our profession are service agencies. MKT 430 provides marketing strategies that are specifically targeted for the service industry. CUP report to the Senate, February 2, 2010 Page3 of 22
  • CUP: February 2, 2010 d. Revise the Interpretation and Outdoor Education minor by: i. Removing the following courses from the minor: 1. RE 155 Outdoor Living Skills (2 cr.) 2. RE 371 Protected Area management (3 cr.) Rationale: In order to accommodate the new RE 482 class these courses were seen as the most appropriate ones to delete given the general content and expectations of the minor. The other remaining courses have a more direct correlation with the minor than do RE 155 and RE 371. ii. Adding the following course to the minor: 1. RE 482 New and Portable Media in Interpretation (3 cr.) Rationale: RE 482 New and Portable Media in Interpretation is a logical enhancement of RE 382 (Self-guided Media). Adding 482 would permit the department to focus more accurately on written self-guided interpretation (i.e., brochures, booklets, newsletters, signs and exhibits) in RE 382 while RE 482 would focus on new media or purely digital publication in interpretation (i.e. audio and video podcasts, digital magazines and movies). A distinct course for digital, or new media, is needed to provide students with proficiency in all media aspects of interpretation. Effect on other Departments: The College of Business was contacted and supports the change from MKT 230 to MKT 430. Staffing: No additional faculty will be needed to teach these courses. Costs: There will be an increased expense for the RE 482 course as Adobe Photoshop will be required. Additional licenses will have to be purchased. Implementation Date: Fall 2010 2. Clinical Sciences Department/ Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences: a. Create a new course: SL 370 Observation in Speech, Language, and Hearing Science (2 cr.) Proposed Bulletin Description: SL 370 Observation in Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences 2 cr. Offered: Fall, Summer Prerequisite: SL 150, SL160, SL 200, SL355; SL356 may be taken concurrently, junior standing or instructor's permission. Students complete 25 hours of supervised clinical observation as required by the American Speech-Language-and-Hearing Association (ASHA). Rationale: A separate course that focused on clinical observation was part of the curriculum prior to 2006 (CD 370). Based on the recommendations of an external evaluator which led to reorganization within the Department, the Observation course was CUP report to the Senate, February 2, 2010 Page4 of 22
  • CUP: February 2, 2010 eliminated and the content incorporated into two other courses (SL357: Fluency Disorders and SL400: Phonological Disorders). Clinical observation is a pre-professional requirement of the American Speech-Language-and-Hearing Association (ASHA) Document: Knowledge and Skills Acquisition (KASA) for Certification in Speech- Language Pathology. The faculty in SLHS has determined that a) there is sufficient content within SL357 and SL400 to offer these courses without the observation component and b) many students have been unable to complete the observation requirement within these courses which has resulted in Incompletes. For this reason, SLHS wishes to re-institute a separate clinical observation course. See Appendix B for all bulletin changes related to this proposal. b. Add the following courses to the Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences major: i. SL 370 Observation in Speech, Language, and Hearing Science (2 cr.) Rationale: Many students have been unable to complete the observation requirement within other courses which has resulted in incompletes. Reinstating the SL 370 course as a separate clinical observation course will help students complete program requirements in a timely manner. ii. SL 465 Methods of Treatment (4 cr.) Rationale: In 2006, the department decided to continue to offer an existing course, SL465 (Methods of Treatment), as an elective. This course includes one hour of lecture/discussion of treatment methods in speech, language, and hearing sciences and supervised clinical practicum with one or more clients in the Speech and Hearing Clinic at NMU. Initially we chose to offer SL465 as an elective because not all students in the major met the minimum qualifications. The course has since been revised so that all students in the major will have clinical experiences prior to completion of the baccalaureate degree. This capstone experience prepares students to be successful in their application to graduate programs in speech-language pathology or audiology or qualifies them for positions as speech/language pathology assistants which is a baccalaureate-level position. c. Revise the prerequisites for the following courses: i. SL 200 Phonetics (4 cr.) Rationale: Students must understand the basic anatomy and physiology of the speech mechanisms in order to acquire knowledge in how speech sounds are produced. These prerequisites will ensure students have the appropriate background for success. ii. SL 220 Speech and Voice Science (4 cr.) Rationale: SL220 requires a working knowledge of the International Phonetics Alphabet and the physiological basis for speech production. These are covered in SL200. CUP report to the Senate, February 2, 2010 Page5 of 22
  • CUP: February 2, 2010 iii. SL 351 Introduction to Audiology (4 cr.) Rationale: Adding the Physics course which is required for the major (PH101 or PH102) as a prerequisite encourages students within the major to complete a foundation in physics prior to undertaking specialized content within acoustics. This was the intent of ASHA when foundation courses in Physics, Biology, Behavioral Sciences, and Math were added to the Certification requirements within the profession. iv. SL 355 Language Development (4 cr.) Rationale: The content in SL200 (Phonetics) forms the basis for study of the development of phonology which is covered in this class. v. SL 459 Cognitive Neuroscience (4 cr.) Rationale: Students within the major have been enrolling in this class without basic foundation knowledge in Biology. This class was intended for students to take within their senior year after successfully completing SL359 but many students enroll during their junior year, taking this course out of the sequence in which it was originally intended. vi. SL 464 Methods of Diagnosis (4 cr.) Rationale: Students should have completed SL 355 before enrolling in this course in order to have the necessary background knowledge. d. Revise the bulletin description for the following courses: i. SL 356 Language Disorders (4 cr.) Rationale: Academic Service Learning is not included on a regular basis. ii. SL 357 Fluency Disorders (4 cr.) Rationale: Clinical observation is removed from SL357 and this content is placed within a new course, SL370. e. Revise the bulletin description and prerequisites for the following courses: i. SL 359 Introduction to Neurogenics (4 cr.) Rationale: SL150 is the introductory course within the major. Academic service learning is not included in this course on a regular basis. ii. SL 400 Phonological Disorders (4 cr.) CUP report to the Senate, February 2, 2010 Page6 of 22
  • CUP: February 2, 2010 Rationale: Clinical observation is removed from SL400 and this content is placed within a new course, SL370. Adding SL 160 will ensure students have necessary prerequisites for success in the course. iii. SL 460 Cognition and Aging (4 cr.) Rationale: Since SL460 covers content in areas within the Behavioral Sciences, the foundation course of PY100 is added a prerequisite. In addition, like SL459, this course was designed for students to take during their senior year, following the completion of the majority of courses within the major and students have taken this course out of the sequence in which it was originally intended. SL460 is a required course for the Gerontology minor. Gerontology minors are not expected to meet the prerequisites within the major but should have the basic content available in PY100 which is the introductory course in psychology at NMU. iv. SL 465 Methods of Treatment (4 cr.) Rationale: Updates requirements for the course and expectations of students. Effect on other Departments: None Staffing: No additional faculty will be needed to teach these courses. Costs: There are no additional costs associated with these changes. Physical facilities are currently adequate to meet the needs of course changes. Implementation Date: Fall 2010 3. Departments of History and Modern Languages and Literatures a. Create a new course: HS/GR 311 (X) Central European Culture and Civilization (4 cr.) Proposed Bulletin Description: HS/GR 311 (X): Central European Culture and Civilization [Cent Europe Cult/Civ] 4 cr. Prerequisites: EN 211 with a grade of "C" or better or HON 102 and HON 112 and sophomore standing. If part of a FLSA, instructor permission and completion of all OIA documents. A multidisciplinary introduction to the culture and civilization of Central Europe, loosely defined as the lands of the Hapsburg Empire, and a comprehensive view of the historical, geographical, political and economic factors which have helped shape today’s Central Europe.* *Note: When offered as 311X, a mandatory field experience abroad will be required. CUP report to the Senate, February 2, 2010 Page7 of 22
  • CUP: February 2, 2010 Rationale: The course builds upon the experiences of the Vienna Study Abroad Program run since 2003 by Dr. Goodrich and Dr. Strauss, and in 2009 by Dr. Sherman, as an interdisciplinary experience that links language immersion with cultural and historical study in Vienna, Austria. It has thus been offered in a variety of forms as a FLSA but without a Bulletin course designation and description that precisely represents the emphasis on Central Europe, historically the German-speaking lands of the Hapsburg Empire. This course would create these through a cross listing that draws on the shared expertise in German Studies of the MLL and HS faculty. The rich experience of leading faculty-led study abroad by Drs. Goodrich (History) and Strauss and Sherman (Modern Languages and Literatures) has underscored both the student and faculty interest in these field experiences and the need to create a clear listing for them. The course would be listed as an elective toward the major and the minor in International studies (See Appendix C), as an elective toward the major or the minor in History, and as an elective toward the German minor and the Secondary Education German minor listed under “Course descriptions” in German and History. Effect on other Departments: None Staffing: No additional faculty will be needed to teach these courses. Costs: There are no additional costs associated with this program Implementation Date: Fall 2010 4. Department of Technology and Occupational Sciences: a. Create the following new courses: i. HM 220 Hospitality Management Corporate Communication (Disney) (3 cr.) Proposed Bulletin Description: HM 220 Hospitality Management Corporate Communication (Disney) 3 cr. Offered: Contact department for information. Graded: Pass/Fail Introduces students to hospitality management corporate communication reaching a variety of publics including customers, investors, employees, media, agencies and communities located in the proximity of the corporation. Students gain greater understanding of the Disney corporate communication process. Rationale: Walt Disney College’s “real world” programs are designed to meet the learning needs of adults in today’s hospitality business world; hence, NMU’s Hospitality Management Program is proposing an academic partnership with Disney. Proposed Disney courses have been approved by the American Council on Education and would be taught by Disney faculty at the Orlando site. Courses would be offered by NMU for elective credit and all tuition dollars would be paid to Northern. • The rigorous course content provides students with tools to apply their learning on the job, help them continuously improve their interpersonal skills, expose them to a diverse CUP report to the Senate, February 2, 2010 Page8 of 22
  • CUP: February 2, 2010 organization, and offer them relevant educational experiences, training, and development for more than 3,000 plus job classifications at Disney World. Objectives for the course include: Identify key functions of organizational communication departments within a corporation • Identify the design of a corporate communication strategic planning model • Recognize special communication functions, including government, investor, and consumer relations • Recognize the significance of communication research • Appreciate the value of cost-effective communication planning • Define and identify the impact of communication technologies on reputation management and surveillance functions • Explore problem solving strategies associated with crisis communication ii. HM 221 Disney Experiential Learning (3 cr.) Proposed Bulletin Description: HM 221 Disney Experiential Learning 3 cr. Offered: Contact department for information. Graded: Pass/Fail Combines academic classroom education with on-site learning opportunities across the Walt Disney World Resort property. Centers on theories of adult education, experiential learning, the role of learning in corporations, and the importance of intellectual capital. Rationale: Walt Disney College’s “real world” programs are designed to meet the learning needs of adults in today’s hospitality business world; hence, NMU’s Hospitality Management Program is proposing an academic partnership with Disney. After completing this course, the student should be able to: • Recognize the importance of adult education and commitment to life-long learning • Build transferable skills and knowledge related to adult learning styles • Integrate experiential learning, academic learning, and work-related experiences to their experiential learning assignments • Explore the historical foundations of adult learning (Erik Erikson, Carl Jung, Abraham Maslow, Fritz Perls, Jean Piaget) • Explore the learning theories of John Dewey, Malcolm Knowles, David Kolb, Kurt Lewin, Edward L. Throndike, Peter Senge, and Thomas Stewart • Identify and participate in self-directed learning activities at the Disney Learning Centers • Participate in at least one career insight activity designed to promote understanding of a variety of career paths and various lines of business • Explore the value of diversity on a personal and a professional level • Learn the benefit and value of community service on a corporate as well as a personal level CUP report to the Senate, February 2, 2010 Page9 of 22
  • CUP: February 2, 2010 • Engage in specific guest experiences to identify the value of and relationship between education and entertainment iii. HM 222 Advanced Studies in Hospitality Management (Disney) (3 cr.) Proposed Bulletin Description: HM 222 Advanced Studies in Hospitality Management (Disney) 3 cr. Offered: Contact department for information. Graded: Pass/Fail Prepares students to become entry-level managers in the Hospitality Industry by exposing them to contemporary operational situations and equipping them with the ability to analyze problems and develop solutions. Rationale: Walt Disney College’s “real world” programs are designed to meet the learning needs of adults in today’s hospitality business world; hence, NMU’s Hospitality Management Program is proposing an academic partnership with Disney. After completing this course, the student should be able to: • Define effective leadership and describe its importance • Explain the concept of strategic management and the strategic planning process • Research a hospitality provider and conduct an organizational analysis • Examine individual and group behavior within an organization • Analyze operational issues and propose recommendations • Develop fair, cost-effective guest service recoveries • Identify various issues related to human resource functions • Evaluate the ethical ramifications of contemporary issues • Conduct an operational audit and critique the quality of a hospitality provided • Discuss the civil and legal rights and duties of travelers and innkeepers • Evaluate the impact of terrorism on the travel and tourism industry • Discuss the hospitality manager’s role in creating a safe and secure environment • Explore technological advances driving efficiency and competition • Examine market forces affecting growth in the hospitality industry • Explore new technology, products and services for the 21st century guest • Predict new trends for the next decade iv. HM 223 Hospitality Personnel Management (Disney) (3 cr.) Proposed Bulletin Description: HM 223 Hospitality Personnel Management (Disney) 3 cr. Offered: Contact department for information. Graded: Pass/Fail Explores personnel management for the corporate setting focusing on the development of knowledge and skills that all managers and leaders need. Emphasis CUP report to the Senate, February 2, 2010 Page10 of 22
  • CUP: February 2, 2010 on the selection process, employment law, labor relations, compensation, performance development, and Disney corporate training. Rationale: Walt Disney College’s “real world” programs are designed to meet the learning needs of adults in today’s hospitality business world; hence, NMU’s Hospitality Management Program is proposing an academic partnership with Disney. After completing this course, the student should be able to: • Examine current people management laws, practices, ethics and globalization in the areas of the selection process, employment law, labor relations, compensation, performance development, corporate training and maintaining effective environments • Explore guidelines and processes around conducting effective interviews • Outline current laws impacting human resource compliance, employment and labor relations • Discuss theory and practice of compensation, employee benefits, performance development and retention • Explore learning theories and effective Disney corporate training techniques • Discuss the impact of effective environments and techniques to maintain a healthy working atmosphere • Apply human resource skills to complete case study assignments and participation in class discussions v. HM 224 Organizational Leadership for the Hospitality Industry (Disney) (3 cr.) Proposed Bulletin Description: HM 224 Organizational Leadership for the Hospitality Industry (Disney) 3 cr. Offered: Contact department for information. Graded: Pass/Fail Examines principles of leadership making specific application to the Disney culture. Designed to build transferable knowledge and skills in community and commerce. Delivered by a subject-matter expert in the field of leadership through lectures, group discussions, self-assessment, and project development. Rationale: Walt Disney College’s “real world” programs are designed to meet the learning needs of adults in today’s hospitality business world; hence, NMU’s Hospitality Management Program is proposing an academic partnership with Disney. After completing this course, the student should be able to: • Explore leadership theory and research to formulate personal attributes and behaviors • Develop thesis-driven research skills resulting in a 1,500-word paper, project, portfolio, and presentation • Explore leadership skills through participation in all of the organizational leadership classes and activities CUP report to the Senate, February 2, 2010 Page11 of 22
  • CUP: February 2, 2010 • Develop a learning community for the free and open expression of leadership theory and research • Assess and examine personal beliefs, styles, and leadership behaviors to increase self-awareness and reduce interaction blind spots vi. HM 225 Hospitality Management Corporate Analysis (Disney) (3 cr.) Proposed Bulletin Description: HM 225 Hospitality Management Corporate Analysis (Disney) 3 cr. Offered: Contact department for information. Graded: Pass/Fail Designed to meet a student’s need for an integrated work-study internship program that provides transferable knowledge and skills to all participants. Content is delivered through lectures, group discussions, and situational studies. Rationale: Walt Disney College’s “real world” programs are designed to meet the learning needs of adults in today’s hospitality business world; hence, NMU’s Hospitality Management Program is proposing an academic partnership with Disney. Upon completion of this course, the successful student will be able to: • Explain the traditions, cultures, business philosophy, and service standards of Disney, a multi-national corporation. • Clarify participant expectations regarding the College Program Educational experience. • Describe the key program components, requirements, and expectations for the Disney Learning experience. • Describe the scope of diversity and culture in managing a multi-cultural organization. • Identify his/her predominate behavioral/communication style utilizing tools to improve leadership effectiveness. • Describe the work behavior tendencies to leverage personal leadership strengths. • Examine key leadership behaviors that help Disney leaders consistently model performance excellence. • Discuss the business and economic issues that drive Disney’s strategies plan for success. • Explore the concept of corporate paradigms and how they influence one’s management style. vii. HM 226 Marketing You: Personal and Career Development (Disney) (3 cr.) CUP report to the Senate, February 2, 2010 Page12 of 22
  • CUP: February 2, 2010 Proposed Bulletin Description: HM 226 Marketing You: Personal & Career Development Strategies (Disney) 3 cr. Offered: Contact department for information. Graded: Pass/Fail Defines a personal brand for career marketing and encourages focusing techniques for students who do not have clear career objectives. Designed to maximize the Disney College Program Internship experiences, and prior/subsequent work experience. Students will also learn interviewing techniques. Rationale: Walt Disney College’s “real world” programs are designed to meet the learning needs of adults in today’s hospitality business world; hence, NMU’s Hospitality Management Program is proposing an academic partnership with Disney. After completing this course, the student should be able to: • Identify a career focus • Define professional career goals • Understand the concept of professionalism as it relates to Appearance, Character and Effectiveness (A.C.E.) • Increase self awareness of Workplace Expectations • Explore personal and career attributes that can either enhance or impede the career journey • Develop a personal brand to advance future career marketability • Learn, practice, and perfect career skills related to a job search. viii. HM 227 Hospitality Management Creativity & Innovation (Disney) (3 cr.) Proposed Bulletin Description: HM 227 Hospitality Management Creativity & Innovation (Disney) 3 cr. Offered: Contact department for information. Graded: Pass/Fail Introduces students to the main concepts of creativity and innovation which are crucially important to individuals, organizations, and the entrepreneurial process. Students will learn various tools to establish a culture of creativity within an organization. Rationale: Walt Disney College’s “real world” programs are designed to meet the learning needs of adults in today’s hospitality business world; hence, NMU’s Hospitality Management Program is proposing an academic partnership with Disney. After completing this course, the students should be able to: • Differentiate between the creative person, process, product and environment. • Explain the key aspects of the innovative process. • Define the aspects of the “intersection” and its importance in innovation. CUP report to the Senate, February 2, 2010 Page13 of 22
  • CUP: February 2, 2010 • Validate why creativity and innovation are important for entrepreneurial and corporate growth. • Assess creative development and prescribe a plan of action to enhance the ability to think more creatively and foster innovation. • Apply four primary tools for encouraging individual and group creativity. • List major barriers to managing creativity and innovation. • List primary management techniques to facilitate creativity and innovation. • Specify ways an organization can encourage and discourage a culture of creativity and innovation. • Explain the primary dimensions of the 7 Levels of Change. Effect on other Departments: None Staffing: No additional faculty will be needed to teach these courses. These courses will be taught on site at Disney World by Disney faculty. Costs: There are no additional costs associated with this program. NMU will receive all tuition dollars generated by enrollment in these courses. Implementation Date: Fall 2010 CUP report to the Senate, February 2, 2010 Page14 of 22
  • CUP: February 2, 2010 Appendix A Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation Proposed Bulletin Copy RE 382 Interpretation II: Self-Guided Media 3 cr. (2-0-2) Offered: Winter Prerequisite: RE 381 and EN 211. A continuation of RE 381 with the addition of planning, implementing and evaluating all types of self-guided interpretive services including publications, exhibits, signs, self-guided tours and trails, multimedia presentations and trunks. Students are expected to be able to create computer presentations and publications before enrolling in this course. Additionally, eight credits instructor-approved non-human natural science courses and eight credits of instructor-approved historical/cultural courses must be completed before enrolling. Develop skills and knowledge in environmental and historical interpretive services. Students gain a theoretical understanding of and practical experience in planning, implementing and evaluating most types of self- guided interpretive services including publications, exhibits, signs, self- guided tours and trails. Outdoor Recreation Leadership and Management Major 129.5-132 Total Credits Required for Degree Liberal Studies 30-40 Health Promotion Requirements 2 Required Courses for Health Promotion HP 200 Physical Well Being 1 HP 239 Swimming-Beginning or 1 HP 239A Swimming-Intermediate (1 cr.) or HP 239B Swimming-Lifeguard Training (1 cr.) or HP 239C Swimming-WSI (1 cr.) or HP 239D Swimming-SCUBA (1 cr.) or HP 239E Swimming-Advanced SCUBA (2 cr.) Required Courses in Major 56.5-57 Major Core 40 RE 110 Introduction to Leisure and Recreation 2 RE 155 Outdoor Living Skills 2 RE 250 Education in Outdoor Settings 3 RE 251 Adventure Activities, Facilitation and Group Behavior 3 RE 261 Leadership and Pedagogy in Leisure Services 3 RE 270 Outdoor Recreation Resources, Behavior and Values 3 RE 356 Wilderness Education Association Wilderness 2 Stewardship RE 362 Program Design in Leisure Services 3 RE 371 Protected Area Management 3 RE 381 Interpretation I: Foundations and Guided Services 4 RE 382 Interpretation II: Self-Guided Media 3 RE 410 Leisure Through the Ages 2 RE 461 Management and Supervision of Leisure Services 4 RE 467 Evaluation/Research in Leisure Services 3 CUP report to the Senate, February 2, 2010 Page 15 of 22
  • CUP: February 2, 2010 RE 482 New and Portable Media in Interpretation 3 Professional Development Seminars 1-1.5 RE 191 Professional Development Seminar I 0.5 RE 291 Professional Development Seminar II 0.5 RE 391 Professional Development Seminar III 0.5 Students must enroll in one of the above every two semesters until graduation; RE 391 may be repeated. Field Work/Internship/Plan of Study 15 RE 294 Field Work (A, B, C and/or D) 3 RE 494 Internship 12 Or approved program of study; courses can be any prefix but must be 300 level or higher. Professional Assessment Seminar 0.5 RE 491 Professional Assessment Seminar 0.5 Other Required Courses 13-15 AIS 101 Introduction to Information Resources (1 cr.) or 1-2 AIS 435 Research Using Digital Information Resources (2 cr.) MKT 230 Introduction to Marketing 4 MKT 430 Services Marketing 4 SO 208 Methods of Social Research I (4 cr.) [V] or 4 GC 235 Quantitative Methods (4 cr.) or MA 171 Introduction to Probability and Statistics (4 cr.) [V] or HL 242 Emergency Health Care (2 cr.) Certification 2- Required or 3 RE 352 Wilderness First Responder (3 cr.) Certification Required RE 357 Teaching of Canoeing or 2 HL 430 Grant Writing for Health Educators (2 cr.) or RE 277 Introduction to Wildland Firefighting (2 cr.) or RE 358 Teaching of Rock Climbing (2 cr.) or Two ORLM adviser approved HP courses *See the “Course Descriptions” section of this bulletin for major and minor course prerequisites, particularly RE 371, RE 381 and RE 382, before selecting liberal studies and world cultures courses. Interpretation and Outdoor Education Minor This minor provides a background in environmental and historical interpretive services. This minor complements majors in history, geography and conservation. Total Credits Required for Minor 23.5 21.5 RE 110 Introduction to Leisure and Recreation 2 RE 155 Outdoor Living Skills 2 RE 191 Professional Development Seminar I 0.5 RE 250 Education in Outdoor Settings 3 CUP report to the Senate, February 2, 2010 Page 16 of 22
  • CUP: February 2, 2010 RE 261 Leadership and Pedagogy in Leisure Services 3 RE 270 Outdoor Recreation Resources, Behavior and Values 3 RE 371 Protected Area Management * (3 cr.) 3 RE 381 Interpretation I: Foundations and Guided Services * 4 RE 382 Interpretation II: Self-Guided Media * 3 RE 482 New and Portable Media in Interpretation 3 *Check course descriptions for prerequisites and consult an ORLM adviser. Appendix B Clinical Sciences Department/ Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences major Proposed Bulletin Changes Total Credits Required for Degree 124 Liberal Studies 30-40 Health Promotion Requirements 2 Required Courses in Major 52 58 SL 150 Introduction to Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences 4 SL 160 Anatomy of the Speech and Hearing Mechanism 4 SL 200 Phonetics 4 SL 220 Speech and Voice Science 4 SL 351 Introduction to Audiology 4 SL 355 Language Development 4 SL 356 Language Disorders 4 SL 357 Fluency Disorders 4 SL 359 Introduction to Neurogenics 4 SL 370 Observation in Speech, Language & Hearing Sciences 4 SL 400 Phonological Disorders 4 SL 459 Cognitive Neuroscience 4 SL 460 Cognition and Aging 4 SL 464 Methods of Diagnosis 4 SL 465 Methods of Treatment 4 Other Required Courses 15 BI 104 Human Anatomy and Physiology [III] or 4 BI 111 Introductory Biology: Principles (4 cr.) [III] PH 101 Eureka: Einstein, the Universe and Everything [III] or 3 PH 102 Physics of Sound and Music (3 cr.) [III] PY 100G Psychology as a Social Science [IV] or 4 PY 100H Honors Psychology as a Natural Science (4 cr.) [III] or PY 100L Psychology as a Natural Science with Laboratory (4 cr.) [III] or PY 100S Psychology as a Natural Science (4 cr.) [III] PY 305 Psychological Statistics [V] or 4 MA 171 Introduction to Probability and Statistics (4 cr.) [V] General Electives 20 CUP report to the Senate, February 2, 2010 Page 17 of 22
  • CUP: February 2, 2010 SL 200 Phonetics 4 cr. Offered: Fall Prerequisite: SL 150 and SL 160 or instructor’s permission SL 220 Speech and Voice Science 4 cr. (3-0-2) Offered: Winter Prerequisite: SL 150, SL 160 and SL 200. SL 351 Introduction to Audiology 4 cr. (3-0-2) Offered: Winter Prerequisite: SL 150, SL 160, PH 101 or PH 102, or instructor's permission. SL 355 Language Development 4 cr. Offered: Fall Prerequisite: SL 150 and SL 200 or instructor's permission. Theories and conceptual models of language development in the young child. The roles of syntax, semantics and phonology are discussed in relationship to linguistic and developmental theories. SL 356 Language Disorders 4 cr. Offered: Winter Prerequisite: SL 355 or instructor's permission. The theoretical language disorders in children with a focus on the practical aspects of assessment and treatment. Academic service learning opportunity is included. SL 357 Fluency Disorders 4 cr. Offered: Fall Prerequisite: SL 150 or instructor's permission. Study of normal dysfluency, stuttering and cluttering. The development, measurement and treatment of stuttering are emphasized. Clinical observation is included. SL 359 Introduction to Neurogenics 4 cr. Offered: Winter Prerequisite: SL 150, SL 160, SL 200 and SL 355, junior standing, or instructor's permission. Study of neurological disorders across the lifespan that affect cognition and communication. Emphasis is placed on the basic principles of brain-behavior relationships. Current theories and controversies in aphasia, motor speech disorders, dyslexia, dysgraphia, right-hemisphere disorder, traumatic brain injury, Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders. Academic service learning is included. SL 370 Observation in Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences 2 cr. Offered: Fall, Summer CUP report to the Senate, February 2, 2010 Page 18 of 22
  • CUP: February 2, 2010 Prerequisite: SL 150, SL160, SL 200, SL355; SL356 may be taken concurrently, junior standing or instructor's permission. Students complete 25 hours of supervised clinical observation as required by the American Speech-Language-and-Hearing Association (ASHA). SL 400 Phonological Disorders 4 cr. Offered: Winter Prerequisite: SL 160, SL 200 and SL 220, junior standing or instructor's permission. The nature, etiology, assessment and remediation of phonological disorders. Also includes principles of phonological awareness in children. Clinical observation is included. SL 459 Cognitive Neuroscience 4 cr. (3-0-2) Offered: Fall Prerequisite: SL 150, SL 160 and SL 359, BI 104 or BI 111, senior junior standing or instructor's permission. SL 460 Cognition and Aging 4 cr. Offered: Winter Prerequisite: SL 150, SL 355, SL 359, PY 100, senior junior standing or instructor's permission. Examination of basic cognitive processes such as attention, perception and memory within the context of adulthood and aging. Pathological conditions that affect cognition such as traumatic brain injury and dementia will also be discussed. Academic service learning opportunity is included. SL 464 Methods of Diagnosis 4 cr. Offered: Fall Prerequisite: SL 200, SL 355, SL 356, SL 365, junior standing or instructor's permission. SL 465 Methods of Treatment 4 cr. Offered: Fall, Winter Prerequisite: Senior status, minimum GPA in the major of 3.0 and permission of clinic director. Instruction and pre-professional practice in clinical procedures related to the treatment of communication disorders. A clinical experience is included. Prerequisite: Senior status; grade of B or higher in all SLHS courses; faculty committee permission for admission to NMU clinic practicum. Information on aspects of the treatment process which includes data keeping, designing behavioral objectives, counseling concepts, feedback systems, behavioral management and treatment methods for communication and swallowing disorders. Clinical practicum will involve evaluation and treatment of clients in the NMU Speech and Hearing Clinic or field placement as an assistant to a speech-language pathologist in a local school setting. CUP report to the Senate, February 2, 2010 Page 19 of 22
  • CUP: February 2, 2010 Appendix C Proposed Bulletin Copy History/German/ International Studies International Studies Major Total Credits Required for Degree 124 Liberal Studies 30-40 Health Promotion Requirements 2 Required Courses in Major 44 Core 24 GC 164 Human Geography [IV] 4 AN 100 Introduction to Socio-Cultural Anthropology [IV] or 4 BC 415 Intercultural Communication (4 cr.) HS 105 World History [IV] 4 IP 490 International Studies Seminar 4 PL 270 World Religions [II] 4 PS 206 International Relations or 4 PS 203 Comparative Government and Politics (4 cr.) Area and Advanced Disciplinary Studies 20 Choose from the following, with no more then 12 credits from one department and a minimum of 8 credits at the 300-400 level. Courses from the minor field of study cannot be used. AD 265 Art and Architecture of Japan (4 cr.) [VI] AD 300 Japan and the West: Crosscurrents in Art and Architecture (4 cr.) [VI] AN 210 People, Culture and Nature (4 cr.) [IV] AN 320 Native Peoples of North America (4 cr.) [IV] BC 325 Communication and Performance in Africa (4 cr.) [VI] BC 420 Global Communication (4 cr.) CJ 426 International Crime and Comparative Criminal Justice Systems (4 cr.) EC 425 International Economics (4 cr.) EN 311 World Literature in English (4 cr.) [II] EN 411Z Topics in World Literature (3-4 cr.) [II] FR 310 Introduction to French Civilization and Culture (4 cr.) [II] GC 220 Economic Geography (4 cr.) GC 300 Regional Studies: World Cultures (4 cr.) [IV] GC 400 Political Geography (4 cr.) GR 310 Introduction to German Civilization and Culture (3 cr.) [II] HS 234 Indigenous People of Latin America (4 cr.) [II] HS 251 Latin American Civilization (4 cr.) [II] HS 252 Arab-Islamic History (4 cr.) [II] HS 254 Introduction to the History of Africa (4 cr.) [II] HS 256 Approaching China (4 cr.) [II] HS/GR 311(X) Central European Culture and Civilization (4 cr.) HS 312 Revolutionary Russia (4 cr.) HS 360 Chinese Revolution, 1800-Present (4 cr.) HS 362 History of Mexico (4 cr.) [II] HS 363 Canadian History and Culture (4 cr.) IP 285 Study Abroad: Special Topics (1-12 cr.) IP 286 Study Abroad: Special Topics (1-12 cr.) (Graded S/U) CUP report to the Senate, February 2, 2010 Page 20 of 22
  • CUP: February 2, 2010 IP 485 Study Abroad: Special Topics (1-12 cr.) IP 486 Study Abroad: Special Topics (1-12 cr.) (Graded S/U) MGT 475 International Business (4 cr.) MKT 466 International Marketing (4 cr.) PS 299 Model U.N. (2 cr.) May be taken twice as country of study varies. PS 312 War and Peace in the 21st Century (4 cr.) [IV] PS 321 Politics in Islamic Nations (4 cr.) [IV] PS 340 International Organizations (4 cr.) PS 404 Politics of East and Southeast Asia (4 cr.) SN 310 Introduction to Spanish Civilization and Culture (4 cr.) [II] SN 314 Contemporary Latin American Culture (4 cr.) [II] SO 351 Social Change (4 cr.) [IV] Minor 20 International Studies Minor Total Credits Required for Minor 24 Core 16 AN 100 Introduction to Socio-Cultural Anthropology [IV] or 4 GC 164 Human Geography (4 cr.) [IV] HS 105 World History [IV] 4 PL 270 World Religions [II] 4 PS 203 Comparative Government and Politics or 4 PS 206 International Relations (4 cr.) Area and Advanced Disciplinary Studies 8 Choose 8 credit hours from the following. At least one course must be at the 300-400 level. Courses from the major field of study or other minors cannot be used. AD 265 Art and Architecture of Japan (4 cr.) [VI] AD 300 Japan and the West: Crosscurrents in Art and Architecture (4 cr.) [VI] AN 210 People, Culture and Nature (4 cr.) [IV] AN 320 Native Peoples of North America (4 cr.) [IV] BC 325 Communication and Performance in Africa (4 cr.) [VI] BC 415 Intercultural Communication (4 cr.) BC 420 Global Communication (4 cr.) EC 425 International Economics (4 cr.) EN 311 World Literature in English (4 cr.) [II] FR 310 Introduction to French Civilization and Culture (4 cr.) [II] GC 220 Economic Geography (4 cr.) GC 300 Regional Studies: World Cultures (4 cr.) [IV] GC 400 Political Geography (4 cr.) GR 310 Introduction to German Civilization and Culture (3 cr.) [II] HS 251 Latin American Civilization (4 cr.) [II] HS 252 Arab-Islamic History (4 cr.) [II] HS 254 Introduction to the History of Africa (4 cr.) [II] HS 256 Approaching China (4 cr.) [II] HS/GR 311(X) Central European Culture and Civilization (4 cr.) HS 312 Revolutionary Russia (4 cr.) HS 360 Chinese Revolution, 1800-Present (4 cr.) HS 362 History of Mexico (4 cr.) [II] HS 363 Canadian History and Culture (4 cr.) CUP report to the Senate, February 2, 2010 Page 21 of 22
  • CUP: February 2, 2010 IP 285 Study Abroad: Special Topics (1-12 cr.) IP 286 Study Abroad: Special Topics (1-12 cr.) (Graded S/U) IP 485 Study Abroad: Special Topics (1-12 cr.) IP 486 Study Abroad: Special Topics (1-12 cr.) (Graded S/U) MGT 475 International Business (4 cr.) MKT 466 International Marketing (4 cr.) PS 299 Model U.N. (2 cr.) May be taken twice as country of study varies. PS 321 Politics in Islamic Nations (4 cr.) [IV] PS 340 International Organizations (4 cr.) PS 404 Politics of East and Southeast Asia (4 cr.) SN 310 Introduction to Spanish Civilization and Culture (4 cr.) [II] SN 314 Contemporary Latin American Culture (4 cr.) [II] SO 351 Social Change (4 cr.) [IV] Appendix D Technology and Occupational Sciences Proposed Bulletin Changes Proposed language to be added to the bulletin under: Technology and Occupational Sciences Department/Program Policies Add: Hospitality Management and Food Service Management Walt Disney World College Program The Hospitality Management program is affiliated with the Disney College Program at Disney World in Orlando, Florida. Students accepted after an interview process with Disney have an opportunity to work at a world- renowned resort in a variety of positions and can also be enrolled in college level classes. Disney allows a maximum of two, college program courses of 3 credits each per semester. Students may also enroll in online classes and internships with NMU while working at Disney. Students must have full- or part-time status with a minimum G.P.A. of 2.0. The student is required to make application with Disney and if accepted, provide transportation to and from Disney World, Orlando, Florida. Students will earn an hourly wage and Disney will provide all housing with the cost deducted from their paycheck. For more information, contact a faculty member in the Hospitality Management program, the Head of the Department of Technology and Occupational Sciences or visit www.disneycollegeprogram.com. CUP report to the Senate, February 2, 2010 Page 22 of 22