Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Business Development for Tourism and Hospitality Management
Business Development for Tourism and Hospitality Management
Business Development for Tourism and Hospitality Management
Business Development for Tourism and Hospitality Management
Business Development for Tourism and Hospitality Management
Business Development for Tourism and Hospitality Management
Business Development for Tourism and Hospitality Management
Business Development for Tourism and Hospitality Management
Business Development for Tourism and Hospitality Management
Business Development for Tourism and Hospitality Management
Business Development for Tourism and Hospitality Management
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Business Development for Tourism and Hospitality Management

2,585

Published on

Published in: Education, Business
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
2,585
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
33
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. 3009THM Business Development for Tourism and GOLD COAST CAMPUS Hospitality Management Semester 2, 2002 COURSE OUTLINE Griffith University Business Group School of Tourism & Hotel Management 3009THM Business Development for Tourism and Hospitality Management 1.0 Identifying Information Course Identifier 3009THM Subject Tourism Year of Offer: 2002 Semester of Offer: Semester 2 Credit point value: 10.00 Program for which Course is UGRD designed: Enrolment Requirements: Only to be taken by final year students or with permission of the Course Convenor Course Convenor Name: Mrs Helen Basch Office: Room 3.42 G01 Telephone: 5552 8709 Email: H.Basch@mailbox.gu.edu.au Teaching Team: Mrs Helen Basch Mr Ray Weeks Course Design: Lecture and tutorial details Contact hours 1 x 2 hour lecture per week 1 x 1 hour tutorial per week Grading Basis Graded Status of course within program: Core within Bachelor of Hotel Management Date of last edit: 28 June 2002 Page 1 of 11
  • 2. 3009THM Business Development for Tourism and GOLD COAST CAMPUS Hospitality Management Semester 2, 2002 2.0 Brief Description This strategic management course is designed to prepare final year students for the competitive and turbulent world of business. The course focuses on the areas of business planning, decision-making and strategic management at both the operational and corporate level for the hospitality and tourism industry. Industry- based case studies are designed for students to further develop their analytical and strategic thinking skills. This ability to think strategically is considered a vital managerial attribute in the current highly competitive and changing industry environment. 3.0 Course Aims This course aims to develop analytical and strategic thinking skills through case study analysis and presentation. An understanding of the major issues currently affecting business will be developed through reading business magazines, trade press and other media exposure. Students will be encouraged to build on their existing knowledge and skills across disciplines to build decision-making capabilities. GENERIC SKILL DEVELOPMENT This course aims to develop the generic skills indicated below using material relevant to the study of tourism and hospitality management. Assesse Practice Taught Generic skills Developed through: Oral Communication Tutorial participation and oral case study presentation Written Case study reports and Final Exam Communication Analysis and Critical Case study analyses conducted in tutorials and in Evaluation groups. Teamwork Working in groups during the tutorial program, towards case study preparation and oral presentation. Information Skills Reading business press and via media exposure Self Management Prioritising work requirements for the course Skills Problem Solving and Group discussion and analysis of articles and Decision making topical issues in class. Date of last edit: 28 June 2002 Page 2 of 11
  • 3. 3009THM Business Development for Tourism and GOLD COAST CAMPUS Hospitality Management Semester 2, 2002 Looking to develop skills that will help you perform better at university and get the job that you want? Check out the Griffith Graduate Web site for a list of resources, activities and workshops http://www.gu.edu.au/ins/griffith_graduate/resources/ The Learning Assistance Unit (LAU) provides free learning assistance services to Griffith University students. To find out more about the range of resources and study skills programs visit the website at http://www.gu.edu.au/ins/lils/lau/home.html or call in to an office in the Mt Gravatt, Nathan, Gold Coast and Logan libraries. Alternatively you can e-mail lau@mailbox.gu.edu.au or phone a friendly learning adviser on any of the numbers listed on the web site! 4.0 Objectives Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: • Describe the managerial concepts and processes of business planning and decision-making. • Describe the major challenges facing companies in the current business environment. • Apply the principles of business planning and strategic thinking processes to specific tourism enterprises. • Develop a greater understanding of how the corporate world functions. 5.0 Links With Other Courses This course is a 3rd year core subject within the Bachelor of Hotel Management program. 6.0 Course Content STRUCTURE AND ORGANISATION The structure of the course content is divided into three main parts: 1) Strategic management inputs (Weeks 1-3) 2) Strategy formulation (Weeks 4-9) 3) Strategic implementation (Weeks 10-14) Date of last edit: 28 June 2002 Page 3 of 11
  • 4. 3009THM Business Development for Tourism and GOLD COAST CAMPUS Hospitality Management Semester 2, 2002 7.0 Organisation and Teaching Methods This course is delivered as a series of lectures that will introduce and explore the main issues surrounding each topic. These will lead directly into tutorial activities, discussions and group case studies concerning the principles of strategic decision- making. Hospitality and tourism enterprises will feature strongly but not to the exclusion of other industries where better examples of the topic or issue under consideration might occur. Students will work in teams for discussing, preparing, tutorial presentations and report writing. Generic managerial skills such as effective teamwork, group communications and how to conduct planning sessions will be promoted and included throughout the program where possible. Students will be encouraged to develop a perspective of the manager as a team-player, planner and decision-maker within the hospitality industry. 8.0 Course Schedule WEEK TOPIC TUTORIALS READINGS 1 No Tutorials this week. Chapter 1 Introduction to Strategic Management Prepare Discussion All Reading to be Questions set for Week 1-2. completed before Strategic management and competitiveness Lecture or Tutorial. 2 Discussion Questions set Chapter 2 and The External Environment for Week 1-2. Opportunities, threats, industry C-1 to C-15 competition and competitor How to prepare a case study. (Back of text) analysis. Read McDonald’s case study for next week. 3 Case Study: McDonalds’ Chapter 3 and The Internal Environment Expansion into India. McDonald’s case Resources, capabilities and study. Prepare Week 3-4 core competencies. C-120 to C-127 Activities 4 Activities Week 3-4 Chapter 4 Business Level Strategy Case study preparation: Strategic focus and formulation McDonalds 5 McDonalds Practice Case Chapter 5 Competitive Dynamics Study Reports and Rivalry actions and responses discussion Air Wars Date of last edit: 28 June 2002 Page 4 of 11
  • 5. 3009THM Business Development for Tourism and GOLD COAST CAMPUS Hospitality Management Semester 2, 2002 WEEK TOPIC TUTORIALS READINGS 6 Due to the Gold Coast Revise for Mid- Show Holiday no class this Semester Exam. week Chapters 1-5 plus lecture and tutorial content to date. 7 Mid-Semester Exam Introducing Raffles Hotel Case Study. Corporate Level Strategy Chapter 6 Prepare Week 8 Activity Diversification 8 Activity Week 8 Chapter 7 Acquisition and Restructuring Strategies Group case: Raffles Hotel Mergers, Acquisitions and Takeovers – A Way forward? The Takeover of Trust House Forte (Hotel group) by the Granada Leisure Group. 9 International Strategy Group Case Reports and Chapter 8 Successful International Presentations: Raffles Expansion: Australia’s Wine Hotel Industry Pre-read Ansett case 10 Group Case: Ansett Chapter 9 Cooperative Strategies Airlines introduced Read Ansett Airlines Hotel Industry Alliances Prepare Activity Week 11 Case: C-31 to C-43 Mid-Semester Break September 30 – October 4 11 Chapter 10 Corporate Governance Activity Week 11 Board of Directors, shareholder interests and the struggle within Group Case: Ansett the company. Airlines continues Prepare revision questions Australian Issues for next week. Date of last edit: 28 June 2002 Page 5 of 11
  • 6. 3009THM Business Development for Tourism and GOLD COAST CAMPUS Hospitality Management Semester 2, 2002 WEEK TOPIC TUTORIALS READINGS 12 Revision questions Chapter 11 Organisational Structure and Controls 13 Ansett Case Study Reports Chapter 12 and 13 Strategic Leadership and and Oral Presentations Organisational Culture Prepare Practice Exam Innovation Questions for next week The South-West Airlines Story 14 Course Review Review course content and have queries ready. Prepare answers to revision questions. Final Exam In the Exam Period: November 9-23 inclusive. Note that changes may occur to this program to take advantage of topical material, videos, industry news and guest speaker availability etc. These will be announced in the lectures. Date of last edit: 28 June 2002 Page 6 of 11
  • 7. 3009THM Business Development for Tourism and GOLD COAST CAMPUS Hospitality Management Semester 2, 2002 9.0 Assessment Assessment Methods: QTY TYPE WEIGHT LENGTH DUE DATES 1 Mid-semester Exam 15% Approx 50 Start of Lecture: multichoice Week 7 questions 3 Group Case Study Start of Tutorials Reports* 5% Maximum of Week 5 Practice Case: McDonalds 1500 words Expansion into India Group Case 1: Raffles 10% Week 9 Hotel Maximum of 15% 2000 words Week 13 Group Case 2: Ansett Airlines Maximum of 3000 words 1 Group Case Study Oral 10% 15 minutes each Week 9 or 13 Presentation and Debate group. Hand in slides used. 1 Final Exam 45% 2 hours Exam Period * Note that all case studies are contained in your text. Assessment Rationale 1. The mid-semester exam is to enable students to check their understanding of the course content and to encourage timely reading. 2. The case studies allow the student to apply strategic management principles to a spe business and to develop critical thinking skills via group debate and discussion. The first case, McDonald’s expansion strategies in India, is set as a practice case to assist groups to practice their analytical and report-writing skills. Each group will be required to ensure that they submit a ‘Pass’/Satisfactory report or it will be recycled for resubmission. A Pass is required on this case report in order to pass the course. Primarily, however, this case is included in the course to enable groups to understand the level of preparation and report-writing skills required to achieve their maximum potential grades. 3. The final exam assesses the individual student’s mastery of the course’s content under restricted conditions. Date of last edit: 28 June 2002 Page 7 of 11
  • 8. 3009THM Business Development for Tourism and GOLD COAST CAMPUS Hospitality Management Semester 2, 2002 Assessment Criteria Specific guidelines for each case study, specific questions to answer and the marking allocation will be advised for each individual case study but general criteria for all areas of assessment will include the demonstration of: Effort and resourcefulness Understanding and knowledge of concepts Application and synthesis of concepts from assigned readings and lectures Logical flow of analysis Professional written presentation Grammar and technical accuracy Constructive group participation – Note that peer group assessment for each case study report will be applied 10.0 Texts and Supporting Materials Prescribed Text Hanson, D., Dowling, P., Hitt, M.A., Ireland, R.D. & Hoskisson, R.E., (2002), Strategic management, competitiveness and globalisation: concepts and cases, Pacific Rim Edition , South-Western College Publishing, ITP. Also visit http://www.nelson.com.au/hanson/ for text-based student resources. RECOMMENDED REFERENCES Bowman, C. & Asch, D., (1996), Managing strategy, Macmillan. Flavel, R. & Williams, J., (1996), Strategic management: A practical approach, Prentice Hall. Go, F. & Pine, R., (1995), Globalisation strategy in the hotel industry, Routledge Gore, C., Murray, K. & Richardson, B., (1992), Strategic decision making, Cassell. Hill, S. (1989), Managerial economics: The analysis of business decisions, Macmillan Hill, C. W. L. & Jones, G. R., (1998), Strategic Management: An Integrated Approach, Houghton Mifflin Hubbard, G., (2000) Strategic Management: Thinking, Analysis and Action, Prentice Hall Johnson, G. & Scholes, K., (1999), Exploring corporate strategy, (5th Ed) Prentice Hall. Johnson, P. & Thomas, B., (1992), Choice and demand in tourism, Mansell. Mintzberg, H. & Quinn, J., (1996), The strategy process, Prentice Hall. Olsen, M. D., Tse, E. & West, J., (1992), Strategic Management in the Hospitality Industry, Van Nostrand Reinhold. Pitts, R. A. & Lei, D., Strategic Management: Building and Sustaining Competitive Advantage. Date of last edit: 28 June 2002 Page 8 of 11
  • 9. 3009THM Business Development for Tourism and GOLD COAST CAMPUS Hospitality Management Semester 2, 2002 Strickland, A. J. & Thompson, A. A., (1999) Strategic Management: Concepts and Cases, Irwin McGraw-Hill. Viljoen, J. & Dann, S. (2000) Strategic Management (3rd Ed), Longman. Note that students are encouraged to maintain an active interest in business news and current affairs via TV, Internet, newspapers and business journals such as BRW. 11. Administration 1. To be eligible to pass this course, students are required to complete all forms of assessment and must demonstrate a reasonable degree of competence in the required course objectives as examined in each form of assessment. 2. To pass this course, as well as achieving a pass level overall, a student must also achieve a minimum score of 45% in the final exam. 3. Students may work together in researching their assignments but final submissions must reflect the work and original contribution of each individual student. 4. Dishonest assignments will be dealt with under the University Policy on Academic Misconduct available at http://www.gu.edu.au:80/ua/aa/ppm/tal/content/Ac_misc.html or in the University Calendar (P61.20) available in the Library. It is recommended that students read this policy. 4.1 The Policy on Academic Misconduct states that: It is academic misconduct for a student to: • present copied, falsified or improperly obtained data as if it were the result of laboratory work, field trips or other investigative work; • include in the student’s individual work material which is the result of significant assistance from another person if that assistance was unacceptable according to the instructions or guidelines for that work; • assist another student in the presentation of that student’s individual work in a way that is unacceptable according to the instructions or guidelines for that work; • cheat; (Cheating is dishonest conduct in assessment); • plagiarise; (Plagiarism is knowingly presenting the work or property of another person as if it were one’s own.) Examples of plagiarism include: • word for word copying of sentences or paragraphs from one or more sources which are the work or data of other persons (including books, articles, thesis, unpublished works, working papers, seminar and Date of last edit: 28 June 2002 Page 9 of 11
  • 10. 3009THM Business Development for Tourism and GOLD COAST CAMPUS Hospitality Management Semester 2, 2002 conference papers, internal reports, lecture notes or tapes) without clearly identifying their origin by appropriate referencing; • closely para-phrasing sentences or paragraphs from one or more sources without appropriate acknowledgment in the form of a reference to the original work or works; • using another person’s ideas, work or research data without appropriate acknowledgment; • submitting work which has been produced by someone else on the student’s behalf as if it were the work of the student; • copying computer files in whole or in part without indicating their origin; • submitting work which has been wholly or partially derived from another student’s work by a process of mechanical transformation. For example, changing variable names in computer programs. [GU Policy on Academic Misconduct, 2002] 4.2 Full and detailed acknowledgement (e.g. notation, and/or bibliography) must be provided if contributions are drawn from literature in preparation of reports and assignments. Your written work must properly cite/reference original work, author(s), etc. 4.3 Quotations should be used sparingly in written work. It is not acceptable to submit assignments or pieces of written work that contain a large amount of other authors work even when the source is appropriately acknowledged. 4.4 Citation and referencing should conform to the APA (American Psychological Association), the AMA (American Marketing Association) or other format, as dictated by the Course Convenor, both in the body of your paper and its attached reference section. 5. All assignments submitted for marking must be word processed or typed. 6. Students must be able to produce a copy of all work submitted if so requested. 7. Submission of Assessment Items - Extension and Penalties Students are referred to the University Assessment Policy (http://www.gu.edu.au/ua/aa/ppm/tal/content/aad_asspol_fs.html) 7.1 Students are required to submit assessment items by the due date, as advised in the Course Outline. Assessment items submitted after the due date will be subject to a penalty unless an extension of time for submitting the item is approved by the Course Convenor. 7.2 Requests for Extension Date of last edit: 28 June 2002 Page 10 of 11
  • 11. 3009THM Business Development for Tourism and GOLD COAST CAMPUS Hospitality Management Semester 2, 2002 Requests for extension of time to submit an assessment item must be made in writing to the Course Convenor. Where the request is made on medical grounds, an appropriate medical certificate must be submitted (see section 5.4.1). The request for an extension should be lodged by the due date for the assessment item. A copy of the extension request should be attached to the assessment item when it is submitted. 7.3 Penalties for Late Submission An assessment item submitted after the due date, without an approved extension, will be penalised. The standard penalty is the reduction of the mark allocated to the assessment item by 10% of the maximum mark applicable for the assessment item, for each day or part day that the item is late. Weekends count as one day in determining the penalty. Assessment items submitted more than five days after the due date are awarded zero 8. Assignments must be submitted with the following information clearly displayed on the cover: • Student name • Student number • Course Catalogue Number and Title • Course Convenor’s name • Assignment due date and time • Tutor’s name • Tutorial day and time Assignments submitted without this information may not be assessed. 9. Students are expected to spend time outside formal teaching sessions developing their skills and knowledge. 10. Assignments received by fax, e-mail, or any other form other than hard copy will not be accepted 11. Where appropriate enrolment in this course is undertaken on the basis that prior assumed knowledge has been gained by the attainment of a grade of “P” (pass) or better in prerequisite course/s. Failure to adhere to this recommendation may result in students experiencing difficulty with the course and not being able to successfully complete it. Additional support or special assistance cannot be expected or requested if students have not completed the recommended prerequisite course/s. Date of last edit: 28 June 2002 Page 11 of 11

×