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BEng_Materials_w_Man..

  1. 1. LOUGHBOROUGH UNIVERSITY Programme Specification Materials and Management Studies – B.Eng Please note: This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided. More detailed information on the learning outcomes, content and teaching, learning and assessment methods of each module can be found in Module Specifications and other programme documentation and online at http://www.lboro.ac.uk/ The accuracy of the information in this document is reviewed by the University and may be checked by the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education. Awarding body/institution; Loughborough University Teaching institution (if different); As above Details of accreditation by a Institute of Materials professional/statutory body; Name of the final award; B.Eng. (Hons) or B.Eng. (Hons), DIS Programme title; Materials and Management Studies UCAS code; J5N2, J5NF Date at which the programme May 2002 specification was written or Revised June 2003 revised. 1. Aims of the programme: To provide a fully accredited honours degree programme in the field of materials engineering which satisfies the needs of industry for high quality graduates who have a strong academic background with outstanding business and interactive skills. A strong academic background with outstanding business knowledge and understanding. The management stream for this programme provides knowledge and understanding in accounting and financial management, human resource management, marketing, operations management and strategy." 1
  2. 2. 2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes: QAA Benchmark Statements for Materials and General Business and Management SARTOR 3 Engineering Accreditation, 1997 Institute of Materials Guidelines for Accreditation QAA National Qualification Framework, annex 1 3. Intended Learning Outcomes Knowledge and Understanding: On successful completion of the programmes graduates should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of: • Relevant mathematical methods and principles of materials science as applied to materials engineering; • A number of specialist materials topics connected with metals, ceramics, polymers, composites, and automotive materials; • The role of information technology in providing support for materials engineers; • Engineering principles relevant to materials selection; • Processing of materials; • The materials aspects of design; • The professional and engineering responsibilities of materials engineers; • Organisations, their internal structures and their management, including the management of human resources, financial resources and operations; • The external environments within which organisations operate; the markets for goods and services; the implications for marketing; • Business policy and strategy; development of policy and strategy; current issues in strategic management." Teaching Learning and Assessment Strategies to Enable the Above Outcomes to be Achieved and Demonstrated Acquisition of the above knowledge and understanding is through a combination of lectures, tutorials, seminars, co-operative projects with industry, internal group and individual projects, practical laboratory work, industrial training coursework assignments, and industrial visits. Assessment is through a combination of written examinations and continuously assessed coursework. Coursework assessment includes the evaluation of laboratory reports, technical reports, project reports, problem solving exercises, computer- assisted assessment, oral presentations, poster presentations, and viva-voce examinations. For example, poster presentations , project reports, viva voce examinations and oral presentations are all part of the Project (MPC010). Industrial visits are made in connection with High Temperature Materials (MPC011) and Materials in Service 2
  3. 3. (MPB006). Materials selection, design and IT is taught and assessed in IT and Communication (MPA006), Introduction to Materials in Product Design (MPA007), and Materials Selection Methods and Product Design (MPC004). Organisations and their management are addressed through lectures in Management of Human Resources (BSA505), Accounting For Managers (BSA526) and Operations Management (BSC502). The external environment, business policy and strategy are covered in two Marketing modules (BSAB560 and BSAB562) and a final year Fundamentals of Strategic Management module (BSC565)." Skills and Attributes a. Subject specific: intellectual/cognitive On successful completion of this programme student should be able to: • Select and identify an appropriate material and manufacturing route for the design of a component; • Utilise materials engineering principles to develop new materials/processing routes for improved performance of engineering systems; • Solve materials engineering problems; • Select and apply appropriate IT tools to a variety of materials problems; • Select materials from an environmentally appreciative viewpoint; • Interpret numerical data and apply mathematical methods to the analysis of materials engineering and management problems; • Define and use the language associated with management theory and practice; • Evaluate a range of organisational scenarios; • Apply appropriate quantitative and qualitative management techniques to identify, formulate and resolve business problems. Teaching Learning and Assessment Strategies to Enable the Above Outcomes to be Achieved and Demonstrated Acquisition of the above skills is through a combination of lectures, tutorials, seminars, co-operative projects with industry, internal group and individual projects, practical laboratory work, industrial training coursework assignments, and industrial visits. Assessment is through a combination of written examinations and continuously assessed coursework. Coursework assessment includes the evaluation of laboratory reports, technical reports, project reports, problem solving exercises, computer- assisted assessment, oral presentations, poster presentations, and viva-voce examinations. For example, selection and identification of suitable material and manufacturing route for selected components is the subject of project exercises taking place in the Project (MPC010), Materials Selection Methods and Product Design (MPC004), and Introduction to Materials in Product Design (MPA007). IT tools are used ubiquitously: more specifically in IT and Communication (MPA006), Advanced Testing and Characterisation (MPB007), Engineering Communication (MMA440), 3
  4. 4. and the Project (MPC010). Selection of materials with and environmental appreciation is taught in Recycling and Environmental Issues (MPC001). Mathematics skills are developed through lectures (MAA100, MAA102, MAA202, MAA102, MAB102, and MAB02), tutorials, and in the Mathematics Support Unit. Management skills will be developed throughout the Business School modules and will be assessed through coursework and examinations. Short scenarios and case study work will be used to bridge theory and practice. b. Subject Specific: Practical Skills On successful completion of the programmes, students should be able to: • Use appropriate mechanical testing, corrosion testing, optical, X-ray, and electron metallographic, and chemical analysis methods for the study of materials; • Use appropriate computer software for design and modelling exercises; • Evaluate and present practical data in a suitable format; • Explain experimental results in terms of theoretical mechanisms and concepts; • Research for information; • Develop alternative strategies and select the most appropriate for a business; • Propose and assess options for the improvement of operations. Teaching Learning and Assessment Strategies to Enable the Above Outcomes to be Achieved and Demonstrated Acquisition of the above practical skills is through a combination of lectures, tutorials, seminars, co-operative projects with industry, internal group and individual projects, practical laboratory work, industrial training coursework assignments, and industrial visits. Assessment is through a combination of written examinations and continuously assessed coursework. Coursework assessment includes the evaluation of laboratory reports, technical reports, project reports, problem solving exercises, computer- assisted assessment, oral presentations, poster presentations, and viva-voce examinations. Examples of most of the modules where these skills are developed are: Project (MPC010), Standards, Testing and Characterisation (MPA005) and Advanced Testing and Characterisation (MPB007), Materials Processing (MPB005), and Polymer Processing (MPC009). Practical control of processing systems for materials is especially taught in Polymer Processing (MPC009). Explanation of practical results in terms of theoretical concepts and mechanisms is taught in Advanced Testing and Characterisation (MPB007) in Part B, and in the Project (MPC010) in Part C. Case study work is a particular feature of the development of skills related to organisational strategies and operations. 4
  5. 5. c) Key Transferable Skills On successful completion of the programmes, students should be able to: • Work effectively, both as part of a team and/or independently; • Organise and manage time and resources effectively; for short-term and longer- term commitments; • Possess skills needed to communicate effectively through written, graphical, inter- personal, and presentation media; • Apply constructive and structured approaches to problem solving; • Demonstrate a reasonable level of numeracy; appropriate to the cognitive skills required; • Compile clear and well-structured reports; • Extend their learning ability to be able to undertake further training of a professional or business-related nature. Teaching Learning and Assessment Strategies to Enable the Above Outcomes to be Achieved and Demonstrated Acquisition of the above skills is through a combination of lectures, tutorials, seminars, co-operative projects with industry, internal group and individual projects, practical laboratory work, industrial training coursework assignments, and industrial visits. Assessment is through a combination of written examinations and continuously assessed coursework. Coursework assessment includes the evaluation of laboratory reports, technical reports, project reports, problem solving exercises, computer- assisted assessment, oral presentations, poster presentations, and viva-voce examinations. Team work is taught and learning strategies for encouraging team work are introduced in Introduction to Materials in Product Design (MPA007). These are taken further in Advanced Testing and Characterisation (MPB007) and in the Project (MPC010). IT and Communication (MPA006) and Engineering Communication (MMA440) combine to assist in providing skills to assist communication in presentational and written forms. The required numeracy is provided by the modules taught by the Mathematics Department. These include: lectures in MAA100, MAA102, MAA202, MAA102, MAB102, and MAB02; tutorials; and help from the Mathematics Support Unit. 4. Programme structures and requirements , levels, modules, credits and awards: The BEng (Hons) programme in Materials with Management Studies is offered as a full-time three year programme or a four year sandwich programme if taken with the optional year of Industrial training in year 3 between Parts B and C. Approximately one-quarter of the programme is taught by the Business School. The sandwich degree offers the additional award of Diploma of Industrial studies (DIS). Students study modules with a combined weight of 120 credits in each part (academic year) of the 5
  6. 6. programme. Each part is taught in two 15-week semesters; weeks 13-15 being assessment weeks at the end of each semester. The programme structure is described below and can be found in the Programme Regulations (see Appendix). Details of module specifications can be found at the following website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/iptme/ug/memods.html and in the Appendix. Modules are listed under the Department primarily responsible for them, e.g. MP, =IPTME, MC = Mechanical Engineering, BS = Business School. The credit for each module is specified, 10 credits being approximately equivalent to a total of 100 hours of student effort, including private study. Typical contact time (lectures, tutorials, and practical classes) for a 10-credit module is 3 hours a week, for 11 weeks. Part A Semester 1 Properties of Materials and Introduction to materials Understanding Product failure Structure-property relationships (MPA001) 10 credits Applications Science for Materials Physics for materials (MPA003) 10 credits Chemistry for materials Mathematics for materials IT and Communication Presentation and communication skills (MPA006) 10 credits Word processor and spreadsheet applications Engineering drawing Management of Human Resources Introduction to organisations and (BSA505) 10 credits management Managing and supervision of staff Engineering Communication Graphics in design (MMA440) 10 credits Computer based engineering drawing tools (CAD); Effective communication in the wider engineering context either Bridging Mathematics Algebra. Trigonometry. Calculus. (MAA100) 10 credits or Mathematics 1 Differentiation. Integration. Differential (MAA102) 10 credits equations. 6
  7. 7. Part A Semester 2 Strength of Materials and Structures 1 Elastic behaviour of materials (MPA002) 10 credits Strength of materials Stresss and strain Thermodynamics and Phase Equilibria Basic thermodynamics (MPA004) 10 credits Phase equilibrium diagrams Standards, Testing and Characterisation Mechanical and non-destructive testing (MPA005) 10 credits Electron microscopy techniques Thermal and x-ray analysis methods Introduction to Materials in Product Materials selection Design Product design and performance (MPA007) 10 credits Economic manufacture Accounting For Managers Financial analysis (BSA526) 10 credits Accounting techniques for problem solving, planning, control and decision making Mathematics 2 Linear algebra. Complex numbers (MAA202) 10 credits Part B Semester 1 Thermodynamics and Kinetics Phase equilibrium diagrams (MPB002) 10 credits Phase transformations Electromechanical metallurgy Industrial Polymers Elastomers, thermoplastics, and (MPB004) thermosets; Industrial polymers; Applications Materials in Service Corrosion, creep, and fatigue; (MPB006) 10 credits Composition-structure-property relationships; Heat treatment Management of Change Impact of change on management; (BSB555) Business structures, policies, and strategies Marketing 1 Principles of marketing and the (BSB560) 10 credits contribution of marketing management; Marketing orientation and customer focus Marketing strategy Either Differentiation. Integration. Differential Mathematics 1 equations (MAA102) 10 credits Or Fourier series. Differential equations. Mathematics 4 Eigenvalues (MAB102) 10 credits 7
  8. 8. Part B Semester 2 Physical Properties of Engineering Structure-property relationships Materials 1 Mechanical properties (MPB003) 10 credits Failure mechanisms Materials Processing Processing of metals, polymers, and (MPB005) 10 credits ceramics; Deformation processes; Thermal and rheological properties Advanced Testing and Characterisation Advanced thermal methods (MPB007) 10 credits Polymer characterisation techniques Advanced microscopy Design and Manufacture with Ceramics Processing, microstructure and properties (MPB008) 10 credits Structural and functional engineering ceramics; Ceramics composites Marketing 2 Nature and components of the marketing (BSB562) 10 credits mix; New product development process; Marketing strategy OPTION: ONE from Mathematics 3 Optimisation. Matrices. Regression. (MAB202) 10 credits Company Finance Financing companies (BSB550) 10 credits Different sources and method, together with their implication French, German or Spanish language Available at a range of levels, students (EUL---) 10 credits will be guided to a level dependant on their experience Part C Semester 1 and 2 *Project Individual research project (MPC010) 30 credits *The Project, in one of the Institute's research areas, is carried out individually using the wide range of processing, testing, and analytical facilities in IPTME. Awareness of the management and business aspects is also emphasised where possible. Projects are often related to industrial problems and are supervised closely by members of staff, most of whom are leading authorities in their specialised fields. 8
  9. 9. Part C Semester 1 Recycling and Environmental Issues Materials resources, availability, and (MPC001) 10 credits recycling; Environmental protection ;Pollution control Materials Selection Methods and Product Selection principles and software Design The design process (MPC004) 10 credits Case histories Fundamentals of Strategic Management Alternative approaches to strategic (BSC565) 10 credits management Formation of strategic plans Operations Management Production/operations management; (BSC502) 10 credits Issues and techniques in operations management; Interfaces between marketing, purchasing, production, distribution and the implications of modern technology OPTION ONE from: Sources of Funds and Financial Packages Finance for small and medium size (BSC022) 10 credits companies; Venture capital; Mergers and Acquisitions, Management buy-outs. The Changing Work Organisation Organisational culture; Performance (BSC085) 10 credits management; Nature of change of the workforce Language and Organisation Communication theory; (BSC090) 10 credits Communication in organisations Marketing Strategy and Planning Marketing planning process; (BSC110) 10 credits Strategic approach to segmentation and branding Risk Management Definition of risk (BSC120) 10 credits Hazard management Management of Information Systems Information systems in organisations; (BSC520) 10 credits Evaluating new and emerging data; Integration of information systems 9
  10. 10. Part C Semester 2 Fracture and Failure Materials failure in service; (MPC002) 10 credits Properties and measurements related to failure and fracture; Structural features affecting failure and fracture Design and Manufacture with Composite Polymer, metal, and ceramic matrix Materials composites; Fabrication techniques; (MPC005) 10 credits Properties and applications OPTION (TWO from five) Corporate and Wholesale Banking Practical and strategic issues in wholesale (BSC024) 10 credits corporate banking Institutional framework Marketing Strategy Simulation Strategic marketing issues; (BSC112) 10 credits Strategic marketing simulation. Marketing Communication Advertising strategies (BSC124) 10 credits Advertising client/agency relationships Project Management Project planning techniques (BSC144) 10 credits Role of Information Technology Evaluating efficiency Leadership and Interpersonal Skills Leadership traits and effective leadership; (BSC575) 10 credits Sources of power 10
  11. 11. 5. Criteria for admission to the programme: For the Materials Engineering (BEng) Programme students will normally require: 240 points (based on the new UCAS Tariff) from: two of mathematics/physics/chemistry at A level plus a third subject at A level or two subjects at AS level (not including General Studies) Holders of Vocational A levels, BTEC, GNVQ, and other similar qualifications in science and engineering subjects are welcome to apply and are considered on an individual basis. Certain overseas qualifications are also accepted. Under special circumstances, second year entry may be possible for those with appropriate sub-degree qualifications. A good level of achievement in materials related subjects studied at college level and considerable relevant practical experience are prerequisites. For those with unusual combinations of examination subjects and grades, the Science and Engineering Foundation Studies Programme offers a possible means of entry to this Materials Engineering Programme. The URL describing these criteria is found at http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/iptme/ug/meera.html All students who apply through UCAS are invited to attend a one day visit, prior to an offer of a place being made, during which detailed presentations are made about the degree programmes, department and the University. Students and their parents are also shown around the laboratories and campus, and given an individual interview with a member of academic staff. Students are encouraged to attend University and Departmental Open Days and arrangements are made in circumstances where a student wishes to visit on an individual basis prior to an application being made. Each year we receive a number of overseas applications. In recent times, these have come from continental Europe, e.g., Italy and Portugal, the Far East, e.g., Singapore and Malaysia, and Africa, e.g., Zambia, Kenya, and South Africa. 6. Information about assessment regulations: The method of assessment for each module is described within the relevant module specification (see section 4). Examinations are held in each subject for which an examination is required in the assessment period at the end of the semester in which it is taught. This is January for semester 1 and May/June for semester 2. At the end of each year the results from examinations and coursework assessment are combined, as detailed in each module specification. The results for each module are compiled and considered by an examination board, which awards credit for each satisfactorily completed module (>40%). Students who achieve sufficient credit to meet the assessment requirements 11
  12. 12. of their programme regulations (see Appendix) are allowed to proceed to the next year of their programme. Assessment criteria 100 credits out of the maximum possible of 120 are needed for progression in each year. Readers are directed to the programme regulations (Appendix) for fuller details of this and the criteria for award of the B.Eng degree. Re-assessment criteria Candidates not meeting the criteria for progression have the right to be re-assessed on one further occasion and, for Parts A and B, this re-assessment may take place in the University’s Special Assessment Period in early September. Re-assessment in the Special assessment period is not allowed for final year candidates or if students have not achieved 40 credits. Re-assessment is also possible in the next academic year, but only by allowing the student to repeat the year of study, according to the regulations of the failed modules. Final Degree The final degree mark is made up of 30% of the Part B mark and 70% of the Part C mark. 7. Indicators of quality The programme is fully accredited for 5 years from May 2001 by the Institute of Materials. In the last independent external review, conducted by the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education, the IPTME gained a total of 21 points, and the Business School was rated “excellent” confirming the excellence of teaching in the degree programmes. In the last independent external national research review in 2001, both IPTME and the Business School gained a grade 4, and both Departments continue to enjoy sustained growth in this activity. A new Materials Characterisation Centre has recently been opened in the Institute. During the last five years, extremely complimentary sets of comments have come form our external examiners and very positive comments were received from the external assessors. 12
  13. 13. 8. Particular support for learning: Careers: University careers officers run timetabled tutorial sessions within the programme. The Careers Service provides a continuous service for students seeking careers guidance and help with job-search techniques, together with a library of careers resources. Careers Service personnel visit Departments to talk to student groups and are involved with students and parents from recruitment and induction onwards. In the UK Graduate Careers Survey, sponsored by the Times Newspaper, Loughborough University Careers Services was rated top of the league of UK Universities. Over 11000 finalists from 25 leading Universities were interviewed and the Careers Service at Loughborough achieved the joint highest score with 79% of students rating the service as good or excellent. Library: The University Library (The Pilkington Library) provides technologically advanced support for student learning in a purpose-built building. It holds a stock of more than half a million volumes, monographs and an extensive serials collection; numerous PC workstations (100+); networked printing facilities and self-service photocopiers. The Library is also a designated EDC (European Documentation Centre). The computerised library catalogue (OPAC) is available on-line, as are electronic versions of reading lists. Opening hours are lengthy and there is on-line access to subject- specific data-bases and networked CD-ROMs from networked labs and study bedrooms on campus. The Library organises self-guided tours for all First Year students. User support is also available from staff at the Library help-desk, via printed and online guides and through a series of 'Lunchtime in the Library' training sessions. There are a variety of study environments in the Library, including individual and group study desks, private carrels and group study rooms. Computing Services: The Institute possesses many desktop and laptop computers which are destined for research applications. These are used by students on the programme, particularly in project and laboratory-based modules. There is a dedicated room, S006, for teaching support activities on the programme and this is accessible for long periods each day. Computing Services provides the University IT infrastructure, and works in close collaboration with Faculty IT Co-ordinators and Departments' IT Support Specialists in maintaining staff PCs and departmental networked laboratories. There is a dedicated server for web based teaching support, the LEARN server, accessible both on and off campus; each member of staff is able to edit web pages on this server relating to their own modules. Learning and Teaching Development: Learning and Teaching Development (LTD) is the University's centre for teaching and learning innovation providing support for teaching, learning and assessment by acting as a reference service for students for learning and study skills. It works with 13
  14. 14. tutors seeking to help particular students as well as providing general guides on studying, learning and assessment. Staff Development: Staff Development (SD) provides continuing professional development in teaching and other skills. Probationary staff attend a full programme of SD courses and, in their third year, the Quality Assessment Unit assesses their teaching through direct observation and a portfolio. Accreditation for this process has been awarded by the Institute for Teaching and Learning (ILT). Permanent staff take refresher courses and investigate new developments in teaching through SD courses. Many staff members are active members of the Institute of Materials and contribute to its activities, including the provision of Materials Education and Educational Books. Counselling Service and English Language Study Unit: The Counselling Service and English Language Study Unit are able to support individual students in resolving problems and in improving communication skills for international students. The Mathematics Learning Support Centre: The Mathematics Learning Support Centre, based in the Department of Mathematical Sciences, provides a range of services designed to support any undergraduate student in the University in their learning of mathematics. In particular it aims to help students in the earlier stages of their studies who might benefit from resources and tuition over and above that normally provided as part of their programme. Disabilities & Additional Needs Service: The Disabilities & Additional Needs Service (DANS) offers support for students including adaptation of course materials into Braille/large print/tape/disk/other formats; organising mobility training; BSL interpretation; provision of communication support workers; notetakers in lectures/tutorials; assessment of specific support, equipment and software needs; individual/small group tuition for students who have dyslexia; representing students’ needs to academic and other University departments; organising adapted accommodation to meet individual needs; helping to organise carers to meet any personal care needs; organising appropriate support for students who have a mental health problem. DANS has links with the RNIB Vocational College, Derby College for Deaf People and the National Autism Society to offer effective support to students at the University. It regularly takes advice from other national and local organisations of and for disabled people. Where a student declares a disability other than Category 1 on their application form and has complex support or accommodation needs, contact with DANS is compulsory prior to acceptance. 14
  15. 15. 9. Methods for evaluating and improving the quality and standards of learning: The University has a formal quality procedure and reporting structure laid out in its Academic Quality Procedures handbook, available online at: http://www.lboro.ac.uk/admin/central_admin/policy/academic_quality/contents.html and directed by the Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Teaching). Each Faculty has an Associate Dean for Teaching responsible for all learning and teaching matters. For each Faculty there is a Directorate (responsible for the allocation of resources) and a Board (responsible for monitoring quality issues within each department). Support is provided by the Staff Development Unit and the Quality Assessment Unit. Student feedback on modules and programmes is sought at regular intervals, individual programmes are reviewed annually, and Departments review their full portfolio of programmes more thoroughly as part of a Periodic Programme Review (every five years). Minor changes to module specifications are approved by the Associate Dean (Teaching) on behalf of the Faculty Board, and ratified by the University Curriculum Sub-Committee in accordance with the University's quality procedures. Major changes are formally considered by the University Curriculum Sub-Committee. All staff participate in the University's staff appraisal scheme, which helps to identify any needs for staff skills development. Both probationary staff and those seeking promotion to Senior Lecturer are subject to a formal teaching evaluation scheme, administered by the Quality Assessment Unit and accredited by the Institute for Learning and Teaching. UG/prog_spec_BengManagement03.doc 15

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