Research techniques for non-researchers
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Research techniques for non-researchers

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The slides for a workshop at UCD 2012 in London. ...

The slides for a workshop at UCD 2012 in London.

The workshop gave a brief tutorial in design research interviews and then allowed the attendees to practice their interview technique on each other.

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  • LicenseCopyright © 2012 John WaterworthThis presentation is licensed under a a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

Research techniques for non-researchers Research techniques for non-researchers Presentation Transcript

  • Research techniquesfor non-researchersJohn WaterworthFoolproof@jwaterworthUCD 2012, November 2012
  • Great designersUnderstand their usersDesign beautiful thingsKnow their materialsIterated with usershttp://www.quadrille.co.uk/books/art-and-travel/book/1844007537/the-genius-of-design 2
  • Understanding users New idea IdeasNew Existinginsight product Insight Product 3
  • Design research Vision Design Concept Product 4
  • Design research Discovery Testing People Product 5
  • DiscoveryAbout peopleReal usersNot just experts or stakeholdersListening and observingWhat they are trying to doHow they try to do itBarriers and challengesThe outcome they achieveThe impact that has 6
  • Research cycle1. Decide what you want to learn2. Find people to talk to3. Prepare your experiment4. Get out of the building5. Collect evidence6. Debrief, share, draw conclusionsDrawn from Lean UX Workshop by Jeff Gothelf and Josh Seiden of Proof Innovation Labs. 7
  • Research cycle1. Decide what you want to learn2. Find people to talk to3. Prepare your experiment4. Get out of the building5. Collect evidence6. Debrief, share, draw conclusionsDrawn from Lean UX Workshop by Jeff Gothelf and Josh Seiden of Proof Innovation Labs. 8
  • Planning1. Decide what you want to learn2. Find people to talk to3. Prepare your experiment4. Get out of the building5. Collect evidence 9
  • Execution1. Decide what you want to learn2. Find people to talk to3. Prepare your experiment4. Get out of the building5. Collect evidence 10
  • Planning1. Decide what you want to learn2. Find people to talk to3. Prepare your experiment4. Get out of the building5. Collect evidence 11
  • Decide what you want to learnQuestionsWhat strategies do people use toremember their user names andpasswords?HypothesesUsers prefer to use Facebook or Twitterlogin than to create a separate user nameand password for each service 12
  • Find people to talk toRepresentative usersCustomers, prospects, colleagues, partnersRecruit from lists you already haveLook where they congregateAsk for their helpHelp you to produce a better productA chance for them to have their sayCan get very political 13
  • Prepare your experimentTopicsDecompose the questions or hypothesesEach has its own objectiveHelp with timing and priorityProvide a sense of flowApproachTalkingObservingActivitiesHomework 14
  • ObservingShow meObserving actual use is always better thanasking about itOwn product or comparatorPhysical material can be useful tooChoosing tasksDecide the tasks in planningSet tasks based on what they’ve told youAlways give clear scenarios 15
  • ActivitiesUsing your handsArrange words into groups or listsPlace concepts on conceptual targetsComplete a diary of recent eventsDraw or annotate diagramsGreat toolsHelp people to remember and articulateGive you lots to dig intoAvoid complex questionsHave a bit of fun 16
  • HomeworkExtra informationKeep a simple diaryTake photosBring examplesGreat conversation startersGive you lots to ask questions aboutHelp people to rememberGet people engage quickly 17
  • Discussion guideResearch aidAgenda for the session, not a scriptHelps your mental rehearsalStakeholders can reviewProvides a recordContentsSection per topic, with objective and timeFixed text you need to read outStarter questions for each topicFurther questions as reminders 18
  • Execution1. Decide what you want to learn2. Find people to talk to3. Prepare your experiment4. Get out of the building5. Collect evidence 19
  • Get out of the buildingGo to them (if you can)In their home or officeCoffee shop, high street, festivalKeep it real (if you can’t)Sit on a sofa in front of a TVCreate a shop counterSet expectationsIt’s an interview, not a meeting, appraisal 20
  • Collect evidenceRecordingSoftware running on the deviceMr Tappy for mobile and tabletDigital voice recorder, camera, screenshotsNote takingAim for a telegram styleFrustrated by X because YFailed to X because Y has no ZIt’s hard – listening, writing, thinking!Get better with practice 21
  • Giving good interviewBe clearAsk concise questionsAsk questions they can understandIf you need to, give backgroundinformation then ask the questionListen … really listenReceive, Appreciate, Summarise, AskShows that you understand what they sayShows that you value what they sayHelps you to dig deeper 22
  • Giving good interviewBe flexibleDon’t plough on regardless if the interviewisn’t workingFollow the participant’s lead in order,timing and approachBe humanChat about the weather, traffic, etc.Offer drinks and biscuitsNod, smile, frown, laugh, commiserateBe surprised, be concerned, be interested 23
  • Getting them talkingOpen, neutral questionsHow do you use … to …?What do you think about …?How do these compare …?Stories and examplesHave you ever …?Can you tell me about the last time that …?What did you do when …?How did you … when …? 24
  • Keeping them talkingDigging inIn what way …?Can you tell me more about …?You said … why/how/when/what/who …?EchoingConfusing?Helpful?Bananas? 25
  • Bad questionsClosedDo you buy groceries online?How do you buy your groceries?LeadingDo you buy your groceries from Tesco?Where do you buy your groceries?SpeculationWhat would you do if Ocado …?Has … ever happened? What did you do? 26
  • EmotionDon’t ask directlyHow did you feel when …?Do you enjoy …?Pick up on emotional wordsYou said … was frustrating. In what way?You said … was amazing. What made itamazing?Shows that you appreciate the emotionalcontent of what they say, but withoutleading them 27
  • Take your timeGo at their paceUse your early questions to gauge theirthinking and answering timesDon’t make them feel pressuredA little silence is OKDon’t rush to the next questionThey may be just about to say somethingabsolutely amazingThe more you talk the less they talk 28
  • PracticeObjectiveEach of you conduct a 10 minute interviewSteps1. Choose a subject2. Sketch out a discussion guide3. Get into groups of three4. Interview each other5. Discuss and critique as you go 29
  • Problems 30
  • BiasBeware of your own assumptionsand prejudices, and those ofthe stakeholdersThe wrong topics, tasks or activitieswill narrow the possible findingsand bias the results 31
  • HonestyThey don’t always tell the truthDont want to appear stupid or negativeDon’t want to cause troubleMay be a subtext you dont know aboutCreate a safe environmentYou’re there to learn from themIts not a test or appraisalTheir honest input is what you need toimprove the product 32
  • Approach 33
  • ObservationWatch them in contextEncourage them to work as normalAsk them to explain what they are doingPrompt for clarificationTake photographs and make notesLess controlHarder to direct them to areas of interestHigh priority work may take them oftopic, but carry on observingLack of privacy may inhibit response 34
  • RemoteMay be your only choiceParticipants are spread around the worldPart of corporate cultureRefine the discussion guide in face-to-faceinterviews, then adapt and go remoteHarder to manageTakes longer to build up a rapportConstrains your research approachLess control over interview environmentTechnology problems can ruin sessions 35
  • GroupsUseful optionCollaborative tasks and multiplayer gamesYounger childrenCompare and contrast experiencesMuch harder to leadManage dominant individualsHard for them to ‘show me’Use activities to get response fromindividuals, then compare and discussdifferences and commonalities 36
  • PaperworkForms SourceConsent form Steve KrugIntroduction script Rocket Surgery Made EasyReceipt of incentive www.sensible.com 37
  • RecapDo DontTalk to a range of users Talk only to experts and stakeholdersListen and watch Interrogate peopleAsk for stories Ask for requirements and featuresSteer the conversation Work through a fixed scriptHelp people to relax and enjoy it Make people feel more nervousEncourage people to talk openly Constrain them to specific answersCreate a flexible discussion guide Try to wing itTake good notes Try to remember what people saidCollect photos, screenshots and Try to remember what you sawphysical materials 38