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Getting out of the building

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These are the slides for a workshop for UX Bristol 2013. The workshop starts from the proposition that creating great designs requires a deep understanding of users' behaviour, abilities, preferences, …

These are the slides for a workshop for UX Bristol 2013. The workshop starts from the proposition that creating great designs requires a deep understanding of users' behaviour, abilities, preferences, goals and motivations. It then introduces a practical technique that designers can use to interview users, and gain new insights.

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  • Research techniques: Getting out of the buildingThese are the slides for a workshop for UX Bristol 2013. The workshop starts from the proposition that creating great designs requires a deep understanding of users' behaviour, abilities, preferences, goals and motivations. It then introduces practical technique that designers can use to interview users, and gain new insights.LicenseCopyright © 2013 John WaterworthThis presentation is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales License.http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/uk/

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  • 1. Research techniques: Getting out of the building UX Bristol July 2013 John Waterworth @jwaterworth
  • 2. There Are No Facts Inside Your Building, So Get Outside Steve Blank Getting out of the building Customer Development Manifesto at http://steveblank.com/category/customer-development-manifesto/ Photograph of Steve Blank from steveblank.fi 2
  • 3. Product cycle 3 Ideas ProductInsight Test assumptions Evaluate products Understand people
  • 4. Research in pairs 4 Interviewer Focus on the participant Ask main questions and run any activities Assistant Manage any setup and recordings Take notes during the session Ask supplementary questions Switch roles
  • 5. Research cycle 5 1. Decide what you want to learn 2. Prepare your interview structure 3. Find people to talk to 4. Interview them 5. Analyse and draw conclusions 6. Debrief and share Adapted from Lean UX Workshop by Jeff Gothelf and Josh Seiden of Proof Innovation Labs.
  • 6. Research cycle 6 1. Decide what you want to learn 2. Prepare your interview structure 4. Interview them Adapted from Lean UX Workshop by Jeff Gothelf and Josh Seiden of Proof Innovation Labs.
  • 7. Decide what you want to learn 7 Questions What strategies do people use to remember their user names and passwords? Hypotheses Users prefer to use Facebook or Twitter login than to create a separate user name and password for each service
  • 8. Practice 8 Objective Form teams and decide what you want to learn from you interviews Steps 1. Get into groups of three 2. Decide who will interview whom 3. Decide subject for interviews 5 Minutes
  • 9. Research cycle 9 2. Prepare your interview structure Adapted from Lean UX Workshop by Jeff Gothelf and Josh Seiden of Proof Innovation Labs.
  • 10. Interview structure 10 Break into topics Each has its own objective Related to a question or hypothesis Decide best approach to learn Semi-structured Help with timing and priority Provide a sense of flow Help you to be flexible
  • 11. Talking 11 Learning about them Behaviour, aspirations, preferences Not asking what they want Guided conversation Have objectives and overall structure Steering and focusing Not following a script Listening, really listening!
  • 12. Not just talking 12 Observation How do they do it now? Product, comparator, materials Activities Arrange words in groups, lists, target Create a diary, annotate a diagram Homework Keep a diary, take photos, bring examples
  • 13. Discussion guide 13 Research aid Agenda for the session, not a script Helps your mental rehearsal Stakeholders can contribute Provides some consistency Provides a record Contents Section per topic, with objective and time Fixed text you need to read out Starter questions for each topic
  • 14. Practice 14 Objective Create a discussion guide for a 7 to 8 minute interview Steps 1. Decide your topics 2. Decide how to approach each topic 3. Write down some starter questions 5 Minutes
  • 15. Research cycle 15 4. Interview them Ada[ted from Lean UX Workshop by Jeff Gothelf and Josh Seiden of Proof Innovation Labs.
  • 16. Giving good interview 16 Be clear Ask simple questions they can understand If you need to, give background information then ask the question Listen, really listen Receive, Appreciate, Summarise, Ask Show that you understand what they say Show that you value what they say Helps you to dig deeper
  • 17. More good interview 17 Be flexible Don’t plough on regardless if the interview isn’t working Follow the participant’s lead in order, timing and approach Be human Chat about the weather, traffic, etc. Offer drinks and biscuits Nod, smile, frown, laugh, commiserate Be surprised, be concerned, be interested
  • 18. Getting them talking 18 Open, neutral questions How do you … to …? What do you think about …? How do these compare …? Stories and examples Have you ever …? Can you tell me about the last time that …? What did you do when …? When … how do you …?
  • 19. Keeping them talking 19 Focus in In what way …? Can you tell me more about …? You said … why/how/when/what/who …? Echoing Confusing? Helpful? Bananas?
  • 20. Bad questions 20 Closed Do you buy groceries online? How do you buy your groceries? Leading Do you buy your groceries from Tesco? Where do you buy your groceries? Speculation What would you do if Ocado …? Has … ever happened? What did you do?
  • 21. Digging deeper 21 Needs Expressed, implied and latent needs Means end chain Product attributes, consequences of use and personal values Five whys Root cause analysis
  • 22. Too many whys 22 Interrogation Can sound accusative Particularly after a sensitive admission Can be repetitive Rephrase or soften What makes X important? Can you say why X is important to you? Apologise for laddering
  • 23. Emotion 23 Don’t ask directly How did you feel when …? Do you enjoy …? Pick up on emotional words You said X was frustrating. In what way? You said Y was amazing. What made it amazing? Shows that you appreciate the emotional content of what they say, but without leading them
  • 24. Take your time 24 Go at their pace Use your early questions to gauge their thinking and answering times Don’t make them feel pressured More you talk, less they talk Don’t rush to the next question A little silence is OK They may be just about to say something absolutely amazing
  • 25. Collect the evidence 25 Starter kit Camera, notebook and voice recorder Note taking Aim for a telegram style Frustrated by X because no Y Recording times for verbatim quotes It’s hard Listening, writing, thinking! Get better with practice
  • 26. Practice 26 Objective Take each role in a paired interview Steps 1. A and B interview C (7-8 minutes) 2. Critique the interview (1-2 minutes) 3. Rotate until you’ve all tried all roles 30 minutes
  • 27. Further reading 27
  • 28. Recap 28 Don't Try to wing it Ask closed, leading questions Ask for requirements and features Interrogate people Work through your script Constrain them to specific answers Get the answers you want Make people feel more nervous Try to remember what people said Try to remember what you saw Do Create a flexible discussion guide Ask open, neutral questions Ask for stories and examples Listen, really listen Steer the conversation Encourage people to talk openly Understand their point of view Help people to relax and enjoy it Take good notes Collect photos, screenshots and physical materials